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HOMECOMING GAME impact pg10

TAMS dance pg15

schedule of EVENTS pg8

2006 Supplement to the NT Daily


PAGE 2 October 6, 2006...


PAGE 3 October 6, 2006...

Aging with Grace Chat gets named

1901

The Journal starts

The North Texas State Normal Journal was established 11 years after the University As the University grew the so did the Normal Journal. In 1916, the university was started. It was a monthly edition that acted as at degree-granting status and wanted an offi- newspaper, magazine and cial student newspaper. The first issue of the annual for five years. In 1906 the staff took a vote to make Campus Chat came the May issue an annual out Oct. 25, 1916. called the Yucca. In 1909 the Students payed Journal was asked to join the $1.25 per year to Inter-Collegiate State Press receive the paper. Association.

1916

NT Daily celebrates 90 years of news

Story By Sarah Whyman

Journal staff 1906

Nov. 1, 1916

1920

All-American Chat

1937

In 1937 the Campus Chat gave its first year of issues to the State Historical Collection and College Museum. The Chat was submitting entries in the Associated Collegiate Press competition and won the second highest rating. In April 1940, the Chat won its first All-American. Texas Intercollegiate Press Association awarded it first place, Division 1 in 1947.

The Chat in the 20s

In the 20s the Chat was experimenting. The Nameplate changed fonts a few times and more attention was given to headline placement. In 1924 the total budget of the Chat was $2,333.46 compared to $645,000 today.

Aug. 12, 1927

1964 Awarded Feb. 18, 1937 Format Changes

1965

In 1965 Chat editor Craig Hines decided to take the paper a step into the future. The normal eight column format at the time was changing to six. This gave the editors more freedom in design and made the paper more readable.

Daily gets color

As years past, the Chat established itself as a leader in student newspapers and won the American Newspaper Publishers Association Pacemaker award in 1964. The paper has won a total of six Pacemaker awards, the most recent being in 1990.

Chat goes Daily

1970

1995

After years of using only spot color, the NT Daily moved to full color in 1995. The NT Daily was also inducted into the Associated Collegiate Hall of Fame in 1990.

Daily goes digital The history of the NT Daily is just beginning for ntdaily.com. In 1998, following media trends, the NT Daily started posting its content on the Web.

1998

Pacemaker

Feb. 6, 1970

2006

In 1970, The Campus Chat was changed from a weekly paper to a Daily and given a new name, The North Texas Daily. C.E. Shuford, chairman of the journalism department, felt the increase of deadlines and responsibility would give students a better idea what a real world paper experience is like.

Friday’s change

Jan. 20, 2006

The NT Daily changed its Friday format to a tabloid called Scene. In April 2005 the NT Daily won Best All-Around Daily Student Newspaper from the Society of Professional Journalists.

The NT Daily has an interesting history and some tales worth the telling. In 1916, the University of North Texas was North Texas State Normal College, and the predecessor to the NT Daily was the Campus Chat. Early issues carried an article exhorting students to read and discuss the paper and some headlines to grab your attention. One headline read, “Faculty Treats Many Students Unmercifully.” Rather than starving or whipping the students, the university had not canceled Sunday afternoon activities, preventing students from attending the Barnum and Bailey Circus. Another said, “Normal Football Men Enjoy Banquet and Smoker.” The occasion was when the team had its annual lunch and cigars at the Elks Hall. Campus Chat had an annual subscription charge of $1.25. The college had around 1,500 students then. Today’s paper is available to more than 32,000 students, faculty and staff. The experimental early editions document campus news, sometimes touched by world events. Former students are killed in the First World War and warning is given against Spanish flu. With such a small student body, the paper could detail who had gone home for the weekend and who was ailing or recovered. Coverage of chapel and sporting events was prominent. The sports coverage is still strong and world events are reflected in the opinions of students. Keith Shelton, who was instrumental in the development of the NT Daily from 1970, tells his favorite stories. “During the Vietnam War protests,” he said, “there were ex-marines and hippies, for and against the war. The editor ran a piece saying that the university needed to keep an eye on the ex-marines, as they were potentially violent. The day the column came out, a group of ex-marines converged on the Daily office and threatened to ‘beat the hell’ out of the editor.”

