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THE SCRIPPS HOWARD SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS . HAMPTON UNIVERSITY

SUMMER 2017

PLUS :

5 0 Y EARS OF M E D I A ARTS

PLUS::

FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE

EXPERIENCES IN MOTHER CHINA


GALLERY

Hampton University Freshman, Maya Smith, walks to class on a cool morning. She listens to music on her headphones to stay focused before her class in the Armstrong Building.

Photograph by India Anderson

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ISSUE NO. 4 | SUMMER | 2 0 1 7 COVER: SCRIPPS HOWARD STUDENT FINE’ THOMPSON POSES WITH CHINESE CHILDREN. PHOTO BY DR. KANGMING MA

FEATURES

BELOW: HAMPTON UNIVERSITY JAC STUDENTS MIAH HARRIS, LEFT TO RIGHT, TRAYONNA HENDRICKS, FINE` THOMPSON, ZUO YUE, CHINESE UNIVERSITY STUDENT, AND ZHAVI HARRIS POSE DURING THEIR VISIT TO THE LOUSHAN PASS IN THE GUIZHOU PROVINCE, CHINA. PHOTO BY DR. KANGMING MA

UPCOMING EVENTS

AUGUST 9-12 The Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication conference is Aug. 9-12 in Chicago. “Closing the Gap: Media, Research and the Profession,” is the theme. Aejmc.org

AUGUST 9-13 Four JAC representatives will participate in the Student Media Projects at the National Association of Black Journalists convention in New Orleans

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PHOTO BY DR. KANGMING MA

AFTER VISITING THE LOUSHAN PASS IN THE GUIZHOU PROVINCE, CHINESE AND AMERICAN STUDENTS POSE FOR A GROUP PHOTO.

12 ALUMNI REMEMBER THE HISTORY OF HAMPTON UNIVERSITY’S MASS MEDIA ARTS PROGRAM DURING ITS 50TH ANNIVERSARY.

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DEPARTMENTS

DEAN

B. DA’VIDA PLUMMER EXECUTIVE EDITOR

WAYNE DAWKINS GRAPHICS EDITOR

MICHAEL DIBARI JR. WRITERS

KAT DESHIELDS ZHAVI J. HARRIS FINE THOMPSON TRAYONNA HENDRICKS PHOTOGRAPHERS

INDIA ANDERSON NIGIL CRAWFORD COPY EDITORS

ALLISON SEYMOUR WAS THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER AT HAMPTON UPCOMING EVENTS UNIVERSITY’S FOUNDER’S DAY.

ALUMNI NOTES

19 TONY BROWN, DEAN EMERITUS OF THE SCRIPPS HOWARD SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS, GETS INDUCTED IN THE 2016 CLASS OF NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BLACK JOURNALISTS HALL OF FAME.

22 JUDY CLABES, RETIRED SCRIPPS HOWARD FOUNDATION EXECUTIVE, RETURNED TO HAMPTON UNIVERSITY.

CONTRIBUTORS

DREW BERRY LORRAINE BLACKWELL PATRICIA BOONE ALLIE-RYAN BUTLER EARL CALDWELL MAVIS CARR WILLIAM LEONARD KANGMING MA FRANCIS MCDONALD LYNN WALTZ APRIL WOODARD

Congratulations

2017

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DANYELLE GARY

Scripps Howard Graduates

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WELCOME

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Media employers want Scripps Howard graduates. That desire was evident in the many trips top executives and recruiters made to our Journalism and Communications school during the 2016-2017 school year. Disney/ABC/ESPN visited Sept. 7-8 and returned Jan. 25-26. At commencement, a graduate said matter-of-fact that she would be starting an internship with the Sunday public affairs show “This Week with George Stephanopoulos.” Another May graduate said she had an interview appointment days after commencement about an opportunity at “Good Morning America.” At Scripps Days Oct. 25-26, executives and recruiters interviewed and placed students at the Semester in Washington national correspondence, and at internships at Scripps newspapers, television and interactive that includes the Food Network and DiY digital channels. NBC Universal stopped by Nov. 16 to interview for internships. Nia Warfield, JAC’15, was a CNBC intern in winter 2016, and Caelyn Sutton and Arriana McLymore – newly minted ’17 JAC grads – were 2016 summer interns at the business cable channel. Leaders of The Marshall Project visited Feb. 24 and briefed a Scripps Howard auditorium student crowd about opportunities in non-profit investigative journalism. Bill Keller, former executive editor and foreign correspondent with The New York Times, directs the justice-mission enterprise. Alumni offer opportunities when other companies do not approach officially. Jay Franklin, JAC ’07, a longtime associate/producer at Comedy Central’s the “Daily Show” left the show last spring for the West Coast. Franklin lobbied a SHS professor who previously taught him to offer up candidates for summer internships. Two names were proffered. Chelsea Harrison, a junior journalism major from Chesapeake, Virginia was awarded a summer “Daily Show” internship in New York. Want proof that Hampton journalism and communications graduates prepare to lead? Exhibit A is Rashida Jones, MMA ’02, who last spring was appointed senior vice president of specials for NBC News and MSNBC. She was previously managing editor of MSNBC dayside programming. Jones has been integral in the network’s rebranding and focus on breaking news coverage. Under her leadership, MSNBC dayside programming saw year-to-year triple-digit growth, a trend that continues. In making the promotion announcement to staff, NBC News president Noah Oppenheim said Jones “brings deep knowledge of cable, breaking news coverage and events programming to her new role.” Before her time with MSNBC, Jones was the news director for WIS-TV, the NBC affiliate in Columbia, South Carolina, where she rebuilt and rebranded the news team to focus on investigative reporting. The station was solidly No. 1 in the market. Rashida Jones, MMA ’02 Jones was also director of live programming at The Weather Channel, leading network coverage and programming for some of the world’s most historic weather events such as the 2005 Hurricane Katrina event. Congratulations, Rashida Jones and thank you for reminding alumni, students and faculty what the standard of excellence looks like. AT PRESS TIME, alumni and friends of the Scripps Howard School raised $317,000 of funds needed to match a $500,000 21st Century Fox challenge grant for digital media innovation. Left is $183,000 in order to meet the goal. Let’s pay down the balance and reach $1 million. Checks payable to Scripps Howard School. Please indicate “21st Century Fox Challenge Grant” on all donations.-- Wayne Dawkins

