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vol. 15 no. 24

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February 15 - 21, 2017 | subscribe free for breaking news at JFPDaily.com

Murder in the city Deep Causes,

Harmful Biases,

Unexpected Solutions Ladd, pp 16 - 20

Domestic Abuse Soon Grounds for Divorce? Dreher p 10

Tacos, Burgers on the Move Cardon, Helsel, p 22

Sweet Lillies Go South Smith, p 26


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February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

At the science museum


JACKSONIAN Donnell Lewis Imani Khayyam

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lorence, Miss., native Donnell Lewis joined mentoring and service organization 100 Black Men of Jackson in 1990, when it had been active for only a few years. He started off in the ranks as a recording secretary, then moved to corresponding secretary, then treasurer, then vice president, before he became 100 Black Men of Jackson’s president in 2013. “Our passion is mentoring,” Lewis explains about the organization. “(100 Black Men of Jackson) is known as the flagship organization for mentoring young minority boys in Jackson Public Schools. And just to see a young kid’s life change because of me in their lives has really touched me, and struck a nerve with me.” Lewis, 54, says there is a focus on community between the mentors and mentees of the 100 Black Men organization. “We think mentoring is the key to break the cycle of the violence that’s going on among our high school kids,” Lewis says. He emphasizes that a lot of these young men come from single-mother households. “We are the only male role models in their lives. So once (they join), it’s hard to let go.” One of these success stories is a young man named Jarvis, whom Lewis first met when he was in the third grade. The two grew very close and remained that way

throughout the mentee’s life. “Even today, Jarvis knows me as Dad or Mr. Donn, and his kids have come to know me as who I am,” Lewis says. Stories like Jarvis’ are not uncommon, Lewis says. Kids who come into the organization in the third or fourth grade often keep in contact with their mentors once they’ve graduated from elementary, middle or even high school. “It’s the attachment that happens with the kids that once you start, you can’t turn back on them,” he says. For Lewis, the bond between mentor and mentee is an essential part of the work. “Once you (find) a mentee, you never want to disappoint him. You always want to be in his life,” he says. The organization is starting a tutoring program in early March with some of the failing schools in the Jackson Public Schools district. “Our slogan is ‘it takes a village to raise one child,’” Lewis says. “And we figure all the kids who are in Jackson Public Schools are (100 Black Men of Jackson’s) kids, so we want to touch as many kids as possible to make their lives successful.” The organization also offers health and wellness screenings, an annual health fair, and summer swim lessons for the community. —Katie Gill

contents 6 ............................ Talks 12 ................... editorial 13 ...................... opinion 15 ............ Cover Story 22 ........... food & Drink 24 ......................... 8 Days 25 ........................ Events 25 ....................... sports 26 .......................... music

6 Governor, Legislature Argue Over Mental Health How the state will fix its mental health-care system is up to how a judge rules on two lawsuits against the State and if legislators sign laws to help the process along.

22 Tacos, Burgers to the Metro Jaco’s Tacos and The Feathered Cow are expanding to the metro area.

26 ............................ book 27 ........ music listings 28 ...................... Puzzles 29 ......................... astro 29 ............... Classifieds

26 Sweet Lillies, Southbound

“We have a band full of people that are really team players.” —Julie Gussaroff, “Sweet Lillies, Southbound”

February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

4 ..... PUBLISHER’S Note

James Dewalt; courtesy Jacos Tacos; imani Khayyam

February 15 - 21, 2017 | Vol. 15 No. 24

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PUBLISHER’s note

by Todd Stauffer, Publisher

Providing Hope for Kids Is In Our Self-Interest

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ou may have noticed that the Jackson Free Press news team has spent a good deal of time reporting the content and context of the 2016 BOTEC report that the State of Mississippi commissioned to study Jackson’s crime and criminals. It is referenced again in this week’s cover story, “Murder in the City,” starting on page 15. One of our major takeaways from that report, also called the “Capital City Crime Prevention Study,” is the idea that there are—according to their analysis—roughly 225 kids in Jackson Public Schools who could account for a great deal of crime and violence in the city if some intervention doesn’t take place quickly. To be clear, we don’t necessarily know their names from the report—it’s an analysis of the patterns of crime and violence based on interviews and the study of data, not a roll call. But what it does tell us is that the problem is easier to tackle when you have a sense of the scope of the challenge. By identifying kids and their needs when they start getting in trouble, and then interrupting that pattern and getting them “wraparound” services, you give them a better chance at making it through the rough patches and into productive lives. One countermeasure in the War on Hopelessness is … hope. With the Mississippi Youth Media Project here on the same floor as the Jackson Free Press (and given that YMP’s founder and volunteer director shares my home and has the big office next to mine at the JFP), I’ve gotten a fly-on-the-wall perspective of how just how powerful it can be to give kids a way to express themselves, work together and learn some business “soft” skills that are going to take them some distance in life.

(At the very least, they will have already conducted a SWOT analysis the next time it comes up in their careers.) I think that’s the “hope” that something such as YMP offers. In the same way, other intervention programs that attract kids’ interests—like sports leagues, mentoring programs, entrepreneurship clinics, etc.—can be used to channel them into more productive lives, especially when they find adult mentors who give a damn about

“There’s a difference between selfishness and self-interest.” their current lives and their futures. In the meantime, the kids from stable homes with less risk still get invaluable experiences and the opportunity to spend time in a pursuit that opens their eyes, allows them to engage with people in other circumstances and offers a creative outlet. Many of us have enough privilege in this life that we know how to open a bank account or get an ID or find an attorney to deal with a nagging issue or get the financial-aid forms filled out for college. But there are kids in Jackson who don’t have those resources available—or, if they do, mentors (and the hope that comes with them) are not wrapping them up in those

resources like a child needs to be in order to take advantage of opportunities. Many young people just don’t believe the same options are open to them until mentors help them reach out and train for them. A comment a few weeks ago on our website constantly nags at me. Under our recent interview with mayoral candidate Chokwe Antar Lumumba, “LB” responded to a section about the Jackson Panthers basketball (and mentoring) program that Lumumba’s father spearheaded before his death. The program had 700 participants and a get-them-to-college rate of 98 percent, his son told the JFP. LB’s comment: “When did it become the city’s job to keep kids entertained?” When I think broadly about American politics over the past few decades, I think we’ve seen a fundamental shift in conservative thought. Put (overly) simply, it’s a replacement of the idea of the virtue of “self-interest”—as Adam Smith expressed, for instance, suggesting the invisible hand that guides markets—with the idea that “selfishness” is that same virtue. An utter aversion to taxes; a disdain for community programming; the idea that all roads should be toll roads; or all taxes should be use taxes—if you think carefully about it, this really is a system of thinking that says “selfishness” has the same effect or positive benefit as “self-interest.” One is zero-sum; the other doesn’t have to be. It’s a selfish notion, for instance, that “the city shouldn’t be in the business of entertaining kids.” If the program offers great results, lowers crime, increases positive outcomes for youth, and maybe even ultimately increases economic development and produces a stronger work force, then it would

absolutely be in the interest of citizens to “entertain” (read: coach and mentor) kids whose families or communities can’t keep them on a solid path to success. (That can be through parks and recreation, the school system, or non-governmental programs like YMP or Operation Shoestring.) Now, I know I’ve got an uphill battle to convince some conservatives of that argument—even if it is closer to what we used to read about back when I was a Reagan-era conservative in my youth or the “compassionate conservatism” that the Bush family still espouses. But something that many of us can agree on is that the problem of violence in our community can be affected and reduce, in large or small part, by each of us showing up and caring more often. Maybe you’re not the “soup-kitchening” or house-building type. (Bless you if you are; the world needs more of you.) At whatever level you can get involved— whether it’s supporting a youth basketball program or teaching a podcasting or Webdesign seminar or mentoring individual kids—you’re working not just to help some of these young people find a little hope, but also in your own self-interest. That is, you’re improving the quality of life in your community for families, yours and others. Please read the cover story this week and then engage with the team at JFP.ms to let us know what you are doing in the community, ideas for others’ involvement and what you could use help with. Together— and, frankly, only together—we can make Jackson a better place for all its people. Read the full and ongoing “Preventing Violence” series at jfp.ms/preventingviolence. Get to know the Youth Media Project at youthmediaproject.com and jxnpulse.com.

February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

contributors

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Donna Ladd

Arielle Dreher

Imani Khayyam

Micah Smith

Dustin Cardon

Kimberly Griffin

Kristin Brenemen

Myron Cathey

Editor-in-chief and CEO Donna Ladd is also the volunteer director of the Mississippi Youth Media Project (see youthmediaproject.com and jxnpulse.com). She specializes in criminal-justice reporting and wrote the cover story.

News Reporter Arielle Dreher is working on finding some new hobbies and adopting an otter from the Jackson Zoo. Email her story ideas at arielle@jacksonfreepress. com. She wrote about mental health and the Legislature.

