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NEWHOME Fall 2011

GREEN HOME ESSENTIALS HOUSING IN PITTSBURGH’S NEW SOUTH HILLS EVOLUTION OF THE NEW KITCHEN HAWTHORNE PARTNERS IF YOU BUILD IT, THEY WILL COME! RIVERSIDE MEWS


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Fall 2011 05

Publisher’s Message

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Contents 28 Evolution of the New Kitchen How a simpler aesthetic and new technologies are leading us into the future.

The Green Home Essentials Now that everyone is “green”, how do you make sense of what are really the best practices in building or remodeling your home?

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36 44 50

Pittsburgh’s New South Hills Good proximity to jobs and lifestyle amenities; great schools and appreciating home values. That’s the recipe for the new South Hills’ success.

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Project Profile Sota Construction and the Riverside Mews Now, interested buyers are coming because of the energy efficiency and sustainability. It’s part of a total cultural shift!

Interiors How new kitchen design and construction can create stunning results. Just ask Kathy Cvetkovich.

Builder Profile

Hawthorne Partners, Inc. One unique franchise and two enterprising entrepreneurs add up to building success.

New Construction Listings New housing developments in the City of Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Beaver, Butler, Washington and Westmoreland Counties.

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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n contribution GDP of regional

Publisher’s Message

PUBLISHER

Kevin J. Gordon kgordon@carsonpublishing.com EDITOR

Jeff Burd

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Jaimee D. Greenawalt PRODUCTION

Carson Publishing, Inc CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Erin Raimondi Linda Simon Hank Walshak

irectly or 105,000 jobs CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Jan Pakler Ed Rieker Toby Richards One80 Real Estate Sota Construction Willowbrook Design Hawthorne Partners, Inc. Heartland Homes Allegheny Conference ADVERTISING SALES

James Hilliard W. Carson Gordon 412-548-3823

SPECIAL THANKS

Coldwell Banker Real Estate, Dollar Bank, Heartland Homes, Howard Hanna Real Estate Services, Northwood Realty, Prudential Preferred Realty, Ryan Homes, Washington County Builders Association, Ernie Sota and Diana Lynn, Lisa and Paul Scarmazzi, and Cathy Cvetkovich.

A

decade ago, the American public had little or no awareness of what it meant to live a sustainable lifestyle and only a few knew what green building was all about.  Now that everyone is “green” how do you make sense of what are really the best practices in building or remodeling your home? Lessons learned from the first half-decade of green homes are actually pretty simple ones.  Energy efficiency and water conservation are much easier to achieve than all of the sexier green features combined. Insulation and prevention of air-flow infiltration are more important than more expensive measures to lowering your home’s carbon footprint.  And replacing windows and doors have long paybacks.  Understanding how to use your energy efficient home is essential to taking advantage of these benefits.  This sustainable thinking is important even if the return on investment isn’t so apparent. Cultural transformation is what sustainability has grown into these days and the acceptance of building green has grown dramatically.  Jeff Burd’s “Green Essentials” feature explains green building, altering lifestyle choices and maybe even your relationship with the planet!

MORE INFORMATION

Greater Pittsburgh’s New Home is published quarterly by Carson Publishing, Inc., 500 McKnight Park Drive, Suite 506A, Pittsburgh, PA 15237; 412-548-3823. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written permission by the Publisher. All rights reserved. This information is carefully gathered and compiled in such a manner as to ensure maximum accuracy. We cannot, and do not, guarantee either the correctness of all information furnished nor the complete absence of errors and omissions. Hence, responsibility for same neither can be, nor is, assumed.

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

ON THE COVER

One of the first “green” housing developments in Greater Pittsburgh, Riverside Mews is a town home development between 18th and 19th Streets on Pittsburgh’s South Side.

This issue of NEW HOME also reintroduces Pittsburgh’s southern suburban communities.  What drives the popularity of this new South Hills is the same as always; good jobs and lifestyle amenities, great schools and appreciating home values.  Even with new attractions in Peters Township and the Canonsburg area, perhaps the most surprising development is the growing housing market in Upper St. Clair. Moving indoors, turn to page 28 and read “The Evolution of the New Kitchen”. This space has grown from a service area to something more communal and all-encompassing.  Kitchen trends are evolving at a fast pace; don’t be left behind. Creating NEW HOME has given us the opportunity to learn from many experts and professionals in our local housing industry.  Inside, let us introduce you to Lisa and Paul Scarmazzi, Ernie Sota, and Kathy Cvetkovich.  I’m sure you will learn much from their experiences.  Enjoy! Remember, before you buy, build or remodel, Greater Pittsburgh’s NEW HOME is required reading!

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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F E AT U R E F E AT U R E

Essentials

GREEN HOME

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www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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G

reen building is a holistic approach to construction and design, and one that is somewhat non-specific. Green building encompasses the materials chosen for their sustainability, the methods of construction, the health of the home’s interior, the reduction of waste, and the energy efficiency of the finished project. The principles of green building also apply to living in a sustainable way, choosing to reduce the resources needed to operate the home, and even altering lifestyle choices about transportation and consumption. Sustainable living often requires a shift in the way the homeowner views his or her relationship with the planet.

F E AT U R E

That covers a lot of ground and not everyone is on board with the whole lifestyle change when they are thinking about their new home. On the other hand, building a home that uses as little energy as possible, a high performance home, has an impact you can measure. Energy efficiency is really where all this green building got its start, of course. After the two energy crises in the 1970’s made Americans aware that they didn’t control their own energy destiny, the construction industry moved ahead by a quantum leap in the area of lowering energy costs. In 1992 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) moved forward with a program that is probably the most influential in residential green construction. The combined agency effort created the EnergyStar program to promote the manufacturing of energy efficient equipment and best practices. What EnergyStar offered that was compelling was a set of performance standards that required third-party verification before the EnergyStar designation was awarded. Obtaining the EnergyStar certification requires meeting measurable standards that were derived from how much better a home was built than the local codes. At the basis for the measurements was a home energy rating system or HERS rating that came from an analysis of a home’s construction plans and onsite inspections. Based on the 8 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

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home’s plans, the home energy rater uses an energy efficiency software package to perform an energy analysis of the home’s design. This analysis yields a projected, preconstruction HERS Index. During and after construction the home rater conducts onsite inspections, typically including a blower door test (to test the leakiness of the house) and a duct test (to test the leakiness of the ducts) to come up with a rating compared to the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code as a reference home. The lower a home’s HERS Index, the more energy efficient it is in comparison to the HERS reference home. A reduction in energy consumption of one percent results in a one point reduction in the HERS Index. Thus a home with a HERS Index of 85 is 15 percent more energy efficient than the HERS Reference Home. EnergyStar requires a HERS of 85 or lower to award certification to a new house. EnergyStar has become a program that concerned residential contractors have turned to for education and certification in better construction practices. Until a few years ago, it was uncommon to find a builder with the expertise or experience to construct a verifiable energy efficient house. As more builders became educated in the process of energy efficient construction they began to integrate energy efficiency into the design in a way that allowed a higher performing home to be built for the same cost as one that didn’t plan for reduced energy usage. And for consumers, identifying an EnergyStar certified builder should be the first step in building a high performance home. One advantage for Pittsburgh area consumers is that the majority of homes built each year are done by EnergyStar builders, even if the majority of the homes may not be. That’s because the top producing builders have all created EnergyStar designs and several are focusing most of their marketing efforts on those EnergyStar homes. Sota Construction was founded by Ernie Sota in 1993 and one of his core principles from the beginning has been green building. Sota has a separate development arm known as Green Development Inc. and has been building green projects in both commercial and residential types since before any rating systems existed.


F E AT U R E Last October, the company was awarded a Green Power Award by PennFuture in recognition of the region’s first zero energy home at the Riverside Mews on the South Side. The home is a 2,000 square foot townhouse, which uses an extremely well-insulated thermal envelope, geothermal cooling and heating to reduce energy consumption, and an array of photovoltaic solar panels on the roof to generate electricity. With the current incentives in place the home cost very little extra to build and will actually make the owner money. A zero energy home literally generates as much or more energy than it uses. Given the limited opportunities for generating electricity, the main emphasis is in driving energy usage down as far as it can go. That’s where Sota’s experience comes in handy. “It’s always about energy efficiency,” he explains. “The thermal envelope plays the biggest role in reducing the energy loss. We use R-20 insulation in the walls but also R-40 in the

floor slab and R-60 in the roof. At The Mews, we had good windows but not great ones; there’s a good solar orientation and a good water source heat pump with a geothermal well in the back yard. There are a lot of small measures that add up to keeping demand low, like LED lighting and a super heater that captures the heat loss during the cooling cycle.” The total of the energy efficiency measures, even after calculating the KwH value of the natural gas used is roughly 7,500 kilowatt hours. Sota installed a photovoltaic solar array capable of generating 8,000 KwH and the home has operated with a significant net negative energy use since it was occupied in April 2011. Government energy policies have helped make construction of zero energy homes very feasible. At the Riverside Mews, the cost of the geothermal well was offset by almost half by a federal tax credit. A state and federal tax credit of 30 percent can be applied to the solar panels, as well as a rebate www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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F E AT U R E

“The experience ... has made us focus more on what we call the E-Home,” ... from PA Sunshine. In the final analysis, incentives and credits make the system almost cost-free within a few years. And for a energy-generating home, there are also the Solar Renewable Energy Credits (SREC). SREC trading varies from state-to-state, depending on how expensive electricity is in the local market. A credit is given to the owner of a certified solar panel installation for every thousand hours of electricity generated. In the current marketplace, a solar operator can get $100 per thousand hours in Pennsylvania but the credits have traded for as much as $300 in the past year and future energy dynamics suggest much higher pricing. It’s also important to remember that SREC’s are a bonus on top of the elimination of energy bills.

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Because green building has become a mainstream concept, most consumers and homeowners understand that sustainable construction reduces waste, conserves natural resources, makes air quality and health better, improves productivity and quality of life. Most even now accept that a green building is more attractive and has a higher value than one that is not. Most of these truths though are quite difficult to prove. The need to prove the value makes Ernie Sota chuckle in frustration. “Anything involving sustainability always gets the payback test, but when you look at all the other things we consume no one ever asks about ROI. Nobody would ask what the payback was for buying a good bottle of wine or driving a high-end BMW.” Another regional builder that has built a zero-energy home is S & A Homes, which has an office in Adams Township. S & A is a production-oriented builder who altered its processes a few years ago to reach the EnergyStar rating goal of HERS 85 on its new models. Moreover, the company realized that it could make several further improvements to drive its HERS rating lower and leverage the improved performance as a marketing advantage. Last spring, the company partnered with Pittsburgh-based Integrated Building and Construction Solutions (IBACOS) to


1. Performance (energy, as well as safety, health, durability, comfort and environmental friendliness) 2. Ease of Construction (material availability; trade capabilities; installation time) 3. Cost effectiveness (affordability to build, own, operate; home value over time)

The lab home will be maintained, unoccupied, for a three-year period in order to fully measure and evaluate its long-term performance in terms of energy efficiency, safety, comfort, durability, and resource efficiency. IBACOS will be using various methods to simulate normal operation of the home, accounting for things like water use and humidity from cooking, dishwasher operation, and showering; energy use from lighting, heating and cooling, etc. to measure the value that these homes will provide and sharing that information with builders and homebuyers. “We have learned a ton already from the experience of build-

ing that home,” says Chris Cinker, S & A Homes’ general manager in Western PA. “The IBACOS project manager [Kevin Brozyna] wrote an article for Professional Builder that talks about the ten lessons learned from building the zeroenergy home.” Brozyna’s observations are technical and general, but for homeowners those lessons boil down to a handful of suggestions: design with production in mind; think outside the box when it comes to materials and make sure they are readily available; little improvements add up; good communication between all parties is critical to success; evaluate the partners in the project and don’t beat them up; and maintain close supervision on the job. “The experience [with the zero-energy home] has made us focus more on what we call the E-Home,” says Cinker. “Energy efficiency is the thing that will help the homeowner the most in the pocketbook, especially after they occupy the home. Our HERS scores on these are falling into the high 60’s.” That means an owner of an E-Home would save 30 percent on its energy consumption over a standard home.

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build a zero-energy lab home in its Cobblestone development in Ohio Township, north of Pittsburgh. The two organizations have built a number of energy-efficient homes in East Liberty together but the Cobblestone lab home is part of an IBACOS initiative to develop design, construction, and financial approaches to delivering affordable net zero energy homes at the production builder level. The lab homes will be evaluated against three criteria:

New construction isn’t the only opportunity for a zeroenergy home. One Pittsburgh area company has completed a zero-energy renovation of a home in one of the city’s older

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F E AT U R E

... for less than the cost of a window replacement.” neighborhoods. West Penn Energy Solutions recently finished converting a century-old house at 710 N. St. Clair Street into a zero-energy home. West Penn’s owner, Michael Merck, focuses on the home as an entire system and is emphatic that the way to zero energy use has many doable paths.

that might be taken. Merck then takes actual utility bills for all the home’s systems and reconciles them with the model so that the homeowner can be assured of the actual energy costs after improvements to within 10 percent of the bill. To get the zero-energy level at 710 N. St. Clair – and at 712 N. St. Clair now under construction – West Penn had to include solar generation equipment. But for most homeowners the goal won’t be making energy. It will be conserving it. For Merck, the most effective places to look for improvements – regardless of cost – are in the places where heat and cooling are lost. • • • •

Air sealing the exterior Maximize the insulation of all exterior surfaces Whole house weatherization Duct sealing

“Our mission is to guide owners to make more effective and sustainable decisions about their projects,” Merck says. “The process starts with tests on the home, analysis of the results and an energy model that can predict the outcome of multiple solutions and give a good idea of the payback.”

“Each home is a different scenario,” he says. “But virtually any home can have all these areas addressed for less than the cost of a window replacement.”

West Penn focuses very heavily on just a few key areas of energy loss. The energy modeling uses a very sophisticated software model that allows the homeowner to see the impact on the HERS rating of the home with each of the measures

For new construction, the rising star in the region over the past half-decade or so has been Heartland Homes. Heartland’s chief executive, Marty Gillespie made a strategic decision to increase the firm’s production when he took the

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In his close observation of the needs of the marketplace, Gillespie realized that energy efficiency was becoming a big deal about five years ago. The company invested in the research and re-tooling needed to become an EnergyStar builder and has been refining those processes ever since. Heartland has been building EnergyStar homes throughout its footprint in the region but is involved in two communities now that are being developed as sustainable, traditional neighborhoods: Newbury in South Fayette and Edgewater Square in Oakmont. To stay ahead of the curve the company employs a full-time expert, Liam Brennan, to continuously improve the designs of their homes and systems. The approach has allowed Heartland to build EnergyStar homes that have HERS ratings consistently in the high 60’s.

“What is encouraging for me is that it hasn’t been purely a marketing decision to build sustainable homes,” says Kevin Oakley, Heartland’s marketing director. “The energy code changes have actually made it easier for builders who are trying to get better. When EnergyStar upgrades its standards again next year we will have to do no extra measures to meet them.” Heartland Homes is part of a small group of privately-owned builders that meet periodically with Dow Chemical’s High Performance Home Homebuilders’ Council. The builders are highly committed to high performance construction and advise Dow on the needs of the marketplace and the obstacles to raising the bar. Among the ideas being suggested is regulating the marketing of high performance homes to ensure that builders are not engaging in puffery about the “green-ness” of their homes. KB Homes even went so far as to announce it would be slapping a sticker on its homes to show the HERS rating, similar to a gas mileage sticker on a new car.

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reins early in the last decade by offering more design choices to buyers looking at the market between starter and high-end homes. That decision has paid big dividends, as Heartland has grown from doing less than 75 homes per year to more than 400 over the past few years.

“No homebuilder in that room likes regulation but Dow has plenty of lobbying clout and it would be very beneficial to the

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consumer and the builder to make sure that the home is what it’s supposed to be,” says Oakley.