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EXPERIENCE ON THE

MOTHER ROAD SCRIPPS HOWARD STUDENTS VISIT CHINA TO WORK ALONGSIDE CHINESE FILM CREWS STORY BY ZHAVIER J. HARRIS PHOTO BY DR. KANGMING MA


By Zhavier Harris

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F E AT U R E

ast summer, I was selected by ICN TV Network and Beauty Media Inc. to work as a reporter and cinematographer for the television show “The Long March.” With this opportunity, I traveled through 13 provinces in the Mainland of China. My journey started around the midway point of second semester, junior year. Dr. Kangming Ma, an assistant professor at the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications, presented an internship opportunity to me during my International Journalism course. We discussed the terms of the China trip. I listened to the information and thought hard about the opportunity. I had never fathomed embarking on a journey to overseas lands. My family and I have very limited experience traveling across this nation and have never ventured to other parts of the world. Finally, I came to the conclusion that I really wanted to go. Before embarking on the journey, I came across a plethora of obstacles. Obstacle one: my parents. They had always been protective of me, especially when it came to leaving the house. They also weren’t ready for me be released from their loving grasp and temporarily live with someone else at such a young age. I am grateful for their love, but due to the circumstances, when the trip to China came up, I was excited about touring a new side of the world and experiencing a whole new type of life. Through strong negotiation and weeks of convincing my parents of my newfound maturity, in late March they approved of my going on the trip. My next obstacle, after discovering that the trip was in motion, was applying for my passport and visa. Lord God, getting those two items were a hassle! Inconveniently, my family moved from Chicago, Illinois, to Springfield, Illinois, when they came to the realization that they wanted children. Well, that’s all fine and dandy, until the moment came for me to get my visa for the trip. The passport went smoothly. It was simple; I went to Walgreens, got a picture taken for the passport, filled out an application, then WHAMMO! I received my passport. OK, same thing for the visa, I thought to myself. Wrong. In order to receive a visa, you have to send all the necessary information to a Chinese Consulate. It is here that authorities approve of your going on the trip. In Illinois, the consulate nearest to me was in Chicago. At this particular consulate, they did not allow “mail-in” applications. I had to drive three


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and a half hours to Chicago to turn in my application. The first time I traveled up, my visa was declined. The second, third and fourth times, my visa was again declined. I had traveled 2,019 miles and spent over 35 hours on the road in efforts to get my visa for the trip! Months passed. I was scheduled to travel in August. My heart was heavy, and my hopes were filled with doubt. But God came through in the clutch for me, as he so reliably does. I was advised by fellow intern Larry-Michael Mencer-Aclise to mail my visa to Houston. The visa came in literally two days before my scheduled flight to China. My team consisted of Miah Harris, Mencer-Aclise and Dr. Ma. We landed in Beijing on Wednesday, Aug. 17. It is not an exaggeration when I say we had smiles that stretched from ear to ear. I found it captivating the moment we left the plane and began the car ride throughout the city to the first hotel. The hotels, by the way, were what I call “a wonder” because I always wondered what quality of hotel we would encounter. The hotels ranged from five stars to what arguably

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shouldn’t even have a star at all. The living conditions dramatically varied, based on what part of China you entered. My roommate was Mencer-Aclise. He and I became particularly close, as we sometimes experienced what many call “the struggle,” which included food, living conditions, sleep deprivation and communication. I recall on numerous occasions our battles with the hotel bugs and roaches. China’s bugs are no joke! Imagine an American beetle dipped in orange or turquoise paint and fed steroids throughout its entire adult life. Those are the bugs in China. We will never forget scrambling around in frantic paranoia, searching under beds, scanning the walls and triple checking the ceilings for large critters. It would be impossible to forget the struggle of not knowing how to properly use Chinese chopsticks, all while desperately trying to scarf down a meal of scrambled eggs and white rice every day. My body and taste buds definitely had to adjust to the very different array of food the culture provided. As many times


as I wanted a burger and fries, I’d just close my eyes and eat the rice and eggs. I guess when you’re hungry everything tastes like steak. My relief was being a part of two food shows. It is here where I was blessed to experience the best Chinese cuisine the world had to offer. My favorite meal was one I shared with the CEO and president of ICN TV Network and Beauty Media Inc., Yan Li. We traveled to one of the most rural parts of China during one of my final days in the country and visited a high-class hotel where we were served a meal comprised of mainly bamboo. Yes, bamboo as in the tree. Literally, every course, every dish, every item on the table that night was made with bamboo. I was hesitant and wondered what I had gotten myself into but, surprisingly, the bamboo was amazing! The chef was able to turn bamboo into all sorts of delicious dishes, including bamboo duck wraps, bamboo noodles, bamboo soup and bamboo pork with rice. Besides the wonderful people and views, this was the highlight of my trip. This trip exposed me to so much more than I ever could have imagined. I overcame my fear of heights when traveling up and through the mountains; went on my first boat ride when we canoed down some of China’s most historic rivers; witnessed my first waterfall ever; traveled internationally for the first time; reported, danced and delivered spoken word on national television and met wonderful, beautiful people. From the beginning through the end of the trip, I was surrounded by loving, kind spirits and souls. The heart of China is the heart of the people. I’ve met hundreds of wonderful people and made connections that I will never forget. China truly changed my perspective on life. As I reflect on the trip, the pictures, videos, sights and sounds of China are all beautiful in their own right, but there is one memory in particular I will hold onto and cherish until I perish. The people of China and the crew from ICN graced me, a black man, a man who didn’t understand the culture or customs of their land; a man they could not fully communicate with due to language barriers; someone who dressed differently; acted differently; looked differently and wore different clothing, with pure, genuine love. They didn’t care that I was a different type of person. They cared for me because I am a person. I will forever remember their smiles and laughs and the time we shared on the roads we passed.

