Issuu on Google+

City College of San Francisco Architecture 101 Final Portfolio

A journey of evolution in design presented by Jad Smith


Table of Contents Site Analysis 3 Audience Analysis 4 Pathway Analysis 5 Conceptual Design 6 1st Model Design 7 - 8 2nd Model Design 9 - 10 3rd Model Design 11 - 12 4th Model Design 13 - 14 The Consturction Process Forming a Plan 15 Setting Up the Frame 16 Anchoring the Arch 17 Creating Triangles 18 The Details 19 The Path of Life 20 - 21 An Architectural Folly 22 - 23 Course Reflection 24


Site Analysis The site that we choose is located at the very top of the country. We choose this site as it was strategic to capture and lure an audience from the main road of Could Circle. The first thing I did when we decided on this site location was to take an aerial observation of the site and analyze the relation of the site to it’s environment and the pathways that connected to the site.

With this topical and a 45 degree angle view of the site I had a better perspective of the two trees and the light poles that occupied our Country location. I took these satallite images and digitally traced them in Photoshop and printed out the site. I made a trace and formed terrain templates to scale for my models and added layers to capture the different elevations of the terrain. All of this effort was to create models that could communicate correctly with our location.


Audience Analysis

After understanding the site location and it’s environment I went on an exploration to understand what our audience experience’s on their daily life as they traverse the campus. What do they see as they walk across from Batmale Hall to the Art Extention buildings? What views do they see when they look towards our site? How can we capture their attention? These were the questions that I proposed to our group in an attempt to help drive a design concept.


Pathway Analysis For the pathway of the installation we wanted to create a sense of mystery and journey. We first looked at a linear path and ultimately decided that it did not provoke enough exploration for our audience. After plenty of discussion on the approach we wanted to have our audience walk through our site at a slowed pace and we finalized that our installation pathway would incorporate a bend to evoke a sense of mystery. In the sketch I made on the left I plotted out the pathway our audience would make from entry to exit. With the pathway agreed Sean and I started taking measurements of the terrain.


Conceptual Design In this first conceptual design I tried to create a pathway with a bend that lead to a observation point. On one side there is a solid wall of constructed panels to hide a portion of the surrounding environment. On the other side I added spacing to the wall panel to invoke a sense of mystery to show a hint of the approaching pathway. The criticism for this design was very helpful in driving my future model iterations. The observation platform that served to frame a part of the environment was too wide and would be too confusing to the audience. What was it that I wanted our audience to see? I was told to be more specific in the language of my design to make it easier for the audience to understand what we were trying to communicate with out design.


1st Model Design

Of the new architectural concepts that were introduced to us I was drawn to the concept of tension. The use of tension as it skins an object showing it’s frame skeleton was intriguing. In this model I tried to replicate this concept. This model has a slight bend to compliment the outer perimeter curvature and the acute bend responds to the tree on our site location. The blue fabric was cut from one material which proved very difficult to apply to the metal framing. Build Issue: - In this bottom right photo I had difficulty getting the fabric to adhere to the metal frame to show it’s true form.


1st Model Design

Build Issues: - Since the fabric was cut from one piece I had difficulty laying it to show the true form of the frame. - The was excess material that was difficult to cut away and form the exit path. - Getting the frame arcs to be even in scale was difficult without a form template. What I learned: - When trying to use tension in my designs the placement of the frame is absolutely important when it comes to forming corners. Having multiple frames at this junction will help define a corner’s presence.


2nd Model Design

Concept: The main driving force behind this design was materiality. I wanted to create a site build that was considerate to the impact of our environment. I wanted to see if it was possible to create a frame mostly from reused materials. The main material for this design is wood pallets. Having a friend who worked at a furniture store made it easy to obtain an unlimited quantity of pallets.


