Page 1

Logo Design Guide Book Logo Design Print Promotion


Contents


What is logo design?


A logo is the visual representation of a

include marks for masons, goldsmiths,

company or business, which forms the

paper makers, and nobility. By the 1700s,

base of its corporate identity. It is a name,

every trader and dealer had a trademark

symbol, monogram, emblem, trademark,

or stamp. The industrial revolution caused

or other graphic device

a dramatic gain in the value and impor-

designed for easy and definitive

tance of trademarks. By the 1950s, with

recognition by the company’s audience.

the emergence of

Logos trigger people’s memories of

national and multinational corporations,

previous experiences with the company

trademarks began to move beyond

and other implementations of the logo,

symbols, using larger design systems to

leaving a greater impact than words alone

unify all communications, to accomplish

can do. This is the simplest and most

identifiable goals. Today, company logos

direct way of promoting

have become the faces of business and

a business presence; a logo describes

our economy. The general public has

a company or organization without a

become very responsive to logos, their

lengthy explanation. If a logo appears

meanings, and their implementations.

unprofessional or unoriginal, so will be

Because of the diversity of products and

the public’s perception of the company it

services available, the need for

represents. A well-designed logo will help

innovative and well thought-out logo and

to increase visibility and, in turn, sales.

corporate identity design is central to a company’s success.

Logo design started many years ago and has its roots in Ancient Greece with the use of symbols consisting of one or more letters. These typically represented the initial letters of a person or place for use on stationery and signs. Many early Greek and Roman coins bear the logos of rulers or towns. During the Middle Ages, similar logos were seen in abundance in ecclesiastical and commercial use. By the thirteenth century, these simple letterforms had evolved into trademarks for merchants. These early examples of logo design


Why are logos important?


Logos trigger people’s memories of

previous experiences with the company and other implementations of the logo, leaving a greater impact than words alone can do. This is

the simplest and most direct way of promoting

a business presence; a logo de-

scribes a company or organization

without a lengthy explanation.Try to think of such companies as CocaCola or FedEx

without recalling their logos. These companies have established an

identity with their logos, which greatly impacts their sales. If a logo appears amateurish or derivative, so will be the public’s

perception of the company it repre-

sents. A well-designed logo will help to increase visibility and, in turn, sales.


The Logo Design Process


The creative brief*

image can also be used. A logo’s

client work together to outline the pur-

distinctiveness are the primary con-

Most of the time, the designer and the pose and limitations of the company’s logo in the form of a creative brief.

simplicity and

siderations in determining its form.

This will outline the design specifica-

Refinement*

their logo. Within the brief, the user’s

revisions, based on an analytical

tion of what the company wants for

demography should be analyzed so

that their individuality can be understood and seen by audiences. This will create a set of rules for design

decisions that can be made to target particular groups. For the designer it is important not to input too much of your own artistic preferences when designing a logo because a logo’s

key purpose should be to communicate with the company’s audience,

not to satisfy the preferences of the designer.

Concept development*

The designer develops conceptual

pathways for the logo, transforming ideas into simple sketches. Then,

these sketches are presented to the client and one or two pathways are

chosen for further exploration. This is where the logo begins to take shape. In some cases a unique text treat-

ment and a distinctive colour palette is sufficient however both text and

Through a process of three or four dialogue between the designer and

client, the logo is taken from a series

of rough sketches to the final polished and cohesive logo design. At this

stage, colour is often introduced. Co-

lour specification decisions are based on an understanding of colour psy-

chology, colour theory, the contrast

between colours, and the limitations of available printing budgets. Delivery*

Once the client has approved the final logo design, the designer assembles a package containing an assortment of logo files for different applications

and a manual outlining how the logo

should be applied to different media. The strict and consistent adherence to the manual is crucial to the success of a logo.


“The trademark in the simplest fo characteristics o institution bein


should embody orm the essential of the product or ng advertised.�

Paul Rand


A Good Logo is...


Simple*

Distinctive*

ing to include too much information

from any other companies or

A good logo is one that is simple. Trycan have a negative impact and

complex illustrations representing

all aspects of the business and long taglines should not be part of the

logo. The type and imagery should be recognised instantaneously, up

close and at a distance. There should not be a lot of colours used because these distract people from the logo’s central theme. Also the more

colours used means a higher production cost.

Versatile*

Logos which use several colours,

photographs or detailed illustrations

may be difficult to use in certain applications. A good logo should consider all potential implementations. (Often, several

versions of a logo will be designed to use in different contexts.)

Logos should be unique and different organizations. Using familiar or

common styles or typefaces defeats the purpose of having a logo, and

can even have a negative backlash

among customers who might see the company as being derivative. Be-

sides this, there are also copyrights

and trademarks of companies which should not be violated.


The evolution of successful logo design.


