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A RAISON D’ETRE of

Jaeyoung Byun

JAE


JAEYOUNG

JAEYOUNG BYUN raison d’être, n. Etym.: “raison” reason + “de” de prep. + “être” to be

A reason or purpose for the existence of a person or thing.

EDUCATION

Sit inside any one of New York City’s subways in the morning and observe the people that sit around you. Do you ever think about the stories they live? Maybe the woman in front of you whose right hand is clinching onto the hand of a small girl while her left hand is holding a pink bookbag is a single mom who can not stop spending every minute thinking about how to better her daughter’s life. Maybe the man in the fitted Prada jacket leaning on the doors while reading the Wall Street Journal is an aspiring stockbroker who is trying to get enough money to buy a yacht to impress a girlfriend he has been seeing since last month. Maybe the man and woman next to you whose legs are intertwined as their eyes are fervently looking onto one other are newlyweds from Europe who are here on their honeymoon and wondering what dreams New York City has to offer. Maybe even the guy in ragged jeans asking for money is a single father whose kids are at day-care while he is scouring the city for every dime he can find so his kids can come home to a decent dinner. Everyone in the subway car has their own stories, their own goals. The subway car acts as a space where these persons and can coexist, an apparatus to help these persons get one step closer to achieving their goals. Architecture needs to have agency. The public transportation apparatus serves three purposes. It serves a practical purpose: an enclosed space that can transport a large group of persons from one place to another. It also serves an existential purpose: an agent for the realization and production of a person’s journey to achieve their dreams. It also serves a social purpose: a space where persons of many different classes and dreams can coexist and possibly even interact with one another. It is designed with the dream that social, financial and cultural barriers can be broken. Moreover it is designed by an architect who had these dreams and desires. The architecture, too, needs to believe in these desires, and possibly, even dream more. What greater joy is there then the joy a person experiences when they realize that their dream can actually become materialized? I believe in an architecture that recognizes itself as an art, as a material expression of the desires of the architect.... a vision manifested to be shared and inhabited by all.

149-37 Willets Point BLVD .. Whitestone, NY 11357

byun@cooper.edu .. 917.456.6542

THE IRWIN S. CHANIN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE OF THE COOPER UNION Bachelor of Architecture Candidate, Expected 2014  Five year accredited program in the only institution that provides full scholarship to all its students  Currently working on Thesis: "Defensible Architecture: Rethinking the Modern City"

AWARDS

THE COOPER UNION FULL TUITION SCHOLARSHIP  Recipient of scholarship valued at $175,000

EXHIBITIONS

NEW YORK, NY Sep 2009 – Current

Sep 2009 – Current

IRMA GIUSTINO WEISS CULTURAL ENRICHMENT FELLOWSHIP  Recipient of fellowship grant dedicated for cultural events to aid studio

Sep 2009 – May 2013

FOURTH ARTS BLOCK (FAB) SUSTAIN FELLOWSHIP  Recipient of fellowship grant dedicated for the research and development of analytical drawings for a collaboration project between Fourth Arts Block and Cooper Union's Institute of Sustainable Design to create New York City's first green community

Winter 2012

THE COOPER UNION'S END OF THE YEAR SHOW Volunteer and Participant  Yearly school exhibition to showcase students' work to the community  Selected studio works from the semester were presented

EXPERIENCE

ARCHITECTURAL INTERN T-L CONSULTING  Collaborated with architects, interior designer and engineer to offer contracting services and construction drawings for local retail and residential projects.  Executed CAD building detail drawings to build up firm's database, edited CAD drawings to comply with building regulations, conducted site surveys.  Participated in design of furniture and material selections, created 3D Rhino models for team reviews, designed 3ds Max renderings for client review

SKILLS

     

Excellent in AutoCAD, 3D Rhino, Google SketchUp, Technical Drawing (Hand Drafting). Excellent in Photoshop CS5, Illustrator CS5, InDesign CS5, Microsoft Office. Excellent in model making skills: Wood, Chipboard, Bristol, Styrene, Metal, Plaster. Working ability in Laser Cut and 3D Print. Basic skills in Revit, Grasshopper, Maya, 3ds Max. Native in English, Basic speaking and writing skills in Korean.