PREVIOUS PAGES: VIEW OF LONGSHENG COUNTY, GUANGXI ZHUANG AUTONOMOUS REGION IN SOUTH CENTRAL CHINA. OPPOSITE, TOP LEFT: ZHAVIER HARRIS POSES WITH CHINESE UNIVERSITY STUDENT ZUO YUE IN FRONT OF THE CHISHUI WATERFALL, IN THE GUIZHOU PROVINCE, AS TRAYONNA HENDRICKS FILMS THE SCENE. THIS PAGE TOP: LARRY-MICHAEL MENCER-ALISE GIVES A BROTHERLY HUG TO A CHINESE BOY WHILE VISITING CHISHUI, GUIZHOU PROVINCE. BOTTOM: TRAYONNA HENDRICKS POSES WITH ZUO YUE FROM GUIZHOU PROVINCE. PHOTOS BY DR. KANGMING MA

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F E AT U R E

UNFORGETTABLE FLAVORS, UNCONVENTIONAL DISHES By Finé Thompson

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lying, communicating and eating. While mentally preparing for my trip to China, my largest concerns revolved around three things: the 17-hour flight that loomed ahead of me (mind you, this was my second time flying on an airplane, my first international flight and I had an irrational fear of airplanes and any activity that required being more than 100 feet off the ground); communicating effectively while only knowing how to say three words in Chinese and what we were going to eat? Naturally, my biggest concern was the food. Many details of the trip were vague, but the meal plan was shrouded in mystery. We knew that food would be provided, but that was the extent of our knowledge. I was determined to embark on my journey completely open-minded, but who wouldn’t be concerned? I had only eaten American Chinese food a few times in my life, just enough to know that I enjoy shrimp fried rice and that I lacked the coordination to properly use chopsticks. Before the trip, I believed American Chinese food and authentic Chinese food were essentially the same. I did not know what to expect, but I figured that whatever we were served would be paired with vegetables and copious amounts of rice. I had hopes of gorging myself on delicious dumplings, noodles, rice and seafood. Maybe I would even start a new healthy lifestyle and return to the Untied States a changed woman. That didn’t happen. However, I did return to the United States with a great appreciation for the unforgettable flavors and unconventional dishes that I tried during my 19-day adventure across China. We traveled across Southwestern China through Guizhou, Yunnan and Sichuan. I quickly learned that these provinces were famous for their spicy dishes. I’m not fond of spicy food. The American students were served “special” dishes in an attempt to accommodate food allergies. Initially, the notion was greatly appreciated, however, the meals became repetitive quickly. Breakfast usually consisted of watermelon, rice porridge, pastries, hard boiled eggs, warm milk and noodles that were way too spicy. Lunch and dinner were essentially the same every day: potatoes, rice, tofu, a myriad of vegetables, beef, more potatoes, eggs, pork (fat), soups that no one touched and even more potatoes. For the first half of the trip, no matter where we traveled, the meals were virtually the same — bland or unbearably spicy. I began craving American food on the third day of the trip. By day five, I was whining about how much I missed french fries and pizza.

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The native food wasn’t bad by any stretch of the imagination. In fact, there were several dishes that I greatly enjoyed and anticipated having daily. My favorite dish was egg and tomato stir fry with rice. The foods and flavors were unlike anything I had ever tasted, but adjusting to a completely new diet in such a short amount of time was difficult. Some of the dishes were bizarre. Ironically, the strangest dishes were Chinese delicacies. On several occasions we were served chicken feet, animal intestines, fish with head and eyes still attached to the body, bees, bamboo and crickets that floated in a mysterious soup. At one event, we were even presented with a cooked chicken head, much to everyone’s chagrin. We later found out that the minority’s culture only presented chicken heads to honored guests and important figures. Before the trip, I believed I had a moderately healthy diet. I realize now that I was wrong. Traveling through China made me realize how unhealthy American food actually is and, subsequently, how unhealthy I am. In China, I did not have the option of eating fries, pizza, pasta, hamburgers or any other


COMFORT AND SATISFACTION By Trayonna Hendricks

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LOCAL CHILDREN FLOCK TO TAKE PHOTOS WITH HAMPTON STUDENT MIAH HARRIS IN TANGDAO COUNTRY, HUNAN PROVINCE. PHOTO BY DR. KANGMING MA

deep-fried foods daily, even though I searched regularly and prayed for those foods. When I reminisce about the food that I ate, although I complained and anticipated returning home to a large pizza, I am thankful. Nineteen days without Western food seemed like a lifetime, but during those days, I was forced to eat healthier and completely reevaluate my diet. The food also made me more open-minded in regards to trying new dishes and experiencing new cultures. China changed me in several ways; I could write a novel explaining exactly how I’ve changed in excruciatingly meticulous detail. However, where food is concerned, I’m a little less picky, a little more health conscious and infinitely more adventurous. The writer is a senior in the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications.