Staff Photographer Imani Khayyam is an art lover and a native of Jackson. He loves to be behind the camera and capture the true essence of his subjects. He took many photos and mentors students in the Youth Media Project.

Music Editor Micah Smith is married to a great lady, has two dog-children named Kirby and Zelda, and plays in the band Empty Atlas. Send gig info to music@jacksonfreepress.com. He wrote about The Sweet Lillies.

Web Editor Dustin Cardon is a graduate of the University of Southern Mississippi. He enjoys reading fantasy novels and wants to write them himself one day. He wrote about food and restaurant news and keeps jfpdaily.com on track.

Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin is a fitness buff and foodie who loves chocolate and her mama. She’s also Michelle Obama’s super secret BFF, which explains the Secret Service detail.

Art Director Kristin Brenemen is an meganekko with a penchant for dystopianism. She’s gearing up for next convention season by starting to learn leather crafting for two space heroines. She designed much of the issue.

Sales and Marketing Consultant Myron Cathey is from Senatobia. He is a graduate of Jackson State University and enjoys traveling, music and spending time with family and friends.


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February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

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The House passed a “tort reform” bill last week by a close vote p 10

“That was one of the most frightening experiences of my life.” — Rep. Chris Bell, D-Jackson, describing an incident where he was pulled over and racially profiled, as he spoke against the passage of the “Back the Badge Act” that the House passed last week.

Thursday, February 9 A panel of three judges from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals  unanimously refuses to reinstate Donald Trump’s ban on travelers from seven predominantly Muslim nations. Friday, February 10 The Washington Post reports that Michael Flynn, Donald Trump’s national security adviser, addressed lifting sanctions against Russia in a call with the U.S. Russian ambassador while President Barack Obama was still in office. … The federal government asks to withdraw a motion filed in the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals last year that asked a judge to scale back a temporary injunction blocking Obama’s guidance on transgender bathroom rights for high school students. Saturday, February 11 Anti-abortion activists stage rallies around the country calling for the federal government to cut off payments to Planned Parenthood, but in some cities counter-protests dwarf demonstrations.

February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

Sunday, February 12 The United States, Japan and South Korea request urgent diplomatic talks at the United Nations over North Korea’s latest ballistic missile launch.

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Monday, February 13 Michael Flynn resigns after reports he misled administration officials about his contacts with Russia’s ambassador to the United States. Tuesday, February 14 Continental Tire awards four Mississippi-based firms contracts for construction of the Hinds County tire plant and training center in Clinton. Get breaking news at jfpdaily.com.

In the Statehouse and the Courtroom, Mental Health is Embattled by Arielle Dreher

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.S., now 19 years old, has a dream of becoming a chef, but has cycled in and out of mental and behavioral health institutions throughout his life. As a young teenager, in 2010, he sued then-Gov. Haley Barbour along with several other children in the state to receive the services he needs. Now, L.S. is aging out of a system that can serve his intellectual disability and mental-health needs. Last week his lawyers argued that consolidating his case with a related lawsuit against the state would jeopardize his access to mental services. Lydia Wright, a Southern Poverty Law Center attorney, represented L.S. in the courtroom last week. She said he hopes to work in a kitchen someday as well as get his driver’s license—both achievable goals, Wright said, if L.S. gets access to help he needs for his intellectual disability and mental-health disorders. “L.S. needs care; he has been waiting since he was 13 years old … for community-based services,” Wright told U.S. District Judge Henry Wingate on Feb. 10. Research in the psychology and psychiatry fields show little to no evidence that hospitals and residential treatment centers are effective in helping a person with mental-health needs. A 2015 Cam-

Imani Khayyam

Wednesday, February 8 Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood files lawsuits against 25 individuals and companies associated with an $800-million prison-bribery scheme. … Mississippi lawmakers advance House Bill 638, a proposal to add firing squad, electrocution and gas chamber as execution methods in case a court blocks the use of lethal-injection drugs.

The state’s system of mental-health care is the subject of a U.S. Department of Justice lawsuit, which alleges that Mississippi over-relies on institutionalization instead of using community-based services for citizens. Gov. Phil Bryant (pictured) wants to oversee the system himself

bridge University study found that children raised in institutions “are exposed to extreme psychosocial deprivation,” which can lead to behavioral and developmental problems like higher inattention, lower working memory and a higher chance of developing attention deficit disorders. Group homes, therapy and other services that enable people to stay engaged in their daily lives while receiving treatment,

Words Search:

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2017 Legislative Session by JFP Staff P V A K H Q F S Q M M F W N Z Z H R Z N S Z V D I A J R D M I S X O I E O H Z B D W A Q C V Y T M T P K H K H P J J U X

H S Y B J W Y U W W A J F L E M H Q T J

K B T N S V U I Z L K L L S M B I G S D

Y G X N B R K C T D E I I V N X L M Z P

O T R G W F U H J G D Z T Q W Z B D J I

J E Y C G O I I O O Z T D I O R Q R Z

M W T I H C P S N Q B R S E D U Y P Y G

E O G S A S L A R M V R C K Z H A Z V G

W F E R Z A L B C A G W P W M R N Z R A

I E E C T D C A E E B U S W N T T M Y V

C Z Y I T B Z C Z P B B S M V U Y Z B E

O E O R P U I M F L J F T O J M G Z O V

I N U O Z A D N I F Y Y K O E F E G X C

P M F K B B U C F D E X O N A P D X U Z

P S I C D K P V M R W M T G K D U Z G P

H I Q T A O B S B Z A A V Z Y A C T U G

A Q N M L M Y O F B L S Q D R F A R U Q

on the other hand, have proved to be beneficial to those who need treatment—as well as more cost-effective. The Troupe v. Barbour case, as L.S.’s lawsuit is known, was originally a class-action lawsuit against Mississippi’s system of mental-health care for youth. Now, it is an individual case on behalf of more HEALTH see page 8

WORD BANK

he legislative session isn’t over yet, but here’s a word search with some of the buzz words so far.

P W Z I K A P U P H V Z T T H Z T X E O

N F C E V C U A E D I B S R J B I Z R O

C Y N R Q N C A I J M G R C U M O X Y R

I Y I E P K L W N G A L N E B C N W H Q

V Z M D M T I I A T N E S P W J T E A L

I T M K H F I N A N C E C Q J E G U B H

L H I K U X U W H G M D N U Z D R D R O

R P G I T E D E P A R T M E N T Z I X E

I B R I X A F V C N M G Z S F W E J E F

G I A Q F K W D V T C M N U S I F D P S

H E N Q B Y F Z E L P Q N E E W N P X W

T O T Z P T D D L A W D R U R A Y O U O

S V S A G H A Y S U I H D G X A M V P H

M L S D V D G E Z N V Y U W Y T F W A B

G S S P R V N A G R W C E X Y Y S Z B X

L A X M F N Z D O P J J T A T Z G C F C

Public policy Civil rights Phil Bryant Campaign Finance Department Education Funding Health care Arts Breweries Legislation Mental health Pass Infrastructure Donald Trump MAEP Immigrants


February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

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TALK | state

HEALTH from page 6

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Mental Health in the Capitol The State of Mississippi has been sued twice for its mental health-care system. First in 2010, the Troupe v. Barbour lawsuit addressed the state’s over-reliance on institutionalization for kids, then the Department of Justice sued the State in August 2016 for its over-reliance on institutionalization in its adult mental health-care system. “Every day, hundreds of adults with mental illness are unnecessarily and illegally segregated in Mississippi’s state-run psychiatric hospitals or are at serious risk of entering these institution,” the DOJ complaint says. “They enter and remain in these isolating institutions because the State of Mississippi has failed to provide them sufficient community-based mental health services.” The attorney general’s office tried to fend off the DOJ lawsuit last year, and for the most part has blamed the Legislature for not appropriating additional funds to the department in the 2016 session. “Last legislative session I called on the governor and legislative leadership to provide DMH with an additional $12 million to keep us from getting sued, but they instead refused to provide the additional $12 million and cut the DMH budget by $8 million. We were promptly sued,” an op-ed from Attorney General Jim Hood says. This legislative session, in a last-minute change, Sen. Buck Clarke, R-Hollandale, brought up a bill that he said would help the state deal with both mental-health lawsuits. Senate Bill 2567 would have made the Mississippi Department of Mental Health an executive agency, with the governor in charge of appointing the executive director instead of the state board of mental health. Sen. Clarke gave several reasons why senators should support the bill, including pay raises the board approved for those in management. Clarke said putting the agency under the governor’s direction would provide the necessary “oversight.” “I think it’s just having the governor’s oversight over their budgets and their direction … if we’re trying to comply with the DOJ to go from this institutional care that they had a problem with and go more com-

tioned a report, which the public or press do not have access to, called the TAC report, which likely provides the clearest and most accurate snapshot of Mississippi’s mentalhealth services. The State asked a circuit court to put the report under a protective order back in 2015, when they were negotiating with DOJ, trying to fend off litigation. Clarke told senators last week that the report suggests that Mississippi put DMH under the governor’s control. He explained the report further on Feb. 13. “(The report has) been made available to the Legislature to look at … because it could be pertinent to the apImani Khayyam