The potential for violence was not fully realized, however. Editors rarely serve for more than one year, which means there have been more than 80 editors of the Daily. Many have gone on to work for other news organizations. The first editor of the NT Daily, following the name change, was Terry Kelly. He now works for the Dallas Morning News. Several editors went to The Dallas Morning News, including Marilyn Pippin, Scott Parks, Steve Blow and Leona Allen. Sarah Pagones joined The Times-Picayune of New Orleans, and was on the staff when it won the Pulitzer for Hurricane Katrina coverage. Other Pulitzer winners who started as Daily editors include Howard Swindle and Joe Murray of the Lufkin News. Murray wrote a series on the death of a young man at a marine training camp and prompted reform of training methods after a congressional investigation. Howard Swindle won three Pulitzer Prizes while working for The Dallas Morning News and returned to teach at NT before his death from cancer in 2004. Ray Moseley has been distinguished by the award of Member of the British Empire by the Queen of England. His war reporting took him to the Middle East for the Six-Day War and the Iranian Revolution. He also covered such diverse areas as Moscow and the Vatican. Journalists who worked for the NT Daily have gone to Time Magazine, the Chicago Tribune, the Los Angeles Times and the Associated Press. Mike Cochran, a crime reporter for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, won a place in history when he was one of the few reporters covering the funeral of Lee Harvey Oswald. There weren’t any pallbearers, and the former Daily editor was drafted to carry the coffin of the most famous assassin in U.S. history. This is not part of the career path generally recommended to NT graduates but, as every journalist knows, being in at the right place at the right time makes a story appear in print. The NT Daily has often proved to be the right place to start. Happy Birthday to NT’s college paper, and long may the print run.


PAGE 4 October 6, 2006...

Homecoming traditions carry-on Students demonstrate Mean Green Pride Story By Madison Swicegood

As the annual homecoming game rapidly approaches, many students begin to wonder why exactly NT celebrates this particular game with so much passion and enthusiasm. To the average student, this game is just like any other. It is, after all, just a football game, right? Wrong! The homecoming traditions have been rooted deep in NT history ever since the very first freshman parade in 1927. Over the years many things have changed – from the name of the mascot to the location of the spirit bell – but one thing remains the same:

No matter what the outcome of the game, NT students will continue to demonstrate pride and respect for the Mean Green Eagles. Since its first flame in 1935, the NT Homecoming bonfire has become a memorable tradition for both students and alumni. The Talons, who serve as the official spirit and service organization of NT, build the bonfire entirely by hand starting a week before the homecoming game. At 40 feet wide, 40 feet long and 25 feet tall, creating the wooden structure is no small feat. “Bonfire is awful and great at the same time,” said Shea Rodgers, vice president of Talons. “You’re exhausted and go to maybe one class the

week that we build. Splinters are stuck everywhere on your body. It is utterly miserable, and yet, when it’s all over, you’re sad that it’s over.” After kicking off the homecoming festivities, the flame burns for hours on end until being extinguished around 5 a.m. Once the flame of the bonfire goes out, there isn’t much time to prepare for the day’s next festivity – the homecoming parade. The homecoming parade is the oldest tradition in NT history, dating back to 1927. It too has evolved over the years, now serving as a showcase for the week’s biggest celebrities: the Mean Green football team. With the football players surrounded by cheerleaders, dancers, band members and fans, the parade weaves up and down the familiar streets of our campus with only one goal in mind – getting the crowd ready

for the game. “It is such a great intensity,” said Gerald Ladner, former NT cheerleader. “It is an awesome feeling being surrounded by so many other people with so much pride in this school.” Pride is never lacking on the NT campus. Whether it is a ‘Mean Green’ T-shirt, an NT bumper sticker stuck proudly on a car, or even the eagle soaring across the front of a notebook, pride can be found almost everywhere students look. Scrappy the Eagle, the official mascot of NT, plays a memorable role in the experience many students have at any football game, especially homecoming. “Scrappy was always so much fun on the field,” Ladner said. “It was always easier for us to pump up the crowd with the help of a huge eagle than just trying to yell by ourselves.”

Photo By Jason Kindig

Fans cheer on the Mean Green.


Practice pays off for NT Dancers Story By Mary Pharris

It takes a lot of hard work, dedication and talent to perform out on the football field, and this work ethic doesn’t apply to just football players. With new routines and plenty of fans, the NT Dancers bring entertainment full of school spirit to the sidelines and halftime as the dancers leap and turn out on the field. “We normally have 60 to 80 girls tryout,” said Captain Tara Richmond, Tyler sophomore. “It’s a lot of competition. Even being a returning member, I have to try out for my spot. Just because I was on the team last year doesn’t mean I’m going to make it.” Jennifer Cloutièr, director and choreographer, said auditions for the team are usually the first of May. Girls auditioning will learn a jazz/ hip-hop routine, the fight song and practice technical elements across the floor on Saturday. Then on Sunday, the girls will perform for a panel of