F E AT U R E

EnergyStar construction isn’t limited to the production-oriented builders with resources to use on research and buying power. The Housing Excellence Award winner last year in the energy efficiency category was Brennan Builders from Evans City. Brennan is a builder that typically only does ten to twenty new homes each year but their focus on energy efficiency is laser sharp. “We wrap the entire home in rigid foam to stop thermal transmission through the studs and use EnergyStar appliances and HVAC equipment, but the most important thing is paying attention to air leakage,” explains Bob Brennan. “It’s not just about the R value of the exterior wall. It’s about how much warm or cold air escapes from the house.”

And sustainable thinking is important even if the return on investment isn’t so apparent.

The best measure of how tight a home is sealed is the air exchange rate. In winter, for example, if warm air is escaping through window and door jambs, vents or even through recessed light fixtures into the attic, cold air is also getting in. That exchange of desirable for undesirable air means the furnace is working harder (and the air-conditioning in the warmer months). Even in an EnergyStar home it is within the acceptable range to have the air exchange three or four times per hour. Brennan says his company recently completed an addition on an existing home that was measured by a third-party testing agent at 0.6 times per hour. “Getting the air exchange that low is very difficult to do, even in a new home,” Brennan says. “To get there we have to pay very close attention to it.” Bridgeville-based Deklewa Home is another that would like to see the consumer understand better what is in an energy efficient home and what it means to live in one. Deklewa has been building EnergyStar homes in East Liberty, Peters and Adams

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“I think I understand how to build an EnergyStar home. Our HERS ratings are consistently between 65 and 70, which is a testament to the products we use and how we’re putting them together,” Deklewa says. “But from living in an EnergyStar home, I’ve learned a ton that I wouldn’t have otherwise known.” Deklewa feels there is a total lack of practical education about how to operate the systems in an EnergyStar home, especially the heating and cooling systems. Ignorance of the proper operation keeps owners from getting the intended benefits that were designed in the home, a shortcoming that could ultimately hurt the reputation of the homebuilders and the sustainable effort in the long run. “We really need to convince our customers that humidifying and de-humidifying the HVAC are critical to performance,” he explains. “In the summer you need to run the air-conditioning colder than you think to get the moisture out. It will actually save energy. It’s also really important to have multiple zones in the house. There’s an upfront cost but it’s well worth it to save on energy bills.” Efficient HVAC systems use thermal convection – hot air rises and cold air sinks – to optimize the performance of the system. New systems use controls to close dampers on lower floors in the summer so that the cooling is upstairs while the fans run full time on the lower floors. Keeping the temperature colder in summer accelerates the comfort of the home, sometimes bringing the house to the desired temperature in a few minutes. The systems have to be maintained more thoroughly and there are seasonal adjustments needed that go well beyond what a homeowner who has never lived in an EneregyStar home is accustomed to. “You have to be an active participant as a homeowner to get the benefits of a well-built home,” says Deklewa. The lessons learned from the first halfdecade of green homes are actually

pretty simple ones. Energy efficiency and water conservation are much easier to achieve than all of the sexier green features combined. Insulation and prevention of air-flow infiltration are more important than more expensive measures to lowering your home’s carbon footprint. Replacing windows and doors have long paybacks. Understanding how to use your energy efficient home is essential to taking advantage of the benefits. And sustainable thinking is important even if the return on investment isn’t so apparent. Most important may be the understanding that the best green homes are designed to function as a system. “Builders who wonder what we buy to get to our ratings are missing the point,” says Kevin Oakley. “The way Liam has engineered the house so the whole system works together is why the home is so efficient. The efficiency has to be in the basic home. We see more demand and we do continue to offer upgrades to buyers that they don’t choose anyway. We’ve learned that you can’t option your way to a green home.” NH

F E AT U R E

Townships for about five years, and is also one of the builders in Newbury. Founder John R. Deklewa also built a new home for himself in Newbury. The experience has been eye-opening and has convinced him that consumers need to know a lot more than just buzz words about energy efficient homes.

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The New South Hills Yogi Berra is said to have been describing one of New York’s most popular restaurants when he said, “Nobody goes there anymore; it’s too crowded.” That same logic could be applied to Pittsburgh’s southern suburban communities but with a twist: everyone is still going there, even though it’s crowded. 16 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

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Living In Pittsburgh’s Southern Communities

T

he South Hills aren’t actually too crowded. What constitutes the South Hills has sort of changed over the decades, moving further south as the city has grown. The ‘old’ South Hills that was part of the post-World War II boom includes communities like Brentwood, Baldwin, West Mifflin and Pleasant Hills. Those neighborhoods were developed in a more dense urban style, even though they were suburbs and have by this time become less convenient for today’s suburban lifestyle expectations. As the post-steel industry of Pittsburgh develops and flourishes it supports more modern, better planned communities that are further out of Downtown. These neighborhoods are smack in the heart of the new economy, especially the natural gas business. For more than a decade these ‘new’ South Hills communities have been growing at a faster pace than much of the region, putting places like Peters, North Strabane, South Fayette and Cecil Townships on home buyers’ ‘A’ lists along with places like Mt. Lebanon and Upper St. Clair. What drives the popularity of these communities is the same as always: good proximity to jobs and lifestyle amenities; great schools and appreciating home values. That’s the recipe for South Hills success. The new suburbs of the south lie along both sides of the Allegheny/Washington County border and for some logical reasons the growth of the area has developed in two acts separated by that same border. www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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Washington County has been more closely tied to the industrial fortunes of the region, with its coalmines supplying the coke plants, and then the steel mills along the Monongahela River in the eastern part of the county. Much of northern central Washington County was still agricultural, even into the 1980’s, so large parcels of land were available for development. When the manufacturing base of the region went away, the economic fortunes of Washington County darkened for a while, and the face of the Mon Valley was altered permanently. But little by little, with both effective public leadership and visionary private investment, the economy of Washington County began to grow again. With two major interstates meeting in the heart of the county, businesses and jobs began to take root in the ‘new’ Washington County and the lower property tax rates attracted shoppers for homes. These buyers saw the advantage of getting more home for the dollar and new construction in a location that was convenient for Downtown commuting and for the many jobs locating in office parks like Southpointe. The new South Hills is home to one of the world’s fastestgrowing industries. Two of Pennsylvania’s top five school districts are based there, as well as one of the state’s fastestgrowing. As the rest of the region watched population decline in recent decades, the South Hills area saw its 2010 population grow four percent compared to the 2000 census. And according to the census, more of the area’s residents are under the age of 18 (22 percent) than over the age of 65 (18 percent).

Washington County has been more closely tied to the industrial fortunes of the region ... Buyers have been looking at homes with envy in Upper St. Clair and Mt. Lebanon for more than four decades. Along with Bethel Park, these communities make up the last municipalities you encounter in Allegheny County on the Route 19 corridor. Although further removed from the center of Pittsburgh, the locations of neighborhoods in Upper St. Clair and Mt. Lebanon were still within a reasonable commuting distance to the employment center in the region, and in Pittsburgh halcyon days as a corporate headquarters in the 1950’s and 1960’s these two addresses became popular for doctors, lawyers and executives. While the economic disruption of the 1980’s impacted Upper St. Clair and Mt. Lebanon, their reputations were so well established that there was never any decline in appeal or home values. 18 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

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IT’S ABOUT SCHOOLS FIRST Having great employers and an exciting growth industry, along with great interstate infrastructure, is a boon to any area but that only makes it a great place to work. The recipe for a great place to live always includes great schools. That’s certainly true in the southern suburbs. Even with aging Baby Boomers becoming an ever dominant force in the housing market, the most important magnet for new home buyers is a great school district. Residents of Mt. Lebanon and Upper St. Clair have always known this and their willingness to invest higher property taxes in their community schools have paid handsome dividends. The Pennsylvania System of School Assessment Examination annually ranks the top districts in the state and region. For the past six years the Upper St. Clair Panthers have been rated the best in the state, closely followed by the Mt. Lebanon Blue Devils in the sixth spot. The high rankings aren’t limited to these two districts in the south, however. Joining them in the top ten rankings is


Peters Township and upstart district South Fayette jumped in the rankings to number 12. That’s four school districts adjacent to each other rated among the state’s top dozen and the region’s top six. Obviously, the academic focus is paramount in these school districts, but each has created an atmosphere where interscholastic athletics thrives. Schools from the South Hills have won state championships in football, boys and girls basketball, and boys and girls soccer within the last three years. And the citizens of South Hills communities understand that education needs to be supported with first-class facilities. In the past decade, new schools have been built and upgraded in each of these highly rated districts, as well as in the other excellent school districts in the south, like Canon-McMillan, Trinity Schools, Bethel Park and the City of Washington. In all of these school districts, the communities have invested tens of millions to ensure that their children have the best access to technology, the safest and most accessible classrooms and schools that are energy efficient and green.

IT’S ABOUT JOBS TOO By the early 1990’s it was apparent that the economy of Western PA had shifted to one built on intellectual property rather than industrial capacity. Millcraft was able to secure the rights to the property south and west of the Western Center when the state began closing that facility. The resulting development became Southpointe, the first large-scale new office development in the region since the RIDC parks opened in the 1970’s. With a broad vision, Millcraft invested over $100 million in a mixed-use office and residential complex that attracted over 2,500 residents, hundreds of businesses, and over 6,000 new jobs by the time the project was fully completed in 2005. More than $500 million in private and public investment has been made in Southpointe, www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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which is also the home of an 18-hole golf club, several hotels, restaurants and the practice facilities for the Stanley Cup champion Pittsburgh Penguins.

... it became clear that the output of the industry would exceed the expectations of the gas companies

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In 2002, the state of PA released the remainder of the Western Center property for development of Southpointe II. The successful developer, Horizon Properties, wasted little time in capitalizing on the attractive location, building a speculative office, called 1000 Town Center Boulevard, in 2007. The project filled quickly, prompting the construction of 4000 Town Center Boulevard this past year. That building has already attracted over 100,000 square feet of tenants as it opened, leaving only 18,000 square feet available to lease. Between the construction of the two offices, Horizon scored an even bigger coup, securing the development of the new corporate headquarters of energy giant Consol Energy. Completed in late 2008, the Consol building is an awardwinning design, and the 384,000 square foot headquarters (along with a 75,000 square foot building for subsidiary Fairmont Supply) has become a beacon for more jobs in the northern part of the county. Also the home of the headquarters of Metso Minerals, USG Insurance and a Homewood Suites hotel, Southpointe II now has over 7,000 employees at its park each day.


The final piece of the puzzle in Southpointe II has changed radically since the end of the decade. The economic slowdown that took a toll on retail coincided with the ramping up of the natural gas industry, which has made Canonsburg its early epicenter. Available space in Southpointe’s offices became scarce and by 2010 it became obvious that the best use for the land at Southpointe II should be new offices rather than a retail lifestyle center. Since the redesign of the master plan for Southpointe II, construction has begun on Range Resources’ new $30 million headquarters (which will have a second phase of equal size), an office condominium project of nearly 200,000 square feet, and the new Mylan Labs headquarters, expected to be around $50 million. These office projects won’t be the last to meet the demand of the energy industry in the south. Construction started in September on the first phase of Alpine Point in South Fayette Township, which includes a 21,000 square foot new office for Columbia Gas. Alpine Point’s first phase will include 110,000 square feet of new offices and the final plan is for twice that much.

IT’S ABOUT ENERGY TOO It has only been a few years since Pittsburghers began hearing about the emergence of a new drilling technology that enables natural gas companies to exploit the largest natural gas fields discovered in America, the Marcellus Shale formation. The most strategic portion of the formation is centered in Canonsburg. The richness and productivity of the wells in the area and the region’s history of shallow gas drilling and coal mining made it a logical place for the early Marcellus drillers to set up shop. From early test drilling in the first half of 2008, it became clear that the output of the industry would exceed the expectations of the gas companies and by early 2009 construction was done to create some of the first natural gas production, refining and storage facilities in Western PA. Energy facility developer

MarkWest invested $300 million in facilities that stretched from Houston to Burgettstown in western Washington County, so that companies like Atlas, Chesapeake and Range Resources could begin drilling and processing the natural gas in the region. During 2010, another large project was developed in Majorsville on the Washington County/West Virginia border to allow transportation of the natural gas. At an estimated 500 trillion cubic feet, the Marcellus formation is ten times the size of the Barnet Shale formation of Northern Texas. The size of the formation proved to be too mouthwatering for the world’s largest energy companies to resist. Throughout 2010, the news was filled with stories of Exxon-Mobil, Chevron and Royal Dutch Shell buying the assets of the early explorers of the Marcellus fields. The influence and investment of these companies has had an enormous imprint on the region’s economy in less than one year and portends greater upside for the future. As the drilling picked up over the past two years, the South Hills started to feel the impact of the industry on its housing market. While other parts of the country have been suffering through a terrible housing recession, housing in the South Hills remains hot, partly because the natural gas industry has been hiring aggressively but mainly because the industry consumes goods and services from businesses nearby with a voracious appetite. These include “hot shot” or small equipment delivery services, water and oil hauling services, equipment rental services including water pumps and water line for hydraulic fracturing and more. Just as impacted have been secondary businesses that support the activity. Motels and hotels in the area are at full capacity www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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These new attractions were dropped into the outskirts of the communities ... and a half dozen more are under construction. Diners that were sleepy local spots have waiting lines for seats. Tire stores can’t keep enough rubber in them to meet the demand for trucks. Survey engineers, land and title lawyers, real estate brokers, and construction supply houses are overbooked. Dozens of small construction companies have sprung up to build well locations and install tank batteries, build oilfield roads, and dig pipelines. “I’d rather be lucky than good,” laughs Paul Scarmazzi, president of Hawthorne Partners in Canonsburg. His company builds one-level attached housing aimed at empty-nesters but is shifting his focus to meet the needs of the gas industry workers. “We made a substantial investment in Chartiers Township a while back, buying over 100 acres [for the Mills subdivision] as a lifestyle development. I started to read about the natural gas industry coming a few years later but I couldn’t imagine the impact it was going to have.” The impact on housing took a couple of years to develop because the industry itself needed to prove out the value of the Marcellus Shale formation – even as companies invested billions in the region – and relocating workers had to prove out the value of the South Hills housing market. Apparently, both questions have been answered with a resounding yes. “There’s no doubt that the gas industry is the reason Greene County’s unemployment rate is 7.1 percent or Washington’s is 22 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

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7.3 percent when the rest of the country is much higher,” notes Scarmazzi. “Gas has had an influence on everything from the jobs directly to the farmers with leases making regular deposits in local banks.” “When I talked to our originators as this thing first started, a lot of the people looking at the area weren’t sure if they were staying for more than a year or two,” says Delbert Hague, vice president of residential lending for Washington Financial. “Now three years later they are seeing more and more inquiries from people working in the gas industry. They are seeing the stability in the business and realize that the Pittsburgh market is not going to lose value in housing.” Hague points out that many of these employees were heads of families who were reluctant to uproot their loved ones to an unknown area but that in short order they have grown to understand that their families will be coming to a place that offers a great lifestyle and a great future. “They have had an opportunity to check out places to live and school districts and are now bringing their families putting their kids in these great school districts.” “We are seeing a little bit of a change in the buying habits of the people working for the Marcellus Shale companies but we’re selling mostly custom homes and that market isn’t where the gas industry worker is looking,” says Darlene Hunter, vice president and regional new homes manager for Howard Hanna


Real Estate Services. “The bigger impact on our sales has been from the people who have businesses serving the gas industry.”