Evolution is a process of change or

development. It is when one version of a product is better than the previ-

ous one. This type of change was first catalogued by Darwin over a hundred years ago. But in the truest sense, evolution occurs in nearly every

aspect of our lives, and especially in the business and consumer worlds. It seems that companies find themselves needing to be fast-paced,

up-to-date and ever evolving to stay ahead of the

competition. If you think about the

world’s most prominent brands, Nike, McDonalds, Coca-Cola and others, it

is easy to visualize their respective logos. Those designs have become the visual representation of the company brand, which is what people think

about your company and their experiences with it.


Ford


Most people know that Ford was

unable to pay his bills to John and

What most people didn’t know was

Ford’s partner brought in a group of

company. Ford experimented with

Dodge Brothers to accept shares in

working for Thomas Edison, and left

company, which was renamed Ford

Detroit Automobile Company, which

Brothers went on to form their own

founded by (who else?) Henry Ford.

Horace Dodge, who supplied parts.

that this was his third automobile

investors and even convinced the

cars while

the

to found his first auto company, The

Motor Company. Later, the Dodge

went

car company (can you guess what?)

a race car and founded Henry Ford

In 1909, Childe Harold Wills, Ford’s

one year (the company later became

also help to design the Model T), lend

bankrupt in just 2 years. He then built Company. Ford left that one after just

first chief engineer and designer (who

Cadillac – see above).

a script font that he created to make

In 1902, Ford went on to create his

Ford logo. The famous blue oval was

Malcomson, Ltd., and almost lost that

remained in use until today.

third automobile company, the Ford & one when sales were slow. He was

his own business card, to create the

added later for the 1927 Model A – it


Pepsi V’s Coca Cola


Coca-Cola is the world’s most popular soft drink. Sold in more than 200 countries, it is produced by The

Coca-Cola Company and is often simply referred to as Coke. The

Coca-Cola logo, like the product

itself, is rated among the most recognized logos and brands in the world. The first Coca-Cola logo was

created by Frank Mason Robinson, in 1885. Thinking that the two Cs would look well in advertising, it was Robinson who came up with the name and chose the logo’s distinctive cursive script.

The typeface used, known as

Spencerian script, was developed

in the mid 19th century and was the dominant form of formal handwrit-

ing in the United States during that

period. The red and white coloured

scheme in the Coca-Cola logo was kept simple and distinctive to lure

young minds. The Coca-Cola logo was first advertised in the Atlanta

Journal in 1915. A Coca-Cola dis-

penser with a Cola-Cola logo was later created by Raymond Loewy.

The Coca-Cola logo got registered as a trademark in 1887 and has since

then become the brand’s corporate identity.


the most famous and well-recognized

new bottle design with crown, la-

In 1898, Bradham used a scribbled

the Pepsi bottle crown colors were

logos in the world.

logo script as the first Pepsi logo to brand the product. When his business got

established and people started enjoying his drink, Bradham decided to

modify the Pepsi logo into a more customized

version of the previous logo script.

Thus, in 1905, a modified script logo was

introduced, followed by a second change in Pepsi logo in 1906. In

1940, Walter Mack introduced the

beled with the Pepsi logo. In 1941, changed to red, white and blue, along with the Pepsi logo, to

commemorate the war efforts of the country. Later, in 1962, the Pepsi

logo was replaced with two bulls-eye marks encircling “Pepsi”, and then again in 1973, into a boxed Pepsi

logo with minor typeface changes.

In 1991, Pepsi commemorated the

evolution of its scripted Pepsi logo by featuring a logo design with an italic

capital typeface. Later at the company’s 100 years celebration in 1998,


Pepsi-Cola unveiled a new logo that

Pepsi-Cola is one of the most

and global recognition. The new

wide.

symbolized the brand’s innovation Pepsi logo consists of a three-di-

mensional globe against an ice blue

background, with the inclusion of the previously designed Pepsi typeface. It has been the official Pepsi logo of PepsiCo, till date.

Over the past century, the Pepsi logo has been evolved into remarkable

designs with significant modifications. All in all, Pepsi logo is an exemplary

piece of creativity and innovation. No doubt, it is one of the most recognized logos, ever.

famous soft drinks consumed worldManufactured and marketed by

PepsiCo, it was first developed and

produced in the early 1890’s by Caleb Bradham, a pharmacist in New Bern, North Carolina labeled as “Brad’s

drink”. In 1898, Bradham renamed his drink into “Pepsi-Cola”.

On June 16, 1903, the title Pepsi-

Cola was trademarked and had since

remained unchanged. But one aspect of Pepsi-Cola that witnessed many

transformations over the years is the Pepsi logo. The Pepsi logo is one of

the most famous and well-recognized logos in the world.

In 1898, Bradham used a scribbled logo script as the first Pepsi logo to brand the product. When his business got

established and people started enjoying his drink, Bradham decided to modify the Pepsi logo into a more customized

version of the previous logo script.

