Issuu on Google+

Chapter  18  Study  Questions  

What  are  the  four  membranes  associated  with  amniotic  eggs?    What  is  the  function  of  each  of   these  membranes?   All  amniotes  have  eggs  with  four  extra-­‐embryonic  membranes:    the  amnion,  allantois,  chorion,   and  yolk  sac.   Amnion:    encloses  the  embryo  in  fluid,  cushioning  the  embryo  and  providing  an  aqueous                               medium  for  growth.   Allantois:    forms  a  sac  for  storage  of  metabolic  wastes.   Chorion:    surrounds  the  entire  contents  of  the  egg,  and  like  the  allantois,  is  highly  vascularized.   Yolk  Sac:    Like  eggs  of  anamniotes,  amniotic  eggs  have  a  yolk  sac  for  nutrient  storage,  although         the  yolk  sac  tends  to  larger  in  amniotes.   =============================================================================   How  do  the  skin  and  respiratory  systems  of  amniotes  differ  from  those  of  their  earlier   tetrapod  ancestors?   Rib  ventilation  of  the  lungs.    Amphibians,  like  air-­‐breathing  fishes,  fill  their  lungs  by  pushing  air   from  the  oral  and  pharyngeal  cavities  into  the  lungs.    In  contrast,  amniotes  draw  air  into  their   lungs  (aspiration)  by  expanding  the  thoracic  cavity  using  costal  (rib)  muscles  or  by  pulling  the   liver  (with  other  muscles)  posterior.   Thicker  and  more  waterproof  skin.    Although  skin  structure  varies  widely  among  living  amniotes   and  anamniote  tetrapods,  amniote  skin  tends  to  be  more  keratinized  and  less  permeable  to   water.    A  wide  variety  of  structures  composed  of  keratin,  such  as  scales,  hair,  feathers,  and   claws,  project  from  amniote  skin,  and  the  epidermis  itself  is  more  heavily  keratinized.    Keratin   protects  the  skin  from  physical  trauma,  and  lipids  in  the  skin  limit  water  loss  through  the  skin.     Together,  keratin  and  lipids  limit  the  skin's  ability  to  exchange  respiratory  gases  ;  so,  unlike   most  amphibians,  few  amiotes  use  their  skin  as  a  primary  respiratory  organ.    Amniotes  gas   exchange  takes  place  primarily  in  the  lungs,  which  have  considerably  more  surface  area  than   anamniote  lungs.   =============================================================================   Amniotes  are  divided  into  three  groups  based  on  their  skull  morphologies.  What  are  these   three  groups,  and  how  do  the  skulls  differ?    Which  living  amniotes,  if  any,  originated  from   each  of  these  three  groups?    