judges and are told if they made the team that same day, Cloutièr said. Team members wishing to return have to try out again as well as interview with her, Cloutièr said. She said only about 20 girls make the team. “They’re both nerve racking, but I think it was more nerve racking giving the interview because you have to give your opinions on how the team should be for next year,” said Co-Captain Caris Tschauner, Odessa sophomore, comparing her first and second year auditions. Both Richmond and Tschauner said they were extremely honored to be chosen as captain and co-captain. “It was amazing,” Richmond said. “I was so proud. The dance team is held in such high standards and for my team to think that I was good enough to lead the team … that made me feel really good.” Cloutièr said the team practices a couple of times in June and July and has “boot camp” the two weeks before school starts. “Boot camp is essential for the dancers,” she said “That’s where they learn the fight song, all the traditional band chants and cheers,

everything that they need to know to prepare them for football games and pep rallies.” During these two weeks, the dancers meet with a trainer in the mornings Monday-Friday at Fouts Field for conditioning. The team also meets for two hours in the evening for dance rehearsal, Cloutièr said. During football season the team practices for two hours, two to three times a week working on sidelines, short routines that the team performs while the band plays during the game, and “perfecting half-time” routines, said Hailey Ganez, public relations officer and Desoto sophomore. The team also performs at pep rallies, every men and women’s home basketball game and also does community service like play with children at Mean Green Village before football games, Cloutièr said. “I like everything [about being a dancer],” Ganez said. “Definitely performing in from of a crowd, I love football games and basketball … practice is practice but I love performing.”

PAGE 5 October 6, 2006...

Richmond said her favorite part of being a part of the team is the girls she dances with. “They are absolutely the best group of girls,” she said. “I was really lucky to walk into the girls I was with. They’ve definitely made my schooling at North Texas worth it … They’re like sisters to me now.” Cloutièr said the team has also competed and won championship titles in the past. Although dance team does take up time, Richmond said Cloutièr stresses that school and family come first. “They are so dedicated and

love the dancers [so much] that they are willing to give up their time … it’s truly amazing,” Cloutièr said. “They are an elite group of ladies that have a great deal of commitment to the dancers, and not only to the dancers, but to me. They respect their title, and they respect my title. And I think that’s truly what makes them fantastic. That what makes them an incredible dancer.” For more information on the NT Dancers visit http://www.unt. edu/untdancers

Photo By Anthony Davila


PAGE 6 October 6, 2006...


PAGE 7 October 6, 2006...

Bonding By The Fire Annual bonfire requires specific safety measures

Story By RYAN Birgelaitis

The wooden palets used every year are DONATED by MILLER and PETERBUILT

The fire is lit at 8:3o p.m. and BURNS for six HOURS until the students put it out with CUPS OF WATER.

This 25 ft CUBE will take an ESTIMATED 2812 paletts to build!

The AUDIENCE is seperated from the fire by a fotball field sized pond that is RUMORED (though unlikely) TO BOIL during the event.,

or T f NUS O N al TA DO r TE e is ithu n w yo No o ork t e w . g s to ot sh wed hem! lo ut t o

Design by JESSE gomez Illustration by BRYAN kelly

One of the biggest events of NT’s Homecoming is the annual bonfire. Last year’s bonfire was canceled because of a Denton County burn ban, increasing the excitement for this year’s bonfire. Taylor Stephenson, Lucas senior, gave his thoughts on the return of the bonfire. “I think it’s great, and I’m very excited that it was not canceled again this year.” Stephenson said. A lot of preparation goes into an event like this, and it is not completed overnight. Shea Rodgers, bonfire chair for Talons, described the process of building the fire and what precautions are taken during the building. “The bonfire structure itself is usually about 40 by 40 feet,” Rodgers said. “But due to the burn ban only being lifted on Sept. 19, the bonfire will be scaled down to about 25 by 25 feet for this year’s celebration.” The design of the structure consists of a square made up of four telephone poles with one more pole in the center. From there more wood is laid across to the center pole, making sort of an “N” shape. The structure tends to take about a week to construct with students constantly working on it throughout the week. To insure the safety of the students who are participating in the building of the bonfire, there are supervisors on the site 24 hours

In order to keep at least TWO poeple ONSITE every day for a week, we CAMP here at TENT CITY.

a day to watch the building process and make sure everything is being setup properly. Rodgers explained other precautions taken during the building. “In addition to the monitoring of the building everyone who participates in the construction is required to receive a

tetanus shot and there is no drinking or smoking allowed on the site.” he said. This year’s homecoming bonfire celebration will be taking place on Friday. For more information about the bonfire contact Rodgers at srodgers@hsl.admin. unt.edu.