IT’S ABOUT HOT PLACES TO LIVE As Southpointe brought more and more employment to northern Washington County, an enormous surge in lifestyle amenities was developed between there and the county seat along the interstate highway corridors. One of the South Hills long-time attractions has been the great shopping on Route 19, from the high-end South Hills Village in Upper St. Clair to Donaldson’s Crossroads in McMurray. During the past decade or so the retail boom nationally was definitely felt in the South Hills, with big box malls opening along virtually the entire length of Route 19 to the I-70 intersection. Since 2008, however, that intersection has gone into a higher gear. The Meadows Racetrack succeeded in securing one of the state’s gaming licenses and invested $400 million in a casino and expanded racing facilities. During the same period the Tanger Outlet Center (it rhymes with hanger), a $90 million, 77-store outlet mall opened in South Strabane Township across the road from the Meadows. These new attractions were dropped into the outskirts of the communities that had been among Pittsburgh’s hottest for new housing during the 1990’s and 2000’s. The Peters Township to Canonsburg area, which essentially lies on either side of I-79 just to the south of the Allegheny County line, is comprised of a handful of municipalities that offer both location and amenities to their residents. In addition to Peters Township, the community of North Strabane Township lies east of the interstate and as far south as the Meadows. West of the highway, Cecil Township takes in an area about as large as Peters and North Strabane combined, surrounding the northwest part of Canonsburg proper.

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But the area also boasts a handful of smaller custom homebuilders ...

As demand for new housing spiked, the mix of housing grew more varied. For buyers interested in northern Washington county there are a variety of options in unique custom homes and higher density neighborhoods. Growing demand attracted the interest of high-volume builders Ryan Homes and Heartland Homes, whose communities dot all three municipalities. But the area also boasts a handful of smaller custom homebuilders, most of who build almost exclusively in this sub-market. Ted Taylor Homes, Brian Homes, Timberland Homes, are a few of those active in this area. The Peters/North Strabane corridor has been an especially sweet spot for the more established builders in the South Hills, according to Brian Colella of Brian Homes. “We consider ourselves to be South Hills builders. This has been a family-owned builder since 1956 and we like to stay where we have been able to grow and sustain business,” he says. “We built a lot of houses in Bethel Park but there aren’t any larger parcels of land available there or Upper St. Clair anymore. When we finished our part of Brookfield in the 1990’s we moved out into the neighboring areas like Peters and North Strabane.” Brian Homes has been active in Saddlebrook Farms and McClelland Farms in North Strabane Township, although the lots are mostly built out there. Colella says they continue to have demand in his Peters Township neighborhoods of McMurray Highlands and Meadowridge. 24 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

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“Peters is nice because we are building on minimum halfacre lots and the community is so desirable,” he says. “Right now we have five spec homes going in Peters and one under contract. Our philosophy is to get them prepared on the exterior, get them landscaped and then let the buyer pick the finishes and fixtures they want.” Building spec homes is more difficult now than just a few years ago. To do so requires a solid contractor/banker relationship and the willingness to invest in a housing market that has less activity than normal, but Brian Homes is accustomed to that approach, even if it is a tighter market. “That’s the way we operate, and it’s not like these are $200,000 homes,” Colella says. “All of our specs are in the $800,000 to $1 million range.” Along the I-79 corridor to the north is one of the newest and most ambitious neighborhoods being developed in Pittsburgh right now, Newbury. The project is a mixed development that springs up from an unused manufacturing site at the corner of Washington Pike and the interstate in South Fayette Township. Developer EQA Landmark has created a plan that puts a walkable town center, with offices, large-scale and neighborhood style retail stores on the highway level, while developing new residential sites with spectacular views on the plateau above. Newbury is being developed as a progressive traditional neighborhood with an emphasis on sustainable design and


construction. The homes there are all EnergyStarcertified and will operate at least 30 percent more efficiently than the standard custom home. Designs are reminiscent of small town American architecture instead of suburban styles.

Clair, developer McCloskey Development is planning Bednar Farms, a 139-unit community on 110 acres along Bower Hill Road.

The neighborhood has gotten a boost from the expansion of the Marcellus Shale exploration but its location directly across I-79 from Bridgeville, within a ten minute drive of South Hills Village, the Parkway West and Nevillewood made it a ‘can’t miss’ on its own merit. In a little more than six months nearly two dozen cottage and manor homes are occupied or under construction by builders Deklewa Home, Stambrosky Homes and Heartland Homes. The coming phases will also include carriage homes by S & A Homes.

One of the older adages about land is that they aren’t making any more of it and that has certainly been true in Upper St. Clair Township. As one of Pittsburgh’s mostcoveted zipcodes, Upper St. Clair had few parcels of land for development of any size. The residents value their natural green space and had created master plans that limited new construction opportunities. A scarcity mentality drove real estate in the community, especially as the new economy in Pittsburgh drew talented workers who were raised in the South Hills and were anxious to find homes in neighborhoods where they were raised, neighborhoods like Upper St. Clair.

Perhaps the most surprising development in the new South Hills is that the community bringing new neighborhoods on line at the most rapid pace in the past six months is Upper St. Clair, proving the adage about what’s old being new again.

For the Bednar Farms and Jordan Estates neighborhoods there is an additional nostalgic element in that the contractors, Heartland Homes and J. T. Thomas Homes are both second generation homebuilders from Upper St. Clair.

The attraction to Upper St. Clair has been limited to the rather robust existing home sales market in the township for several decades. But now, even as the slower new construction market has impeded the development of new subdivisions in most communities, Upper St. Clair has three new communities where new construction is about to get underway. In the Fair Acres subdivision, 37 lots have been approved for new homes. On the high end, 12 lots have been approved in the new Jordan Estates neighborhood across from St. Clair Country Club, which will be developed by Heartland Homes. And on the largest piece of residential property remaining in Upper St.

Heartland Homes is one of Pittsburgh’s nicer success stories of the past half decade. The company was founded by Alan ‘Gus’ Gillespie more than a quarter century ago when he built a small neighborhood – that included his own new home – in Upper St. Clair. Gus built a solid business that has skyrocketed to being the largest locally-based builder under the leadership of his son Marty. Heartland’s growth was tied in part to their success in creating neighborhoods in the booming Washington County communities. But Gillespie always had one eye on property in his home neighborhood, especially the expansive Bednar Farm. www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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“Marty’s had his eye on that piece of property for a while,” says Kevin Oakley, marketing director for Heartland Homes. “He worked it and worked it, and brought in some partners like Jeff Thomas to do some high end homes, until the project made sense.”

more at the higher end, I’d say up to $800,000. We have two neighborhoods in Peter Township – Anthony Farms and Hamlet of Springdale – where the homes are in the $600,000 to $650,000 range. When there are new homes in that range in Peters they move fast.”

Oakley says that about 80 percent of the homes will be built by Heartland Homes and explains that the location in Upper St. Clair makes it a special opportunity for the company. He also fears that it will succeed faster than a marketing executive would like.

That’s the new South Hills. The newest neighborhoods are in older communities. The greenest new homes are part of a reclaimed industrial site. And the fast-moving middle of the market in the South Hills would be considered high-end in other parts of the country. The new South Hills is in many ways reflective of life in 21st Century Pittsburgh. If you draw a straight line from the revitalized Central Business District to the heart of the booming new natural gas industry you bisect the communities of the new South Hills. Great communities are thriving with commuters going in both directions from the South Hills. And great communities are centered on great school districts, among the top in the Commonwealth.

“Upper St. Clair is home to the Gillespie’s and there are plans to do some things at Bednar Farms that will be really done right,” he says. “There will be walking trails throughout it and plans for a big community garden. I’m afraid it’s going to sell out in a year-and-a-half. I’d like to see that Upper St. Clair pin on our map for as long as I can!” For Darlene Hunter, new construction in Upper St. Clair is a bonus because much of the action in the South Hills is centered further south. “There has been less new construction in Upper St. Clair or Mt. Lebanon because of the limited amount of land, although what is available does very well” she says. “The part of the market that is doing well now is a little

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People still want to live where there are lots of things to do and see but without giving up the feeling of living in a small town. Living in the South Hills means being in the hottest part of one of the hottest cities in America and still having a community to call home. NH


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FEATURE

the

evolution OF THE NEW KITCHEN:

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FEATURE

How a Simpler Aesthetic and New Technology Are Leading Us Into the Future By Erin Raimondi

The Dark Ages Once the center of the home, literally, for warmth and sustenance, the kitchen has come a long way from a cold stone room with a hearth and a few battered copper pots. Images of French countryside peasants come to mind when I think about the most provincial of cooking spaces: the fowls being de-feathered on the long wooden work table; dough rolled out upon a heavilyfloured stone slab; buckets of water brought in from the well to be heated on the woodburning stove (or better yet, over an open fire). Without all of the modern conveniences of plumbing and electricity, it could take multiple days to prepare one, special dinner.

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FEATURE

I

f we fast forward a few centuries, we see that the kitchen in the post-war era had become a domain of convenience: a place where women would boast from the pages of magazine advertisements that their refrigerator could fit three hams, a T-bone steak, and a 20-lb. roasted turkey, with enough room to still cool the Jell-O mold and last night’s Tupperware leftovers. The subjects’ smart, cinched, house dresses and aprons matched the pastel colors of their appliances (it’s impossible to find that shade of 1950’s refrigerator pink these days) as they flashed pageant smiles and served a hungry family an infallible dinner of meatloaf and marshmallowed-side dishes, replete with cocktail toothpicks. It has been over the last two decades that we have seen this space go from a “service” area, to something more communal and all-encompassing. If the 50’s through the 80’s was about keeping the kitchen and cooking activities separate from the rest of the house, the last few years have been about exposure and inclusion. The walls have literally come down, and homeowners are not looking to return to the way things once were. The era of housewives putting the finishing touches on hors d’ oeuvres while husbands entertained the guests from a living room bar cart are long gone. The future is quickly upon us, and it involves natural elements, modernity, customization, and technology. We are also seeing a diverging path: In many instances, we continue to see kitchens of grand proportions with a plethora of appliances.

Regardless of where they are to be found, the kitchen trends are evolving at an impressive clip ... 30 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

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On the other hand, we also see smaller appliances and a more judicious use of space. Due to regional differences and tastes, as well as space availability, these two schools of thought can live parallel to one another, and often do. Regardless of where they are to be found, the kitchen trends are evolving at an impressive clip, proving that now is the time to learn and apply.

LESS IS MORE Sleek, sleek, sleek. If you’re still not convinced, repeat this phrase throughout the day and while looking at trade magazines, attending shows, and searching catalogs. It’s all about cleanliness. It’s almost the perfect complement to our nation’s economic “entanglements” of late: simplify where one can so as to weed out the unnecessary and get to the point. A wonderful example is the handleless movement. The allure of handleless cabinetry is that it allows the other products in the space to speak for themselves. Now, the playing ground is even. The eye easily scans across a smooth wall of light natural wood cabinets, many hinged to open from bottom to top, not swing open from left to right. To further the feeling of minimalism, add frosted glass (sometimes textured) panels and you have catapulted yourself to 2011 and beyond with one mere revision. Appliances have followed suit, and in contrast to the appliances in the past (see 1950’s pink refrigerator above), they are starting to come in more modest designs that do not detract from the overall canvas of the kitchen. Since the kitchen is now the most coveted space in a home, not to mention one of the most important variables for resale price next to location, the area has to be considered a cohesive whole. Competing scales and incongruous design is okay for commercial kitchens that concentrate on necessity, but for residential purposes, an inconspicuous hood, like the Cache in Zephyr’s Cheng line of ventilation hoods, can mean a world of difference for a kitchen’s overall look. And, if upper cabinetry surrounding the hood is avoided, it makes the final effect even cleaner. For inspiration in keeping things fresh and simple, Tim Hillebrand, President of Hillmon Appliance Distributors in Cran-


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FEATURE

The high, white gloss is a material we can expect to see more of ... berry, suggests looking towards our European neighbors: “We are getting away from the industrial appliances for the residential consumer. This was the trend over the past 10 years, but people are looking for more European, sleek-looking units today.” Keeping in accordance with the handleless effect, most European appliances do retain somewhat of a traditional feature: knobs. Where many American manufacturers use touch-pad technology, European counterparts utilize knobs, which in terms of design, is still on trend, for a knob adds an organic shape and softens the typically boxy frame of a European appliance.

IT’S ONLY NATURAL Credence is also being given to the outdoors. Homeowners are now making the relationship between the kitchen and the space beyond its walls a marriage, versus a juxtaposition. Sky lighting, floor to ceiling windows, natural bamboo or cork floors, and natural stones are one way to do this. Full spectrum, natural light in great saturation helps to cut down on energy costs as well. By incorporating stone countertops like soapstone, one is working within a natural color palette that welcomes the sense of the elements indoors and makes the transition from the scenery outside to the interior subtly bridged.

Pedini, a European favorite amongst designers, is at the forefront of the design curve, and has caught on to the trend of organic shapes. The Dune line, in particular, takes a cue from nature by offering islands and cabinetry units in smooth, undulating curves with multiple sinks and appliances sub-countertop. The finished product is handleless and trend-forward. Combinations for the Dune series include wood, glass, matte, and high gloss finishes. The high, white gloss is a material we can expect to see more of, too: it lends itself to the smooth, seamless, and clean aesthetic that Americans are quickly adopting from overseas. Quartz countertops still have a strong presence in kitchen design, as does Silestone. Staying with the “green” trend, recycled materials have begun to gain popularity for worktops as well. “We’re beginning to see manufacturers making countertop material from recycled tires. Some tops also include specs of recycled metals and of course, there’s always recycled glass,” Lori Kreke of Desmone & Associates Architects notes. “And if budget allows, concrete is also on-trend. Expensive, but it can look amazing.” Concrete not only produces a clean, neutral look, but it’s formidable and stately. It lends a coolness and sophistication that is the antithesis of “fussy.” Again, the words “sleek” and “elemental” come to mind. Volcano onyx has even been used in island and worktop construction, and when hollowed, the onyx structures can be lit from within to create a warm glow that highlights the variegation in the rock.

KEEPING IT ALL TOGETHER American homeowners, especially those in Pittsburgh and the surrounding regions, do not usually have to work within tight confines or space limitations. When the sky’s the limit and the scale of the home warrants a grand kitchen, it presents oppor32 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

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FEATURE

tunities to buy appliances in multiples, but it also creates the challenge of designing a congruous space that isn’t a hodge-podge of awkwardly-placed appliances, worktops, and islands. This is where customization comes into play. Double Sub-Zeros flanking quadruple ovens within a wall of cabinetry should be integrated and built-in. Otherwise, it looks like a showroom floor where the products have been placed too close together. Custom trim and paneling on refrigeration units and dishwashers are necessary to prevent distraction. Customization like this is where savvy interior designers and architects are worth their weight in gold. “When homeowners are renovating or building a kitchen, it’s sometimes hard to imagine the space as a whole. Many times, non-professionals are trying to fit different pieces together and it ends up looking choppy or obvious. That’s where we come into the picture,” says Nancy Policicchio, a project designer at Desmone & Associates Architects. “We know how the overall effect is going to look when finished, how to render it to scale, and how to direct the contractors.” She stresses that especially in the construction of modern kitchens, professional design help can be the wisest investment, because measurements must be perfect: there are no superfluous details to cover up mistakes. “And fixing mistakes,” she warns “can be more expensive than the project itself.”

THE NEED FOR SPEED Aesthetics and spacing are the first thing people notice when walking into a kitchen, but the kitchen is only as useful as its appliances. As our schedules become tighter, manufacturers have had to adapt to this challenge, realizing that as important as looks can be, it’s not the only determining factor. There must be special attention paid to providing the consumer with the highest level of convenience possible, and the results have been more and more products that slash cooking and prep time. Bill White, appliance professional at Dormont Appliance Center, understands his clients’ need to get in and out of the kitchen fast. Amongst his most recommended appliances is the GE Advantium microwave/oven combination. It cooks 4-8 times faster than a conventional pan, oven, or toaster. The secret is halogen lights combined with quartz heaters. At only a cubic foot or so, it’s inconspicuous and can fit under-counter. In addition, it can also serve as a warming drawer, another feature that more homes are starting to incorporate. “Warming drawers are great for the busy family, keeping dinners warm while the kids are playing,” adds Hillebrand.