n Sunday, Sept. 4, four Hampton University Scripps Howard School of Journalism students and I had the privilege of covering “The Red Army Crossing Chishui River Flash Mob Show,” held at the Chishui River site in the ancient town of Bing’an Chishui City, Guizhou Province. This appeared to have been one of the longest events we covered throughout our entire journey. It felt like we were there forever, starting with many interviews from local Chinese networks and our sponsored network, ICN Television. This was a pivotal event as this was the Chinese way of paying tribute to the soldiers of the Red Army who crossed the Chishui River four times to defeat its enemy. There were many performances lined up, including musical selections by a mass choir and stunts by participating troops. Before the performances took place, all the American and Chinese students had to connect with their chosen partners and share their friendship lock to place on the bridge. I had three Chinese students partnering with me; their American names were Crystal, Doris and Roy. We all held hands with each other as we walked toward the bridge to place the locks. On each lock there was a personalized message written by a student, sharing positive feelings for one another. It was such a beautiful moment for me that I could not stop smiling; it was not, however, the last moment that my heart would be touched that day. While walking toward the troops for the flash mob show, a man from the crowd frantically stopped me while holding out his phone. I turned to look at him, and he had this huge smile spreading across his face, gesturing me to look at his phone. Because of previous experiences with Chinese citizens and their phones, I assumed he wanted a picture, but to my surprise, he already had one to show me. As I smiled and turned to look at the screen of his phone, smiling back at me was a picture of our U.S. President Barack Obama. He too was in China taking care of business for our country. My immediate response was to laugh and grasp my heart saying, “Yes, that’s my president,” and it was at that moment I felt a wave of comfort and satisfaction. I stood there sharing a piece of historical Chinese culture with a Chinese man who so enthusiastically wanted to remind me of my own. The writer is a senior in the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications.

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HONORING JOURNEYS OF H A M P TO N U N I V E R S I TY MASS MEDIA ARTS ALUMNI Mass Media Arts/JAC school celebrates 50th Anniversary By Kat DeShields The television studio and control room, radio station WHOV-FM 88.1, the five media labs, and the hightech classrooms found within the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications at Hampton University all started with one faculty member, 11 students and one typewriter. Fifty years ago, housed in Armstrong Hall, the mass media arts program was established within the School of Liberal Arts and Education at Hampton Institute. Founded in 1967, the mass media arts program is reported to be the first media program among HBCUs. In 2002, the mass media arts program evolved into an independent school upon the development of an industry-academy partnership with the Scripps Howard Foundation. It is the result of more than 35 years of dedicated mass mediarelated instruction at Hampton University. In this edition of JAC magazine, some alumni of HU’s mass media arts program were asked to share their experiences in the program and how those experiences shaped their careers.

Sheila Solomon, Class of 1974

Solomon serves on the board of directors for the Journalism and Women Symposium, and is an editor/producer and internship coordinator at Rivet News Radio. She has received numerous honors and awards, including the Ida B. Wells Award from the NABJ and Medill School of Journalism and the Peggy Lewis LeCompte Communication and Journalism Award. Solomon was inducted into the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications Hall of Fame at HU. “I chose the mass media arts program after

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deciding I wasn’t going to become a doctor. There’s so many of us who start out thinking we’re going to do something else. I can remember sitting in chemistry class at HU, and while I did enjoy science, I wasn’t going to enjoy it for four more years. I had to think about

what else interested me. Reading and writing came to mind, and people said I was good at the writing thing. So, I decided to pursue mass media. “Once you get involved in the major, if you’re doing well, all these opportunities come your way. During the school year, Dr. George Cullen brought in people from newspapers who were looking to hire, graduates from Hampton University, and people who were working for major publications across the country. In 1973, there weren’t that many people of color in anyone’s newsroom. It was still a rarity. By my junior year, I was already working internships and going to school at the same time. I was interning at a weekly newspaper in downtown Hampton that’s no longer in print. The opportunity came to me because


PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE HAMPTONIAN , 1967/68 DEPICTED HAMPTON STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN WHOV. PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF THE HAMPTONIAN

Dr. Cullen thought that I’d be a good newspaper reporter. He started introducing me to people who worked at the Daily Press. Cullen went to the interview, sat with me, and spoke on my behalf. “When I was capable of hiring people, it made me realize what it meant when a professor invests in students like that. Writing a reference is one thing, but professors are sticking their neck out when they bring in a student to meet with you. That doesn’t happen often, but when it does, hiring managers need to pay attention. Usually, it means that student is a good hire. “There’s rarely a day that goes by if I’m thinking about my career that I don’t think about the people who were instrumental in guiding me and seeing things in me that I didn’t see in myself. Dr. William Kearney, (retired) Col. Robert Cook, Dr. Lottie Knight and Dr. George Cullen are just a few of the mass media arts professors who I owe much gratitude for their guidance -- even years after my professional career began. I walk into my office and saw my Kappa Tau Alpha certificate -- wouldn’t have that if not for a professor at HU who saw something in me that I didn’t see.”

Thonnia Lee, Class of 1985

Lee is the associate director of communications for Habitat

for Humanity International. She is also a member of the American Society of Journalists and Authors. Her career includes writing and management roles for companies and institutions such as Delta Air Lines, the Atlanta JournalConstitution and Morehouse College. “As a student in the 1980s, we wrote our copy using a typewriter, and if you were lucky it was electric. Whiteout was always needed and if you had too many corrections, you might as well start again. It was a messy sight to see whiteout blotches all over the page and hand-written edits. Spellcheck was a brilliant idea. I could have used it back then. But I can still hear the clicking from the keys of 30 typewriters in the classroom during a test. Fifteen minutes to digest information and write that story. Nobody hears the ding of the carriage return any more. “Dr. [William] Kearney would stand at his door, full of intimidation, in between classes. I learned years later when he lived in Atlanta, what a softy he was. Joe Ritchie was my favorite instructor. He is a former Washington Post writer and editor who helped turn that light bulb on for me. His intellectual curiosity helped to shape my view of journalContinued on following page

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Mass Media Arts Continued

The Principles Of Leadership Powerful resource for individuals, non-profits and corporations by icon of higher education, Dr. William R. Harvey who explains 10 principles that distinguish effective leaders

About Dr. William R. Harvey Dr. William R. Harvey has served as President of Hampton University for 39 years. During his tenure, he has introduced innovations that have solidified Hampton’s stellar position among the nation’s colleges and universities. His extraordinary leadership is reflected in the growth and quality of the University’s student population, academic programs, physical facilities and financial base. Hampton University has built the first proton therapy cancer treatment center in the Commonwealth of Virginia -- an unparalled hub for cancer treatment, research and technology. An astute businessman, Dr. Harvey has applied his business acumen to the needs of Hampton University. In the process, he established student scholarships, created jobs, provided services, and increased the number of African-American entrepreneurs, while expanding the tax base in the City of Hampton. In addition to the distinguished leadership Dr. Harvey has provided to Hampton University, he is the sole owner of the Pepsi Cola Bottling Company of Houghton, Michigan.

