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Reflections of Glass on Water


Distributed by De Gauw Publishing, Inc. © Fräbel Art Foundation, Inc Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A., 2008 ISBN 978-0-9794491-1-6 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without written permission of the publishers. Every effort has been made to seek permission to reproduce those images whose copyright does not reside with the Fräbel Art Foundation, Inc. and the Fräbel Gallery, Inc. Any omissions are entirely unintentional, and the details should be addressed to the author. All artwork displayed is protected by US and international copyright laws and any copying is expressively prohibited. Hans Godo Fräbel permits and encourages photography of his artwork in this exhibition for education and non-commercial use only. Printed in the U.S.A. De Gauw Publishing, Inc. Smyrna, GA, U.S.A. Photography and Design by Jason Crim and Junghoon Park


Reflections of Glass on Water

By Gerrit op de Ese

This publication was made possible through the generous support of BILL AND MARY ANN BECKER


Large Cube with Imploded Glass Spheres Hans Godo Fr채bel, 2006 | 14' x 14' x 16' McKee Botanical Garden, 2008

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Longfellow Fountain Hans Godo Fr채bel, 2006 | 11' x 10' x 9' McKee Botanical Garden, 2008

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Reflections of Glass on Water

Red & Amber Trunk Woman Viney Hans Godo Fräbel, 1999 18" x 15" x 12"

Hans Godo Fräbel, the world’s most famous flamework glass artist and avid gardener, is continuously inspired by nature and the world around him. Flowers especially have been the inspiration for many Fräbel abstracts as well as realistic art pieces. All exhibitions, like the botanical garden in Vero Beach, are unique to their surrounding environments. With the Reflections of Glass on Water exhibition, Fräbel utilizes McKee’s unique vegetation and beautiful waterscapes to optimally display his amazing glass sculptures and large installations.

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In the beginning of 2008, Hans Godo Fräbel and the artists of the Fräbel Studio started working on the exhibition that can be found in this book. Fräbel was so impressed with McKee Botanical Garden that he decided to introduce some incredible new installations to his botanical garden exhibition inspired by, and especially for, McKee Botanical Garden. Since the Garden has a strong focus on Water Lilies and Lotus flowers, Fräbel let himself be inspired by these amazing flowers to create a number of extraordinary Water Lily and Lotus sculptures. The Water Lilies and Lotuses found in McKee Botanical Garden’s aquatic landscape were the stimulus for an exciting journey, going from nature into sculptural glass interpretations of these exquisite botanical forms. Once begun, Fräbel’s fascination with these intriguing shapes and colors brought challenge, hard work, and finally gratification with the finished sculptures. The synergy of melding the flowing colored glass into interpretations of these natural forms wrought inspiration for new avenues and new ideas of work. Fräbel also created several large compositions, specifically for the water settings at McKee Botanical Garden, such as the “Aces and Deuces, Jokers Wild” sculpture that consists of 13 jokers, balancing on playing cards. This sculpture is a symbolic expression of life’s journeys through ups and downs, highs and lows. It shows the risks and challenges we face and the gambles we have to make in our lives. Further in this line, Fräbel created 15 large clowns on large spheres, entitled “Balancing”. Fräbel tries to tell his story to enjoy life like these clowns, as if it is one big carnival. These clowns, balancing on large colorful floating spheres, compliment the beauty of the ponds at McKee Botanical Garden and reflect delightfully into the water. Since the beginning of the Fräbel Studio in 1968, flowers and plants have formed an important part of the Studio’s realistic art repertoire. Flowers like the Lily, Dogwood, Cherokee Rose and various Orchids were recreated in realistic fashion using borosilicate glass. Wielding his creative expression, Fräbel has designed glass botanicals, interpreting the essence of plant life while displaying the magic and irresistible beauty of glass.

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Reflections of Glass on Water

Flower Profile Hans Godo Fräbel, 2000 18" x 5" x 20"

An example of imaginative Fräbel art inspired by nature is the “Profile” series. The “Profile” series, first created in 1976, depict a glass outline of a head, which playfully transitions into a stunning mane of leaves. One of the first “Profile” sculptures of this series, a clear glass outline with clear leaves, was acquired by the Corning Museum of Glass in New York in 1976. Other examples of ingenious Fräbel art inspired by nature are the “Viney” series. Vineys are sculptures that blend the human form with plant life and represent a close-knit and fantastic connection between humans and nature. After his initial visit to McKee Botanical Garden, Fräbel stated: “I am proud and honored to showcase my art in the beautiful tropical setting of McKee Botanical Garden. Although a relatively small garden, this is one of the most beautiful botanical gardens I have ever visited.” This exhibition is the largest flamework glass art exhibition ever held in a botanical garden anywhere in the world and is organized by McKee Botanical Garden in cooperation with Hans Godo Fräbel.