LATER in the semster the talons will come back to the site and pick up any DANGEROUS MATERIALS, like nails, left from the burning and CLEAN THE SITE for next fall.


G N I M O C E OM

PAGE 8 October 6, 2006...

PARADING AROUND

H

s t h g i l h g i H Event

Story By LAUREN Evans

y RYAN Kell Art By B mez o JESSE G Design by

FRIDAY (oct. 6) 6:00 P.M. North Texas Exes Friday Night Bonfire Tailgate ENJOY BURGERS, HOTDOGS AND LIVE MUSIC WITH THE NT EXES ON THE ALUMNI CENTER LAWN,LOCATED IN THE GATEWAY CENTER, AT 801 NORTH TEXAS BLVD. 7:00 P.M. Spirit March A PROGRESSIVE SPIRIT MARCH WILL BEGIN AT FRATERNITY ROW ON MAPLE STREET, PROCEEDING TO THE HOMECOMING BONFIRE SITE AT EAGLE POINT (ADJACENT TO THE RADISSON HOTEL). WITH LIVE MUSIC FROM

6:00 PM Sat. - FOUTS field

FLICKERSTICK!

8:15 P.M. Bonfire and Yell Contest JOIN IN ONE OF HOMECOMING’S OLDEST TRADITIONS, THE LIGHTING OF THE BONFIRE! ENJOY FIREWORKS AND THE STUDENT YELL CONTEST. LOCATION: EAGLE POINT (ADJACENT TO THE RADISSON HOTEL).

SATURDAY (oct. 7) 1:00 - 2:00 P.M. Parade SEE THE GREEN BRIGADE MARCHING BAND, NORTH TEXAS CHEERLEADERS, DANCERS AND SCRAPPY!! FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY. DON’T MISS IT! PARADE STARTS AT WELCH AND HICKORY STREET, AROUND THE SQUARE, DOWN OAK STREET TOWARD WELCH, LEFT ON WELCH, TRAVEL ONE BLOCK TO HICKORY AND TURN RIGHT (GOING THE WRONG WAY ON HICKORY THROUGH CAMPUS), LEFT ON NORTH TEXAS BLVD. TO HIGHLAND. PARADE ENDS AT HIGHLAND AND AVENUE D.

8:15 PM - EAGLE point

1:00 PM SAT. - WELCH and hickory

4:00 PM SAT. - FOUTS FIELD

4:00 - 5:30 P.M. Department of Economics Tailgate Party PARKING LOT OF FOUTS FIELD. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CONTACT NANCY BOYD 940-565-2251 OR STEVE COBB 940565-2184. 6:00 P.M. Homecoming Football Game JOIN US AT FOUTS FIELD FOR A HOMECOMING VICTORY OVER FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL.

While the homecoming parade is not until Saturday, organizations have already begun to plan and construct their floats, some acting in secret while others choose to be open about the process. “Our float will definitely be very spirited in a way that hasn’t been seen in a while,” said Robert Middaugh, president of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia and a senior from Oak Point. Alpha Phi, Brothers for Christ, Phi Kappa Sigma and Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia are joining forces for a four-fraternity float. While Middaugh could not go into details regarding the design of the float because of the competitiveness of the parade, he was able to reveal that each organization will have its letters on the float and the design involves a ring. Middaugh noted using four fraternities rather than just one hasn’t been an issue but rather has made the experience easier. With four fraternities as opposed to one, Middaugh said they have a better chance at speeding up the construction schedule of the float. While Alpha Phi and Phi Kappa Sigma have worked with other fraternities in the past for the parade and other events, this is the first time all four organizations have worked with each other at such a large scale. The groups hope to win the Scrappy Trophy, awarded based on “Yell like Hell” participation and float decoration. On the other end of the spectrum, the journalism department has been recruiting help and spreading the

theme for this year from the beginning. Since the Daily is celebrating 90 years of publication, the theme of the float will be a birthday cake to mark the occasion. Students will walk along the parade route in costumes from different eras passing out candy to the crowd, occasionally breaking out to the tune of “Happy Birthday” on kazoos. “It’s not just about the award,” said Nancy Eanes, career development specialist and program coordinator for the journalism department. “The real purpose of the award is to connect students to alumni.” The journalism department has won the president’s trophy four times out of the past five years they have participated in the event, missing out on the award only in 2003 to Texas Academy Math and Science. Eanes said their success is because the turnout they have from students. The event serves not only to unite the entire journalism department for one event but also allows students to network with other students and alumni. A panel of faculty, students and community leaders, who serve as judges, awards 12 trophies. Some awards are strictly based on the float, while others are split in half between the “Yell like Hell” participation and float or spirit wall and float. Categories a parade entry can be placed under include greek organization, departmental, independent campus organization and non-university organization. Each trophy has a cash prize awarded to the organization with the coveted trophy being the President’s Trophy for the best overall entry. The winners are decided before the parade and awarded a banner to carry during the duration of the parade.