Inspiring and motivational, Principles of Leadership: The Harvey Leadership Model explains how you can apply 10 key principles in your life and career.

Get your copy TODAY http://PrinciplesOfLeadershipBook.com 14

ism in a real way. His constant complaint about the wire stories in the local paper (where I wrote obits at night) helped me understand the importance of local reporting. What does it mean to the person reading your paper? “I wished we had the Internet back then. My senior thesis was “The Death of the Afternoon Daily.” I was thinking about television news replacing the need for an evening paper. Who knew how much would change in the way we collected information? Afternoon dailies died long before the 24-hour news cycle online and on cable. “Lottie Knight once told me my sentences were too simple, elementary. This confused me because I thought we were supposed to be writing on the eighth grade level. I can still see her looking over her glasses at me. I was always pushed for something better. This shy kid was forced to grow thick skin; forced to accept tough feedback. For this, I remain grateful. “My advice: Remain fearless. Don’t let disappointments, challenges, or life’s distractions stop you. There will be changes in direction that make sense and setbacks to learn from. But regroup as quickly as possible with the next plan of action.”

Michael Dutton, Class of 1971

Dutton is a senior communications manager for the Executive Leadership Council in Alexandria, Virginia. “I was a Math major before I spent my spring break in New York City during my sophomore year at Hampton. My sister had arranged for me to spend a couple of days shadowing her friend Ed Bradley, who was a reporter for WCBS-AM Newsradio 88. Watching Ed work and file stories from a small panel van at curbside impressed me. The immediacy and impact of news reporting was attractive to me. I returned to campus with a curiosity about Hampton’s new Mass Media Arts major and canvassed several classmates pursuing it, including Maynard Eaton. By the time I started my junior year that fall, I had changed my major to Mass Media Arts. Armstrong Hall was a hub of activity and excitement. The “modern” facility was home to television and radio studios, a theater and a music wing. It was like a separate school of the arts and literature. There, I learned about the


integration of reporting, writing and PR from Col. Robert Cook, a retired military leader and editor from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “I had an evening radio program on WHOV-FM and was able to broadcast interviews with Eubie Blake, The Friends of Distinction and others performing on campus. I started my radio program with Wes Montgomery’s “A Day in the Life,” adapted from the Beatles 1967 release, and closed my program with The Moody Blues’ “Days of Future Past.” My program was an eclectic blend that included jazz, rock, R&B and gospel. But, hey, it was the 1960s. I had heard that people traveling through Hampton often listened to WHOV and liked it. “My classmate Maynard Eaton was one of two Hampton Mass Media Arts majors working as reporters for local news station WVEC-TV. Somehow, he convinced the station manager to hire me as one of the studio cameramen on the 6 and 11 p.m. broadcasts. It was a better source of income after my two jobs maintaining the campus pool and working as a driver in the campus motor pool. “Years later I settled in New York. My first jobs included working as a wire copy desk assistant at WCBS Newsradio 88, eventually moving over to WRVR-FM in the Riverside Church near Columbia University where Robert Siegel and Adam Clayton Powell Jr. were experimenting with long-form reporting, a precursor to National Public Radio. A mentor hired me as a studio stage manager on The Electric Company [PBS]. “Hampton turned out to be an incredible resource that prepared me to compete in multiple roles in the greatest media city in the world. – Michael Dutton, MMA ’71

Spencer Christian, Class of 1971

Over his 45 years in TV news, Christian has worked as a news reporter, sportscaster, talk show host, and weather forecaster for shows such as ABC’s Good Morning America to interviewing thenU.S. Sen. Barack Obama just before he announced his candidacy for President. For the past 18 years, he’s called San Francisco his home as the weather forecaster for ABC7. He is also the author of several children’s books. “I was a part of the first mass media arts class. In 1965, I entered HU as a math major. I was one of those weird students who tested equally in both the verbal and math sections. Freshman year, I took calculus 2 without ever having taken calculus 1. I struggled with it, so I decided to turn to my other love. The late 1960s was a revolutionary time in this country. You had the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and the women’s rights movement. It was fascinating to see how the media covered the events at the time. I chose to major in English and minor in mass media arts in the 66-67 school year. I never took any broadcast classes. I only took print, and then I ended up with this crazy career in broadcast journalism. “All freshmen were required to take a public speaking course. On the morning of my speech, I overslept. When I woke up, I realized that class was

PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE HAMPTONIAN , 1967/68 DEPICTED STAFF MEMBERS OF THE HAMPTON SCRIPT. PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF THE HAMPTONIAN

starting in five minutes. I ran across campus and arrived 15 minutes late. The professor said, ‘Ok Mr. Christian, you’re next.’ I was breathless, rushed, and had no notes. I said, “Ok,” and stood up there and just did it. It was probably one of my best performances ever. It taught me that I was able to perform under pressure. In journalism, there is a certain element of pressure. You don’t have unlimited time to gather information, and you may have to put something together quickly. Delivering that speech gave me confidence that I can perform under pressure. I got an A+ on that speech; the professor was blown away. “Every effective communicator that carves out an identity in this business is someone who is comfortable with his or herself. Those who conform to the cookie cutter idea of what a journalist is supposed to be have average (or no) careers. My advice to aspiring journalists is to never be afraid to show your true self. Show people who you are and take the risk of making yourself vulnerable, of making mistakes. “This has worked for me for 46 years.”