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Hans Godo Fräbel and the Fräbel Studio

Hans Godo Fräbel was born in Jena, East Germany in 1941. He was the third child in a family with five children. The tumultuous political climate in existence after WWII necessitated a family migration to a small city called Wertheim in West Germany, where Fräbel’s father opened a scientific glass factory with a business partner. After moving a few times, the family ended up in Mainz am Rhein, a much larger city in West Germany, where Fräbel’s father obtained a position as a controller at the Jena Glaswerke. Fräbel did not enjoy school, and when 15 his father enrolled him into a “Lehrausbildung Program” (a traineeship) as a scientific glassblower at this prestigious Glaswerke, West Germany. Within 3 years, Fräbel received his “Gehilfenbrief,” an apprenticeship diploma, showing that he had mastered the trade of scientific glass blowing. In his spare time, he had the opportunity to focus on his real passion, art, and attended different art classes to learn how to paint and draw. In 1965 he came to the United States and settled in Atlanta. There he obtained a position at the Georgia Institute of Technology in its scientific glass blowing laboratory. There he also continued his art studies at Emory University and Georgia State University. While working at Georgia Tech, Fräbel’s creative talents were often sought after by professors and acquaintances alike to create crystal glass sculptures as gifts for friends, partners and business associates. With so many people enjoying the beauty of his glass sculptures, Fräbel felt strengthened to continue his quest to become an artist. In 1968, Fräbel established his own glass studio in Atlanta, Georgia. Over the next 40 years, he would follow in accordance with the European tradition of apprentice and mentoring studio master: as the master artist he would pass his skills on to a handpicked group of apprentices, who after many years of training would become master artists in their own right. In the 1960’s glass was not considered a serious art medium and artists were not utilizing the beauty and diversity that the techniques of flame-worked glass offers to create unique art pieces.

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Hans Godo Fr채bel 2008 | McKee Botanical Garden

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Hans Godo Fräbel and the Fräbel Studio

In the Middle of the Night Hans Godo Fräbel, 1976 This sculpture of an exaggerated drop of water hanging on a faucet and frozen in time is in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C.

Until that time, glass designers had always been giving their designs to factory glass workers, who would then try to create their design in glass. Harvey Littleton and Hans Godo Fräbel were among the first artists who chose glass as their art medium and decided to create glass art with their own hands. Although Fräbel’s art received much attention in the United States, his international breakthrough as a glass artist did not occur until 1979 when his pop art sculpture “Hammer and Nails” was utilized as the feature piece of the “New Glass Art Exhibition.” For the next several years, the exhibition toured the world visiting museums in numerous major cities. This international exhibition was a major factor in the recognition of Hans Godo Fräbel as a founding father of modern torch-work in the world of art. Over the years Fräbel’s reputation as a master in glass art has spread worldwide beyond the glass community. Fräbel art pieces can be found in public and private collections in over 80 countries worldwide. Some of the more illustrious collectors of Fräbel glass art are Queen Elizabeth II, Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko of Japan, current and former heads of governments such as Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, Margaret Thatcher, Anwar Sadat as well as museums in London, Paris, Tokyo, Dresden, Valencia, Corning, San Francisco, New York and Washington D.C. Two of the most famous “trademarks” of the Fräbel name are the “Hammer and Nails” sculpture from the “New Glass Art Exhibition” which is still travelling museums around the world; and the playful, cavorting clowns which received worldwide recognition with the Absolut Vodka advertising campaign in the late 80’s and early 90’s. Hans Godo Fräbel was the first glass artist honored with the title of Absolut Artist. Other famous artists that were chosen as Absolut Artist are Andy Warhol and Keith Haring.

