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BEFORE REDESIGN


BEFORE REDESIGN


Keep off the grass

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10.02.09 • COLLEGE HEIGHTS HERALD • Vol. 85, No. 9 • WKU FOR OBAMANOMICS COVERAGE, CHECK WKUHERALD.COM

FOOTBALL: DOYLE A TOP TARGET

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SPORTS

WKU outgrows state schools

SEE GROWS, PAGE 3

 











 



 





  

The legion of undergraduate Toppers is growing faster than any other body of students in the state. Western’s estimated undergraduate enrollment rate of growth has surpassed all other Kentucky public schools in the past decade. The growth of 36.6 percent since 1999 was the largest by a margin of 13.1 percent, according to estimated enrollment data from the Council on Postsecondary Education. “It is definitely a hefty

10-YEAR GROWTH IN UNDERGRADUATE ENROLLMENT



news@chherald.com

increase,� said Sue Patrick, communications director for CPE. Western’s undergraduate enrollment rate increase is followed by Northern Kentucky University with growth of 23.5 percent and Kentucky State University with growth of 15.8 percent, according to CPE’s data. “Western seems to be keeping up with their thriving campus,� Patrick said. “They are a stellar example of how to grow and also serve the students, region and state.�

% GROWTH

By COLLEEN STEWART

 

Source: Council on Postsecondary Education Comprehensive Data Base

MORGAN WALKER/HERALD

Madisonville freshman Chelsea Dickerson practices for the Western performance of “13 Dirt Floor Cathedral Dances� hours before the show on Wednesday. Volunteers were trained by the Lubberland National Dance Company the day of the show. “Everyone involved in theater got an e-mail about it,� she said. “We’ve been here practicing since 2.�

Daily Bread

Officials ban parking on lawns on game day By MICHELLE DAY news@chherald.com

One Western tailgating tradition will be missing before the Oct. 10 football game against Florida International: the rows of vehicles parked on grassy areas. Officials announced Thursday that tailgaters can’t park on campus lawns anymore and cited protecting lawns and trees as the reason for the decision. Tailgating on the lawns is still allowed in pop-up tents, said Howard Bailey, vice president for Student Affairs. Tailgaters in parking lots can use up to three parking spaces but can’t block driving lanes. “Tailgating on major campuses is primarily done on hard-surface parking lots,� Bailey Check said. “Parking lots are made for park- online for ing cars.� a map of Western spends about $20,000 each tailgating year repairing grass, changes trees and sidewalks after tailgating damage, Campus Services Manager Greg Fear said. But tailgating at the WesternCentral Arkansas game alone caused $10,000 to $12,000 in damage to grass and soil, Fear said. “Usually we can go the whole season with all the games and just have to replace the sod in the winter or spring,� he said. “It’s gotten that bad maybe once.� Heavy rainfall and increased attendance caused the extra damage, he said. More people have started attending games and tailgating partially because of the team’s move to the Football Bowl Subdivision, said Todd Stewart, associate athletic director for communications. More people equals more damage to traditional tailgating areas. Western has plenty of parking, so people shouldn’t be discouraged from tailgating, he said. “People will be able to enjoy everything they were able to enjoy before,� Stewart said. SEE GRASS, PAGE 6

Traveling theater group makes stop at Western By KATHERINE WADE diversions@chherald.com

Evolving. Challenging. Protesting. That’s how Maura Gahan described the Bread and Puppet Theatre, whose Lubberland National Dance Company presented its new show in Gordon Wilson Hall Wednesday. The group, based in Glover, Vt., contacted Western about getting stu-

dent volunteers to learn the dances and perform them — all in one day. “You don’t have to be trained or come from a specific background,� said Gahan, a touring member of the dance company. “You just come together and use your bodies as voices, and that’s pretty amazing.� Bread and Puppet Theatre was founded during the Vietnam War, when the group organized anti-war protests

in New York. They serve bread to the audience after each performance and believe art should be as central to people’s lives as bread, Gahan said. “They asked for at least 10 volunteers, and got well over that,� said Emily Wilcox, a senior art major from Louisville who organized the event. “We’re really happy about how many people participated.� SEE BREAD, PAGE 6

Former student ďŹ nds ďŹ t in Bowling Green By WHITNEY KOONTZ news@chherald.com

Students who want their clothing altered only have to walk down the Hill into downtown Bowling Green to find what they need. Erin Huntsberry opened Just My Fit, an alterations and design shop at 916 ½ State St., in April. “I have a love-hate relationship with my job,â€? she said, while trimming fabric on her measuring table. “There are sometimes when I feel a little overloaded, but there’s no better feeling in the world when I finish a complicated job.â€? Huntsberry, who does all of the alterations on her own, is from Gettysburg, Penn., but transferred to

Western to major in design, merchandising and textiles. She left Western in 2007. She said she decided to open Just My Fit because she longed to do something she felt passionate about, so she left her job as a waitress at a local restaurant and began to plan for her own alterations business. Just My Fit caters to students’ needs, she said. The most popular services for students are jean hemming and changing the cut of a pair of jeans. Hemming a pair of jeans costs $12 and taking in a pair costs from $15 to $20, depending on the amount of tailoring needed, Huntsberry said. Just My Fit also SEE TOWN, PAGE 6

CONTACT: NEWS 270.745.6011

our TOWN Just My Fit alterations and design shop 916 ½ State Street justmyďŹ t.squarespace.com

Our Town is a series that highlights Bowling Green businesses that appeal to students..