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ALUMNI NOTES

FOUNDERS DAY SPEAKER FOUND HER CALLING AT HAMPTON U.

ALLISON SEYMOUR SPOKE AS THE GUEST SPEAKER AT HAMPTON UNIVERSITY’S FOUNDER’S DAY. PHOTO COURTESY OF HAMPTON’S UNIVERSITY RELATIONS

By India Anderson Hampton University and Mass Media Arts alumna Allison Seymour was the guest speaker at Founder’s Day Sunday, Jan. 29. The accomplished Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications Hall of Famer said she was overwhelmed with excitement to come back and share her words of wisdom with Hampton University students. Seymour said she intends to encourage and remind students to let their lives do the singing like the words of the alma mater. Now working with Fox 5 News, Washington, and with 28 years of television experience under your belt, Seymour understands that success takes patience. After four great years of enjoying the waterfront, joining the Gamma Iota Chapter

of Delta Sigma Theta, and feeding her passion for television in the former mass media arts program inside Armstrong Hall, Seymour graduated from Hampton in 1988. Seymour started her television career at ABC News Washington Bureau and worked behind the scenes as a production assistant and desk assistant. She then decided to continue her educational journey at the University of South Carolina at Columbia. After receiving her Master’s of Mass Communication, Seymour worked as a production assistant and a writer for a local news station. After her first on-air job at WUTR-TV in Utica, New York. Seymour moved to WBNG-TV in Binghamton, New York and became the main Continued on page 19

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Hardy “Jay” Lang has been in radio for 42 years, starting at the age of 14 and following behind his father Jimmy “the gator” Lang; who was also a radio broadcaster. Lang’s father was the first black announcer in 1949 at WDAR radio station in Savannah, Georgia and strongly influenced his son’s desire to work in radio. In 2008, Hampton University’s radio station Smooth 88.1 WHOV-FM brought Lang on board. “They told me that they needed someone to come and turn their radio station around and asked if I was interested and here I am,” he said. “I believe we’re the oldest in the country, we’ve been around more than anybody else, and so we kind of set the standard of excellence for college stations.” Hampton University’s renowned radio station Smooth 88.1 WHOV-FM was founded in 1941. With three main formats, jazz, gospel, and R&B, Smooth 88.1 considers it a station that has something for everybody. “Even though we call ourselves a smooth jazz station, we have gospel in the morning which has always been a staple in black communities, then you go into the regular format, and then the talk show element which keeps us connected [and] keeps the community connected with what’s going on,” said Lang. “Radio stations don’t do that anymore.” What Lang appreciates most is the freedom that university President William R. Harvey has given him to program the station: “I bought back

Nigil Crawford

Hampton University’s

that community involvement to the radio station and we’ve been able to program something that people like. We have talk shows every day Monday-Friday. When people ask how far is your station heard [or] how many people can you reach, that’s a relative question because radio is no longer defined by a radio tower. We have listeners all around the world; in Asia, Europe and Africa through our affiliation with iHeart Radio and Sirius XM.” What makes this station special is its mission. According to its website WHOV is to serve as a practicum for Hampton University students and to “operate in the public interest, convenience and/necessity” as mandated by the Federal Communications Commission. “Without having the actual degree of professor, everyone here calls me Professor Lang and I guess with the years of experience, I’ll take that,” he said. Lang also said, “Outside of being a hands-on, real-time, teaching lab for students, the station is here to give the Hampton Roads community and now the world via iHeart Radio a radio station that connects with the community like it used to be way back when.” -- Trayonna Hendricks

WHOV, iHeart and Soul of the Community 17


ALUMNI NOTES

helped to pioneer audience development for T Brand Studio, the award-winning creative studio at The New York Times. In this role, she managed on-site and paid social media

distributing CBS Evening News packages to affiliates and international clients. Through her current experience, Clough is involved in the entire newsgathering process. She regularly coordinates and orders live feeds, packages, and video material to be distributed domestically and internationally.

Jentil Neal, JAC ’15, joined the WILX-TV, Lansing, Michigan news team in February as a reporter. She started out behind the camera as a producer for WCAV-TV CBS 19 in Charlottesville, Virginia. While working there, she was also able to do a little reporting. It was then that she decided to pursue reporting full-time. During her tenure at Hampton University, she immediately got involved with the university’s newscast WHOV News and “The View from Hampton U” television show.

campaigns for more than 50 branded content executions while collecting, analyzing and presenting performance data for each campaign.

Jess Moore Matthews, JAC ’12

As the social media manager for the First Lady of New York City, Jess Moore Matthews, JAC ’12, run point on Chirlane McCray’s social media strategy to better connect her with everyday New Yorkers and to bolster her many successful efforts such as expanded access to Pre-K, feminine hygiene products and mental health care (#ThriveNYC). Before arriving at the Mayor’s Office, Moore Matthews

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Kayla J. Clough, JAC ’12, is an associate

producer at CBS News in New York. She produces content for morning, afternoon and nightly newscasts that is used by more than 200 CBS affiliates. Her responsibilities also include

Stephanie James, JAC ’08 “If I inspire you, you are my inspiration,” said Stephanie James, JAC ’08. Grateful to work for a Fortune 50 company for eight consecutive years after college, but the year 2017 was different. James left everything behind to travel to 12 countries in 12 months and share her gifts with the world. “I am an inspirational poet, author, singer, host and motivational speaker,” she explained. “I am building a game changer that will ‘bridge the borders for all artists worldwide.’” For more info about James’ journey and how you can be a part visit www.justavesselpoetry.com. “Look forward to hearing from you soon,” she said. “I love my HIU!”