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Hans Godo Fr채bel and the Fr채bel Studio

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Until the mid nineties, the Fräbel Studio created art pieces almost exclusively in clear borosilicate, a strong, brilliant crystal that is resistant to scratches and which if broken can usually be restored without a trace of damage. In the mid 1990’s the artists of the Fräbel Studio began exploring the use of color. Since that time, color has formed an increasingly important part of the Fräbel repertoire. Other techniques the Studio employs are sandblasting and painting. Sandblasting gives the sculpture a frosted, highlighted appearance, which is an interesting optical illusion. This optical illusion is produced by the human eye, which cannot handle the diffractions of the fine indentations in the glass. The indentations or facets on the surface of the glass reflect all colors of light from its surface and confuse the human eye, giving an impression of a whitish tint.

Hans Godo Fräbel behind the torch, 1965

Studio sculptures of the Fräbel Studio are embossed with the trademarked “FS,” which stands for “Fräbel Studio,” wherever space permits on the piece itself. The Fräbel name and the initials of the artist who executed the design are engraved into the mounting peg, which holds the sculpture steady in its base. The executing artist sculpts the piece entirely by hand, based on the model created by the designer. These Studio sculptures are called Multiple Originals because each sculpture is uniquely created by hand and molds are never used. The vast majority of original Fräbel Studio models are designed by Hans Godo Fräbel himself. One-of-a-kind Fräbel sculptures are signed with “GF,” which stands for Godo Fräbel. These sculptures are one-of-a-kind exclusives or limited editions. Although an original study model has been created, it will never leave the Fräbel Studio. The mounting peg bears the year of its creation.

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McKee Botanical Garden

In 1932, the McKee-Sexton Land Company was established to preserve an 80acre hammock along the Indian River in Vero Beach, Florida. This is where the history of McKee begins. Arthur G. McKee and Waldo E. Sexton set about assembling one of the most outstanding collections of water lilies and orchids – augmenting native vegetation with ornamental plants and seeds from around the world. Landscape architect William Lyman Phillips, from the esteemed firm of Frederick Law Olmsted, designed the basic infrastructure of streams, ponds and trails, and by the 1940’s more than 100,000 tourists were visiting what was then known as “McKee Jungle Gardens” each year, making it one of Florida’s most popular natural attractions. In the 1960’s, tourists’ interests began to change and the development of I-95 and the Florida Turnpike caused a decline in attendance. By 1974 McKee Jungle Gardens was put up for sale. The Garden ceased operations on May 1, 1976. The property was sold in 1978 to Vista Properties and all but the 18-acre Garden’s core was developed into condominiums and a golf course. The remainder was held for future development and left to be reclaimed by nature. In 1994, the Indian River Land Trust launched a fund-raising campaign and successfully purchased the property on December 1, 1995 for $1.7 million. Since that pivotal date, $9 million was raised to purchase, stabilize and restore the Garden. The Garden held its formal dedication and reopening in November, 2001. In the spring of 2002, the Board of Directors of the Indian River Land Trust approved a Resolution stating that a division of activities between the operation of McKee Botanical Garden and land conservation activities typical of a community land trust is in the best interests of both entities and should be explored. The Resolution further stated that this division should be accomplished in a fashion that will ensure both the short-term and long-term success of both organizations. In January, 2003 The Indian River Land Trust and McKee Botanical Garden became separate entities. McKee Botanical Garden celebrated its 75th Anniversary this past year. The Board of Directors and Advisors, members and donors, have honored the McKee-Sexton commitment to preservation. Today the focus is on a vision

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Fräbel FrÄbe | Reflections l | R eflecti of Glass o nsonoWater f G lass


Pergola, McKee Botanical Garden

for the future. By joining together as good stewards of the environment, the conservation and preservation of McKee Botanical Garden will not only enrich lives but guarantee the Garden’s future as a recognized cultural destination. Evidence of the Garden’s environmental and historic significance still exists today in the dense and diverse tropical vegetation, which includes a large number of specimen trees, as well as two recently restored buildings originally built by Waldo Sexton. A unique setting and an outstanding botanical collection has gained new recognition for the Garden as the entire landscape has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places and is endorsed by The Garden Conservancy as a project of national significance.

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Longfellows

Hans Godo Fräbel in front of his “Longfellows” Hans Godo Fräbel, 2006 McKee Botanical Garden, 2008

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In 2002, Fräbel created a series of small and large “Longfellows”. These elongated figures play with proportions by using exaggerated extremities and stretched torsos, giving these figures an almost alien look.

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Fantasy Flower Goblets

Fantasy Flower Goblets Hans Godo Fr채bel, 2006 McKee Botanical Garden, 2008

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Fr채bel Fantasy Flower Goblets are bright, colorful goblets, created to look lively like flowers. This entire series is based on real flowers that are around us on a daily basis.