2nd Model Design Features: - The entrance of this site responds to the street that leads to Cloud Circle. This entrance was designed this way to draw an audience from that main road. - This design was focused on creating a tranquil space with a framed view for the treeline on the opposing hill. - The skin of this design was a material that I saw at an art store and looked fun to use. A real like application for this was a 6 mil plastic sheeting that was frosted to allow light in, but unable to see through. I wanted to used paint cans as a template for the circles and cut them out with a knife. These circles would have allowed natural light to flood the installation. Build Issues: - The skin of the fabric was not consistently applied throughout the design. The skin sits behind the some of the wood planks while the rest sits on the outside of the frame. Initially I thought this would add intrigue to the design, but the design language did not look consistent.


3rd Model Design

Design Features: - The uneven roof responds directly to the gradient of the terrain. - The sectioning arcs were designed with rhythm in mind. They start slow and speed up as you traverse father into the design. - The skin (sports netting) was applied to obscure the environment and have our audience focus on the journey.


3rd Model Design

Build Issues: - The arcs are designed to be 2x2’s in real life installation. With the amount of arcs built to portray rhythm and repetition it would have severely increased our budget. - Finding a way to get the arcs properly align as they would be installed over uneven terrain would have proven to be very difficult. - The wall with the framed view was different from the rest of the planks in the design. It did not feel consistent and should have also been built at an angle for a consistent design language.


4th Model Design

Design Concept: This design was an accumulation of elements that our group agreed on as a whole. We liked the sectioning aspect of my earlier design and we wanted to incorporate a tensile based skin as it would stand up to the strong winds that were prevalent on our country location. In my model iteration I constructed the tensile skin in this fashion to represent the movement of the wind. The rectangular arches represented the different stages in one’s life as the whole installation represented our life journey.


4th Model Design Build Issues: - Finding a way to stabilize the whole structure would be problematic without each arch braced to each other. - Had we prefabricated this design we would have had problems as the uneven terrain was not account for in the square arches. - Each arch will be constructed by 2x2’s which would have driven the cost of the build.


The Consturction Process

Forming a Plan The initial budget we had set for our group was an individual contribution of $50 per person. This gave us a total spend of $250 dollars. With our budget mostly concentrated on the frame of our installation and the skin we figured we would be on target and expect a few dollars in return to our pockets. As we were adding the final touches to the sight we noticed that we needed to purchase more rope so that we could have an even distribution of rope throughout the installation. This increased our budget an additional $12 per person bringing a grand total of $310 spent on materials for the project. Before we started construction we analyzed our skill-sets and construction experience. After these were identified specific construction responsibilities were tasked out so that each person/team could focus on one aspect of the build. Sean and I were tasked with creating the triangles fo our site as there were 250 of them that needed to be cut. Taylor was tasked with setting up the frame and it’s stabilization. Berina and Pilar were tasked with the design layout of the triangular pathway.

Materials:

Tools used:

-

-

2x4s 3 Inch drywall screws 1 x 5/8 Inch drywall screws Eyebolts 1/4 Inch Manila Rope 3/8 Inch Manila Rope

Framing squares Circular saws Sawzall Framing hammers Sledge hammers Spray Chalk Impact Driver

-

Chalk line Levels Combination square Extension cords Gloves Sawhorses Ladder


The Consturction Process

Setting Up the Frame

- The first thing we did to the site was clear out all the mulch so that we could see the terrain. - We used temporary spray chalk to make out the pathway and points where the stakes would be driven.

- These stakes wre used to stabalize each arch leg.

- We used 2x4s that were 12 feet long and split them in half to create 2x2s. This gave us the maximum yield we would need for wood framing at a better cost then pre-cut 2x2s.


The Consturction Process

Anchoring the Arch

One of the rules of our design was to not interfere with nature. We could not physically screw of mount anything that would break the bark of the tree. We wanted our arch to radiate from the tree so we had to devise a way mount them without harming the tree. Our initial design was to build a square 2x2 brace and use tension to secure it in place. This method did not work so I advised that we use a coarse rope that would not slip off the tree and something that would blend into the tree. The answer was Manila Rope.