February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

L.S., who will age out of eligibility for services under Medicaid on Oct. 21, 2018. Lawyers for L.S. argue that a magistrate judge’s decision to consolidate his case with the Department of Justice lawsuit filed against the state for adults seeking mentalhealth services is harmful to L.S.

munity-based, that’s going to cost money, and we’re going to (have to) close down large hospital facilities and move people out,” Clarke told reporters after the bill passed the Senate by two votes. The bill was held on a motion to reconsider, however, and some senators changed their initial votes on Feb. 13, and the Senate killed the bill by three votes. The Board of Mental Health, whose members the governor appoints, vehemently opposed the bill that essentially benches the board making them advisory in nature only. Its chairman, Richard Barry, explained his issues with the bill in a letter

Attorney General Jim Hood mainly blames the Legislature for underfunding the Mississippi Department of Health in 2016, which led to the Department of Justice suing the state that August, Hood says.

in a letter. “The purpose of having a board is to avoid political interference, provide continuity of quality care and professional oversight of services,” Barry wrote in a letter opposing Senate Bill 2567. Gov. Phil Bryant wrote an op-ed on Feb. 3, published in The Clarion-Ledger, warning that the state’s mental health-care system is still potentially ripe for a federal takeover. “Nothing within the governing structure or state law requires the executive director (of DMH) to report to the governor’s office or any other elected official. That is troublesome,” Bryant wrote Feb. 3. “Clearly, something must change if we are to fulfill our moral obligation to those fighting mental illness and their families. Doing nothing will only embolden the status quo and leave those in the care of MDMH further behind.” The Secret Report On the Senate floor, Sen. Clarke men-

propriations process and it may be (used for) changing our funding models to better help the Department of Mental Health,” Clarke told the Senate on Feb. 13. “It’s my understanding … that the issue with the Department of Justice is institutional care versus community-based and the model Mississippi has been following all these years is not what the DOJ would like—thus the lawsuit.” Sen. Hob Bryan, D-Amory, who led the initial charge against the bill last week, said he had not seen statements from the Department of Justice claiming it supported SB 2567 or the report. “I would certainly like to read (it),” Bryan said. “The difficulty here is once again we are asked to make a decision with long-ranging implications without the knowledge we need to make that decision.” Sen. Tommy Gollott, R-Biloxi, who serves on the PEER Committee, asked the Senate to kill the bill so that the oversight group could look into the situation and re-

port back to the Legislature next year. Senators killed the bill by three votes Feb. 13; in the meantime, the U.S. district court could decide to make the TAC report public. The Clarion-Ledger initially sued to see the report back in 2015, and the fight for the TAC report to be made public continued last Friday in court. Leonard Van Slyke, representing that newspaper, told Judge Wingate that the Hinds County Circuit Court erred in entering a protective order on the study. Van Slyke pointed out that the report is likely one of the only documents that “gives us the real facts in the case” and also said that all participants in the study were told and were aware that it would be made public. The state’s original defense for concealing the report was the ongoing negotiations with DOJ before they sued last August. Jim Shelson, an attorney representing the State of Mississippi, asked Judge Wingate to uphold the magistrate judge’s ruling on the TAC report, saying the report was created and exchanged for the purposes of negotiations between the state and the Department of Justice. He argued in a brief Monday that the report could not be admitted as evidence in the case. Troupe v. Barbour and the DOJ’s August lawsuit were combined back in December 2016. On Feb. 10, lawyers representing the state asked Judge Wingate to keep the two cases consolidated, saying that both center around de-institutionalization for the state. Shelson argued that seeking unspecified relief for L.S. alone was not necessarily possible especially if community-based services are at the heart of that relief. “Relief as to one is relief to all … effects (of de-institutionalization) cannot be confined to L.S…they can’t single him out for those services,” Shelson argued Feb. 10. Wright argued that to keep the cases consolidated would likely mean L.S. would age out of Medicaid eligibility for services by the time the DOJ case went to court. Shelson said it was impossible to tell how long discovery would take in the case—and pointed out that now that L.S.’s case was individual, a settlement could be reached separately without deconsolidating the two cases. Wright disagreed. “The prejudice is 110 percent on the back of L.S. who is 19 years old and right now sitting in a facility waiting for services,” Wright said. Email state reporter Arielle Dreher at arielle@jacksonfreepress.com and follow her on Twitter @ arielle_amara.


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February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

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TALK | state

Tort Reform, Sexual Assault Prevention and Fantasy Sports Bills Move Forward by Arielle Dreher

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February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

Imani Khayyamw

ort reform” rose from the House not to vote in its favor. because of no fault of their own and they past at the state Capitol last “If you pass this bill, you will elimi- pay zero, and then we have to go to court week as lawyers in the House nate collateral source doctrine, which and make a claim against somebody who of Representatives battled it has been around for years …. Every law- injured him,” Baria said of potential cliout over a short, seemingly inconsequen- yer in here who does civil work knows ents, continuing, “and I go to court after tial bill, House Bill 481, which would exactly what I’m talking about. If you do this bill is passed, you know what I put affect personal-injury litigation in the away with the collateral source doctrine, on as proof of their medical expenses? state. What some referred to as Zero, because that’s what they the “Phantom Damages” bill paid. So what is that going to would change how those seekdo to that hospital? They will ing damages for injury could get zero, folks.” prove their injury in court— A few more lawmakmeaning that the legislative ers spoke against the bill that branch was potentially crosspassed 63-56, and is now in the ing into judiciary territory. Senate’s hands. Rep. Andy Gipson, RBraxton, authored the bill and Sexual Assault, presented it on the floor. He Domestic Violence said it was narrow in scope, Legislation addressing sexand its effect would be that ual assault on college campuses anyone asking for damages in and adding domestic violence court could only claim medias a grounds for divorce passed cal expenses for what they acoverwhelmingly in the House tually paid for themselves. and the Senate last week. That would mean any Rep. Angela Cockerham, one who could not afford to D-Magnolia, authored a bill pay for their medical expenses that will force state universithey received could not recovties and community colleges to er monetary damages for their develop comprehensive plans injuries. and policies for addressing Lawyers on the floor were complaints of sexual assault on quick to point out that this Rep. Andy Gipson, R-Braxton, brought the Ghost of college campuses, including a would negatively affect potential Tort Reform Past back to the Mississippi Legislature measure that would force colclients who had no health insur- with HBl 481, which passed by seven votes last week. lege officials to follow up on reance or weren’t on Medicaid— ports of sexual assault or domesor anyone who would not have tic abuse within 12 hours of the paid for their emergency medical care. you will turn our tort law—the law that report being made. The bill also requires “What they can’t do is hold up some allows them to make a claim in tort … colleges and universities to provide vicfalse bill, some bill that claims to be a bill (and) our judicial system, turn it upside tims with a list of their options in terms that’s not, and not get these phantom down,” Baria told the House last week. of recourse and make such information damages awarded to them,” Gipson said The debate augured back to Gov. publicly available on their websites. to explain the bill. Rep. Sally Doty, R-Brookhaven, Haley Barbour’s first term when the Rep. Trey Lamar, R-Senatobia, corporate lobbyist fought hard and suc- re-introduced her domestic-violence asked why the Legislature would look cessfully to limit lawsuit damages in the divorce bill this year, which adds “cruel at passing a law that is unconstitutional. state, which many believed was also a and inhuman treatment, including spouLamar said the bill seemed to broach way to limit the ability of lawyers to fund sal domestic abuse” as an official ground the separation of powers that prevent Democratic candidates. (Read more at for divorce in the state of Mississippi. the Legislature from telling the judiciary jfp.ms/tortreform.) Habitual drunkenness, drug abuse and branch what is and is not admissible as Baria said the insurance companies pregnancy by another person “if the husevidence in court. would have the most to gain from the band did not know of the pregnancy” are “I disagree that it’s expressly uncon- bill, while poor Mississippians who can- already grounds for divorce in the state. stitutional … over 30 states have rules not afford to pay for their health insurlike this in place, so why not Mississip- ance in the first place have the most to Fantasy Sports Regs After a study committee met in 2016, pi?” Gipson responded. lose. He also said hospitals and doctors the Fantasy Contest Act regulates fantasy Rep. David Baria, D-Bay St. Louis, would feel the effects of the bill. who said he practiced in civil litigation “If I represent them, and they go contests, namely fantasy sports leagues, unthat the bill would affect, asked the into a hospital, and they’ve been injured der the Mississippi Gaming Commission’s 10

purview. The Senate’s version of the act prescribes fees and regulations that companies offering fantasy sports leagues (like Fantasy Football, Basketball, Baseball) must follow in order to operate in the state. The act only allows operators to offer fantasy contests for professional sports—not for collegiate, high-school or youth sports in the state. Fantasy-sports companies must apply for a license with the gaming commission if Sen. Sean Tindell’s, R-Gulfport, bill becomes law. The House passed its own version of the law last week too.