MARY POWERS/HERALD

Western graduate and business owner Erin Huntsberry of Bowling Green measures a garment at Just My Fit, an alteration shop she operates from her apartment downtown. Huntsberry has been sewing since she was 8 years old.

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10.23.09 • COLLEGE HEIGHTS HERALD • Vol. 85, No. 13 • WESTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY BIGGER. BADDER. REDEFINED. JENNIFER DOOPER'S COLUMN

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VOLLEYBALL | SPORTS

Campus adapts to flu season

U of L or UK? Coke or Pepsi? The rivalries continue...

By TARA BILBY news@chherald.com

This year’s flu season prompted Health Services to make some changes. With an increase in illnesses and a heavier flu season caused by the spread of swine flu, Health Services is taking on additional staff and operating hours this semester to accommodate patients, said Terri Cunningham, marketing coordinator for Health Services. There’s normally an increase in illness this time of year compared to others because it’s flu season, Cunningham said.

or

SEE FLU, PAGE 3

Apple posts record quarterly profit, unveils and updates products

Microsoft launches Windows 7 with upgraded user interface

BG postal services may move By BILLY HICKS

By EMILY ULBER

By NOAH FREDERICK

news@chherald.com

diversions@chherald.com

news@chherald.com

Louisville junior Kat Michael is a PC. She always has been and always will be. “I grew up using PCs, and I find them a lot easier to work with,” Michael said. “They are just something that I know.” Her operating system of choice is Microsoft Windows Vista. “Everybody knocks Vista, but I’ve figured it out, and I like it,” Michael said. A light-hearted Mac versus PC war has infiltrated advertising media. Apple produced several Microsoft commercials portraying Macs as ■ Launched Wina young, modern professional and dows 7 Oct. 20. PCs as an older, geeky business■ Several upgrades man. were made to the Microsoft responded with docuuser interface, such mentary-style commercials featuras new themes, improved gadget ing people shopping for a computmanagement and er. Many refer to Macs as sleek but log-on screen too expensive as they walk away customization. with a new PC. ■ Improvements As an English major, Michael were also made uses her laptop constantly. Typto the start menu ing papers on Vista’s word procesand taskbar, such sor has become second nature to as tweaked search her and she says she can’t get her boxes and previews. “head around the Mac stuff.”

Bowling Green and Western’s mail processing could move out of the city, which local officials say might create delays in mail delivery. The United States Postal Service is conducting a study to determine whether or not to move mail processing operations from Scottsville Road in Bowling Green to a Nashville processing plant. Denny Palmer, a Bowling Green postal worker and American Postal Workers Union member, asked for city commissioners’ support in keeping the facility operating during Tuesday’s city commission meeting.

Dillon Orison made the switch from a Windows PC to a Macintosh laptop this summer. And the Killeen, Texas sophomore claims he’s never going back. Orison, the proud owner of a MacBook Pro, is a graphic design major. He said the switch seemed somewhat backward at first, but within a week, he was hooked. Macs are extremely user-friendly, Orison said. “They want to do everything for you,” he said. “That’s just how Apple develops their stuff.” Apple Orison isn’t alone in his satisfac■ Announced tion with Apple products. releases or updates Even in an economic recession, on three of its the company reported its most profproducts, including itable quarter ever this week, with the Magic Mouse a net quarterly profit of $1.67 biland the updated MacBook laptop. lion, according to an Apple news ■ The Magic release. Mouse, the latest In this past quarter, which ended of Apple’s touchSept. 26, Apple sold about 3 million enabled products, Mac computers, 10.2 million iPods is a wireless mouse and 7.4 million iPhones, according with laser tracking to the release. and an internal chip Goshen junior Justin Wuetcher that “won’t confuse said he wasn’t surprised Apple’s a scroll with a profits were so high. swipe.” Source: Apple Web site

SEE APPLE, PAGE 5

SEE MICROSOFT, PAGE 5

Source: Windows Web site

SEE POSTAL, PAGE 5

Three SGA senators resign By SHAKIA HARRIS news@chherald.com

ARE YOU A MAC OR A PC?

KEVIN SMILEY SGA president

PC “Control F is way better than flower F — let’s just face it.”

CONTACT: NEWS 270.745.6011

BARBARA BURCH provost

MAC “It does what I want it to do, and I’ve just stayed with Mac — it just works for me.”

BOB OWEN vice president for info. tech.

PC “I’m not antiMac — I use PCs because that’s just what I’m most familiar with.”

The Student Government Association is working to fill vacant senate seats after three senators left their posts. At Tuesday’s SGA meeting, Louisville senior Michel Stephens, Lexington sophomore Daniel Shaw and Bowling Green sophomore Emmett Stephens resigned from their student senator positions. Stephens said SGA President Kevin Smiley’s decision to choose Lexington senior Greg Capillo as SGA’s representative on the Student Publications Committee played a role in his resignation. The Student Publications Committee has responsibilities such as choosing the Herald and Talisman editors-in-chief. SEE SGA, PAGE 6

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Before & After: College Heights Herald  

This is my redesign of my college newspaper, The Herald. The first two pages are from my first semester of working at the newspaper as an en...

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