G N I M O C E OM

PAGE 8 October 6, 2006...

PARADING AROUND

H

s t h g i l h g i H Event

Story By LAUREN Evans

y RYAN Kell Art By B mez o JESSE G Design by

FRIDAY (oct. 6) 6:00 P.M. North Texas Exes Friday Night Bonfire Tailgate ENJOY BURGERS, HOTDOGS AND LIVE MUSIC WITH THE NT EXES ON THE ALUMNI CENTER LAWN,LOCATED IN THE GATEWAY CENTER, AT 801 NORTH TEXAS BLVD. 7:00 P.M. Spirit March A PROGRESSIVE SPIRIT MARCH WILL BEGIN AT FRATERNITY ROW ON MAPLE STREET, PROCEEDING TO THE HOMECOMING BONFIRE SITE AT EAGLE POINT (ADJACENT TO THE RADISSON HOTEL). WITH LIVE MUSIC FROM

6:00 PM Sat. - FOUTS field

FLICKERSTICK!

8:15 P.M. Bonfire and Yell Contest JOIN IN ONE OF HOMECOMING’S OLDEST TRADITIONS, THE LIGHTING OF THE BONFIRE! ENJOY FIREWORKS AND THE STUDENT YELL CONTEST. LOCATION: EAGLE POINT (ADJACENT TO THE RADISSON HOTEL).

SATURDAY (oct. 7) 1:00 - 2:00 P.M. Parade SEE THE GREEN BRIGADE MARCHING BAND, NORTH TEXAS CHEERLEADERS, DANCERS AND SCRAPPY!! FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY. DON’T MISS IT! PARADE STARTS AT WELCH AND HICKORY STREET, AROUND THE SQUARE, DOWN OAK STREET TOWARD WELCH, LEFT ON WELCH, TRAVEL ONE BLOCK TO HICKORY AND TURN RIGHT (GOING THE WRONG WAY ON HICKORY THROUGH CAMPUS), LEFT ON NORTH TEXAS BLVD. TO HIGHLAND. PARADE ENDS AT HIGHLAND AND AVENUE D.

8:15 PM - EAGLE point

1:00 PM SAT. - WELCH and hickory

4:00 PM SAT. - FOUTS FIELD

4:00 - 5:30 P.M. Department of Economics Tailgate Party PARKING LOT OF FOUTS FIELD. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CONTACT NANCY BOYD 940-565-2251 OR STEVE COBB 940565-2184. 6:00 P.M. Homecoming Football Game JOIN US AT FOUTS FIELD FOR A HOMECOMING VICTORY OVER FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL.

While the homecoming parade is not until Saturday, organizations have already begun to plan and construct their floats, some acting in secret while others choose to be open about the process. “Our float will definitely be very spirited in a way that hasn’t been seen in a while,” said Robert Middaugh, president of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia and a senior from Oak Point. Alpha Phi, Brothers for Christ, Phi Kappa Sigma and Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia are joining forces for a four-fraternity float. While Middaugh could not go into details regarding the design of the float because of the competitiveness of the parade, he was able to reveal that each organization will have its letters on the float and the design involves a ring. Middaugh noted using four fraternities rather than just one hasn’t been an issue but rather has made the experience easier. With four fraternities as opposed to one, Middaugh said they have a better chance at speeding up the construction schedule of the float. While Alpha Phi and Phi Kappa Sigma have worked with other fraternities in the past for the parade and other events, this is the first time all four organizations have worked with each other at such a large scale. The groups hope to win the Scrappy Trophy, awarded based on “Yell like Hell” participation and float decoration. On the other end of the spectrum, the journalism department has been recruiting help and spreading the