Other Bills to Watch: Back the Badge Act vs. Blue, Red and Med Lives Matter The House and the Senate took two different approaches to legislating “Blue Lives Matter” bills, and what the final result will be might be worked out in conference. The Senate’s “Blue, Red and Med Lives Matter” bill would classify crimes against law enforcement and emergency personnel as hate crimes. The House’s “Back the Badge” Act would triple penalties for capital or first-degree murder of law enforcement or emergency personnel. Sanctuary Cities With little debate, Sen. Tindell’s antisanctuary cities legislation passed through the Senate last week. Senate Bill 2710 would deem ordinances, like in the City of Jackson, that prevent cops from asking about a person’s immigration status unlawful and prevent any city or state entity from ever creating such a policy. Limiting the AG House Bill 555 would require the attorney general to get permission from the governor, lieutenant governor and the secretary of state before entering litigation that would likely cost over $250,000 in attorneys’ fees. The bill initially failed in the House by two votes, but passed by seven votes when brought back up. Criminal Justice Reforms The re-entry council’s reforms are mainly in House Bill 1033, including stopping judges from throwing people in jail for not paying fines, not taking away a person’s driver’s license for a simple drug possession charge and changing parole eligibility requirements in the state.


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11


No Longer About Party

D

uring Beyoncé’s performance at the Grammys on Sunday night, my kid snuck two extra cupcakes when I wasn’t paying attention. I gave her the standard talking-to because she knows better. But she is 7 years old, and she loves sugar. And I am her mother, and I was not paying attention. So I talked to her but then took my own blame in that situation. Thankfully, the sugar only made her do six laps around the coffee table and added an extra 30 minutes until bedtime. Sugar, like unfettered power, is a hell of a drug. When Donald Trump was campaigning, I used to joke that his campaign slogan really was, “Embolden the Ignorance.” His rhetoric gave permission for everybody that ever had a strong “-ism” to come out of the woodwork and think that viewpoint was OK to have, again. Unfortunately—or fortunately—I see it as having properties of both; these people were originally shamed post-Civil Rights Movement into at least keeping this crap low-key. Now they are all up in our face with it. I say good. We shouldn’t be acting surprised. This system has been working toward this for 200 years. If we systematically oppress factions of a population, it is only privilege that makes us think it will never happen to us. It’s that same privilege in us that is causing this to actually happen. And that might be the best thing that’s happened in this country for years. Our current administrations—state and federal—are emboldened. They feel no weight of checks and balances. As soon as one party seems to have all power, all compromise stops, and it becomes about party— not people. It is not in service of our brother that these men in office are working. It is of service to themselves and no one else. We should be both ashamed that we allowed this to happen but understand that this is a reckoning we have also created. It is up to us to fix it. We have a president who does not respect the judicial branch and a governor who does not respect the legislative one. This separation of powers is fundamental to our process—to both our federal and state constitutions. It is beyond me why the Mississippi Legislature would ever vote to abdicate its own role in our checks and balances, effectively relinquishing control to the governor. The branches are in place to provide against the power grab both our governor and president are currently making. Make no mistake, it is the same thing. They are emboldened. And we were not paying attention. But we are the last check— the people. We the people. We abdicated our responsibility in this process years ago. If the Legislature feels that it should also abdicate their power to a higher god, then we have failed. All of us have failed. While we debate politics for fun, the whims of administrations are not meant to be visited upon entire populations. This is no longer about party. This is about how we will allow ourselves to be governed. We exist to right the ship when it is listing. And we are listing. Now comes the arduous task of righting ourselves. We must become emboldened. As emboldened as the first person who decided to toss some tea into a harbor. In that we shall find the true spirit of who we are, our evolution. I will not say “again” because that would indicate no progress. And that is what will truly make us great. And maybe, in that strange way, Trump’s campaign slogan was right on. To be great, we must heal. We must remove the infection. And make no mistake about it, these administrations are both very ill. If that is symbolic of who we have become, then I am due for a healing. We all due for one. In the words of Beyonce, “If we are going to heal, let it be glorious.” Lori Gregory is a social worker from Greenville, Miss. She lives in Fondren with two ruined rescues and a 7-year-old daughter who terrorizes her. 12 February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

It is up to us to fix it.

Stop the Mental Health Politicking

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ong, long ago doctors thought separating the mentally ill from society was the best solution or “cure” to mental illness. Many doctors also prescribed procedures such as shock therapy for the mentally ill. It is 2017, however, and science today suggests that segregating people with mental illness instead of allowing to live in the community is not only detrimental to their health and well-being but is also costly to states to maintain. The 1999 Olmstead v. L.C. decision 1999 set precedent for the U.S. Department of Justice to sue states that did comply with the new standard: Unjustified segregation of persons with disabilities, including those with mental illness, in institutions violates the Americans with Disabilities Act. Mississippi has had 18 years to get compliant with the new standard, and to be frank, lawmakers in 1999 should have gotten to work. The State’s mental-health department runs six institutions that provide in-patient behavioral health programs for Mississippians with mental-health or substanceabuse problems as well as six more facilities that only serve individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the state. In total the department runs 12 institutions. Advocacy organizations sounded the alarm for Mississippi’s young people back in 2010, filing a lawsuit against the State for its institutionalized system of care for youth, but nothing changed. In August 2016, the U.S. Department of Justice sued Mississippi for its adult mental health-care system, alleging that the state over-relies on institu-

tions, and we do. The actual problems with our state’s system of care have long been shrouded in secrecy either by lawmakers, agency heads or both in the past almost two decades. For these reasons, lawmakers should and could have addressed mental health-care reform in previous sessions as well as this session. It turns out that addressing the problem with secrecy and an assumption of a Republican supermajority won’t always work. The Senate killed the bill that would have put Gov. Phil Bryant in charge of the mentalhealth department on Monday. At least part of the reason for this is due to a lack of transparency and openness from higher-up leaders about the dire needs of the state’s system of care. Sen. Buck Clarke, R-Hollandale, cited a taxpayer-funded report that has been under a protective order for years, hidden from the public. In addition to negotiating with the DOJ for all these years, the attorney general also should have been more transparent about just how bad the system is. No one is talking about systemic change, except in passing, and that is problematic. The State of Mississippi must close some of its institutions, simultaneously opening communitybased mental-health services across the state. This will take money, coordination and bi-partisan support to work. Politicking about mental health and not being transparent is not going to make the path to get there easier or cheaper, and the Legislature needs to wake up and face it before taxpayer dollars are spent on litigation for 10 years.

Email letters and opinion to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to 125 South Congress St., Suite 1324, Jackson, Mississippi 39201. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity, as well as factchecked.


Robert Luckett

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ewey Phillip Bryant attended spring term and all others in the country by Council McCluer High School fall 1970. his junior and senior years. At the start of the 1963 school year, Council McCluer was a segre- Bolton tells us Mississippi had 17 private gationist academy founded after the U.S. schools, including a black boarding school, Supreme Court forced schools to deseg- Piney Woods. By 1970, the state had regate with its 1969 Alexander v. Holmes 236 private schools. From 1969 to 1971, decisions. The Citizens’ Council, the single 10,000 white students left JPS alone, aplargest private segregationist organization parently including Bryant—40 percent of in the country, operated McCluer. W.J. the state’s largest and most powerful school Simmons, one of the state’s more promi- district. Of those, 60 percent attended a nent segregationists and a Citizens’ Coun- segregated Citizens’ Council school. cil leader, was the school treasurer. Let’s jump forward to today. Since Gov. Bryant does not mention his 1997, the Mississippi Adequate Educahigh-school career on his official website, tion Program has been fully funded twice. and when his office responded to a query, Over the past eight years, the Legislature a staff member said he had has underfunded MAEP by graduated from Wingfield $1.857 billion, data from the High School. Yearbooks and Parents’ Campaign shows. classmates prove that Gov. Wealthy areas can make up Bryant is the product of white that difference in property flight and segregationist edutaxes, while poor districts cation, which may explain his like JPS face overwhelming efforts, along with others in shortfalls. his party, to undermine pub Our governor and the lic education in this state. Legislature want to revamp Since the 1890 MissisMAEP and strengthen charsippi Constitution was draft- Gov. Phil Bryant, ter schools. We must be wary. ed to disfranchise African senior year, 1973 It’s not by chance that modAmericans and established a ern school-choice “reformâ€? system of free but “separate schools ‌ for has a strong connotation with our racist children of the white and colored races,â€? past. Many in the state’s white leadership are access to high-quality public education was products of white-flight desegregation just limited to white people. Not until Brown like the governor. Many of these white powv. Board of Education in 1954 was the erbrokers have never been personally investJim Crow status quo challenged, but then ed in high-quality public education for all whites embraced new defiant strategies. children and see little reason to be now. It In a precursor to vouchers today, is not surprising that many do not believe the State of Mississippi provided tuition the supposed reforms are aimed at the wellgrants for white students to afford segrega- being of poor and minority students. tionist academies. In “The Hardest Deal of Charter schools, the third-grade readAll: The Battle over School Integration in ing gate, the demise of Initiative 42, vouchMississippi, 1870-1980,â€? Charles Bolton ers and the role of EdBuild in proposing shows that the state gave white students a new funding formula all point to a state with more than $80,000 to attend segre- government hostile to high-performing, gated private schools from 1964 to 1965. potentially transformative public schools. Mississippi also deployed “Freedom Gov. Bryant’s office could have been of Choiceâ€? for public-school desegregation: straightforward about his high-school caParents in a district were supposedly free reer, but he must be concerned that if citito choose their child’s school. As segrega- zens learn the truth, they may question his tionists well knew, few black parents were proposals. Or perhaps he doesn’t care. going to be the first to send their children In the world of “alternative facts,â€? we to an all-white environment. Bolton writes must be vigilant and stake claim to our histhat in the first year of Freedom of Choice, tory and all its atrocities. In Mississippi, fewer than 1,000 black students enrolled that history has a direct link to where we in all-white schools. By 1966, just 7,200 are today, and if we are to make significant of 296,000 black children were at formerly progress in the future, we must stand in dewhite schools. Finally, in 1968, the Su- fense of the highest-quality public schools. preme Court rejected Freedom of Choice, Robert Luckett is the director of the and forced the districts named in Alexan- Margaret Walker Center and a history profesder v. Holmes to desegregate by the 1970 sor at Jackson State University. council mccleur high school yearbook, 1973