Now that appliances like wine refrigerators, microwaves, and warming drawers are found under-counter, it also makes it easier for children to become more independent in the kitchen, saving parents time. When young cooks are in the kitchen, there is great relief in knowing that some of the newer appliances take enhanced safety into consideration. Induction cooktops are a good example. They use electromagnetic pulses to heat the metal pot, not the burner. “The electro-magnetic force is very intense, and heats liquids and foods in about half the time of a traditional cooktop,” says White. And like its gas counterpart, these electric tops respond instantly to temperature reduction or elevation. When cooking is complete, the surface is warm, not scalding hot, reducing the chance of serious burns. No one will argue that clean-up is the dreaded ending to an otherwise enjoyable dining experience. Though the advice of our well-meaning mothers still echoes in our brains (“wash the dishes as you cook to prevent a looming pile afterwards!”), we ignore it. Many will still test the hypothesis that dishes will do themselves overnight, while the owners slumber, full-bellied and wine-logged. Fortunately, companies are looking to improve efficiency in this arena as well. The frustration felt when attempting to clean large pots and pans in an unaccommodating sink is akin to a root canal: it’s necessary, but proves itself long

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FEATURE introduce connecting elements that attractively mark separation, like half-walls with stools for seating.” Lighting is also a wonderful way to separate the areas. Generally, pendant lights will hang above a dining counter or bar where harsh light is unneeded and unwelcome. Task lighting is generally only found above worktops, and fire places are increasingly found in adjacent lounge areas. Conversation-piece fixtures can hang above dining zones where light will be diffused by highly-stylized or avant-garde design.

“The kitchen is not just where you cook anymore.” and painful. Blanco, a German company specializing in sinks and faucets, has answered our prayers by recently introducing the Performa Silgranit II sink. The Performa is a 1-3/4 sink with a low divide, allowing users to maneuver larger items and their handles expertly and efficiently. The design is attractive and simple, the shape blending well in both modern and traditional kitchens.

EVERYTHING IN ITS PL ACE Now that kitchens have become increasingly “wall-less,” this has precluded the need for the formal dining room. The landscape is now a continuous plane that requires zoning to differentiate between dining area, cooking space, and the living room. “It’s more about informality now,” says Kreke, “and the formal dining room is going away. Now what we must do is

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Lounge areas are a great addition for entertaining purposes. Adding cushioned seating options, plush rugs, and a hearth in a conjoining area allows the cook to remain in control of cooking procedures while socializing with company. Guests can enjoy a glass of wine in front of the fireplace without getting in the cook’s way, and also enjoy more time with their host. By making this space more inviting and commodious for long periods, the majority of entertaining now takes place in the kitchen, whereas in the past, the living room and dining room received more use. “The kitchen is not just where you cook anymore,” confirms Policicchio, “it’s a work space, an office, a homework station, and an entertainment environment.” She has led projects for homes that even incorporate spaces designed specifically for culinary collections, such as specialty teas and coffees. Baking areas still remain popular, and the lower, marble work counter provides bakers with the correct height and surface material to manipulate dough and create confections with less hassle.

THE FUTURE The transitional and traditional kitchens will never go away, however, the current trend towards sleek design is not a flash in the pan. It is expected to become more ubiquitous, and as the age of homeowners shifts to include younger generations, it may prove to be the rule and not the exception relatively soon. Globalization has had a significant effect on kitchen design recently: the shape of, and accoutrements for, our appliances; high-gloss and handleless finishes; organic shapes and creative spacing; more efficient work solutions to combat space restriction; and the obliteration of walled areas are some examples. And as for color, our culture has a love-hate relationship. We love to wear colorful Easter dresses and hats, but wouldn’t consider the same intensity for kitchen walls or seating. Energizing, unabashed orange is the rage in Argentina, from residential to commercial kitchens and dining rooms, and in Italy, it’s all about adding a strong and unapologetic energy with reds. Regionally speaking, neutrals are still the most often used palettes for kitchens, but designers such as Policicchio and Kreke hope that homeowners start to embrace the current design movement. “A


FEATURE lot of people are afraid to spend a lot of money on what they think may be a passing trend,” says Kreke, “but what we are seeing today has been gradually building for some time now. It’s safe to say that it’s not going away.”

Tim Hillebrand is the President of Hillmon Appliance Distributors in Cranberry, PA. Hillmon specializes in high-end appliances, and is a leader in finding solutions for your creative kitchen needs. Experience their state-of-the-art showroom and top of the line selection. 310 Commerce Park Drive, Cranberry, PA, 16066. 724-779-9393. www.hillmonappliance.com. Bill White is an appliance sales professional at Dormont Appliance Center. Now with showrooms in the North and South, the Dormont Appliance sales team is happy to introduce you to innovative, new appliances for your kitchen, laundry, home cooling, and more. 2875 West Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA, 15216 (South Hills Location). 412-531-9700. www.dormontappliance.com.

and is a third generation family-owned architecture and interior design firm. Their philosophy is that of design excellence and superior client service. Desmone provides services for various industries, including the residential, commercial, healthcare, industrial, religious, and educational sectors. One Doughboy Square, 3400 Butler Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15201. 412-6833230. www.desmone.com

Lori Kreke (Interior Designer) and Nancy Policicchio (Project Designer) are design professionals at Desmone & Associates Architects in Lawrenceville. Desmone was founded in 1958,

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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Project Profile

Ernie Sota at the Riverside Mews.

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Project Profile

RIVERSIDE MEWS Pittsburgh has earned its claim of being America’s ‘greenest city.’ Some of the pioneers of sustainable design and construction researched and implemented green building in Western PA long before the rest of the country did. But like most U. S. markets, Pittsburgh has only seen limited acceptance of green building in the new residential construction and remodeling market.

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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Stone Surfaces Make Life More Interesting

Everywhere

The sublime beauty of natural stone moves beyond the kitchen into every room of the house. It is a versatile design tool – for stairways, over walls, on floors, around fireplaces, and for custom-made countertops. Ultimate Granite is western Pennsylvania’s finest purveyor of natural surfaces: granite and marble, quartz, soapstone, limestone and travertine. And our customer service and installation teams go beyond expectation. Call ULTIMATE GRANITE to schedule an appointment at our showroom in Gibsonia, conveniently located near Butler Valley Exit 39 of the PA Turnpike.

www.ugsurfaces.com


Project Profile

F

or homebuyers who are looking to own a green home there are now a number of EnergyStar builders, those who build EnergyStar-certified homes. But for buyers who are committed to living green there are fewer options. For those kinds of concerned and committed homeowners the good news is that Pittsburgh is home to Sota Construction and the Riverside Mews. Sota’s president and founder, Ernie Sota is one of those pioneers that made Pittsburgh a green city. Starting in 1993, Sota made green building a pillar of his business’ foundation, long before there were even organizations to promote and monitor green building. The company has been at the forefront of sustainability and Sota put his beliefs into practice in residential development a few years ago when he located property along the Monongahela River on Pittsburgh’s South Side. Sota’s plan was for a small neighborhood of sustainable housing in the style of the Windom Hill Place townhouses he was building on the Slopes above South Side. Windom Hill was a modern development of eight homes that offered highefficiency living and style that attracted attention as far away as the New York Times Sunday edition. That sense of style that was not of Pittsburgh was important to Sota, an architect by education who has a love for architectural styles that represent old and new, familiar and foreign. Sota’s sensibilities directed design architect John Martine, partner at Strada Architecture LLC, to look to Europe and the American prairie for inspiration, as well as a more local example. “Our model is actually Chatham Village, which is a model of modern community from the 1930’s,” explains Martine. Chatham Village was developed by the Buhl Foundation to create affordable cooperative housing in an urban setting on Mt. Washington. Although the architecture is English cottage style, Martine sees similarities to Riverside Mews that go beyond the eye. “There is communality to Chatham Village that we saw applying to the community of Riverside Mews. We worked with [architects of record] Perkins Eastman on the planning and my responsibility was the exterior. We thought it would be interesting to have each exterior vary slightly from the others but we wanted common themes in colors, materials and form.”

The form Martine speaks of came from Ernie Sota’s vision for Riverside Mews. “Ernie has an affinity for Arts and Crafts architecture so that was a theme in the design that you see in the proportions, the colors and the bay windows,” he says. “Arts and Crafts homes have steep roofs but we wanted to have roof-top terraces for the views and because there wouldn’t be outdoor space for each home. So we decided to modernize the design by drawing from early modernism, which Ernie also likes.” Modernism was championed in Europe in the post-World War I era. The style features geometric shapes, monolithic surfaces – often concrete – and lots of modern materials. The style was often used in contrast to natural settings or to reflect stark urban settings. Some of the more famous modernist architecture was in Prague, with its well-known hillside houses, and in the Bauhaus style developed in Germany by Walter Gropius and Mies Van der Rohe. Intended to be unpretentious and practical, Bauhaus came to America when Gropius and Van der Rohe emigrated here prior to World War II. Modern style became instead the style of the new wealth of 1950’s and 1960’s America. The final architecture of the Riverside Mews features multistory geometric facades with large windows and industrial exterior materials like steel and concrete block. Railings, trim and walkway covers are of painted steel. The floor plans of

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Project Profile

Sota Construction began work on the first phase of Riverside Mews in mid-2007, completing and selling 14 homes by early 2008. As hoped, the buyers were people who were interested in the urban lifestyle Riverside Mews offered but also in living in a more sustainable way, although the level of knowledge was different in 2008.

...the construction industry has ramped up its research and design to take

energy efficiency and green building to a higher level.

the units are similarly modern and open, offering flexibility and light to the residents while bringing the skyline of the city into the home. Riverside’s design also included very serious thought about green building. The homes are designed to be energy efficient, with advanced technology in insulation materials, techniques for sealing the houses windows and doors to reduce airflow, low-E glass, and low energy lighting. Many of the materials used in the house were made of recycled material or involved use of woods from sustainably harvested forests. Sota also managed the construction with as little waste and energy use as possible. The site itself sets up between 18th and 19th Streets along Merriman Way and the Mon River. When completed there will be a total of 48 homes in attached groups of three to nine units. To the north of the houses themselves is a riverfront park that gives common green space for the neighborhood and allows access to the river. The heart of the South Side shopping and restaurants is just a few blocks walk to the south. South Side Works lifestyle center lies just five blocks to the east and the Birmingham Bridge, with its access to Oakland, is just three blocks away. 40 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

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“The residents are very diverse – from singles in their early 20’s to empty nesters,” says Diana Lynn, of 180 Real Estate Services, the agent for Riverside Mews. “When we first started selling the homes, the buyers were looking more at the sense of big city contemporary style. Some were from out-of-town or were urban pioneers from the suburbs. Now the interested buyers are coming because of the energy efficiency and sustainability. It’s part of the whole cultural shift.” Lynn makes the point that prior to the recession most Americans were still not thinking about their carbon footprint. Even after the spike in prices that followed Hurricane Katrina in 2005, most people in the region still did not give much thought to how much energy or fuel they were consuming. That has certainly changed. Phase one of Riverside Mews were some of the first homes Sota Construction built to EnergyStar standards. EnergyStar certification requires meeting measurable standards that were derived from how much better a home was built than the local codes. At the basis for the measurements was a home energy rating system or HERS rating that came from an analysis of a home’s construction plans and onsite inspections. Making use of highefficiency appliances and energy efficient design, an EnergyStar home will be rated by the percentage of energy used below the average home. A home with a HERS rating of 85 is 15 percent more efficient than the standard home. The standard home in Riverside Mews has a HERS rating of 50, meaning that it is designed to consume half the energy a standard home does, and Sota can improve upon that if the buyer wishes.


Project Profile

As the culture has shifted, the construction industry has ramped up its research and design to take energy efficiency and green building to a higher level. For pioneers like Ernie Sota, each year brings more study and experimentation in the effort for continual improvement in green building. With phase two of Riverside Mews now underway, the bar has been raised even higher. Last October, the company was awarded a Green Power Award by PennFuture when it completed the region’s first zero energy home at the Riverside Mews. A zero energy home literally generates as much or more energy than it uses. The home is a 2,000 square foot townhouse, which uses an extremely well-insulated thermal envelope, geothermal cooling and heating to reduce energy consumption, and an array of photovoltaic solar panels on the roof to generate electricity. Sota has set up monitoring equipment www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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Project Profile

... green building is winning people over while the photovoltaic solar array has generated 8,000 KwH. Operating a house with no energy bill is the result of a number of small steps that make up a better design. “It’s always about energy efficiency,” Sota explains. “The thermal envelope plays the biggest role in reducing the energy loss. We use R-20 insulation in the walls but also R-40 in the floor slab and R-60 in the roof. At The Mews we had good windows but not great ones; there’s a good solar orientation and a good water source heat pump with a geothermal well in the back yard. There are a lot of small measures that add up to keeping demand low, like LED lighting and a super heater that captures the heat loss during the cooling cycle.” at the Riverside Mews home that feeds data to his office in Bellevue to track the amount of electricity generated and the energy consumed. Since the home was occupied in April 2011, the total energy use has been less than 7,500 KwH 42 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

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Ernie Sota understands that more people are coming to see green building as the way to go but is sometimes frustrated by the focus on the return on investment instead of living sustainably because it’s the right thing to do.


Project Profile Still, he recognizes that green building is winning people over, regardless of the motivation. “The owner of the zero-energy house is a coal mining engineer,” he laughs. “And the first two townhouses I sold at Windom Hill were to guys who drove Hummers.” Whether it’s the palpable shift in cultural focus to sustainable living or the simple attraction of a contemporary urban design unique to Pittsburgh, buyers are clearly ‘getting’ the Riverside Mews. Phase two is being built in three set of six homes. The first six includes the model and the remainder have sold out and one more has presold of the next six to start. All indications are that all 18 homes in phase two will be completed by next spring. “Riverside Mews has evolved into a really cool community,” says Diana Lynn. “Three more buyers are ready to sign contracts for the remaining five in this phase. It’s like Ernie says, we’ve hit our tipping point.” www.sotahomeliving.com NH

Rx for Suburbanitis* *sub-ur-ban-i-tis \s -'b r-b -,nit- s\ n: moderate to severe ennui caused by blasé fare: buffet lunching, lawn mowing, distance driving and channel surfing e

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Lose the lethargy and urban-up with luxury living on the South Side, where culture, shopping and fine dining await — just minutes by bike or hike.

Riverside Mews, Western PA’s first and only Energy Star-certified development, offer award-winning architecture, breathtaking views, bright, clean interiors, and exceptional values.

Don’t delay: Phase II is underway! Call One80 for an Open House Schedule or for a Private Tour

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One80 Real Estate Services, LLC | 2010 Kinvara Drive | Pittsburgh PA 15237 | 412.318.4139 www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

43


INTERIORS

Breaking

the Mold:

How New Kitchen Construction Can Synthesize Trend and Tradition for Stunning Results By Erin Raimondi When Kathy Cvetkovich talks about what makes

trenches.” To listen to her explain the complexity

a true, professional kitchen designer, the criteria

of knowing how to commandeer the building

seems to be a hybrid between therapist, life

process and the proper sequence of events that

coach, aesthetics specialist, and ring leader.

lead up to a final product, one can tell that she

Founder and Senior Designer of Willowbrook

is not only thrilled by what she does, but she is

Design, she has helped clients design homes

equally as excited about fielding the common

for nearly 30 years, and it was a road that

mistakes that homeowners make when designing

meandered serendipitously to kitchen design.

a new kitchen space. Her energy and experience

“When I got out of art school with a degree in

makes for a designer who, as she puts it, will see

Interior Design, I decided that new construction

every project through to the “very end,” and she

was what I wanted to do because it was so

has left many happy clients in her wake because

terribly difficult and very challenging. My focus

of this philosophy.

went to kitchen design after some years in the

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INTERIORS

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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INTERIORS morously recalls the reaction from a real estate professional: “I was told that when realtors began showing the home, they literally stopped in the doorway and one said that it was the coolest kitchen she had ever seen. That’s going some for a realtor—they see all kinds of things.” The success of the client’s first kitchen was partly due to their ability to think outside the box, something that a lot of homeowners struggle with when imagining they may one day be in the position of seller. “Eventually, the right people appreciate it and realize that they are not looking at the same old thing… which is something that Willowbrook Design always strives for.”