May 2010 - 2013

QUEENS, NY June 2011 - August 2011


SPRING 2010

THE CONE, CUBE, PYRAMID, CYLINDER AND THE INTERSECTION

ARCHITECTONICS

Lebbeus Woods Aida Miron Uri Wegman

FALL 2010

UN-HOUSE

Pablo Lorenzo Eiroa Lydia Kallipoliti James Lowder

SPRING 2011

GRAVITY (EAMES CHAIR)

ANALYSIS

Michael Young Lydia Kallipoliti James Lowder Sasaki Shiori

SPRING 2011

FLAT|PROXIMITY (MORIYAMA HOUSE)

Michael Young Lydia Kallipoliti James Lowder Sasaki Shiori

WINTER 2012

SPRING 2013

SUSTAIN FELLOWSHIP

Cooper Union’s Institute for Sustainable Design Fourth Arts Block Karl Schulz

URBAN STUDY

LINKING ISLANDS: A CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL ON THE BOWERY

Diane Lewis Daniel Meridor Peter Schubert Daniel Sherer Mersiha Veledar

SPRING 2012

DUNESCHOOL

David Turnbull Hayley Eber Urtzi Grau

FALL 2012

GATE-TOWERS

DESIGN

THE THE

Sussanah Drake Sean Sculley Lydia Xynogala

THE

TITLE•Advisors•Partner

AND

THE

CONE, CUBE, PYRAMID, CYLINDER, THE INTERSECTION


“Architecture is the masterly,correct and magnificent play of masses brought together in light.” – Le Corbusier


What happens between two planes... one that is being hung and another that is being held up? ...a journey from cartesian to cartopological space to advance a spatial idea.

from the to the

CARTESIAN GRID CARTOPOLOGICAL

UN-HOUSE


How do we represent the human experience? (i) When one sits on a chair, the body falls unknowningly, searching for the very object that can hold the body’s weight. A trust has to be established between the person and the chair: that the chair can carry the body’s load and not let it fall onto the ground. Charles and Ray Eames designed the plywood chair with these factors in their mind. The chair is quite shortthe body has to come a long way down to be able to sit on it. Likewise, the curves of the seat embrace the glutes and thighs as the body slides down into the curves of the chair’s back, which prevents the body from falling into the ground. This is the perfect, minimal combination of geometry and structure. How then can we map the flow of forces? How can we understand what goes on in the split-second that it takes to sit down on the chair? Through traditional uses of elevations and sections, material experimentations of watercolor, splines, acetone and pink foam - the experience of sitting is understood under different lens.

GRAVITY An analysis of Eames Plywood Chair


How do we represent the human experience? (ii) Sited within one of Tokyo’s blocks lies ten rectilinear volumes that make up the Moriyama House. The Moriyama House effectively functions as a city within a city: having its own set of avenues, public and private spaces, and six unique residents. Because of the close proximity yet still spaced relationships the volumes have to each other, various spatial phenomenons occur. In addition to the avenues noticed in the plan are visual boulevards--where the windows of the volumes align and visually connect the volumes. Moreover, if these volumes were to be read as one house, an unexpected “housescape” forms. So, the Moriyama House is all about the visual experience, how our eyes define what is private, public, and circulation.

FLAT|PROXIMITY An analysis of Moriyama House, SANAA


FOURTH ARTS BLOCK SUSTAIN FELLOWSHIP


On the Bowery, at the intersection of 3rd, once was Leopold Eidlitz’s Dry Dock Savings Bank, an island building that performed as a link between the block and the Bowery. Grounded within the block sits a cemetery bounded by walls that houses the bodies of people past. I want to propose a Children’s Hospital, a new civic space to acknowledge the children whose body lie underneath the void, but also to move on from its past towards a new future: a rebirth. “In art there are only fast or slow developments. Essentially it is a matter of evolution, not revolution” - Bela Bartok

LINKING ISLANDS

A CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL ON THE BOWERY


DUNESCHOOL

a public school in Harlem

Sand always seem to be fleeting, getting distracted by each wind current it encounters. Eventually, it will land and become part of the majestic sand dune, the ever-growing visible archive of land. The child's imagination is like this too, always following new ideas which ultimately construct a child's knowledge. Sited in Harlem, New York City; the Duneschool understands the neighborhood children's desire to seek an escape from the povertystricken households they come from. Also understanding that a child needs to grow in nature, the Duneschool is such a place where a child can grow. Architecturally, the Duneschool is, in section, two lines (one that is the ground, another that is the sub-ground) that undulate up and down as pockets of space is carved in between. The child can play in the underground sub-natural landscape, learn in the pockets, and then enter the landscape of the city. The child is free to grow.


school

ground | explore

mid-ground | learn

sub-ground | play

mid-ground plan

roof plan

exploded sectional axon


The Brooklyn Navy Yard having shutdown in 1966 as a naval base and reopened in 1969 as a site for small local businesses, it provides itself as a site filled with history and culture. After visiting the site, I noticed how the bounding fence concealed the Yard and hid the great architectures that live behind the fence. I wanted to redefine the fence, with the fundamental question of how do we expect the spatial organization of the Yard prior to entering it? After drawing several figure-ground variations of the plan, I found forms within that provoked interesting spatial questions. Using these found forms of the plan, I wondered if we can experience these plans in the section. These then become the gate-towers: a new boundary condition, where one can chose to go vertically instead of horizontally...

GATE-TOWERS of

the BROOKLYN

NAVY YARD


Ariadne:How did architects get involved? Cobb:Someone had to design the dreams. - from Christopher Nolan’s Inception

Thank you


Jaeyoung's Raison D' etre