DEAN EMERITUS TONY BROWN INDUCTED INTO NABJ HALL OF FAME Tony Brown, dean emeritus of the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications, was among the 2016 class of National Association of Black Journalists Hall of Fame inductees. The ceremony occurred Aug. 5 at the NABJ convention in Washington. Brown was dean of the Hampton University school from 2004 to 2009. In 1971, Brown was the founding dean of the Howard University School of Journalism and Communication. In 1970, Brown produced and hosted the PBS public affairs show “Black Journal,” and in 1978 the program became “Tony Brown’s Journal” and aired through the first decade of the 21st century. He was inducted into the Scripps Howard School Hall of Fame in 2012. Brown was inducted into the NABJ Hall with Charles Gerald Fraser [New York Times], Dorothy Leavell [NNPA], Dori Maynard [Maynard Institute], Gil Noble [“Like it is,” WABC-TV], Monica Kaufman Pearson [WSB-TV, Atlanta], Austin Long-Scott [Associated Press], Stuart Scott [ESPN], Jacqueline Trescott [Washington Post], Morrie Turner [cartoonist, “Wee Pals”], John H. White [NABJ co-founder] and L. Alex Wilson [Tri-State Defender, Memphis].

Allison Seymour Continued from page 16 anchor at the station. In Hamptonian style she made history and became the first women to be the main anchor at the station. “My four years has lasted me 28 years,” said Seymour when asked how Hampton University has had an impact on her career. In 1999, she joined WTTG-TV [Fox 5] and never looked back. Hired as a general assignment reporter and midday anchor, she kept pushing her way up the Fox News ladder. In 2007, the D.C. metro area native became main anchor at Channel 5 on “Fox 5 News Morning and” and “Good Day D.C.” Reflecting her accomplishments and where she is today, Seymour said, “The confidence I gained at Hampton helps me every day.” Because of her hard work and dedication to television, she was inducted in the Scripps Howard School of Journalism Hall of Fame in 2012. “One of my proudest moments thus far,” said Seymour.

Over time, her show expanded from a 3 ½- hour show to six hours and 35 minutes show. Seymour said she is proud of everything the show has become. Now, the married mother of the three has built a supporting viewer base at WTTG-TV. She is honored to be in the anchor chair reporting on events that shape the lives of people in the D.C. community. As her journey in television continues, Seymour still acknowledges Hampton University as the place where she found herself. “Because of Hampton, I have a better sense of who I am, where I belong, and my overall worth.” she said. On Sunday she spoke to the driven students of Hampton, pushing them towards their goals and dreams and reminding, as she reminds herself, to let their lives do the singing. India Anderson is a Scripps Howard School student.

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F A C U LT Y N O T E S

FACULTY NOTES Last fall, Wayne J. Dawkins was named National Award for Excellence in Teaching winner by the American Journalism Historians Association. The award honors a college or university teacher who excels at teaching in the areas of journalism and mass communication history, makes a positive impact on student learning, and offers an outstanding example for other educators. Dawkins, who last May was promoted to full professor of professional practice, accepted the award Oct. 6 at the AJHA convention in St. Petersburg, Florida. “For more than a decade, Professor Dawkins has made significant contributions to our school and Hampton University

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at large as a journalism historian and an academic prolific in research, scholarly articles and authorship,” said B. Da ‘Vida Plummer, dean, Scripps Howard School. “We’re proud to have Professor Dawkins on our staff and look forward to his continued good works with Scripps Howard students, along with his other noted academic pursuits.” Dawkins, a member of the Scripps Howard faculty for a dozen years, has written book reviews for peer-reviewed publications American Journalism [American Journalism Historians Association and Journalism Studies, Routledge].

Last fall, Lorraine M. Blackwell joined the Scripps Howard School

faculty as an assistant professor. She is an award-winning journalist, filmmaker and media educator. She worked as a staff writer for the Richmond Times-Dispatch newspaper for 10 years, then returned to college to complete her bachelor’s degree in creative writing at Virginia Commonwealth University, where she graduated with honors. After working as a writer and editor for the Associated Press, Blackwell pursued her passion for screenwriting and documentary film, and enrolled in film school at Howard University, where she received her MFA in film production. She taught media production to undergraduates in the Department of Radio, TV and Film at Howard, and taught scriptwriting to adults at the Graduate School USA in Washington, DC. Blackwell has written three full-length feature scripts. Her first script, “Wrong Side of the Tracks,” was a quarterfinalist in the 10th annual International BlueCat Scriptwriting Competition and won a Paul Robeson Award for Best Graduate Feature-Length Script.


F A C U LT Y N O T E S

THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT AND LIFE MAGAZINE

Patricia Boone also joined the Scripps Howard School faculty as an assistant professor. Previously she was assistant director for alumni programs at Wake Forest University and before that associate dean of continuing studies at Salem College in Virginia. Boone, a JD graduate of the North Carolina Central University School of Law and alumna of Hampton University, teaches media law and public relations writing. Michael DiBari Jr., Scripps Howard Endowed Professor, is the author of “Advancing the Civil Rights Movement: Race and Geography of LIFE magazine’s Visual Representation, 1954-1965,” published this spring by Lexington Books. The book cover depicts Malcolm O. Carpenter’s haunting black

THE VISUAL REPRESENTATION OF RACE AND GEOGRAPHY MICHAEL DiBARI JR.

and white image of Ruth E. Tinsley being carried away by two police officers in Richmond, Virginia. The Tinsley photograph is among 22 evocative images in the six-chapter, 133-page hard cover work. DiBari, Ph.D. and Scripps Howard Endowed Professor, said in the acknowledgments that he was inspired by “my mentor, teacher and friend, Dr. Michael Carlebach. I am a better photographer

and a better person because of him.” Carlebach praised DiBari’s book because it “offers a persuasive examination of Life magazine’s crucial role in covering the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s. DiBari’s book details the evolution, impact and significance of Life’s coverage, and by doing so shows how much has been lost in the tepid equivalency journalism of today.”