C

urrently, Kathy is designing a home for a young family in the South Hills. It’s new construction, her favorite kind of design project, since new construction is void of those unique challenges that renovation presents. “It is a completely blank palette with just about the only restriction being the budget or allowance of the homeowner,” and though this presents a homeowner with greater options in one respect, it still comes down to budget. “There are any number of ways to design something—but it’s all tied to the bottom line.” This is the second time around for the South Hills client: Kathy had worked with them on their previous home four years ago. The first project was a renovation for their builder-grade kitchen that the homeowners were “simply done with.” It was a winning combination of a design-oriented homeowner and a designer with expansive vision, but a realistic disposition, that ultimately created a jaw-dropping kitchen space. Every inch of storage space was maximized, due to the couple’s growing family. There were two islands: one for food preparation and ovens, the other for seating. An oversized hearth housed pull-out spice racks on both sides, and an adjacent room had a stone fireplace and a bar built around it. The muted colors helped to seamlessly bridge the transition from the rest of the house. When the family decided that it was time for more space and put their house on the market, it sold in record time. Kathy hu-

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For this current project, the homeowners were interested in re-instituting some elements from their first kitchen: namely multiple workspaces and a diversion from the traditional design “work triangle,” which is better suited for smaller, or older, kitchens; larger kitchens should be necessarily zoned. The spacing between appliances, perimeter cabinetry and traffic areas will be customized based upon the owners’ habits and preferences vs. cookie-cutter standardization. “Naturally, it ended up being slightly different from the first time,” she says, “but they wanted to capture the same essence as before.” That essence is what she would describe as a break from the “stuffiness or “stodginess” of the traditional kitchen space. By foregoing certain finishes, Kathy worked with the client on introducing concepts that were more progressive and stylized - and broke away from regional convention. Through mixed finishes, mixed doors, and mixed construction (inset and full overlay), she believes that this will be a progressive, but respectably classic, final product. Pittsburgh has generally been a region that remains slightly behind the design curve, but that seems to be changing. “The movement in other regions of the country,” Cvetkovich verifies, “is toward more contemporary designs: cleaner lines, more classic-contemporary, and not so many carved moldings and dark finishes.” Other instances in which she has seen this trend changing clients’ choices include details like doors and frames: “In the 70’s there was that really slick, high-sheen door in frameless construction—now passé. The updated version is full overlay (framed) with good-looking, warmer, wooden doors. It


INTERIORS provides a nicer profile that’s understated… slightly classic contemporary.” Generally speaking, she is seeing fewer details and more attention given to creative color combinations and textiles. As to why Pittsburgh is finally comfortable enough to welcome more current concepts, she offers that generational differences may play just as much a role as trend: “Perhaps it has something to do with baby-boomers wanting things to be different than their parents.” Either way, it’s a trend that we probably won’t see reversing itself anytime soon, given the almost immediate sale of her client’s first home on the heels of their kitchen renovation. Another up and coming trend she believes is gaining rapid interest, is that of ceiling treatments. “They are not easy, and have to be designed and installed preferably before the cabinetry.” Cutting no corners and taking meticulous care, Cvetkovich has successfully completed design projects that include said ceiling treatments, lending a fresh, interesting element to the ceiling space that compliments her design work throughout the rest of the room. Her clients are now very anxiously awaiting the final ceiling treatment for their new home. The current plan includes a paint-grade finish ceiling treatments – squarely positioned over double islands. Similar treatments, such as coffered ceilings were usually completed using plaster molds, but today’s treatments use predominantly wood, increasing options and producing a less stilted effect.

807 E. McMurray Road, Venetia, PA 15367 724-941-9777

The client remains steadfast in designing without the next owner in mind. They have, instead, decided that their space should be exactly that: their own space to design, decorate, and layout as they see fit and enjoyable. “Clients must keep in mind that it’s their house. The notion of designing it for the next owner is crazy. It’s your mortgage, your house, so make it as wonderful as it can be—just for you,” she passionately states. All “rah-rah” for individuality aside, however, there are a few things that potential sellers should be aware of. “If the kitchen is under-scaled for the grandiosity of the house, and if an owner has opted for a standard offering of stock cabinetry and design, potential buyers are likely to see these things immediately.” She warns against cutting costs in a kitchen because it’s just as much about design as it is functionality. “You can see beautiful homes over $500K that have kitchens that cost $30K: laminate tops, 3rd level appliances, etc. Typically, only 2%-3% is provided in an allowance for cabinetry, when realistically, it should be more like 10% of the cost of the structure itself. So when the house is ready to sell, the cabinets are either completely shot, or just barely hanging on.”

“ Good design is timeless - no matter what the style.” Kathy Cvetkovich

www.willowbrookdesign.com www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

47


INTERIORS

... a designer does a lot of listening.” quell that urge. It’s her drive to finish what she starts, that has helped her score so much repeat business, her current clients included. She also offers that it’s just as much a matter of trust as communication: “You have to connect right away, and there must be a high level of trust. Input is necessary (it’s the client’s house!), but it works best when homeowners let the professionals do their job. A designer does a lot of listening.” Presently, her South Hills client is most likely looking towards a project that will average six months. After many careful discussions regarding expectation and budget, renderings have been completed and things are moving ahead at a healthy clip, helped by the fact that she has worked with the family once before. Unlike the 48-hour design challenge spectacles on channels like HGTV (which is “nothing like the real design world at all”), she is serious about keeping a steady pace that pleases client, designer, and builder, ultimately resulting in a job done right the first time. “The key is that you have to stay engaged until the very end…until the client is completely satisfied.” Now there’s a trend every homeowner likes. NH

With her dedication to adhering to the demands that new homes can present designers, it’s no wonder that she has been asked by this client to help produce another spectacular kitchen. She will admit that there are really two different sides to being adept at doing such work, and being asked to do it repeatedly for the same client. There’s the issue of competence and talent, and then there’s the slightly more esoteric quality of personality, Cvetkovich explains. “New construction isn’t easy: you must be able to visualize the entire space, the mechanicals, roof lines, colors, all of it. Not everyone can, or is willing to do that. Mistakes are expensive.” She also believes that if a designer does not wholly respect and understand the building process (especially the proper sequence of events), then it can make for a rocky road with the builder, whose main objective is to keep moving and stay on a timeline. “The process is long, and some of the large projects, with tons of detail, can take over a year! After some time, the urge is very strong to move onto the next thing.” Kathy has learned to

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What to Expect When You’re Expecting…a New Kitchen “The design process for new construction is a blank palette, except for budget,” Cvetkovich explains, but that certainly doesn’t mean working without a plan. Below, she shares a few basic guidelines that homeowners can expect to follow: - As in all projects, we have a careful conversation with the client and listen closely to all concerns, dislikes, must-haves, etc. Right away, we speak frankly about budget and whether their intention is to exceed it, or if they would like to stay near allowance; typically a difficult task... - Based on this conversation, we prepare several roughs within the space. A final plan view is then selected, and the real work of detailing begins: making sure all the pieces fit, prepping elevations, and dealing with pricing and mechanical issues.


INTERIORS - Then, the project assumes the pace of the construction schedule. The builder is looking for mechanicals for stub-ups and rough-ins, as well as venting. That means that the design has to be finalized very early, and very little should be changing on the plan view at this stage. The electrical must also be prepared early on, because electricians will be pushing to rough in everything before insulation and drywall. So, the final appliance selections must also be made before this step.

There’s No “I” in “Team”: Your Role in the Kitchen-Building Process The homeowner has an important roster of responsibilities in the design/building process (and yes, it involves more than a checkbook!). Here are a few tips for keeping the design process a team effort that moves along smoothly: - Client: Rethinking decisions can be the “kiss of death.” This stunts progress and it’s critical to stay on schedule with the builder. So homeowners, do yourself a favor and be an asset, not your own worst enemy. - Designer: “We juggle all of the balls and transmit information from homeowner to builder in a timely and organized manner, meet budget, crawl around muddy construction sites, balance on the inevitable gangplank, and get called on to answer every question imaginable,” Cvetkovich reveals. But there are definitely moments that make the efforts worth it. In her case, it’s the olfactory pleasures she looks forward to: “But, we also get to smell the fresh lumber, feel progress, and feel the wind blow through the studs,” she says. “It’s great!” - Builder: The builder will want to keep a steady clip, and circumvent glitches and delays. They will need to provide accurate timelines, and if his tradesmen are being used on the project, they must be professionals that can provide the extra touches that seasoned designers include in the design work.

Kathy Cvetkovich is the founder and Senior Designer at Willowbrook Design in Venetia, PA. She has nearly 30 years of experience in the design industry, and graduated with a degree in interior design from the Art Institute of Pittsburgh. She specializes in kitchens - renovation and new construction. Kathy can be reached at 724-9419777, or at kcvetkovich@verizon.net. Visit her web site at www.willowbrookdesign.com. NH

5408 Walnut Street

412.621.4700

ShopatfeatherS.com

5408 Walnut Street

412.621.4700

ShopatfeatherS.com

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

49


Builder Profile

Hawthorne Partners

Lisa and Paul Scarmazzi, founders of Hawthorne Partners.

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Builder Profile

building a company on a field of dreams

One unique franchise, two enterprising entrepreneurs add up to building success! Ever wonder what it’s like to realize a life-altering goal? “Moonlight” Graham mused about the opposite in the popular baseball film “Field of Dreams”: “It was like coming this close to your dreams and then watching them brush past you like a stranger in the crowd.”

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Builder Profile After moving onto mortgage financing, Scarmazzi, and his wife, Lisa, gave serious thought to “getting into something we enjoyed… something larger than ourselves” where they could make their mark by offering something of value. So after a brief period of building a few homes singularly, they purchased property near the Pittsburgh airport, became an Epcon franchisee, and began a 74-home community of attached condominiums called the Villas of Parkwood Estates. With just the pair working in a twospace cubicle located at Southpointe, the development sprang to life.

If You Build It, They Will Come

A

ccording to Paul and Lisa Scarmazzi, founders and principles of their company Hawthorne Partners Inc., not only did they reach a life-altering goal, but did so on their own field of dreams in the verdant acreage of southwestern Pennsylvania. Working in investment banking over many years, Paul Scarmazzi first heard “the voice” when conducting business with Phil Fankhauser and Ed Bacome, two Columbus, Ohio builders who formed a unique concept in home building – development franchises. Known as Epcon (Ed and Phil’s Condominiums), the company touted single level, lifestyle communities and has become the nation’s #1 builder of lifestyle-rich homes. The idea was that the development process itself could be franchised with the communities catering to active baby boomers, those wishing to downsize, and those desiring a more social lifestyle without yard work and outdoor maintenance, but still prserving quality and comfort. The pair was seeking financing for their first three Epcon licensees located in Youngstown, Ohio, Penn State, and Cranberry, north of Pittsburgh, which Scarmazzi arranged. Initially, the idea of development franchises sounded, well, “crazy” to Scarmazzi, but a second, more subtle voice prompted him to keep tabs on this interestingly formulated home franchise business coming to be known as “a condo in a kit.”

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“We were certainly novices and coming into a franchise organization (like Epcon) helped us connect the dots, said Paul Scarmazzi. “Our first project was like getting a PhD in the real world of business.” Epcon prides itself on supporting franchisees, offering access to sales and marketing expertise, researched and market-tested home designs, training and knowledge behind their more than a quarter century business acumen in addition to offering their system of purchasing power for materials and more. But the Scarmazzi’s were not without some advantage and expertise that lent itself to the project. Lisa Scarmazzi, a former marketer with Pittney Bowes and Eastman Kodak, had gone back to school for interior design and had started her own design firm. She utilized those skills to design the first clubhouse and model home in the community and to


Builder Profile date, has decorated and designed 11 models. She also called on her marketing skills as the project advanced, coming full circle. Paul Scarmazzi’s mortgage and finance background served him well, as did an understanding of good locations. “I also understood a good amount about location, zoning, looked at demographics, and more. We worked very hard on the first community – three years from start to finish. We kind of felt frustrated every day.” Despite those daily frustrations, the pair looked toward the next project in 2004 and saw a real need in Washington County. “While we were finishing the first construction project, we secured 20 acres overlooking the golf clubs in South Strabane Township, which became a fun project,” noted Scarmazzi. That “need” was confirmed early on by research conducted for Epcon and independent sources that showed striking trends for baby boomers and retirees. Coupled with the fact that Pennsylvania has a higher percentage of older Americans than many other states, the ground was ripe for single level living geared toward active retirees and baby boomers. The four-plex condos, or carriage homes as they are sometimes called, in the Scarmazzi’s second plan and its clubhouse were dubbed the Villas on the Green. “Here, we created a good entry to the community with extensive landscaping and a long, divided boulevard that really welcomes you home.”

“OUR FIRST PROJECT WAS LIKE GETTING A PHD IN THE REAL WORLD OF BUSINESS.”

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Builder Profile

... AS THEY EASE THE PAIN OF ACTIVE RETIREES AND BABY BOOMERS WHO SIMPLY WANT WHAT THEY WANT. lifestyle community, but desiring a separate home of their own. “As we changed, we began to build single family, detached homes and with that change, we broadened our market,” noted Lisa Scarmazzi. In November 2010, the couple was invited into a project in Ohio Township – Cobblestone Manor, that had “great developers” and was a great project of single family homes. “Here, we also introduced single family space as well and did walk-out spaces and provided additional options. The homes tend to be much deeper.” Most recently, the pair is involved in a 44-carriage home community in Cecil Township they’re calling Mission Hills, marking their eleventh year in the franchise development industry.

Ease Their Pain This successfully finished project led to a third in Chartiers Township, replete with ponds on either side of the entry, fountains and 136 homes on a plot of 127 acres. Begun in 2006, the Villas at Arden Mills embraced the franchise concept of true, single story architecture geared toward carefree living; living for those who wish to remain vibrant and active. For those looking for single level living in a detached home rather than a condo, 2009 saw the introduction of the Courtyards of Arden Mills for families, couples, the newly single or any others enamoured of the 54 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

| Fall 2011

Scarmazzi admits that folks seem to be clamoring for lifestyle communities and there is evidence that points in that direction. Mike LaRuffa, past president of Builders Services Inc., and a licensed real estate broker in North and South Carolina who has held numerous positions in building, sales, marketing and asset management, headlined a June 2011 article “Build the Home I Want … Please!” decrying the fact that builders don’t pay attention to baby boomers’ needs and wants in a home. He claims that builders abandoned boomers who want and will buy “… more compact and manageable homes to set us free to turn the key and go …” In fact, he writes


Builder Profile that in the Charlotte, North Carolina region, the top selling community for the past few years has been an active adult (age 55 and over) community. While LaRuffa’s report might be dismissed by naysayers as speculative or somewhat anecdotal, a “Special Report – Housing Trends Among Baby Boomers” (Gary V. Englehardt for the Research Institute for Housing America) tells us that “… old sellers looking to buy another home represent an important source of demand, especially for smaller trade-down homes or homes with desirable features – e.g., homes with a first floor bedroom, onestory homes and condominiums …” Finally, Linda Stern, contributor to “The Daily Beast”, an American news reporting and opinion web site notes in an article titled “How baby boomers are reigniting the housing market” that Baby-boom retirees and pre-retirees who are in the market seem to be considering the effort and expense involved in managing a property. They are looking for something different their second and third time around. They want single story houses, smaller floor plans, and some amenities aimed at older home purchasers …” Concerns all considered within the framework of Scarmazzi’s company, Hawthorne Partners, Inc. as they ease the pain of active retirees and baby boomers who simply want what they want.

Go The Distance While any new construction may look appealing in its first months and years, the Scarmazzi’s take great pride in the quality of their homes, crossing the field to bring quality of life together with a quality product. “Our homes are all Energy-Star homes with 2 x 6 wall construction,” Scarmazzi stated. “And, they are backed by a 10-year warranty.” Other features include a two and a half car garage, nine-foot ceilings and 10- foot trey ceilings.