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Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer Associate Publisher Kimberly Griffin

13


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Murder in the City: Deep Causes, Harmful Biases, Unexpected Solutions by Donna Ladd

O

February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

courtesy facebook

n the night of Thursday, Feb. 9, to Mississippi is not what I ever dreamed Commander Tyree Jones, the JPD spokes- pen to older, wealthier or certainly whiter a group of twenty-something of,” his auntie posted on Quisy’s Facebook man, said the following Monday. people who fire on robbers or attackers. Jacksonians were hanging out in page Monday morning. “I always pictured Perversely, this attitude that they “We talk all the time about gun vio- Westwood Apartments at 3150 the trip would be so much fun, us kickin it, lence in the city. In the majority, the per- are all guilty no matter who struck first Robinson Road playing dominoes. Sud- laughing, catching up on the good times. I petrators know one another in some kind means that many young people believe denly, several men walked in pointing guns wasn’t ever planning on my trip would be of way. There was no forced entry into the they must have a gun to protect themand demanding their belongings. coming to you and Dominique Garrett’s apartment; we know there was an affilia- selves, even as they openly say they abhor The young adults in the apartment, funeral; that wasn’t the plan.” the violence in their communities. tion between both parties.” which is near the United Com “Some people carry guns munity Pentecostal Church, were for the wrong things, but a lot of also armed, as many Mississippi people carry guns because if you residents often are in anticipation don’t carry a gun in Jackson, Misof a home invasion. Instead of sissippi, you gone get robbed or handing over their stuff, police say shot,” a young rap artist from the the victims fired on the robbers. Washington Addition who goes They hit one of the intrudby Kvng Zeakyy told the Jackson ers, Jacarin Robinson, 21, in the Free Press in interviews last year. head, killing him. Another robHe had been in and out of juveber, Jessie Kelly, 23, was hit; one nile detention since he was in the of his friends drove him to Merit fourth grade and participated in Health, where he died at 4 a.m. Youth Media Project last year. One of the robbery victims, “People might leave you Dominique Garrett, 23, died in alone just because they see your the apartment. He had attended gun,” he said, explaining the desJim Hill High School and studied perate survivalism of kids living welding at Hinds Community in often-violent neighborhoods, College. His brother and roomwhich do not represent the whole mate, Marquis “Quisy” Garrett, of black America despite presiden25, was also shot. An ambulance tial stereotypes to the contrary. took him to the University of When gun violence does Brothers Marquis (left) and Dominique (right) Garrett died after an armed home invasion. Mississippi Medical Center. happen, the retaliation cycle often After Jackson police arrived, kicks in, which can lead to longthey recovered several weapons at the scene. Police and the city’s media did not im- Jones said no evidence shows the term “beefs” between two groups and dozThey later released a statement saying that mediately frame the four-death incident as shootout was gang-related and confirmed ens of deaths and injuries over many years. the three deaths—of two apparent home the murder of two robbery victims along- that none of the men had outstanding warinvaders and one victim, all young black side the self-defense, or “Castle Doctrine,” rants. That does not mean, however, that ‘They Jumped Him First!’ Amber Taylor was walking through adults—were the “8th 9th, and 10th homi- killings of two attackers. The assumptions the community as a whole will not frame it cide investigations for 2017.” Police were are different for young black men in a city as another “gang” shootout; it will not help the Valley North neighborhood in Jacksearching for Carl Harper, 24, who turned and state where armed self-defense is oth- that the young men had posted pictures of son on a cool summer evening with her himself in Friday night but was released. erwise valued and defended, even against themselves with guns and flashing what boyfriend CJ when suddenly three young Marquis Garrett then became the unarmed assailants, much less armed ones. men started trailing them. Her heart began looks like “gang” symbols on Facebook. 11th Jackson homicide this year when he In fact, JPD believes the two groups Many young black Jacksonians say pounding with fear, and CJ started sweardied the following Sunday. The city’s ho- had at least one person in common— police and the general public nearly always ing under his breath. micides would be equal to last year’s seven someone in the Garretts’ apartment that frame their acts of self-defense, including “They’re following us, aren’t they?” she year-to-date had these four young men not night who knew the robbers. “It’s a tragic with guns, as mutual acts of violence and asked her boyfriend, then 16. died in a few minutes of gunfire. and unfortunate situation that four men treat both assailants and victims as guilty “Hey nephew this crazy that my trip had to lose their lives in such a manner,” parties in a way that does not usually hapmore VIOLENCE, see page 16 15


violence

February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

The local stories are horrifying and mirror what too often happens in challenged urban areas across the U.S. A 9-yearold watching his best friend gunned down while playing dice in a park. Another teenager’s cousin killed at age 12 in a drive-by

“He never wanted to hear what they had to say because they never wanted to hear what he had to say.” shooting over a long-running beef. Another’s brother left bleeding in the middle of a street after an ambush. Still others hitting the ground when some guy pulls out a gun in front of a busy store when he saw someone he was beefing with—you killed

ain’t gone be like, ‘Move, son, I’ve got this’ and start shooting for you. No! They gone wait ‘til everybody get done shooting and then lock everybody up, that’s what they’re going to do. It’s just the truth.” Disdain for police by the young people most victimized by gun violence in Jackson and America, and the return disgust from many officers, is a problem that the federal COPS program acknowledges, saying this gulf causes “extraordinary damage.” “A community that sees the police as a race predator cannot make common cause with the law,” wrote David Kennedy, director of the National Network for Safe Communities, in the COPS intervention guide. “Police that see the communities they serve as corrupt cannot make common cause with their people. These conflicts are real.” It is a problem Police Chief Lee Vance acknowledges locally: People who don’t trust police will not help them. “If you’re seen in these neighborhoods as being a servant and not an adversary,” Vance said during a drive through the Second Precinct last year, “it’s going to work out much better.” If the police act respectfully, residents are more likely to call them when they witness crime, and provide intelligence, Vance said. Young Jacksonians of color often disEli Bettiga

“Yeah,” he answered. CJ already had been in and out of juvenile detention, Taylor wrote in a column for the Mississippi Youth Media Project. His mother’s boyfriend had mentally and physically abused him starting when he was 8, and he started getting in trouble at school. By the time he was 12, older boys approached him about becoming a 4CH, or 4 Corner Hustler, but Taylor was trying to help him leave that life behind. “Look, I want you to go back to my house, aight? Text yo mama,” CJ told Taylor. “I’m gonna stay outside and see what these boys want. Don’t call the police. I’ll handle it myself.” He then pushed her inside and slammed the door. Outside, the three young men jumped CJ, and she decided to call 911 anyway to help her boyfriend. Soon, CJ’s brother showed up with a couple of friends to help. She was standing on the porch when the cops got there at least 15 minutes after she called them, she wrote. “They jumped him first!” she screamed, as one of the cops slammed her boyfriend’s face into the pavement. She remembers three cop cars, and that two of the original had disappeared. “Yeah, who gives a damn? A gang fight is a gang fight, little girl,” the officer answered before cuffing the third assailant, as well as CJ, his brother and everyone else on the scene. They all ended up in HenleyYoung Juvenile Justice Center, and she did not see him for another three months. A disturbing number of young people growing up in poorer, neglected Jackson neighborhoods have either witnessed violence or experienced it themselves, often many times, including watching friends dying in pools of blood in front of them. Despite under-funded schools with holes in the roofs, no jobs for young people or good transportation to the ones across town, and the crack epidemic that crippled the family tree a couple generations back, many outsiders simply blame their families, who probably grew up in similar conditions. “The root causes of crime and disorder in our disadvantaged communities involve so many systemic dysfunctions that it becomes hard to imagine how law enforcement can begin to stem the tide of group and gang violence,” wrote Joshua A. Ederheimer, the former assistant chief of the Washington, D.C., police department and later the director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, or COPS, in the U.S. Department of Justice, in the group’s “Group Violence Intervention: An 16 Implementation Guide.”