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Aces and Deuces, Jokers Wild

Aces and Deuces, Jokers Wild Hans Godo Fräbel, 2008 McKee Botanical Garden, 2008

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This good-natured sculpture is a metaphor for life. Ups and downs; highs and lows. “Aces and Deuces, Jokers Wild” is one of Hans Godo Fräbel’s most recent creations, and is making its debut at McKee Botanical Garden.

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Frogs and Lizards

Oriental Fire Bellied Toad Hans Godo Fr채bel & Frankie Fox Jones, 2008 | 4" x 3" x 2" McKee Botanical Garden, 2008

The frog series were originally created for an exhibition of the works of Hans Godo Fr채bel at the Atlanta Botancial Garden, which has an endangered frog program to try and rescue frogs all over the world from extinction. Frogs on the verge of extinction are captured and bred in captivity, to be released back into the wild, when circumstances give them a chance to survive again. These lizards will never be found in real life. Each and every one of these creations of Hans Godo Fr채bel are unique and have a color scheme that you just will not find in nature.

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Left: Tiger Legged Monkey Tree Frog Hans Godo Fr채bel & Frankie Fox Jones, 2008 4" x 3" x 2" | McKee Botanical Garden, 2008 Right: Crowned Tree Frog Hans Godo Fr채bel & Frankie Fox Jones, 2008 4" x 3" x 2" | McKee Botanical Garden, 2008

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White Eyed Tree Frog Hans Godo Fr채bel & Frankie Fox Jones, 2008 4" x 3" x 2" | McKee Botanical Garden, 2008

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Green and Cream Striped Lizard Hans Godo Fr채bel, 2006 | 14" x 3" x 7" McKee Botanical Garden, 2008

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Sprite and Viney Series

Yellow Trunk Man Viney Hans Godo Fr채bel, 2006 | 16" x 15" x 16" McKee Botanical Garden, 2008

Viney sculptures blend the human form with plant life and represent the close-knit connection between humans and nature. Sprites are sculptures that mix nature and fantasy by depicting sprites (the male version of fairies) dancing on branches and flowers.

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Green Branch with 5 Frosted Sprites Hans Godo Fr채bel, 1998 | 19" x 9" x 13" Atlanta Botanical Garden, 2007

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Left: Green and White Trunk Woman Viney Hans Godo Fr채bel, 2006 | 18" x 13" x 19" Right: Red Trumpet Flower with Frosted Sprite Hans Godo Fr채bel, 1998 | 15" x 12" x 20"

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Wavy Bowls

Wavy Bowl Hans Godo Fräbel, 2006 | 18" dia x 8"

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Fräbel’s wavy bowls are strings of borosilicate glass that all connect to create a bowl-like structure. All the connections and the thin pieces of glass create an incredible play with the sunlight.

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Wavy Bowl Hans Godo Fr채bel, 2006 17" dia x 7.5"

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Balancing

Balancing Hans Godo Fräbel, 2008 McKee Botanical Garden, 2008

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A lighthearted and playful portrayal of Hans Godo Fräbel’s famous clowns. Fifteen large clowns are balancing on bright spheres and seem to just play around. The message here is to enjoy life as if it were one big carnival.

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Water lilies, Lotuses and Orchids

Nymphaea Mrs. Charles Winch Water Lily Hans Godo Fräbel, 2008 18" x 18" x 29"

The Water Lilies and Lotuses found in McKee Botanical Garden’s aquatic landscape were the stimulus for an exciting journey, going from nature into sculptural glass interpretations of these exquisite botanical forms. Once begun, Fräbel’s fascination with these intriguing shapes and colors brought challenge, hard work, and finally gratification with the finished sculptures. The synergy of melding the flowing colored glass into interpretations of these natural forms wrought inspiration for new avenues and new ideas of work. Hans Godo Fräbel has created a large number of breathtaking orchids. Most of them are rare or even extinct and were brought back to life by the incredible glass art of Hans Godo Fräbel.