Together with a large amount of windows and transoms, the feel is open and airy. “Floor plans center around a private courtyard or deck, like a giant “U”, Lisa Scarmazzi emphasized. “You see the outdoors from any point in the home.” “There are also great site lines,” continued Scarmazzi, provided with research that reported some 6,800 baby boomers when asked “What do you want in a home?” answered “A desire for outside living area and private space.” Which may be one of the compelling reasons why so many buy Scarmazzi’s homes after looking at just the floor plan or an earlier built community. “There is a lot of customization to our homes and every part of the space is usable. The buyers don’t want the burden of yard work any longer, they don’t want the big house, but we’re still giving them everything they’re looking for,” said Lisa Scarmazzi. “It’s simply the lifestyle inside and outside of the home.” The homes themselves measure from 1,400 to 2,000 square feet with costs ranging from $170,000 to the low $200,000s. Each of the communities has a Home Owner’s Association with fees paid monthly along with a large clubhouse. “The clubhouse is like a ‘community living room’. Folks come together here, compare similar life experiences, and form a social bond throughout the community.” Someday, as their own nest grows empty and retirement looms, the Scarmazzis can see themselves in one of their own single level, lifestyle community homes after having gone the distance and seeing that their “field of dreams” was truly a dream come true for so many others across the region. NH

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

55


Residential

NEW CONSTRUCTION

Custom single-family homes, carriage homes, townhomes or condominiums‌ new locations and new homesites. NEWHOME can help you discover a home to match your lifestyle.

58 City of Pittsburgh 58 Allegheny County 62 Beaver County 62 Butler County 65 Washington County 66 Westmoreland County www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

57


CITY OF PITTSBURGH CITY OF PITTSBURGH 151 First Side Downtown Pittsburgh Condominiums PRICED FROM $500,000 SCHOOL DISTRIC2 City of Pittsburgh AGENCY 151 First Side 412-586-5970 n n

www.151firstside.com

ALLEGHENY COUNTY Federal Hill City of Pittsburgh/ Northside n Townhomes PRICED FROM $140,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT City of Pittsburgh AGENCY S & A Realty 412-364-2626 n

Hilltop Housing Initiative n n

Angel's Arms

City of Pittsburgh n Condominiums PRICED FROM $259,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT City of Pittsburgh AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-363-4000 or 412-431-1625 n

www.angelsarms.net

Angel's Arms Southside Condominiums PRICED FROM $199,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT City of Pittsburgh AGENCY Northwood Realty Services 412-367-3200 n n

Bedford Hill City of Pittsburgh, Homewood n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $130,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT City of Pittsburgh AGENCY Northwood Realty 412-367-3200 n

www.northwood.com

Bedford Hill City of Pittsburgh Single-family homes PRICED FROM $150,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT City of Pittsburgh AGENCY Northwood Realty 412-367-3200 n n

www.northwood.com

The Condominiums at St. Mathews City of Pittsburgh n Condominiums PRICED FROM $350,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT City of Pittsburgh AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-521-2222 n

www.theenclavepgh.com

Crescent Court Condominiums

Squirrel Hill n Condominiums PRICED FROM $375,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT City of Pittsburgh AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-421-2153 n

Beltzhoover Single-family homes

PRICED FROM $89,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT City of

Pittsburgh Northwood Realty 412-367-3200

AGENCY

www.northwood.com

Summerset at Frick Park City of Pittsburgh/ Squirrel Hill Traditional Neighborhood Development n Single-family homes, duplexes, townhomes, condominiums, apartments PRICED FROM $300,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT City of Pittsburgh AGENCY Summerset Land Development Associates 412-420-0120 n

Shadyside n Condominiums PRICED FROM $365,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT City of Pittsburgh AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-683-1980 n

www.howardhanna.com

Sweet Briar Village City of Pittsburgh/ Mt. Washington Townhomes PRICED FROM $240,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT City of Pittsburgh Coldwell Banker Real Estate AGENCY 412-521-2222 n

n n

Northside Single-family homes

$180,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT City of Pittsburgh AGENCY RE/MAX Select Realty 412-633-9300 ext. 214 724-309-1758 PRICED FROM

www.fineviewhomes.com

Vista Grande

City of Pittsburgh/ Mt. Washington n Luxury condominiums PRICED FROM $500,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT City of Pittsburgh AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-344-0500 www.pittsburghmoves.com

Windom Hill Place

City of Pittsburgh/South Side n Contemporary townhomes - condo PRICED FROM $679,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT City of Pittsburgh AGENCY One80 Real Estate Services LLC 412-318-4139 n

Oxbridge at South Side City of Pittsburgh/ South Side n Townhomes PRICED FROM $349,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT City of Pittsburgh AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-833-3600 n

www.howardhanna.com

The Residences Pittsburgh Downtown Pittsburgh Skyhomes PRICED FROM $514,500 AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-355-0777 n

n

Wylie Ave. Homes East Allegheny / Hill District n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $140,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT City of Pittsburgh AGENCY Northwood Realty 412-367-3200 n

www.northwood.com

ALLEGHENY COUNTY Asbury II n n

Monroeville Carriage homes

PRICED FROM $229,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT

Gateway AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-327-5161 www.howardhanna.com

www.howardhanna.com

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Avonworth Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686

AGENCY

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Franklin Park Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM $500,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT North Allegheny AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 412-367-8000 n n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Beechwood Bethel Park n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $240,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Bethel Park AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1704 n

www.loveheartland.com

Berkeley Square Monroeville Single-family homes PRICED FROM $280,000 n n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Gateway Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-856-8300

AGENCY

www.howardhanna.com

The Berkshires South Fayette Township n Townhomes and singlefamily homes Single-family $210,000 $160,000 Town Homes SCHOOL DISTRICT South Fayette AGENCY Ryan Homes 412-914-2057 www.ryanhomes.com

Berringer Court at Sonoma Ridge Moon Township Carriage homes PRICED FROM $230,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Moon Area AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1724 n n

www.loveheartland.com

58 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

| Fall 2011

Breckenridge Highlands Baldwin Borough Townhomes and single family homes PRICED FROM $160,000 townhomes and $210,000 Single-family n n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Baldwin-Whitehall Ryan Homes 412-884-3024

AGENCY

www.ryanhomes.com

Barrington Manor

n

n

www.one80res.com

Ohio Township n Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM $400,000 n

www.one80res.com

Riverside Mews City of Pittsburgh/South Side n Contemporary town homes PRICED FROM $449,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT City of Pittsburgh AGENCY One80 Real Estate Services LLC 412-318-4139

Avonworth Heights

www.pittsburghmoves.com

n

Nunnery Hill Overlook

Steve Fink

Voice: 412-787-8807 Fax: 412-787-0429 email: Steve@VisitParagonHomes.com

www.summersetatfrickpark.com

n

Market House

Robinson Township Classic Custom Homes from $500,000 On 2.5 Acres Each www.VisitParagonHomes.com

Briarwood

Franklin Park Single-family homes PRICED FROM $320,000 SCHOOL DISTRICt North Allegheny n n

AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1716

www.loveheartland.com

Brookfield Manor

Bethel Park/South Park Single-family homes PRICED FROM $220,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Bethel Park/South Park AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1704 n n

www.loveheartland.com

Burwood Acres Robinson Township Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM $320,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Montour AGENCY S&A Homes 412-276-0422 n n

www.sahomebuilder.com

Burwood Estates Robinson Township Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM $385,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Montour AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 412-262-4630 n n

Camelot Woods O’Hara Township Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM $500,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Fox Chapel AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 412-782-3700 n n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com


ALLEGHENY COUNTY Carriage Estates Franklin Park Lots PRICED FROM $80,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT North Allegheny AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-366-1600

Cimarron Moon Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $210,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Moon Area AGENCY Ryan Homes 412-295-8359

Deerfield Ridge South Fayette Township Custom Single-family Homes PRICED FROM $375,000 AGENCY Paragon Homes 412-787-8807

n

n

n

n

n

n

www.pittsburghmoves.com

Castletown

Franklin Park Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM $650,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT North Allegheny AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 412-367-8000 n n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Centennial Point

Collier Township n Townhomes PRICED FROM $150,00 n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Chartiers Valley AGENCY S&A Homes 412-276-0422 www.sahomebuilder.com

Chartiers Landing Robinson Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $295,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Montour AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 412-262-4630 n

Chavelle Estates Plum Borough n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $285,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Plum Borough AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-733-5390 n

www.howardhanna.com ricciuticonstruction.com

www.ryanhomes.com

Cobblestone Ohio Township n Single-family homes and townhomes PRICED FROM $240,000 Single-family-homes; $180,000 townhomes; n

www.ryanhomes.com

Cobblestone

Ohio Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $260,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Avonwarth AGENCY S&A Homes 412-364-2626 n

Marshall Township Luxury estate custom homes PRICED FROM $1,200,000 AGENCY North Allegheny Eddy Homes 412-221-0400 n n

Moon Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $700,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Moon Area AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-262-5500 n n

www.howardhanna.com

n

Carnegie Garden style condominiums

PRICED FROM $194,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Carlton AGENCY RE/MAX Select

412-633-9300 ext. 214 724-309-1758 www.elane.biz

n

North Fayette n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $180,000

n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

SCHOOL DISTRICT

West Allegheny AGENCY Ryan Homes 412-498-8120

English Farms Pine Township Custon single-family homes PRICED FROM $380,000 Pine-Richland S&A Homes 724-538-4900

www.sahomebuilder.com

Jefferson Borough Single-family homes PRICED FROM $275,000 AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-655-0400

n

n

www.pittsburghmoves.com

n

n

n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Hampton Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $600,000 Hampton Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-366-1600

AGENCY

www.ryanhomes.com

Ohio Township Single-family carriage and villa homes PRICED FROM $234,400 SCHOOL DISTRICT Avonworth AGENCY Epcon Homes and Communities 412-548-3298 n

Fayette Farms Estates

www.pittsburghmoves.com

n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Pine-Richland Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-772-8822

AGENCY

Fields of Nicholson

n

Franklin Park Borough Custom carriage-homes from $542,400, Custom villas from $434,400 SCHOOL DISTRICT North Allegheny AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686

n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

North Fayette Township Custom Homes PRICED FROM $400,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT West Allegheny AGENCY Keller Williams 412-787-0888 n

The Estates at Jefferson

Richland Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $500,000 n

www.howardhanna.com

n

n

The Courtyards of Cobblestone

www.ryanhomes.com

AGENCY

Copper Leaf

Baldwin Whitehall AGENCY Ryan Homes 412-884-3024

Field Brook Farms

Fayette Farms n

Estates at the Villa

City of Pittsburgh Townhomes PRICED FROM $170,000

Voice: 412-787-8807 email: BestService@VisitParagonHomes.com

Realty

www.EddyHomes.com

n

Cherrington Pointe

n

www.sahomebuilder.com

Copper Creek

South Fayette Custom Building Lots Coming Soon! Unique Home Designs Custom Builder Quality

E lane @ Carnegie

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Avonworth AGENCY Ryan Homes 412-367-1927 and 412367-7382

Deerfield Ridge

www.VisitParagonHomes.com

Fayette Farms Meadows and Towns

North Fayette Township Single-family homes and townhomes PRICED FROM $220,000 Single-family homes $140,000 Townhomes SCHOOL DISTRICT West Allegheny AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1728

n

n

Forest View Indiana Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $500,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Fox Chapel AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-772-8822 n n

www.loveheartland.com

ricciuticonstruction.com www.howardhanna.com

Fayette Farms Villas

Foxwood Knolls

Evergreen Place Ross Township Townhomes PRICED FROM $220,000

n

n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

North Hills Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-487-0500

AGENCY

www.epconcarriagehomes.com

www.pittsburghmoves.com

Fairwinds Richland Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $260,000

n

n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Pine-Richland Ryan Homes 724-444-3177

AGENCY

www.ryanhomes.com

Falconhurst Forest O’Hara Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $750,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Fox Chapel AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-963-6300

n

n

North Fayette Township n Single-family Villa Homes PRICED FROM $190,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT West Allegheny AGENCY Paragon Homes 412-787-8807 n

Moon Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $220,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Moon Area AGENCY Ryan Homes 724-249-6835 n n

www.ryanhomes.com

www.howardhanna.com

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

59


ALLEGHENY COUNTY Franklin Run

The Isles at The Highlands

n

n

n

n

Franklin Park Single-family homes PRICED FROM $330,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT

North Allegheny Heartland Homes 724-871-1716

AGENCY

Plum Borough Patio and townhomes PRICED FROM $184,900s SCHOOL DISTRICT Plum AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-327-5161

Langdon Farms Pine Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $600,000 n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Pine-Richland Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-366-1600 or 724-776-2900

AGENCY

www.howardhanna.com

www.loveheartland.com

Jefferson Estates Gardens at Fox Hall

Jefferson Borough Carriage homes PRICED FROM $199,000 AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-655-0400

www.pittsburghmoves.com

www.pittsburghmoves.com

Avonworth AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-0173

n

O’Hara Township n Custom single-family condos PRICED FROM $850,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Fox Chapel AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 412-782-3700

n

Georgetowne

n

n

Pine Township n Luxury townhomes PRICED FROM $529,000 n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Pine-Richland Prudential Preferred Realty 412-367-8000

AGENCY

Kings Court Richland Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $200,000

Legacy Village Sewickley n Carriage homes PRICED FROM $210,000 n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

The Links at Deer Run

The Manor at Hartwood

West Deer n Golf course community, carriage homes PRICED FROM $239,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Deer Lakes AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686

n

n

n

Indiana Township Single-family homes

PRICED FROM $900,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Fox

Chapel Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-963-6300

AGENCY

www.howardhanna.com

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Long Ridge Kennedy Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM 1710,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Montour AGENCY Ryan Homes 412-653-0680 n

McCaslin Ridge Hampton Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $500,000 n n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Hampton Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-366-1600

AGENCY

www.ryanhomes.com

www.pittsburghmoves.com

www.loveheartland.com

McCormick Farms

Moon/Crescent Township Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM High $400’s SCHOOL DISTRICT Moon Area AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 412-262-4630 n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Pine-Richland AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-487-0500

n

www.kingscourtplan.info

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

_Hampton Woodlands

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Hampton Single-family homes PRICED FROM $450,000 n n

Neville Manor

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Hampton AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-487-0500 or 412-860-6625

n n

Collier Township Carriage homes

PRICED FROM $200,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT

Chartiers Valley Heartland Homes 724-871-1710

AGENCY

www.pittsburghmoves.com

www.loveheartland.com

Heritage Estates Ohio Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $240,000 n

Newbury

South Fayette Carriage homes PRICED FROM $360,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT South Fayette AGENCY S&A Realty 412-276-0422 n n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Avonworth Heartland Homes 412-364-1020

AGENCY

www.loveheartland.com

www.sahomebuilder.com

Hidden Falls

Newbury

Indiana Township/Fox Chapel Borough n Single-level townhouses PRICED FROM $540,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Fox Chapel AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-963-6300

South Fayette Single-family homes and towhomes PRICED FROM $200,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT South Fayette AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-0175

n

n n

www.loveheartland.com

www.howardhanna.com

North Park Manor

Pine Township Single-family Homes PRICED FROM $600,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Pine Richland AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-366-1600 n

The Highlands Plum Borough Single-family homes PRICED FROM $220,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Plum Borough AGENCY Ryan Homes 412-793-4797

n

n n

www.ryanhomes.com

HyTyre Farms West Deer Township n Carriage Homes PRICED FROM $224,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Deer Lakes School District AGENCY Richland Holdings, LLC 724-443-4800 n

Lake MacLeod Pine Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $750,000 n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Pine-Richland Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-487-0500 or 724-625-1277