from page 15

Mayor Tony Yarber went further than previous mayors in requesting a systemic look locally at the flaws in the criminal-justice system.

my brother, who was part of a group that attacked your cousin, who was part of a crew that took out a member of my brotherhood, and so on. Still, many young people say they will not call the police when they get in trouble, and not just because of fear of reprisal. “Police ain’t gone be too much help,” Kvng Zeakyy told the Jackson Free Press. “You think somebody shooting at you, police

trust the police due to what many of them have observed or experienced; and they believe the police will arrest everyone on the scene instead of trying to really figure out who was actually at fault and who was trying to defend themselves. And if the victims have guns in a state where many people carry guns, it increases the likelihood that they will be arrested at the scene. In her YMP column, Taylor chal-

lenged Mayor Tony Yarber’s statement at Millsaps College that the city needed more “treehouse kids”— young people who want to work with the police in their neighborhoods rather than avoid them. “I, along with CJ and his brothers, were practically screaming for them to listen,” she wrote on jxnpulse.com about the police, “and we were told to ‘shut up and cooperate’ … I wanted to know so badly the day CJ went to court just where safe relationships and support were long ago when he needed it the most.” Taylor demands to know why more adults do not stand up to help young people before they end up in a cycle of violence. “Numerous times CJ was put out of class or kicked out of school,” she wrote. “No one ever asked, ‘What’s wrong?’ or ‘Why did you do that?’ It was always, ‘That boy don’t have no home training’ or ‘He just gonna end up in jail’ before they scolded him and told him what he should be doing. He never wanted to hear what they had to say because they never wanted to hear what he had to say.” ‘Trying Circumstances’ Still, with police responding to incidents like the Feb. 9 quadruple homicides on Robinson Road—and the existing problem that both the robbers and their targets that night might fear both the cops and retribution for ratting out the guilty—it is not hard to understand why police choose to round everyone up and sort it out later. After all, dead young men lay in front of them in an apartment filled with firearms, with no end in site from a cop’s perspective. Even without those four deaths, the city was on track for the same number of homicides as last year, and the police say they have no way to prevent most of them, even as the public blames them if they can’t magically know where a gun is about to fire. At a Dec. 9 COMSTAT meeting, Chief Vance praised his cops’ efforts despite the fact that the city had seen 10 more homicides by that day than the 55 the year before. For the most part, he said, police can do little to stop murders, especially between people who know each other. “No matter how hard we work, we cannot control every time somebody loses their temper, pulls a gun and shoots somebody that they have been knowing for 20 years. They don’t email us, and they don’t text us before they do it; they just do it,” Vance told the officers. “And all we have the chance to do is go over there and pick up the pieces.”


violence weariness in officers’ voices when asked how they can stop such tragedies. “How can you prevent a crime like this?” Commander Jones said Monday. “We don’t get a call from someone about to go out and shoot someone and commit a violent crime. … We usually get the call afterward.” Jones added that there are “no precursors” that predict that kind of violent gun play. But there are precursors that indicate whether particular young people are more likely to become violent, even if the public might not want to hear about them and at least one of them goes against conventional policing wisdom. The top two precursors? First, stop stuffing minors into the backs of police cars, detention centers and jail cells, and do everything possible to keep and engage them in school.

more likely he or she is to commit a worse crime. In a 2015 study on Jackson crime pushed for by now-mayoral candidate Sen. John Horhn, paid for by the Mississippi Legislature and commissioned by Attor-

ceration “plays a critical role in recidivism.” “Juveniles who spent time in correctional facilities are more likely to drop out of high school and be on public assistance later in life,” BOTEC warned. In addition, it reports they are more likely to commit worse crimes, abuse substances, become single parents, drop out of school and suffer from trauma. Still, it is extremely common to talk to young Jacksonians and hear that they’ve been repeatedly put into detention, often for minor crimes, such as Kvng Zeakyy and his friend breaking into their elementary school to steal a computer they couldn’t lift when they were in the fourth grade. Thus, the cycle of recidivism begins. Arrests and incarceration lead to the other primary precursor (and vice versa), often getting the child kicked out of school, or at least stuck Arrests Increase Crime? in a low-performance rut or al You really can’t make up ternative school until he or she that the gang many young eventually drops out. people in Jackson identify with, BOTEC found that often in name only, started in 225 young people in Jackson a youth detention center near Public Schools are at the highChicago. The Insane Vice est risk of ultimately commitLords began in the 1950s inting violent crime precisely side the Illinois State Training because they lag in school Chokwe Antar Lumumba says opportunities and jobs will School for Boys in St. Charles, attendance and have had frehelp prevent violence in the capital city. Ill. After the club’s members quent encounters with police. left the facility, they created a The question becomes: Who street gang and started defending their turf ney General Jim Hood, BOTEC Analysis are those 225, and how can the community and moving into criminal enterprises. Corp. warned that over-policing young wrap services around them to interrupt the Likewise, black and Latino gangs in people can have a devastating effort, both cycle of violence and retaliation? America actually began as a reaction to for them and the larger community. The Cure Violence approach, which white gangs enforcing segregation, espe- Horhn originally lobbied for $10 mil- epidemiologist Gary Slutkin of the Univercially in public housing in big cities. Even lion in resources to Jackson to help strength- sity of Illinois at Chicago School of Public the notorious Bloods and Crips were first a en the criminal-justice system, but the Health started, is one route to that interway to defend their neighborhoods against Legislature settled on funding a $500,000 ruption, and it avoids the police who young other ethnic gangs. “Capital City Crime Prevention Study that people so often do not trust. Instead, it hires Jails and prisons are a breeding ground mapped criminal hot spots and shined and trains “violence interrupters”—usually for gang, “group,” “set” or “crew” recruit- a bright light on problems from Jackson men and women who have been in trouble, ment, and a place that research shows ac- Public Schools to the Hinds DA’s office. gangs or prison—to mentor young people tually increases the likelihood of an inmate “It has useful data in it,” Horhn said. “If away from the lifestyle. They also rush to later committing a worse crime—especially we had been able to get full support of certain young people connected with violence to when he gets out and comes home to his plays in law enforcement and the commu- stop retaliation, such as the friends of the neighborhood and cannot get work because nity, it would be even more useful and illu- four young men killed last week. he has a police record and few skills. The minating.” But, he added, “It’s not too late.” “The lockup solutions are not the sostate Legislature is finally grappling with The “Precursors of Crime in Jackson: lutions. They’re not,” Slutkin said in an inthe re-entry problem, with even some con- Early Warning Indicators of Criminality” terview. “Behavior is not primarily formed servative lawmakers pushing for a re-entry section of the BOTEC report states bluntly by punishment. It’s not maintained by fear reforms to help with the transition back to that since the 1970s, helped along by poli- of punishment. Those are old ideas.” a productive life rather than more crime. tics, criminal justice has moved from reha- But the program, even as it has a And the younger a person is when bilitation toward the belief in punishment pulled into a cop car or behind bars, the as an end goal. But, it warns that incarmore VIOLENCE, see page 18 17 February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

Imani Khayyam

The chief emphasized that crime had fallen in all other categories other than homicide. At that meeting, overall crime was down about 17 percent over the same period in 2015 even if murder was up. Vance was quick to take credit for the drops, if not the homicide increases. “Crime is almost 20 percent down. And that represents a lot of hard work; it don’t automatically get like that. So we are going to continue to do what we do, under a lot of trying circumstances,” the chief told his troops in December. What that often translates into, especially during a city election season, is a vow to increase enforcement in “hot” pockets where police think crime might occur. A typical approach might have the chief and sheriff standing next to each other and announcing a joint operation, usually heavy sweeps of a distinct zone where crime has spiked. A show of force may slow down crime for a short time in that area, and may push it elsewhere. At least it shows the public that the police are trying. Hinds County Supervisor Robert Graham, a former JPD spokesman, is calling for more sophisticated “predictive policing” as part of COMSTAT during his run for mayor. That is, do a better job of crunching the data to anticipate where police need to be when and who likely shooters are. “I believe that you have to concentrate on hot spots and hot people. Because what is making this spot hot is this guy,” he said in an interview. “… We would make it hot for him. You have to concentrate on the hot people, not just the hot spots. Everyone in Jackson is not a criminal. Everyone is not committing crimes. The officers know who (the criminals) are. Let’s target them. I don’t mean target them in a negative way.” Graham is right that there are sophisticated ways to “target” young people likely to commit violence; David Kennedy’s “Operation Ceasefire” is a way that police do that working with service providers and the community. But it’s easier said than done: Jackson tried a Ceasefire approach it called MACE before the current chief and sheriff were in place, but just used it as an excuse for additional neighborhood sweeps. The effort ignored the program components that might help prevent a violent crime by getting to the young people before they pulled the trigger, as the Jackson Free Press reported last year. Plus, such programs take immense resources and organization, even as the general public demands more police. Predicting robbery patterns are one thing, but four dead men in a shootout is another, JPD believes. You can hear the