Chapter  18  Study  Questions  

Anapsid  Skull:    contains  a  single  orbit  opening.    Most  animals  with  this  skull  are  now  extinct;  but       testudines  (turtles)  appear  to  be  the  only  living  animal  with  the  anapsid  skull.   Synapsid  Skull:    contains  a  single  pair  of  lateral  temporal  openings.    Synapsids  are  often  highly         modified    by  loss  or  fusion  of  skull    bones  that  obscures  the  ancestral  condition.           This  skull  is  currently  present  in  mammals.   Diapsid  Skull:    contains  both  a  pair  of  dorsal  temporal  openings  and  a  pair  of  lateral  temporal         openings.  With  the  exception  of  turtles  (who  lost  their  diapsid  openings),  this  is         the  skull  type  used  by  current  living  reptiles  and  birds.   =============================================================================   Describe  ways  in  which  non-­‐avian  reptiles  are  more  functionally  or  structurally  suited  for   terrestriality  than  amphibians.   A.    Non-­‐avian  reptiles  have  better  developed  lungs  than  do  amphibians.   B.    Non-­‐avian  reptiles  have  tough,  dry,  scaly  skin  that  protects  against  desiccation  and  physical     injury.   C.    The  amniotic  egg  of  non-­‐avian  reptiles  permits  rapid  development  of  large  young  in     relatively  dry  environments.   D.    The  jaws  of  non-­‐avian  reptiles  are  efficiently  designed  for  crushing  or  gripping  prey.   E.    Non-­‐avian  reptiles  have  an  efficient  and  versatile  circulatory  system  and  higher  blood     pressure  than  amphibians.   F.    Non-­‐avian  reptiles  have  efficient  strategies  for  water  conservation.   G.    The  nervous  system  of  non-­‐avian  reptiles  is  more  complex  than  that  of  amphibians.    In     lizards  and  snakes,  olfaction  is  assisted  by  a  well-­‐developed  Jacobson's  organ,  a     specialized  olfactory  chamber  in  the  roof  of  the  mouth.   =============================================================================   Describe  the  principal  structural  features  of  turtles  that  would  distinguish  them  from  any   other     non-­‐avian  reptilian  order.   Of  all  reptiles,  turtles  (  Order:  testudines  )  are  unique  that  they  are  enclosed  in  shells  consisting   of  a  dorsal  carapace  and  a  ventral  plastron.    The  shell  is  so  much  part  of  the  animal  that  it  is   fused  to  the  thoracic  vertebrae  and  ribs.    Because  the  ribs  are  fused  to  the  shell,  the  turtle   employ  certain  abdominal  and  pectoral  muscles  as  a  "diaphragm"  to  draw  air  inward  and  out.  


Chapter  18  Study  Questions  

Also  turtles  have  no  teeth;  but  their  jaws  have  tough  keratinized  plates  for  gripping  food.   =============================================================================   How  might  nest  temperature  affect  egg  development  in  turtles?    In  crocodilians?       All  turtles  bury  their  shelled,  amniotic  eggs  in  the  ground.    In  some  turtle  families  nest   temperature  determines  the  sex  of  the  hatchlings.    In  turtles  low  nest  temperature  during   incubation  produce  males,  and  high  temperatures  produce  females.    As  with  turtles,   crocodilians'  nest  temperature  of  the  eggs  also  determines  the  sex  ratio  of  the  offspring.     However,  unlike  turtles,  low  nest  temperature  produces  only  females,  whereas  high  nest   temperature  produces  only  males.   =============================================================================   In  what  ways  are  the  special  senses  of  snakes  similar  to  those  of  lizards,  and  in  what  ways   have  they  evolved  for  specialized  feeding  strategies?   Most  snakes  have  relatively  poor  vision.     Most  snakes  employ  chemical  senses  rather  than  vision  or  vibration  to  hunt  their  prey.   Boids  (pythons  and  boas)  and  pit  vipers  have  very  special  heat-­‐sensitive  pit  organs  on  their     heads;  with  dense  free  nerve  endings    that  are  extremely  sensitive  to  radiant  energy.   In  addition  to  the  usual  olfactory  areas  in  the  nose,  snakes  have  a  pair  of  pit-­‐like  Jacobson's   organs  in  the  roof  of  the  mouth.    These  organs  are  lined  with  an  olfactory  epithelium  and  are   richly  innervated.    The  forked  tongue,  flicked  through  the  air,  collects  scent  molecules;  the   tongue  is  then  drawn  past  the  Jacobson's  organs;  lastly  information  transmitted  to  the  brain.     Lizards  have  a  keen  vision  that  is  important  for  finding  food.   Lizards  (like  snakes)  do  not  use  hearing  in  day  to  day  activity.    ============================================================================   What  is  the  function  of  Jacobson's  organ  in  snakes  and  lizards?   In  addition  to  the  usual  olfactory  areas  in  the  nose,  snakes  and  lizards  have  a  pair  of  pit-­‐like   Jacobson's  organs  in  the  roof  of  the  mouth.    These  organs  are  lined  with  an  olfactory   epithelium  and  are  richly  innervated.    The  forked  tongue,  flicked  through  the  air,  collects  scent   molecules;  the  tongue  is  then  drawn  past  the  Jacobson's  organs;  lastly  information  transmitted   to  the  brain.    


Chapter  18  Study  Questions  

 


Zoology Chapter 18