theme for this year from the beginning. Since the Daily is celebrating 90 years of publication, the theme of the float will be a birthday cake to mark the occasion. Students will walk along the parade route in costumes from different eras passing out candy to the crowd, occasionally breaking out to the tune of “Happy Birthday” on kazoos. “It’s not just about the award,” said Nancy Eanes, career development specialist and program coordinator for the journalism department. “The real purpose of the award is to connect students to alumni.” The journalism department has won the president’s trophy four times out of the past five years they have participated in the event, missing out on the award only in 2003 to Texas Academy Math and Science. Eanes said their success is because the turnout they have from students. The event serves not only to unite the entire journalism department for one event but also allows students to network with other students and alumni. A panel of faculty, students and community leaders, who serve as judges, awards 12 trophies. Some awards are strictly based on the float, while others are split in half between the “Yell like Hell” participation and float or spirit wall and float. Categories a parade entry can be placed under include greek organization, departmental, independent campus organization and non-university organization. Each trophy has a cash prize awarded to the organization with the coveted trophy being the President’s Trophy for the best overall entry. The winners are decided before the parade and awarded a banner to carry during the duration of the parade.


PAGE 10 October 6, 2006...

Big day brings big hopes Story By Brittany Bull

With the big game against Florida International approaching quickly, NT football coaches and players are working to deliver the university the win it truly deserves for homecoming 2006. “Homecoming to me is a pride thing,” said offensive lineman and team captain Dylan Lineberry. “You want to have a lot of pride for your university, and it’s big to get a win because everyone comes to the game expecting a win … If you don’t win homecoming, it’s kind of a let down.” Lineberry is a senior criminal justice major from Houston. “Homecoming is a big game for us because we get to play in front of our crowd,” said

Johhny Quinn, team captain and senior wide receiver. “It’s a big deal for the university because it’s something where a lot of fans come out and support, and we want to put on a good show for them … to win this in front of our crowd and to have that be our homecoming would be a big deal for us.” Even though the Eagles are working hard toward a homecoming victory, some of the best motivation, Quinn said, are the festivities that flood the week leading up to the game. Events such as parades and the traditional bonfire make it possible for the players to be directly involved with school spirit. With so many

events being held to celebrate homecoming, the coaches are working hard to keep the player’s focus on game day while also allowing them to enjoy the festivities.

“It’s fun to have all the festivities,” Quinn said. “It shows that it’s an important game, but we do have to stay focused on the goal and that is to get a win.”


New Players show talent Story By Maria Rocha

A new season is beginning for the Mean Green football team, and for some players this is their first season to play for NTs. These players, however, are not unfamiliar with the game. Some new players on the field this year are quarterback Woody Wilson, Fayetteville, Ark. junior; Kartey Agbottah, Irving, freshman and Antoine Bush, Tyler, freshman. Agbottah and Bush both play defensive back this year. These players seem to have adapted well to their new team. They all expressed the same enthusiasm for the game as well as each other. “I am enjoying it,” Bush said when asked how he liked play-

ing for NT. “I enjoy my teammates,” Wilson came to NT last spring after playing for Coffeyville Community College. He said he had other offers to play football including Kansas State University, but he chose NT because he had the opportunity to play quarterback. “I love the area,” Wilson said. “I love the team. It’s a big university and very diverse.” So far Wilson is averaging 17.3 rushing yards per game according to statistics provided on the Mean Green Athletics Web site. Wilson, thus far has completed 81 percent of passes attempted and is also averaging 68.3 passing yards per game. Bush is ranked fifth among the Mean Green defensive leaders so far, according to the overall defensive statistics for NT. Bush played for John Tyler High School before coming to NT and was a redshirt in 2005. Bush said he chose to attend NT

because his visit to the campus felt comfortable. Bush is also majoring in kinesiology, he said he has always wanted to teach and coach. Agbottah played for MacArthur High School before coming to NT. Agbottah was also a redshirt in 2005. Agbottah said he has been playing football since the age of 9 when he joined a city league team called the Cowboys. The game of football appears to be physically demanding. Reports periodically come out about the types of injuries that athletes receive as a result of the game, but the love of the game is sometimes greater to athletes. Wilson said the training he received at NT was the same as the training he had received previous years when he played high school and junior college football. “Nothing new, running, hitting, it’s the same,” Wilson said.

PAGE 11 October 6, 2006...