VIOLENCE

from page 17

February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

AP/ Tony Dejak

proven track record, requires the com- these groups drive serious violence,” the ask. The answer to the riddle is probably munity to gather the resources to fund intervention guide explains. “Many (and both—cops under-investigating gun viothe program (which, it so happens, cre- often most) such groups will not fit the lence against young people of color to see ates jobs for previous offenders) even as statutory definition of a gang.” And as Am- who actually is at fault, while often sweepmayoral elections usually bring out calls ber Taylor explained in her YMP column, ing through a chosen area, treating any for more police officers. Slutkin says real many young people pretend they’re in young person as a possible criminal. prevention saves money spent on public- gangs, called “false set claiming.” The truth A new approach is desperately health costs and prison beds down the is, though, that flashing a Vice Lords sym- needed, violence experts say, even if they road. “The easiest way to save money is to bol on Facebook doesn’t indicate any kind do not all agree on exactly how to do it, keep people out, not to put people in,” he of organized-crime membership. especially on whether police should play said. “Public-health methods keep people However, the guns and the beefs, es- a central role. They all say, though, that out because the event doesn’t happen.” pecially when involving retaliation for a it will take more than flooding disadvan Sen. Horhn has talked to Slutkin’s group several times. “Programs like Cure Violence ought to be out front and center in the planning process,” Horhn said this week. “It’s been demonstrated to work in other parts of the country, and provides gainful employment to ex-offenders once they’ve paid their debt to society. The interrupters are often more effective and convincing when they’re talking to young people.” It can be hard to convince a larger community to make that investment if it continues to think of the David Kennedy, right, believes that gun violence can be reduced by identifying key players, people caught in this cycle as and bringing them in to hear “moral” communities, get opportunities for help and with all members of violent gangs threats of incarceration if he or his assocates commit violence. that have run the drug trade in low-income parts of the city for decades, that they’re violent and hopeless. That’s a mythology, former act of violence, are an explosive mix, taged areas with police officers. Urgently, that means squarely facing however. especially for the young people on both Yes, many of them flash traditional sides of the feud. Violence may be a way of the deadly effects of trauma. Vice Lords or Black Gangster Disciples life, but it doesn’t mean most young peosymbols on Facebook, or have pitchfork ple, gang-related tattoo or not, are happy Traumatized into Violence Growing up in Subdivision 2 in west tattoos or other symbols of belonging to about it. Almost to a person, they tell the something bigger than themselves. But stories with trauma-soaked gazes and body Jackson, Mayor Tony Yarber both lost most “gangs” today are not the organized- language. They say they want something, his best friend to a guy with a sawed-off crime units they used to be—an exception anything “positive”—which broken down shotgun when he was 16, and one of his in Mississippi is the dangerous and whiter means they want someone to believe in first cousins was shot 17 times in 2000; Simon City Royals, which deals meth and them and say it out loud and not assume he was only a year older than Yarber, then 22, and had six children. is strong in Rankin County and South the worst about them and their friends. “All six of those children were left Mississippi. They also believe they are the ones Police say most of the “gangs” now in who must stop the carnage, to bring other without a father to provide. Those chilJackson are more like cliques with guns in young people together to do it, but they do dren were traumatized,” Yarber said at a today’s world—still dangerous, but they ex- not know how to stop the historic cycle of JFP forum at Millsaps College last sumist as much as a get-your-back brotherhood someone firing again on a perceived enemy, mer. That is exactly where the “virus��� can start, experts say. as a way to earn a living. They are much making a ceasefire seem impossible. While more privileged and whiter more likely to kill each other in the back- Meantime, violence spreads like a vi- and-forth than strike out at a stranger, rus, as Slutkin calls it, with too little will or communities pass down life savings, real although it can happen. The COPS pro- knowledge to stop it on the part of those estate and other wealth to their children and grandchildren, the communities gram chooses not to refer to “gangs” at all, who could as a group—the rest of us. opting instead to call them “groups.” And, so far, the nation’s police have many black and Hispanic kids are grow “The simple fact is that many high- done either too little or too much to curb ing up in often pass on trauma to new rate offenders associate in groups and that the violence, depending on whom you generations. Maybe granddad was ha18

rassed or lynched, then dad or mom or both sold crack and went to prison for decades, and now the child is nearly raising himself as society scowls at him. Or maybe the young person grew up with at least one parent working three jobs to make life better for her, but she cannot escape the reality of the streets, especially with mom gone all the time to help her have a future. Both are too often true despite the harmful stereotypes. Untreated trauma can turn young people into killers. “When nobody teaches you how to be effective in conflict resolution, then guess what comes up every time?” family counselor George Porter said in a Dec. 23 interview. “First is a feeling of inadequacy and insecurity and, secondly, it is covered by anger.” “And when anger is there, and you don’t know how to deal with it, you take out the biggest damn weapon you can find and blow the son-of-a-bitch away,” added Porter, who attended the mayor’s recent criminal-justice task-force meetings to discuss solutions. Confronting generational trauma is a vital part of New Orleans’ anti-violence approach, called NOLA for Life, which is a systemic plan that incorporates programs from Kennedy, Slutkin and service providers confronting trauma, as well as work programs and midnight basketball. Such an integrated “wraparound” approach is much more effective than blaming parents for not knowing what to do, Dr. Charles Corprew, a child and behavioral psychologist in New Orleans, advises. “Some states are doing it well, but many are not because they are not focused on the crux of the problem: How did the child develop into this space? … They may be growing up in neighborhoods that don’t have enough resources, and they end up going to schools who lack the resources. So it is a systemic thing that provides the ultimate failure of the child.” Even with the comprehensive “NOLA for Life” strategy, it is not easy to turn around a battleship, as reports of violence from the Crescent City show, but it is building a proactive, organized foundation of future change—something Jackson has not found the will to do. Mayor Yarber has attempted systemic change since he has been in office, however. He convened a juvenile-justice task force to examine weaknesses within the criminal system. It was on his watch that Jackson more VIOLENCE, see page 20


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VIOLENCE based programs that include wraparound kinds of services, those have to be … in the neighborhood. And of course everything is about money, but there are enough people in the city, in the communities, who do this stuff professionally anyway, somewhere,” Yarber said last summer on a bus tour through west Jackson with Youth Media Project students to discuss crime. Yarber has been blunt about the lack of organization and will that stops the ball from rolling. “I think it’s there, but how we pull … all of this pie-inthe-sky that I’m talking about down to

Imani Khayyam

was added to the federal Violence Reduction Network last fall, which at least for now offers grants for communities to build comprehensive strategies that could involve the services-plus-threat model of Operation Ceasefire or the trusted-messenger strategy of Cure Violence, or other evidence-based models (see sidebar, below). (Whether federal anti-violence dollars will be diverted to funding stop-and-frisk profiling under President Trump remains an open and daunting question, however.) The services need to be within walking distance, the mayor said. “Community-

from page 18

Gun Violence: Solutions

H

ere is a sampling of evidence-based solutions for preventing and interrupting gun violence. See jfp.ms/stopviolence for links to learn more.

• Cure Violence: This public-health program trains and employs “interrupters”—trusted messengers, often who have been in prisons and gangs, that young people trust to mentor and prevent retaliation without directly involving police. Note: It’s called “CeaseFire” in some cities including New Orleans and Chicago, which is not the same as Operation Ceasefire (below). More: cureviolence.org

• Group Violence Intervention: Originally called “Operation Ceasefire,” GVI shares some principles of Cure Violence (above), but law enforcement is at the center. The program identifies “group” members, brings them into a “call-in” with authorities and “community moral voices,” offering them both services and threatening them with stiff charges if anyone in their group commits violence. More: nnscommunities.org • Comprehensive Gang Model: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Preventions recommends a set of five core strategies—community mobilization, opportunities provision, social intervention, suppression, and organizational change and development—that offer a comprehensive, collaborative approach designed to prevent and reduce gang violence. Its goal is to transform the societal institutions and conditions that foster gang activity. See: nationalgangcenter.gov

February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

• Multisystemic Therapy (MST): An intensive family- and community-based treatment program that focuses on addressing all environmental systems that impact chronic and violent juvenile offenders—their homes and families, schools and teachers, neighborhoods and friends. MST recognizes that each system plays a critical role in a young person’s world. See: mstservices.com