Thus, in 1905, a modified script logo was

introduced, followed by a second change in Pepsi logo in 1906. In

1940, Walter Mack introduced the new bottle design with crown, la-


beled with the Pepsi logo. In 1941, the Pepsi bottle crown colors were

changed to red, white and blue, along with the Pepsi logo, to

commemorate the war efforts of the country. Later, in 1962, the Pepsi

logo was replaced with two bulls-eye marks encircling “Pepsi”, and then again in 1973, into a boxed Pepsi

logo with minor typeface changes.

In 1991, Pepsi commemorated the

evolution of its scripted Pepsi logo by featuring a logo design with an italic

capital typeface. Later at the company’s 100 years celebration in 1998,

Pepsi-Cola unveiled a new logo that symbolized the brand’s innovation and global recognition. The new

Pepsi logo consists of a three-di-

mensional globe against an ice blue

background, with the inclusion of the previously designed Pepsi typeface. It has been the official Pepsi logo of PepsiCo, till date.

Over the past century, the Pepsi logo has been evolved into remarkable

designs with significant modifications. All in all, Pepsi logo is an exemplary

piece of creativity and innovation. No doubt, it is one of the most recognized logos, ever.


Shell


For more than a century, the word

‘Shell’ has immensely acknowledged the Shell brand and endorsed the

commercial character. Undoubtedly,

the Shell logo, highlighted in red and yellow since

decades, has played a vital role in the promotion of the company. Shell logo holds distinctive qualities that draw

audience’s attention to itself. It projects an emotion of professionalism and

defines the company’s outstanding position and stupendous products. Over the years, the Shell logo has

been renovated quite a lot of time but the shell graphic has stood courageously to

benefit the logo design. The current Shell logo was sketched by a pre

eminent designer Raymond Loewy in

1971. Shell logo has proved to be the most

impressive design by the contributions of the great designer.


Shape of Shell Logo:

Shell logo consists of a shell image

which has served the emblem since decades. This illustration was adopted after the company name. It certainly

narrates the company’s high corpo-

rate reputation and class. The image

of the shell in Shell logo has been redesigned quite some times but it still continues to hold supremacy, power and strength.

Color of Shell Logo:

The use of highlighting color is gracefully adopted in Shell logo. Red and yellow are the colours utilized to

enhance the beauty of the Shell logo. Font of Shell Logo:

A very simple and easy to remember typeface is employed in Shell logo

to enhance the characteristics of the company and its high quality products. The

alphabets are done in bold font to

impose a high status of the corporation market position.


The 10 Commandments of Logo Design


1. A logo doesn’t need to say what

You don’t need to be an artist to

Restaurant logos don’t need to show

Ideas can flow much faster between

a company does

food, dentist logos don’t need to show teeth, furniture store logos don’t need to show furniture. Just because it’s

relevant, doesn’t mean you can’t do

realise the benefits of logo sketching. a pen and

paper than they can a mouse and monitor.

better.

5. Under-promise, over-deliver

The Mercedes logo isn’t a car. The

take to complete, estimate longer.

Virgin Atlantic logo isn’t an aeroplane. The Apple logo isn’t a computer. Etc. Etc.

2. Not every logo needs a mark

Sometimes a client just needs a professional logotype to

identify their business. Don’t be afraid to ask what they think. 3. Two-way process

Remember, things might not

always pan out as you hope. Your client might request

something you disagree with. If that

If you’re unsure how long a task will Design projects are like construc-

tion work — you piece lots of little

elements together to form a greater whole, and

setbacks can crop up at any time. 6. Leave trends to the fashion industry

Trends come and go, and when

you’re talking about changing a pair

of jeans, or buying a new dress, that’s fine, but where your brand identity is concerned, longevity is key. Don’t follow the pack. Stand out.

happens, try giving them what they

7. Work in black first

believe is an improvement, and why.

process, you focus on the idea. No

want, then show them what you

They’re less likely to be so resistant if they already see how their thoughts pan out.

4. Picasso started somewhere

By leaving colour to the end of the

amount of gradient or colour will rescue a poorly

designed mark. 8. Keep it appropriate


Designing for a lawyer? Ditch the fun approach.

Designing for a kid’s TV show? Noth-

ing too serious. I could go on, but you get the picture.

9. A simple logo aids recognition Keeping the design simple allows for flexibility in size.

Ideally, your design should work at a minimum of around one inch without loss of detail. Look at the logos of large

corporations like Mitsubishi, Sam-

sung, FedEx, BBC etc. Their logos

look simple and are easier to recognise because of it.

10. One thing to remember

That’s it. Leave your client with just

one thing to remember about the de-

sign. All strong logos have one single feature to help them stand out.


“Don’t fo pack. Sta


ollow the and Out� LogoDesignLove

Logo design guidelines  

Guidelines of logo design

Logo design guidelines  

Guidelines of logo design

Advertisement