W h e n asked what the major difference was for them in playing college football versus high school football was, Agbottah said “the speed of the game, back then I had five coaches, here I have like 12.” “Everybody is talented in college football,” Bush said. Wilson said that’s what makes each player work harder. All of these players apparently love what they do and seem to enjoy playing for NT. “It hurts no one wants to lose,” Bushh said “You come back the next week.” Photo By Michael Clements


PAGE 12 October 6, 2006...

walls showcase spirit, talent Students Display creativity and pride Story By Rana Rizvi

The annual Homecoming Spirit Wall Contest is just around the corner and the theme this year is, you guessed it, school spirit. The Spirit Wall Contest, an NT tradition started four years ago, has a different theme every year that usually promotes the fever of homecoming. The contest targets the 11 residence halls on campus and is open to any student organizations or departments that wish to participate. The Student Government Association took part and

won the contest last year. “We’re definitely planning to win again, of course,” said Diana Palacios, the director of leadership for SGA. “Our freshmen interns are in charge of the spirit wall, and we have a lot of confidence in them. We want to really show school spirit in our interns, and it’s a great opportunity for them to build togetherness.” The SGA interns won first prize for their spirit wall with a huge 3-D Scrappy, the NT mascot, leaping out of it. “In the past, we’ve had pomping walls which are 6 ½ by 8 foot chicken wire filled with tissue paper and spray painted; and painting walls which is a solid piece of plywood to be painted,”

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said Lori Burns, special assistant for programming. The end results of the departments’ and organizations’ spirited labors will be displayed across the Willis Library Mall, and the residence halls will display theirs in front of their respective halls through homecoming weekend. “This year we’re judging spirit walls on who promotes NT’s school’s spirit for the football season best,” Burns said. The spirit walls will be judged by various people invited from different departments such as the NT Exes, NT police and the Division of University Relations, Communications and Marketing. The three cash prizes are a $100 each for residence hall winner, student organization winner and department winner. The winner will be announced at the homecoming kick-off with the annual picnic and pep rally in the Library Mall and Shrader Pavilion from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Oct. 5. Burns said, Santa Fe Square won first prize for the residence hall spirit wall last year. This year the North Texas Daily won it for the student organizations catagory. Homecoming themes are chosen by students casting ballots online, according to the NT InHouse Web site. Past winning themes have been “There’s No Place Like Home,” “A Blaze of Green Glory,” “Mean Green Back on the Scene,” “Got Green?” and most recently in 2005, “North Texas Hold ’em.”

Photo By Lili Castillo

Bryan Kelly, Gainsville senior, paints the NT Daily’s spirit wall.

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Writers Rebecca Evans Sarah Whyman Maria Rocha Mary Pharris Madison Swicegood Nancy Thai Ryan Birgelaitis Lauren Evans Rana Rizvi Kristin ALlman Brittany Bull


PAGE 13 October 6, 2006...

Marching band gives student confidence, leadership skills Story By Kristin ALlman

Free time can be a scarce commodity for a music major. In order to be a successful music student one has to practice, perform, practice, study for classes and not to mention, practice. “The life of a music major is a hectic one,” said Stephanie Lee, Powder Springs, Ga., sophomore. When marching band is added to the picture, even more time is taken away. Marching band members know how hours of time on the marching field can cut into studying and social lives. So why join marching band in the first place? “It’s really a great opportunity all around,” Lee said. “Some of your

best friends will come from marching band, and it’ll just be a pleasure to see them every day.” Lee, one of three drum majors, leads the marching band by conducting each practice and performance. She said it takes a considerable amount of devotion to be in the marching band. This devotion includes learning visuals, marching techniques and music memorization and interpretation. “From head to toe, you just have to know what every part of your body is doing,” Lee said. “Everybody on the field has to know their role, and how they fit into the bigger picture.” The “bigger picture” is overseen by each drum major, including Lee. She underwent a great deal to achieve her status as a drum major. This included being judged on a personal essay, a short marching routine, the conducting of pep band tunes and a two-minute piece. But Lee’s drum major responsibilities do not include just conducting.

Lee said you have to be there for many people. “If somebody is having a bad day, you have to be the one who says, ‘Hey, it’s OK,’” she said. Lee’s drum major philosophy is seen by other leaders of the marching band. “Stephanie is a leader by word and action,” said fellow drum major Allyson Livengood, Plano junior. “She is a hard worker and an encouraging person to be around.” Not only does Lee see to it that each member knows their job in the show, but she also lives as a leader, Livengood said. With more than 200 people, Lee has to adjust to each member’s individual personality. “You accept everyone for who they are without any conditions,” Lee said. For the diverse members of the marching band, the fall semester is filled with performances, including homecoming activities. Traditionally,

the marching band participates in the homecoming bonfire and parade. Lee remembers a memorable experience at the homecoming parade during her freshman year. She said the band stopped along the parade route and played the fight song for a wife of a former band director. All of these performances stem from hours of practice. The marching band practices at least seven hours a week, and additional practices are scheduled for activities such as pep rallies, parades and football games. “Whatever [the practice] is, you get the reinforcement you need to be successful in the performance situation that we’re typically in,” she said. While time is limited, Lee said she believes marching band is a great chance to perform. “It’s great to see your friends every day,” she said, “but it’s great to know that after two hours, you leave and what you did before is no longer your best. You can do it better now than you could before.”