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Left: Nymphaea Josephine Water Lily Hans Godo Fr채bel, 2008 30" x 16" x 28" Right: Nelumbo Pink Grandiflora Lotus Hans Godo Fr채bel & Magnum Mangang 2008 | 18" x 15" x 27"

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Left: Nelumbo Pink Sacred Lotus Hans Godo Fr채bel, 2008 26" x 18" x 29" Right: Nymphaea Indian Goddess Water Lily Hans Godo Fr채bel & Magnum Mangkang 2008 | 18" x 15" x 27"

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Left: Nymphaea Mrs. Charles Winch Water Lily Hans Godo Fr채bel, 2008 18" x 18" x 29" Right: Nymphaea Lindsey Woods Blue Water Lily Hans Godo Fr채bel & Magnum Mangkang 2008 | 16" x 16" x 22"

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Yellow Lutea American Lotus Hans Godo Fr채bel, 2008 35" x 21" x 32"

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Left: Nymphaea White Lotus Hans Godo Fr채bel & Magnum Mangkang 2008 | 18" x 15" x 27" Right: Nymphaea Woods Blue Goddess Water Lily Hans Godo Fr채bel & Magnum Mangkang 2008 | 18" x 16" x 28"

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Nelumbo Pink Scared Lotus Hans Godo Fr채bel, 2008 26" x 18" x 29"

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Left: Dendrophylax Lindenii (Ghost Orchid) Hans Godo Fr채bel & Sieglinde Widmann 2006 | 17" x 14" x 21" Right: Paphinia Posadarum Orchid Hans Godo Fr채bel, 2006 24" x 20" x 30"

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Left: Spiranthes Odorata Orchid Hans Godo Fr채bel & Tung Bui 2006 | 14" x 9" x 22" Right: Embree Rodigasiana Orchid Hans Godo Fr채bel & Magnum Mangkang 2008 | 18" x 16" x 28"

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Cavorting Clown Fountain

Cavorting Clown Fountain Hans Godo Fr채bel, 2006 | 7' x 7' x 10' Atlanta Botanical Garden, 2007

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Hans Godo Fr채bel, renowned for his playful figures in glass, created this large fountain in 2006. Based on his illustrious Cavorting Clown theme, the fountain stands over 10' tall and 7' in diameter. The Cavorting Clown series brought international recognition to Fr채bel when he was chosen as an Absolut Vodka Artist in 1987, the very first glass artist to be bestowed with this title. Other famous Absolut Vodka Artists are Andy Warhol and Keith Haring.

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Cavorting Clown Fountain Hans Godo Fr채bel, 2006 | 7' x 7' x 10' McKee Botanical Garden, 2008

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Cavorting Clown Fountain Hans Godo Fr채bel, 2006 | 7' x 7' x 10' Atlanta Botanical Garden, 2007

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Cavorting Clown Fountain Hans Godo Fr채bel, 2006 | 7' x 7' x 10' McKee Botanical Garden, 2008

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Longfellow Fountain

Longfellow Fountain Hans Godo Fräbel, 2006 | 11' x 10' x 9' McKee Botanical Garden, 2008

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In 2006, Fräbel utilized his “Longfellows”, which are often described as alien looking figures, to create a fountain installation. The “Longfellows” in the “Longfellow Fountain” are the largest he has ever created, up to 44" tall. When illuminated, these sculptures light up at the ends and the thinner parts of the sculpture, creating a visual magic.

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Hans Godo Fräbel with his “Longfellow Fountain” Hans Godo Fräbel, 2006 | 11' x 10' x 9' McKee Botanical Garden, 2008

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Longfellow Fountain Hans Godo Fr채bel, 2006 | 11' x 10' x 9' McKee Botanical Garden, 2008

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Large Cube with Imploded Glass Spheres

Large Cube with Imploded Glass Spheres Hans Godo Fräbel, 2006 | 14' x 14' x 16' McKee Botanical Garden, 2008

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In the late 1970’s, Hans Godo Fräbel created a small series of cube-shaped abstracts, which were all between 15" and 30" in size. Based on these sculptures, Fräbel decided to try and create a replica of these sculptures as large as physically possible. The imploded spheres in the center of the cube generate a magnificent play with the sunlight.

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Fr채bel Studio 689-695 Antone St. NW Atlanta, Georgia 30318

Tel Fax

404.351.9794 404.351.1491

Tel Fax

772.794.0601 772.794.0602

www.frabel.com

McKee Botanical Garden 350 U.S. Highway 1 Vero Beach, Florida 32962 www.mckeegarden.org


Reflections of Glass on Water


$19.95 US $22.95 CANADA


Mckee Botanical Garden