AGENCY

www.lakemacleod.com

60 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

Lenox Place Finley Township n Carriage homes and townhomes PRICED FROM $189,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT West Allegheny AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 412-262-4630 n

www.lenoxplacecondos.com

Madison Woods Moon/Crescent Township Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM $350,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Moon Area AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 412-262-4630 n

www.pittsburghmoves.com

n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Northtowne Estates

Marshall Township Townhomes PRICED FROM $170,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT North Allegheny AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1720 n n

www.loveheartland.com

| Fall 2011


ALLEGHENY COUNTY Oakwood Heights

West Deer Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $275,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Deer Lakes AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 724-776-2900 n n

www.pittsburghmoves.com

Patriot Pointe

Saddlebrook Farms

Jefferson Hills Borough n Single-family homes & townhomes PRICED FROM $190,000 single-family; $220,000 townhomes with first floor owner’s suite

n

n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Jefferson Hills Ryan Homes 412-653-0680

Bethel Park Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM $321,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Bethel Park AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 412-833-7700 n

Walkers Ridge

New Cul-de-sac lots just approved. Adjacent to Nevillewood Great Collier location minutes from Robinson and the South Hills

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

AGENCY

Oakwood Heights West Deer Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $270,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Deer Lakes AGENCY S&A Homes 724-538-4900 n

www.sahomebuilder.com

The Overlook at Forest Manor

Harmar Township n Manor homes PRICED FROM $500,000

www.ryanhomes.com

Scarlett Ridge n n

Pine Hollow Pine Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $310,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Pine Richland AGENCY Ryan Homes 724-940-4051 n n

www.ryanhomes.com

Allegheny AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686 ww.EddyHomes.com

Silver Pines

n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Fox Chapel Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-963-6300

AGENCY

www.howardhanna.com

Private Acreage

n

South Fayette n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $300,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT South Fayette AGENCY Paragon Homes 412-787-8807

n

n

www.VisitParagonHomes.com

Paragon Place Robinson Township n Custom estate homes PRICED FROM $550,000 n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Montour Paragon Homes 412-787-8807

AGENCY

www.VisitParagonHomes.com

Park Place

Indiana Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $769,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Fox Chapel AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-963-6300 n

www.howardhanna.com

Parkes Farm Estates South Fayette Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $250,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT South Fayette AGENCY Ryan Homes 412-914-2057 n

www.ryanhomes.com

Parkview Estates

Richland Township n Single-family and carriage homes PRICED FROM $230,000 n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Pine-Richland AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-0171 www.loveheartland.com

Franklin Park Custom single-family

Pine Richland Townships Single-family homes

PRICED FROM $850,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Pine

Richland AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-934-3400

Marshall Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $270,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT North Allegheny AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1716 n

www.loveheartland.com

Rabold Fields Pine Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $400,000 n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Pine-Richland Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-366-1600

AGENCY

www.pittsburghmoves.com

Moon Township Village single-family homes and estate homes PRICED FROM $240,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Moon Area AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1724 n

www.loveheartland.com

Springer Manor Moon/Crescent Township n Custom villas PRICED FROM $325,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Moon Area AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 412-262-4630

n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Staunton Heights The Reserve at Fox Chase Fox Chapel Area n Patio and carriage homes PRICED FROM $299,900 n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Allegheny Valley Dennis Associates 412-828-7606

AGENCY

Riverwatch at O'Hara Woods Fox Chapel n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $400,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Fox Chapel Area AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-963-7655 n

www.pittsburghmoves.com

www.VisitWalkersRidge.com

The Village at Sweetwater

Stonebridge Hampton Township n Single-family homes, carriage homes PRICED FROM: $500,000 single-family homes; $289,000 Custom carriage homes SCHOOL DISTRICT: Hampton AGENCY: Century 21 Town & Country Real Estate Services 724-779-2101 n

Moon / Crescent Townships n Multi-family homes $299,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Moon Area AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services n

www.howardhanna.com

Sterling Ridge

South Fayette Single-family homes PRICED FROM $320,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT South Fayette AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-344-0500

n

AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1716

www.loveheartland.com

Villages at Neville Park

Collier Township Townhomes with first floor owner’s suite PRICED FROM $200,000 n n

Stonecrest

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Pine Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $330,000 n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Pine-Richland AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1700

Chartiers Valley Ryan Homes 412-276-0644

AGENCY

www.ryanhomes.com

Vineseian Place

Wilkins Township Single-family, single level living, quite cul-de-sac neighborhood PRICED FROM $375,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Woodland Hills AGENCY One80 Real Estate Services 412-318-4139 n n

www.loveheartland.com

Sturbridge Court Wexford/Franklin Park Single-family homes PRICED FROM $550,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT North Allegheny AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-772-8822 n

n

www.howardhanna.com

www.one80res.com

Walkers Ridge n n

The Summit

Marshall Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $800,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT North Allegheny AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-366-1600 n

www.pittsburghmoves.com

Chartiers Valley Paragon Homes 412-787-8807

AGENCY

www.VisitParagonHomes.com

Walnut Ridge

Emsworth Condominiums PRICED FROM $160,000 n n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Trotwood Acres

Robinson Township n Luxury townhomes PRICED FROM $180,000

Avonworth Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-363-4000

n

AGENCY

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Montour Heartland Homes 724-213-3800

www.walnutridgecondos.info

AGENCY

www.pittsburghmoves.com

Collier Township Single-family homes

PRICED FROM $270,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT

n

n

n

Sewickley Townhomes PRICED FROM $370,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Quaker Valley n

www.PghPropertyOnline.com

Sonoma Ridge n

Providence Pointe

Voice: 412-787-8807 email: BestService@VisitParagonHomes.com

PRICED FROM $500,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT North

Washington Park

www.loveheartland.com

Mt. Lebanon Condominiums PRICED FROM $359,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Mt. Lebanon AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-343-1620 n n

Village at Pine

Pine Township Townhomes NEW VILLAGE COMING FALL 2011 SCHOOL DISTRICT PineRichland AGENCY Ryan Homes 724-940-4051 n n

www.washingtonparkcondos.com

www.ryanhomes.com

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

61


ALLEGHENY COUNTY Whispering Creek Hampton Township n Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM: $450,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT: Hampton AGENCY: Century 21 Town & Country Real Estate Services 724-779-2101 n

www.PghPropertyOnline.com

Goldenrod Meadows North Sewickley Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $250,000

BUTLER COUNTY

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Riverside Northwood Realty 724-776-9705

AGENCY

www.northwood.com

Acton Franklin Township n Single-family lots PRICED FROM $39,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Slippery Rock Area AGENCY Northwood Realty 724-282-1313 n

www.northwood.com

Nottingham

n

n

Adams Crossing

n

n

www.loveheartland.com

Woods of Sewickley

Sewickley Hills n Custom single-familyhomes PRICED FROM $410,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Quaker Valley AGENCY S&A Realty 412-364-2626 n

www.sahomebuilder.com

Woods of Sewickley Hills Sewickley Hills Single-family estatehomes PRICED FROM $360,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Quaker Valley AGENCY Ryan Homes 724-325-2367 n n

www.ryanhomes.com

BEAVER COUNTY Chippewa Heights Chippewa Township n Single-family,  townhomes and ranch style patiohomes PRICED FROM $274,000 single-family, $190,000 townhomes and $215,000 patio-homes n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Ellwood City Townhomes and patiohomes PRICED FROM $160,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Riverside Beaver County AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 724-776-2900 www.pittsburghmoves.com

Seven Oaks

Brighton Township Golf-course community with single-family custom homes and triplex carriage homes PRICED FROM $269,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Beaver Area AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686 www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Shenango Woods

Garden View Estates

Center Township n Single-level  homes and villas PRICED FROM $210,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Center Area AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-378-4479 n

n

n

www.ryanhomes.com

Traditions of America at Liberty Hills New Sewickley Township/ Economy Borough n 55+ Lifestyle Living/ Single-family and garden homes/ Maintenance Free n

PRICED FROM

$200,000s Traditions of America 724-869-5595

www.pittsburghmoves.com

www.pittsburghmoves.com

Cranberry Township Traditional single family homes PRICED FROM $255,900 neotraditional and $350,000 estates SCHOOL DISTRICT Seneca Valley AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686 n

Belle Vue Park

Chippewa Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $180,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Blackhawk AGENCY Ryan Homes 724-847-1659

The Village at Timberwood Trace

Franklin Township n Carriage homes PRICED FROM $170,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Riverside AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 724-776-2900 or 724-752-0383

Belle Vue Park

n

AGENCY

n

www.adamscrossing.com

n

Blackhawk AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 724-774-2900

Clearwater Estates

Adams Township n Carriage homes PRICED FROM $239,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Mars Area AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-366-1600 or 724-444-4663

n

n

www.TraditionsofAmerica.com

Cranberry Township Townhomes PRICED FROM $180,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Seneca Valley AGENCY Ryan Homes 724-772-3645 n

www.ryanhomes.com

Blackthorn Penn Township n Single-family  home sites/ Single-family homes n

PRICED FORM

$66,000/$379,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT South Butler AGENCY Northwood Realty 724-282-1313 www.northwood.com

Brookstone Adams Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $270,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Mars Area AGENCY S&A Homes 724-538-4900 n

n n

Chippewa Township Carriage homes

PRICED FROM $167,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT

Blackhawk AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-728-4600 www.howardhanna.com

Woodbridge Villas Center Township Townhomes or condos PRICED FROM $175,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Center Area AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-775-5700 n n

www.howardhanna.com

www.howardhanna.com

62 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

| Fall 2011

Adams Township Luxury carriage homes PRICED FROM $575,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Mars Area AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686 n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Cherrywood Springs Center Township n Single-family  home sites PRICED FROM $39,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Butler Area AGENCY Northwood Realty 724-282-1313

John Quincy Adams Estates

Adams Township Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM $500,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Mars Area AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686 n

n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

n

Willowbrook

South Fayette Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $240,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT South Fayette AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-0177

Chatham Court n

n

n

www.northwood.com

Ehrman Farms Cranberry Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $550,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Seneca Valley AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-538-4858 n n

Foxmoor

Cranberry Township Condominiums and townhomes PRICED FROM $130,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Seneca Valley AGENCY Re Max 724-933-6300 X207 n n

The Gables at Brickyard Hill n n

Adams Township Custom Carriage Homes

PRICED FROM: $300,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT: Mars Area AGENCY: Century 21 Town

& Country Real Estate Services 724-779-2101

www.PghPropertyOnline.com

Heritage Creek Adams Township Custom single-family homes, townhomes with first floor master suite, two-story townhomes PRICED FROM: $300,000 single-family homes; $280,000 townhomes with first floor master suite; $230,000 twostory townhomes SCHOOL DISTRICT: Mars Area AGENCY: Century 21 Town & Country Real Estate Services 724-779-2101 n n

www.PghPropertyOnline.com

www.sahomebuilder.com

Indian Meadow Carriage Manor

Cranberry Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $600,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Seneca Valley AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 724-776-2900 n n

www.pittsburghmoves.com

Adams Township Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM: $600,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT: Mars Area Agency: Century 21 Town & Country Real Estate Services 724-779-2101

Kaufmann Run Adams Township Townhomes and singlefamily homes PRICED FROM $170,000 townhomes; $220,000 single-family homes SCHOOL DISTRICT Mars Area AGENCY Ryan Homes 724-776-5610 and 724-776-7222 n

n

www.ryanhomes.com

Leslie Farms Connoquenessing Township Single-family and carriage homes PRICED FROM $210,000 single family and $225,000 carriage SCHOOL DISTRICT Butler Area AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 724-776-2900 n

n

Madison Heights Cranberry Township Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM: $700,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT: Seneca Valley AGENCY: Century 21 Town & Country Real Estate Services 724-779-2101 n n

www.PghPropertyOnline.com

Marshall Heights Cranberry Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $250,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Seneca Valley AGENCY Ryan Homes 724-538-5239 n n

www.ryanhomes.com

Meadow Ridge Forward Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $240,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Seneca Valley AGENCY S&A Homes 724-538-4900 n n

www.sahomebuilder.com

n

n

www.PghPropertyOnline.com

Meadows Ridge Forward Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $230,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Seneca Valley AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1714 n n

www.loveheartland.com


Single family lots with striking golf course views. Green Tree offers the perfect blend of at home comforts and mountain resort living with amenities for the entire family.

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BUTLER COUNTY Meredith Glen Estates

The Oaks

Plantation at Saxonburg

Adams Township n Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM $750,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Mars Area AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686

n

n

n

n

n

Buffalo Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $299,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Freeport Area AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-366-1600 www.homesattheoaks.com

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Myoma Woods Adams Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $340,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Mars AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1700 n

www.loveheartland.com

Mystic Ridge Cranberry Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $350,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Seneca Valley n n

Heartland Homes 724-871-1716 AGENCY

www.loveheartland.com

Napa Ridge at Brandywine Connoquenessing Township n Townhome community PRICED FROM $239,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Butler Area AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686 or 724-283-0005 n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Orchard Park Cranberry Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $300,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Seneca Valley AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1712 n n

www.loveheartland.com

Park Place Cranberry Township n Traditional neighborhood development single-family homes, townhomes, condos, rentals, retail PRICED FROM $350,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Seneca Valley AGENCY Northwood Realty 724-776-1863 n

Plantation at Saxonburg Clinton Township Single-family lots and homes PRICED FROM $65,000 lots $399,000 homes SCHOOL DISTRICT South Butler AGENCY Northwood Realty 724-295-9090 n n

64 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

| Fall 2011

Clinton Township Single-family and carriage homes PRICED FROM Singlefamilies $250,000 Carriage homes priced from $190,000’s SCHOOL DISTRICT South Butler AGENCY S&A Realty 724-538-4900 www.sahomebuilder.com

The Preserve West Cranberry Township Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM: $550,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT: Seneca Valley AGENCY: Century 21 Town & Country Real Estate Services 724-779-2101 n n

www.PghPropertyOnline.com

Redmond Place Cranberry Township Custom Carriage Homes PRICED FROM: $370,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT: Seneca Valley AGENCY: Century 21 Town & Country Real Estate Services 724-779-2101

Seaton Crest

Shady Lane Farms

n

n

n

n

Adams Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM the $330’s SCHOOL DISTRICT Mars Area AGENCY S&A Realty 724-538-4900 www.sahomebuilder.com

n n

www.PghPropertyOnline.com

Shadow Creek

Cranberry Township n Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM: $500,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT: Seneca Valley AGENCY: Century 21 Town & Country Real Estate Services 724-779-2101

Center Township Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM $300,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Butler Area AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-283-0005 www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

n

www.PghPropertyOnline.com

Shannon Mills

Connoquenessing Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $280,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Butler Area AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-282-7903 n

n

www.howardhanna.com


BUTLER COUNTY Stratford Heights n

n

The Vineyards at Brandywine

n

n

n

www.howardhanna.com

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Village at Camp Trees

AGENCY

Center Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $290,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Butler Area AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-283-0005 www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Taylor Ridge Adams Township Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM: mid $400,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT: Mars Area AGENCY: S&A Realty 724-538-4900 n n

www.sahomebuilder.com

Taylor Ridge Adams Township n Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM:$450,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Mars Area AGENCY: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-687-0157 n

www.howardhanna.com

Timber Ridge

Lancaster Township Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM $450,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Seneca Valley AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-687-9097 n

n

www.howardhanna.com

Timberlee Butler Area Single-family-homes SCHOOL DISTRICT Butler Area AGENCY: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-687-0157

Adams Township in Butler County and Pine Township in Allegheny County n Custom  Single-family PRICED FROM $600,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Mars Area and Pine-Richland AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty

Connoquenessing Township n Custom  single-family homes PRICED FROM $229,000 Butler Area Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686

n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

The Village at Sarvers Mill BuffaloTownship n Custom  townhomes and cottage homes PRICED FROM $200,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Freeport Area AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-353-2223 n

www.howardhanna.com

The Village at Treesdale

Adams Township Custom carriage homes PRICED FROM Low $300’s SCHOOL DISTRICT Mars Area AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-687-0157 n n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

The Vineyards at Brandywine Connoquenessing Township Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM $240,000 n

WASHINGTON COUNTY Brookwood Manor

Walkers Ridge Worth Township Farmlettes PRICED FROM $74,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Slippery Rock AGENCY Northwood Realty 724-458-8800

n

n

n

www.northwood.com

Weatherburn Heights Middlesex Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $250,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Mars Area AGENCY Ryan Homes 724-776-7222 n

www.ryanhomes.com

n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Butler Area AGENCY S&A Homes 724-538-4900 www.sahomebuilder.com