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PAGE 14 October 6, 2006...

Students campaign for seat on NT throne Story By Rebecca Evans

NT will become a monarchy while students prepare for the battle against Florida International. A new period in NT Homecoming tradition will be ushered in with the crowning of the new homecoming king and queen. Elections for king and queen, sponsored by the Student Government Association, began Monday and ended at 6 p.m. Thursday. The court will be announced at the bonfire today, and the results will be announced at the football game on Saturday. According to the SGA bylaws, candidates are required to have at least a 2.5 grade-point average and be in good standing with the university. Candidates must also “file with a partner, one male for king and one female for queen.” SGA bylaws state that candidates can spend up to $300 on fliers, banners and other materials to campaign for votes. Running from the Panhellenic Association and the Interfraternity Council

are Kasie Jackson, president of Kappa Kappa Gamma, and Clint Lee, president of Lambda Chi Alpha. Jackson and Lee said they are going to use their nomination to try to change students negative opinion of the greek community. “You can try and convince someone all day long that we’re not the typical stereotypes,” said Jackson, Garland senior. “You’re not going to know until you get to know them and respect them or get them to join a sorority or fraternity.” Jackson and Lee said they plan on using fliers and facebook.com to gain votes from students but will depend on the greek community for the majority of their votes. “I think being homecoming nominees is a good way for people to realize that we do more than party,” said Lee, Allen junior. “We do a lot of stuff around campus, a lot of community service. More than any other organization on campus, I’d say. ” Jackson said the two are competing for more than just the name. “We want to represent the university and let them know what else we’re involved in,” she said. Candidates are elected in pairs, with second place receiving the title of prince and princess, the third place pair duke and

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TAms board Titanic

PAGE 15 October 6, 2006...

students gear up for annual dance Story By Nancy THai

“Near, far, wherever you are. I believe that the heart does go on … ” Celine Dion’s once hit might make a comeback at this year’s Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science homecoming dance on Nov. 4, where the theme is said to be “Titanic.” The location of the dance has been chosen to be withheld, as per request of the committee heads of the TAMS homecoming dance, seniors Teresa Lee and Best Songsangkhan, but information will be released to TAMS students before the date of the dance. TAMS is a two-year long rigorous program for high school-aged Texas students who exceed well in academia and have an interest in mathematics and science. They reside in McConnell Hall and attend classes taught by NT faculty members while earning dual credits for high school and college. Lee and Songsangkhan have been planning the homecoming dance since May but

will not put together a committee of volunteers until October. TAMS students can attend as long as they’d like to and come whenever they’d like during the length of the dance, which is from 8 p.m. to midnight. Lee described the dress attire as “dress casual” for the night of the dance. “Guys can wear slacks and a button up shirt while girls can get away with wearing slacks and, like, a halter,” Lee said. Mums and garters will not be filtering through McConnell hallways since traditions of homecoming are not heavily emphasized for these students. “Most people just think that we’re all super smart people who just study all the time and have no social life,” Lee said. “But we’re all just like normal teenagers, and we also like to have fun.” Though they may be holding a homecoming dance, alumni are not typically expected to attend the dance. “It’s not like an actual homecoming because we really don’t invite all the old TAMS students back here,” Songsangkhan said. “Like Teresa said, it’s just another dance for the students.” TAMS students can bring friends from

out-of-town and dates to the dance. But again, former TAMS students are typically not expected to be in attendance. “In the past the purpose is not to have exTAMS students attend, but this year we’re thinking about [letting ex-TAMS students attend] more,” Lee said. Since most of the students are academically focused on their studies and courses, some students don’t feel like the dance matters a great deal. “I don’t think that it’s a really big deal,” said Tram Pham, Lewisville senior. “It’s

just another dance that you have to get dressed up for. Basically you go there, dance and go home and study some more.” But Lewisville senior Lisa Jacobs feels like she has got to enjoy her final year at TAMS. Attending the dance will help Jacobs make the most out of her last year. “I expect a dance that I can look back and think of all the good times I had here,” Jacobs said. “I want to make the most of my time here, make the most memories I can with my closest friends so that I’ll have a lifetime to remember them.”

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PAGE 16 October 6, 2006...

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2006 Homecoming Issue  

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