The Consturction Process

Creating Triangles

- Berina & Pilar were in charge of the layout of the Triangles as Taylor provided the physical installation.

- Sean & I were tasked with creating more than 250 Triangles of different sizes. We had two circular saws going at the same time as this was the bulk of our construction time.


The Consturction Process

The Details

- We made sure that each corner was cut the same way so that we could keep consistency & maintain structural integrity.

- The tensile system consisted of 1/4 inch and 3/8 inch Manila Rope. This rope represented the experiences we have in life. these are the things that mold us into the individuals we are today. They make us unique and order in which they are applied has no specific formula. these ropes overlap and intersect each other as our experiences build up upon each other creating a network of our individuality.


The Consturction Process

The Path of Life

The Triangles in this installation are made from the backs and seats of old school chairs. This was the only material that was re-purposed for another use. These triangles represent the educational path in life that we choose while we are here at City College. This path is not always straight forward and we tried to capture that by having the path wrap around the inner skin of the sectioning arches. As the progress in this path that we pave in life it kicks out to show us the outside world that awaits us, to offer a sense of value as we work towards our education. As the path wraps back around the tree it pulls our focus back on our course and trickles off as we end the installation.


The Consturction Process

The Path of Life


An Architectural Folly

Installation Complete


An Architectural Folly

Installation Complete

The Jury’s Critique: One of the main criticisms we received was that our installation needed to respond to the site more directly. One of the things that Chandler offered was that the rope system could have resembled the roots of the trees. He also mentioned that the Triangle system and the rope system don’t respond to each other and they just cross paths. When these systems meet there should be a design response. Amily suggested that the pathway of the triangles could have been spaced out even further and not stick with a linear design as it wrapped the installation.


Course Reflection To be completely honest with myself, this is the first time that I am truly sad that I have completed a course. With this sadness births a new eagerness to advance my learning of architecture and refine my design language. As I look back at the beginning of this course and the work that I have produced I was surprised at the level of design I had created. Am I pursuing the right path? Has this always been my calling? I’ve always been surrounded by construction. My Father had always been remodeling the house we lived in and me being the oldest I was defaulted as the one who always had to help him hold a tool or help with a measurement. My very first memory of construction was holding a saw at the age of 11 or 12 and tearing down a wall. At that young of an age I had mixed emotions about helping him. I’ve always been self sacrificing and always complied to my Father’s wishes even if it felt like a burden at times. This made my brothers extremely happy as it freed up my turn on the video game system that we shared. My Father slowly groomed the knowledge of basic construction into my skill set. As I got older I inherited the responsibility of remodeling the house and I’m very thankful for this knowledge. This knowledge has helped me immensely in this studio class. When I first sat down into this class I was extremely excited as I heard what the course would cover and I was enthralled by Jerry Lum’s approach to this class. When the first assignment was handed to us where we had to create an object that represented us. I was immediately drawn the meaning behind the work we designed. When thinking about architecture it’s not just plopping a building on a site and calling it a day. The way Jerry tried to make us think abstractly about our designs help drove my design process. When we form a corner or design a curvature I ask myself what the story is behind this actions. What emotions am I trying to convey? How does this angle respond to the design? This was the foundation Jerry has instilled in us all semester. To get us to think about architecture in the artistic sense and use this new understanding as a driving force for design. With the knowledge I have of construction coupled with the design language I am learning I found myself creating a story out of each design I made. My absolute favorite parts of the class were the critiques. These were opportunities for me to refine and open myself up to possibilities that I did not see initially. They gave me tools to think differently about my approach to a concept and help refine my design language. Before this class I was armed with the physical knowledge of construction. Now that I have completed this course, I have tapped into the physiological and emotional impact of design and it feels powerful. To create an object that will make an individual trudging through the monotony of their daily life to stop and become inspired by my work is a goal I will achieve. Thank you for planting to seed of Architecture in me & I look forward to my next journey. - Jad


Arch 101 Final Portfolio