Peters Township Luxury custom estate homes PRICED FROM $900,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Peters Township AGENCY Century 21 Frontier Realty 724-941-8680

n

www.EddyHomes.com

Brookview

 eters Township P Carriage homes PRICED FROM $349,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Peters Township AGENCY Keller Williams 412-831-3800 n n

The Brookview Villas

WASHINGTON COUNTY

n

Alto Piano Cecil Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $500,000 n

Township Paragon Homes 412-787-8807

AGENCY

n

Wakefield Estates Cranberry Township Custom Single-family homes PRICED FROM $500,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Seneca Valley AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686 n n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Custom villa homes

PRICED FROM $350,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Peters

www.visitparagonhomes.com

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Canon-McMillan AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-302-2304 www.howardhanna.com

Anthony Farms Peters Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $600,000 AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-276-5000 n n

Cameron Estates

 outh Strabane Township S Single-family and carriage homes PRICED FROM $200,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Trinity AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-0179 n n

www.loveheartland.com

www.howardhanna.com

www.howardhanna.com

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

65


WASHINGTON COUNTY

WESTMORELAND COUNTY

Chadwick Estates

Hill Station Manor

Overlook

Peters Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $350,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Peters Township AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1736

n

n

n

n

n

www.loveheartland.com

Concord Green

 orth Strabane Township N Single-family homes PRICED FROM $220,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT CanonMcMillan AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1730 n n

www.loveheartland.com

Cecil Township Townhomes or condos PRICED FROM $254,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT

Canon-McMillan Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-873-7355

AGENCY

Peters Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $270,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Peters Township AGENCY Ryan Homes 412-835-1869 and 724-941-5809

www.howardhanna.com

www.ryanhomes.com

Majestic Hills

The Overlook

North Strabane Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $220,000 n n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Canon-McMillan Ryan Homes 724-745-6410

AGENCY

Peters Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $399,900 n n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Peters Township Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-941-8800

AGENCY

www.ryanhomes.com

The Courtyards At Arden Mills

Chartiers Township n Single-family carriage and villa homes PRICED FROM $239,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Chartiers Houston AGENCY Epcon Homes and Communities 724-223-1844 n

www.epconcarriagehomes.com

Maple Ridge Cecil Township n Townhomes  PRICED FROM $160,000 n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Canon-McMillan AGENCY Ryan Homes 724-745-6064 www.ryanhomes.com

McMurray Highlands

Peters Township n Custom  single-family homes PRICED FROM $575,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Peters Township AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 412-833-7700

www.howardhanna.com

Paxton Grove Chartiers Township n Single-family-homes SCHOOL DISTRICT ChartiersHouston AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-222-6040

www.EddyHomes.com

Great Meadows

Peters Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $250,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Peters Township AGENCY Ryan Homes 412-835-1869 n n

www.ryanhomes.com

Hamlet of Springdale

Peters Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $679,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Peters Township AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-941-8800 n n

Heartwood Farms

 ecil Township C n  Single-family homes and carriage homes PRICED FROM $220,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT CanonMcMillan AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1706 n

www.loveheartland.com

Hiddenbrook P  eters Township V  illa homes n n

$270,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Peters Township AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1738 PRICED FROM

www.loveheartland.com

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Meadow Ridge

www.howardhanna.com

Peters Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $774,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Peters Township AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 412-833-7700 www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Mission Hills

Cecil Township n Carriage  and villa homes PRICED FROM $228,500 Canon-McMillan AGENCY Epcon Homes and Communities 724-223-1844 n

www.epconcarriagehomes.com

Oakbrooke Estates

Cecil Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $210,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT CanonMcMillan AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1706 n

www.loveheartland.com

Orchard Hill

Peters Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $280,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Peters Township AGENCY Ryan Homes 412-835-1869 n n

www.ryanhomes.com

Township n  Carriage homes and luxury townhomes PRICED FROM $170,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT CanonMcMillan AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1732 www.loveheartland.com

The Ridge at Spring Meadows Peters Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $250,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Peters Township AGENCY Ryan Homes 412-835-1869 n

n

www.ryanhomes.com

North Strabane Township n Carriage homes PRICED FROM $280,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT

Canon-McMillan AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-222-6040 www.howardhanna.com

WESTMORELAND COUNTY Acropolis Heights

Unity Township Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM $620,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Greater Latrobe AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Allegheny Woodlands Allegheny Township Custom single-family and cottage villas PRICED FROM $199,900 single-family and $164,900 cottage villas SCHOOL DISTRICT Kiski Area AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-568-9903 n

Sycamore Reserve n n

North Franklin Township Single-family homes

PRICED FROM $250,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT: Trinity AGENCY: Keith Homes

724-223-0285 www.keithhomes.net

Timber Run Cecil Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $190,000

n

www.howardhanna.com

n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Canon-McMillan AGENCY Ryan Homes 724-745-6410 www.ryanhomes.com

Walnut Ridge

www.ryanhomes.com

Foxfield Knoll Unity Township Custom single-family homes

n

PRICED FROM

$289,900–$580,000 Greater Latrobe AGENCY Scalise Real Estate 724-539-3525 SCHOOL DISTRICT

 ottingham Township N Single-family homes PRICED FROM $210,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Ringgold AGENCY Heartland Homes 724-871-1730 n

www.loveheartland.com

Waterdam Farms

North Strabane Township Carriage homes PRICED FROM $300,000 n

Cedar Hills

Rostraver Township Carriage homes PRICED FROM $179,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Belle Vernon Area AGENCY Northwood Realty 724-929-1370 n n

Canon-McMillan AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-344-0500

Murrysville Single-family homes PRICED FROM $600,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Franklin Regional AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-327-5161 n

n

www.howardhanna.com

Gleneagles at Cherry Creek Hempfield Township Golf course community patio homes PRICED FROM $211,500 n

n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Hempfield Area Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660

AGENCY

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Glenn Aire Unity Township Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM $390,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Greater Latrobe AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

www.northwood.com

Cherry Knoll Delmont Single-family homes PRICED FROM $225.000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Franklin Regional AGENCY ReMax Realty 412-856-2000 n n

ricciuticonstruction.com

n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Foxtail Court at Rolling Ridge

n

n

www.pittsburghmoves.com

| Fall 2011

North Huntingdon Township n Single-family  homes PRICED FROM $240,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Norwin AGENCY Ryan Homes 724-863-3506 n

n

Cherry Wood Estates Mt. Pleasant Township Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM $225,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Mount Pleasant AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 n

n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

66 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

Chestnut Hill

n

Weavertown Woodlands

n

n n

n

n

n

The Crossings n P  eters Township n  Luxury custom villa homes PRICED FROM $300,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Peters Township AGENCY Century 21 Frontier Realty 724-941-8680

Weavertown Village N  orth Strabane

Greenfield Estates Unity Township Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM $250,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Greater Latrobe AGENCY Scalise Real Estate 724-539-3525 n

n


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WESTMORELAND COUNTY Lincoln Hills

Moreland Manor

North Huntington Township n Single-family homes, townhomes and grand villas PRICED FROM mid$300,000 Singlefamily, $239,900 townhomes and $289,900 grand villas SCHOOL DISTRICT Norwin AGENCY RWS Custom Homes 724-861-0571

n

n

www.rwscustomhomes.com

n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Lindwood Crest

Hampton Heights (Formerly Carradam Golf Course) n North Huntingdon Township n One acre homesites PRICED FROM $400,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Norwin AGENCY RWS Custom Homes 724-861-0571 www.rwscustomhomes.com

Harrington Way at Wendover Hempfield Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $249,900 n

Hempfield Area AGENCY Northwood Realty 724-327-5600 www.northwood.com

n

Hempfield Township Patio homes PRICED FROM $170,000 n n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Hempfield Area Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-832-2300

AGENCY

Heritage Estates Murrysville Single-family homes PRICED FROM $250,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Franklin Regional AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 724-327-0123 n n

www.pittsburghmoves.com

Kingsbury North Huntington Township n Two-four acre estates PRICED FROM $450,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Norwin AGENCY RWS Custom Homes 724-861-0571 n

www.rwscustomhomes.com

Laurel View Place Derry Township n Single-family lots PRICED FROM $49,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Derry Area AGENCY Northwood Realty Services 724-537-0110 n

www.northwood.com

The Legends North Huntingdon n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $450,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Norwin AGENCY Scalise Real Estate Inc.

www.howardhanna.com

ricciuticonstruction.com www.howardhanna.com

Mallard Landing Murrysville n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $470,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Franklin Regional AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-327-5161 n

www.howardhanna.com

MarRose Estates Hempfield n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $190,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Hempfield Area AGENCY Ryan Homes 724-836-1804 www.ryanhomes.com n

Northpointe

Hempfield Township Custom single-family homes PRICED FROM $270,000 n

Murrysville n Luxury condominiums PRICED FROM $275,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Franklin Regional AGENCY Kacin Companies, Inc. 724-327-7700 n

Hempfield Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $170,000’s n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Hempfield Area S & A Realty 724-837-6124

Rolling Hill Farm Rostraver Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $170,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Belle Vernon Area AGENCY S & A Homes 724-872-8403 n

Rolling Ridge

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Oak Farm Estates Penn Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $250,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT PennTrafford AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Oakton Manor North Huntingdon Single-family homes PRICED FROM $259,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Norwin AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 724-327-0123 n n

www.pittsburghmoves.com

Palmer Place Unity Township Custom single-family PRICED FROM $650,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Greater Latrobe AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Park Lane Greensburg Patio homes and townhomes PRICED FROM $174,900 n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Greensburg-Salem Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-850-7249

AGENCY

www.howardhanna.com

www.sahomebuilder.com

The Reserve at Lago Greensburg Patio homes PRICED FROM $229,000 n n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Hempfield Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-850-7249

AGENCY

www.howardhanna.com

| Fall 2011

www.sahomebuilder.com

www.sahomebuilder.com

AGENCY

68 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

n

Hempfield Area AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660

n

Meadowlane Heights

Tinstman Estates

Penn Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $290,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT PennTrafford AGENCY S & A Homes 724-837-6124 n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

n

Marquis Place

Rivendell

n

n

n

724-864-5500

Allegheny Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $200,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Kiski Area AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-733-5390

Murrysville n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $360,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Franklin Regional AGENCY Ryan Homes 412-325-2367

Scottdale Single-family home lots PRICED FROM $35,900 n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Southmoreland Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660

AGENCY

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

The Trails Level Green Patio homes and single-family homes PRICED FROM $299,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT PennTrafford AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-327-5161 n n

www.howardhanna.com

n

www.ryanhomes.com

Salem Ridge Village

Rostraver Township n Single-family PRICED FROM $249,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Belle Vernon Area AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660

Victoria Highlands Unity Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $290,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Latrobe AGENCY Bob Shuster Realty 724-864-8884 n n

www.rwscustomhomes.com

n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Sinan Farms

Murrysville Single-family homes PRICED FROM $500,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Franklin Regional AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 724-327-0123 n n

www.pittsburghmoves.com

Stonegate

Rostraver Township Multi-family homes PRICED FROM $199,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Belle Vernon AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services n n

www.howardhanna.com

Village at Foxfield Unity Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $210,000’s n n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Greater Latrobe S & A Homes 724-837-6124

AGENCY

www.sahomebuilder.com

The Village at Ligonier Ligonier Borough Carriage homes PRICED FROM $199,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Ligonier Valley AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-836-3660 n n

www.howardhanna.com

The Village at Stonegate Penn Township Villas PRICED FROM $264,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT PennTrafford AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 or 724-327-0444 n n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com


WESTMORELAND COUNTY The Villas of Willow Estates North Huntington n Townhomes and grand villas PRICED FROM $239,900 and $289,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Norwin AGENCY RWS Custom Homes 724-861-0571 n

www.rwscustomhomes.com

The Villas at Grayhawk

Unity Township Villa style condominiums PRICED FROM $239,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Greater Latrobe AGENCY Cedar Ridge Realty 724-832-3501 n n

Westmoreland Community Action Reed Avenue

Jeannette Single-family homes PRICED FROM $63,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Jeannette City AGENCY Northwood Realty 724-838-9643 n n

www.northwood.com

Westmoreland Farms n n

Murrysville Single-family homes

PRICED FROM $210,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Franklin

Regional AGENCY Ryan Homes 724-327-9330 www.ryanhomes.com

www.thevillasatgrayhawk.com

Westmoreland Community Action

Jeannette n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $75,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Jeannette City AGENCY Northwood Realty 724-838-9643 n

www.northwood.com

Westmoreland Farms Murrysville n Single-family homes and villas PRICED FROM $229,900 single-family; $176,900 villas SCHOOL DISTRICT Franklin Regional AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-387-4300 n

Westmoreland Human Opportunities Monessan n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $70,000 n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Monessen Northwood Realty 724-838-9643

AGENCY

Wimmerton Place

Yok Wood Ridge

n

n

Unity Township n Patio homes PRICED FROM $195,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Greater Latrobe AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

www.northwood.com

Unity Township Single-family homes PRICED FROM $200,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Greater Latrobe AGENCY Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 n

www.prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Woodhaven Ridge Westwind Estates Hempfield Township n Single-family homes PRICED FROM $220,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT Hempfield Area AGENCY Ryan Homes 724-836-1804 www.ryanhomes.com n

Willow Glenn/Willow Heights

Hempfield Township Townhomes PRICED FROM $114,900 n n

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Hempfield Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-850-7249

AGENCY

www.howardhanna.com

n

Woods of Brandywine

n

n

North Huntingdon Single-family homes PRICED FROM $270,000 and homesites starting at $49,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT Norwin AGENCY Howard Hanna Real Estate 724-863-3300 www.howardhanna.com

Manor Borough Single-family homes PRICED FROM $320,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT PennTrafford AGENCY Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-327-0123 n

www.pittsburghmoves.com

www.howardhanna.com

Builders Association Of Metropolitan Pittsburgh Looking for a new home?

Call on the Region’s Home Building Experts

2011

September 24, 25, October 1 & 2, 2011

412-434-5690

www.pghhomebuilders.com www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

69


A

PUBLICATION OF

CARSON PUBLISHING INC. • 500 MCKNIGHT PARK DRIVE • PITTSBURGH, PA 15237 • 412-548-3823


OTHER COUNTIES

OTHER COUNTIES Clarion County

Valleyview Heights

Fairway Estates

Pulaski Township Single-family lots PRICED FROM: $35,000

Foxburg n Single-family lots PRICED FROM: $39,900 n

SCHOOL DISTRICT:

Allegheny Clarion AGENCY: Northwood Realty Services 724-282-1313

n n

SCHOOL DISTRICT:

Wilmington Area Northwood Realty Services 724-658-6645

AGENCY

www.northwood.com

www.northwood.com

Mercer County Greene County Colonial Place n n

Franklin Township Single-family homesites

PRICED FROM

$28,000 SCHOOL DISTRICT

Waynesburg Northwood Realty 724-627-4300

AGENCY

www.northwood.com

Camelot Estates n n

PRICED FROM

Lots starting at $29,900 AGENCY Northwood Realty 724-458-8800 www.northwood.com

Legends of Grove City n n

Volant Highlands Washington Township Single-family home sites PRICED FROM $27,900 n

$184,900 SCHOOL DISTRICT

Grove City Northwood Realty 724-458-8800

AGENCY

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Wilmington Area Northwood Realty 724-658-6645

www.northwood.com

www.northwood.com

Pierce Bluffs n n

Carriage Hills

Pine Township Villas, patio homes and Single-family homes

PRICED FROM

n

AGENCY

Hermitage Single-family homes

Hermitage Single-family homes

PRICED FROM

Pulaski Township n Single-family lots PRICED FROM $35,000

Lots starting at $40,000 AGENCY Northwood Realty 724-458-8800

SCHOOL DISTRICT

www.northwood.com

n

Wilmington Area AGENCY Northwood Realty Services 724-658-6645 www.northwood.com

72 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

| Fall 2011


Computer Generated Load Calculations and Operating Cost Comparisons

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