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F A C U LT Y N O T E S

JUDY CLABES RETURNS TO HAMPTON U.

PHOTO BY DR. MICHAEL DIBARI JR.

Judy Clabes, retired Scripps Howard Foundation executive, returned to Hampton University April 21. Clabes was responsible for initiating, developing and orchestrating the approval of $10 million in order to build and open the Scripps Howard School in fall 2002. She also funded the Scripps Howard Endowed Chair position, bringing in noted journalist, Earl Caldwell (seen above).

Last fall, April Woodard became cohost with Cheryl Nelson of “Coast Live,” a breezy lifestyle and public affairs show airing 10 a.m. weekdays on WTKR-TV 3, Norfolk, Virginia. “Coast Live” celebrates people and places, the sights and sounds, the food, fun and flair that is the region’s coastal lifestyle. The award-winning journalist and Hampton Roads na-

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“At the Scripps Howard Foundation my first goal was to build a quality JAC school at an HBCU,” said Clabes. “I wanted to go deep and wide.” Clabes participated in a videotaped interview with Earl Caldwell, Scripps Howard School writer in residence. Drew Berry, Scripps Howard visiting professional and former foundation board member, introduced Clabes.

tive has returned to the region and now will be back on TV in her hometown. Woodard, an assistant professor, got her start in news as a reporter for WTKRTV 3, Norfolk [CBS] and has worked nationally as a correspondent for Inside Edition and BET. She has also appeared on network TV as a pop culture expert on HLN, MSNBC and FOX.


STUDENT NOTES

U.S. STATE DEPARTMENT VISIT Hampton University JAC students Zhavier Harris, Kiana-Alexis Salley and Dasia Willis attended the 2017 HBCU Foreign Policy Conference Friday, Feb. 17 at the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Public Affairs in Washington, D.C. Students were briefed by senior State Department officials, observed presentations on career opportunities and had many opportunities to network. Hampton University was last represented at the conference in 2012 when alumnae Meagan Downing, Domanique Jordan and Janiece Peterson attended. “I’m incredibly enthusiastic for tomorrow’s trip,” said Kiana-Alexis Salley, a sophomore, journalism major, Spanish minor from Willingboro, New Jersey. “I don’t PHOTO COURTESY OF THE U.S. STATE DEPARTMENT know what to expect, but I’m eager to be around other uncut students that share the same passion for politics and journalism as I do.” -- Taylor Lee and Raven Able

KYLA WRIGHT, ESPN RHODEN FELLOW

Kyla Wright, a sophomore journalism major, was among six inaugural Rhoden Fellows, announced a representative from “The Undefeated,” ESPN’s multiplatform initiative for sports, race and culture. The sports journalism internship program focused on identifying and training aspiring African-American journalists from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). In addition to Wright of Hampton University, the other fellows are Miniya Shabazz, Grambling State University Louisiana; Paul A. Holston, Howard University, Washington, D.C.; C. Isaiah Smalls, II, Morehouse College, Atlanta; Simone

Benson, Morgan State University, Baltimore; and Donovan Dooley, North Carolina A&T University, Greensboro. With financial support from ESPN, the Rhoden Fellowship is a two-year program founded by former New York Times award-winning sports columnist William C. Rhoden, who joined ESPN’s “The Undefeated” as head of the fellowship program and as columnist and editor-at-large. Fellows will report news stories from their respective universities and cover facets of HBCU life, serving as correspondents for The Undefeated’s HBCU vertical. They will produce daily, weekly and monthly multimedia content, as well as serve as on-site beat writers covering sports teams – college or professional – in their respective markets. During the summer, students will work 40-hour weeks at ESPN for 10 weeks, gaining a first-hand education and experience in sports journalism.

3 HAMPTON U. STUDENTS PARTICIPATE IN NATION MAGAZINE CONFERENCE NEW YORK – Three Hampton University students participated at the Nation Magazine Student Journalism Conference, where students discussed how to cover politics and social movements with professional, award-winning journalists. Kathryn Grant, Leondra Head and Alazja Kirk represented Hampton’s Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications on March 24, the only HBCU at the conference. The students said they enjoy learning innovative ways to enhance their reporting skills. “The conference opened my eyes to a lot of new

ideas,” said Grant, a freshman from Houston. “Each and every person came from different places with different experiences and ultimately allowed me to learn from them through their success and mistakes. I learned a lot about how to report and how reporting on things that the audience does not already know shines an even brighter light on prevalent issues.” The one-day conference brought together 60 student journalists from across the nation from schools such as Columbia University, University of Florida, and the University of California at Berkeley. -- Leondra Head

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THE SCRIPPS HOWARD SCHOOL

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OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS HAMPTON UNIVERSITY

HAMPTON, VA

546 E. QUEEN STREET, HAMPTON, VA 23668

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AS A VA LUED MEM BER OF T HE SC R I P P S HOWA R D S C H O O L , W E I N V I TE YO U TO P E R M A N E N TLY E TCH YO UR LEGACY AT OU R “ HOM E BY T HE SEA .” G I V E TO TH E S C R I P P S H OWA R D S C H O O L , B U R N I S H YO UR NAM E IN TO JO URN A LISM

ITS R IC H PAST, A N D P L AY AN I N TE G R A L PA RT I N P R E PA R I N G TH E N E X T G E N E R AT I O N O F A N D COM M UN IC AT ION S P R O F E SS I O N A L S . W E N E E D YO U.

1. TAKE-A-SEAT Give a gift of $1,000 and memorialize your name, major and class year with an inscription in gold lettering on a black brass plate on a seat inside the Robert P. Scripps auditorium.

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JAC Magazine Summer 2017  

Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications very own magazine.

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