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URBAN& S T R E E T

Photogra p hy B y Ja ke

d e

B uri a tte


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William Klein William

Klein

is

a

photographer

and

filmmaker noted for his ironic approach to media and his use of unusual photographic techniques

in

the

context

of

photojournalism and fashion photography. Klein has spent large amounts of time in Paris and New York, where most of his photography has focused on. He is still taking photographs at age 86.


One of the things that appeals to me about WIlliam Klein is his variety of work. Rather than focus on one area of photography, he has experimented with fashion andphotojournalism in combination. Above is an image entitled ‘House of Stripe’ - a photo taken for Vogue. I like it because on first glance it looks like a candid street shot, but then you notice the two ladies looking at one another, and a whole new depth to the photo is unearthed.


The combination of grainy black and white

film

and

the

candid

style

of

photography really appeals to me. It creates a very dramatic and power ful image, that has a ‘raw’ and honest side to

it.

Klein

has

also

used

experimentation both in camera and in the dark room to create unique images, which are techniques that I would like to use in my work.


The black and white portrait, and the three images after were taken in Paris. They are all candid images, with a serendipitous nature. I managed to capture a silhouette of the lady above, I exposed for the sun in the background, leaving her under exposed.


I found this style of photography quite challenging because I had to get into stranger’s personal space, particuarly with the black and white headshot, because I had to get very close to the subject with a big lens.


These two images were taken at Camden Market and at Camden Town tube station. I like the image of the tube tunnel because the shape of the tunnel draws the viewer into the picture. and to the man on the platform. The image of the food stall is one of my favorite pictures. For me, it emphasizes on on the thrills about street photography - you never know how a subject is going to react. In this case, the subjects didn’t want their photos taken, so they gestured for me not to. In post production I used split toning to change tint the colour of the highlights and lowlights, creating a look that I feel reflects the urban environment.


Ernst Haas Ersnt Haas was an American born photographer, specializing

in

photojournalism.

He

travelled

around the world photographing World War Two. In addition to this, Haas was an early innovator of colour film, particularly using experimentation within the medium. He

was

represented

by

Vogue

and

Life

magazines, and went on to work for Magnum Photos.


What appeals to me most about Ernst

is

work

Haas’

his

use

of

experimentation, especially with longer shutter speeds (as above). Haas

was

one

of

the

first

to

experiment in such a way with colour, and it provided a very fresh, new and abstract feel to fr photography. The longer exposures leave light trails, which can be manipulated with shutter duration and camera movement

to

create

effects, which are visually

unique

pleasing - some of the photos look more

like

photographs.

paintings

than


The above images were taken with an Adox Golf - a medium format film camera. This is a camera with fully manual controls, which means no metering or automatic exposures. I chose to shoot with a wide aperture (f2), and a long shutter speed (1s). When the shutter was open, I fired a burst from a flash fun that I held in my hand. I developed the image with multi-grade paper and a high contrast setting on the enlarger, making the blacks punchy and the whites brilliant


Alexey T itarenko Alexey T itarenko is a Russian photographer and artist. At 15, he was the youngest ever member of Zerkalo, the Russian photo agency. T itarenko is renowned for his experimental work, which was per haps influenced by his artistic talent within more traditional art for ms. T itarenko appeals to me for the same reason that Haas

does,

particularly

for in

his

use

of

long

combination

exposures,

with

street

photography. In his ‘City of Shadows’ series, he blurs peoples movement within a street scenario.


There are two key elements within the Titarenko inspired photographs: the fluid parts and the static parts. Generally, the moving element is the people walking, and the static element is the surroundings.


URBEX Rather than being inspired by an individual, I have been inspired by a movement of photographers Urbex, or urban exploration. This is the photography of rundown and abandoned urban areas, whether it is schools, houses or old hospitals. During the summer holidays, I worked at RAF Heyford a, now abandoned, cold war American air base. The base was simply abandoned, and everything left in 1994, so it is a very strange environment which is like no other. I hoped to convey the eeire, cold but uniqe environment through my photographs. The following two images are examples of Urbex photography. It isn’t possible to credit them, because they were posted anonymously, as the photographers are often trespassing, which is a crime.


These photographs are quite heavily edited – a common theme within the urban exploration photography. Generally I increased the clarity, vibrancy and contrast, which made for a more dramatic image, which I feel better reflected the environment.


In October I traveled to Lonfon with the view of taking some more street style photographs. London is a constantly busy and bustling ciy, unlike Oxford, which would be a new challenge.


In the image above, I have tried to capture the monotony of the tube by washing out the colours through split toning, so dramatic/contrasting colours are removed.


Oxford After the previous T itarenko inspired images from Oxford city centre, I decided to develop the idea of long exposure within the city by photographing at the market, which was good due to its high volume of people moving through the labyrinth of market stalls.


I like the contrast between the still aspects and the more dynamic aspects of the image. In order to create the blur, I had to use a long shutter speed of 15 seconds, with a high aperture and a neural density filter.


The high aperture and ND filter means less light hits the sensor, so the image doesn’t become over exposed. To keep the non-moving components sharp, I used a tripod.


In postproduction, the only adjustments made were to colour temperature and the crop. The colour temperature was reduced, to avoid a yellow hue, which was a result of an incorrect colour temperature in camera. The crop removed elements of the image


~


Urban & Street  

A2 Photography project based on the Urban & Street environments in the UK.

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