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• Functional Family Therapy (FFT): A family-based prevention and intervention program for at-risk young people ages 11 to 18. The treatment groups show lower recidivism rates; and when the program was delivered by high-adherent therapists the results were even more significant. The program had a positive effect on youth by reducing risky behavior, increasing strengths, and by improving functioning across key life domains. See: fftllc.com • Capital City Crime Prevention Study (aka the BOTEC report): The Legislature-funded comprehensive study of Jackson crime suggests multiple solutions specific to Jackson. See: jfp.ms/botec. Other programs reviewed at crimesolutions.gov Read more: jfp.ms/preventingviolence

JPD Chief Lee Vance says police cannot be expected to stop every gun crime between people with personal or group conflicts.

the group, you know, it’s not something that’s gonna happen overnight,” he said. Movement may be happening, though. The City this week announced a Feb. 23 public meeting at 5:30 p.m. at City Hall to “address crimes that affect you directly and indirectly,” co-sponsored by the Violence Reduction Network, the U.S. Attorney’s Office and the Department of Justice. Among the speakers is LAPD homicide detective John Skaggs, whom journalist Jill Leovy featured in her book “Ghettoside,” arguing that police do not take murder investigations seriously enough in violence-prone communities. Horhn said he hopes the Violence Reduction Network will yield results. “I’m happy the city is finally talking about putting a plan together,” he said. He encourages using the “Capital City Crime Prevention Plan” along with resources available through the federal Violence Reduction Network to pay for equipment, technology and support to help reduce violence. Chokwe Antar Lumumba is a defense attorney who is also running for mayor of Jackson. His brother was paralyzed after being shot in the head in Jackson. He says the city must continue to be “tough on crime”—the election mantra for most candidates—but he and his mayoral father before him have long advocated for trying to reverse root causes, redirect young people and not just fill jails with them to continue the cycle. “What you will hear from me, which is different, (is that) a big part of the issue of crime is the opportunities that ex-

ist in the city,” he said in an interview. “If you don’t do anything to combat the conditions which lead to crime, you can’t outpolice it. So what we have to do is engage our young people; we have to have greater opportunities to give them something else to do. And we have to fund that.” Lumumba pointed to his father’s long-time basketball program, the Jackson Panthers, where 700 or so boys participated and then had a 98-percent rate of getting into college. “He took something that captured their attention and used that to keep them close enough to the process of learning: You’re not able to play basketball if your grades aren’t right, you can’t go on these trips, you can’t do any of these things,” Lumumba said. “When we look at our young people, and I am not just leaving the issue of crime to young people, we have to find ways to connect with them. “Clearly, that isn’t happening enough. How do you change that?” Maybe by having a system to ensure that each of the 225 JPS teenagers are wrapped around with evidence-based options, as well as those coming up behind them. And an attitude that every life matters enough to try to save it. Tim Summers Jr. contributed to this story. Find links to all solutions mentioned in this story at jfp.ms/murder and read the JFP’s ongoing “Preventing Violence” series at jfp. ms/preventingviolence. The series is supported by fellowships from the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and grants from the Solution Journalism Network.


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who co-owns Glenn Foods (Rooster’s Restaurant, The Feathered Cow and Basil’s), entered into a franchising deal with Mike McFarland, who has managed restaurants such as Buffalo Wild Wings. “(McFarland) has been in the business for a long time as a general manager and wanted to open a restaurant of his own,” Glenn told the JFP. “He approached me about a year and a half ago about this arrangement, which is the pilot restaurant for setting up other Feathered Cow chain locations in the future.” Glenn opened the first The Feathered Cow in Jaco’s Tacos has a new location, Jaco’s Tacos 2014. The menu has eight Fast N Fresh in Flowood. different burgers, four types of fries, fried and grill chick On Jan. 17, the owners of Jaco’s en, tamales, salads and more. The reserTacos and Jaco’s Tacos Fast N Fresh voir location will have 180 seats, a bar in Flowood held the new location’s soft area with 30 televisions and a full bar, opening. Instead of a full-service restau- new entrees, and more salads and desrant like the downtown Jackson Jaco’s, serts. “The new location also has resort the one in Flowood is quick-service. status, so in addition to having a full There, diners go through a line to build bar, it’ll have resort-status hours,” Glenn and prep their meal and can customize said. “That means it can open early and dishes such as nachos, rice bowls, bur- stay open later, allowing us to do things ritos and salads. The Flowood location like having a brunch menu out there. will also offer food such as breakfast Even with all the changes compared to tacos with sausage, bacon and eggs, but the restaurant does not serve alcohol. “Before we launched this new location, we did a lot of offsite catering featuring buildyour-own-taco bars, and we got lots of positive feedback from it,” Allison Bell, co-owner of Jaco’s Tacos, told the Jackson Free Press. “We started building this new location from the The Feathered Cow’s reservoir location is ground up in September 2016 expected to open in April. and made sure it was the perfect size to host that concept as its primary focus.” Jaco’s Tacos Fast N Fresh (5657 Lake- the original location, though, it will still land Drive, Flowood, 601-992-3237) first and foremost be a family-driven is open Tuesday through Saturday from restaurant.” 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For more information, The new The Feathered Cow (1070 visit jacosfastnfresh.com. Spillway Circle, Brandon, 769-233-8366) The Feathered Cow will have a will open in April 2017, and its hours new location on the reservoir by April will be Monday through Sunday from 2017. Earlier this year, Nathan Glenn, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.

courtesyJaco’s Tacos Fast N Fresh

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Jackson Restaurants Expand to Metro Area

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23


THURSDAY 2/16

FRIDAY 2/17

WEDNESDAY 2/18

Awesomely Luvvie Live! is at Duling Hall.

The Moonshine Bandits performs at The Hideaway.

The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra’s “Bravo! Tchaikovsky!” is at Thalia Mara Hall.

BEST BETS Feb. 15 - 22, 2017

“The Role of the African American Church and Social Justice” forum is at 6:30 p.m. at the New Hope Baptist Church (5202 Watkins Drive). The forum discusses understanding the historical relationship of the African American church and social justice and finding strategies for the future. Free; call 601-366-7002; find it on Facebook.

Langdon Clay

WEDNESDAY 2/15

(Left to right) Holly Hunter and Kim Coates star in “Strange Weather,” which screens Monday, Feb. 20, at Malco Grandview Cinema in Madison.

THURSDAY 2/16

February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

courtesy Kwame Alexander

Paulette Jiles signs copies of “News of the World” at 5 p.m. at the Eudora Welty House (1119 Pinehurst St.). $22.99 book; call 601-353-7762; lemuriabooks.com. … “Museum After Hours: On the Verge” is at 5:30 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). The interactive spring art festival includes projects from local artists, such as “Mr. Picasso Head” and “mini Monster Jam.” Also includes a ’sipp-Sourced pop-up menu, music, outdoor movies, games and more. Free; msmuseumart.org.

call 601-974-1000; millsaps.edu. … “Cabaret at Duling Hall: The British Invasion of Jackson” is at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). The Mississippi Opera presents works from the Beatles, the Dave Clark Five, the Kinks, the Rolling Stones and more. Doors open at 6 p.m. $25; call 601-960-2300; msopera.org.

SATURDAY 2/18 The Make-a-Difference 5K Run/Walk is at 8 a.m. at SouthGroup Insurance Services (795 Woodlands Pkwy., Ridgeland). Includes a 5K, a one-mile fun run, door prizes and activities for children. Proceeds benefit Friends of Children’s Hospital. $25 5K, $15 fun run; call 601-914-3220; southgroup.net.

Author Kwame Alexander reads and signs copies of “The Playbook: 52 Rules to Aim, Shoot and Score in This Game Called Life,” on Tuesday, Feb. 21, at Lemuria Books.

FRIDAY 2/17

The “Black Beard (Pa Negre)” film screening is at 7 p.m. at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). The adaptation of Emil Teixidor’s novel tells the story of a young boy 24 named Andreu and his experience with local fascists. Free;

SUNDAY 2/19

by TYLER EDWARDS

events@

jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream” is from 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Mississippi College (200 S. Capitol St., Clinton) in Swor Auditorium. The Mississippi College theater department performs the Shakespeare play about a group of actors being control by fairies. Additional dates: Feb. 1618, 7-9 p.m. $10, $7 for students and seniors; call 601-9253453; email seawrigh@mc.edu; mc.edu. Lyle Lovett and John Hiatt perform at 8 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). The singer-songwriters perform an acoustic set. $30.50-$75.50; call 877-987-6487; ardenland.net.

MONDAY 2/20

Beth D’Addono signs copies of “100 Things to Do in New Orleans Before You Die” at 5 p.m. at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N. Suite 202). Reading at 5:30 p.m. $16 book; call 601-366-7619; lemuriabooks. com. … The “Strange Weather” film screening is at 7 p.m. at Malco Grandview Cinema (221 Grandview Blvd., Madison). Filmed in Mississippi, the lyrical drama stars Holly Hunter as a mother who travels the back roads of the Deep South to settle a score. $15 in advance, $20 general admission; call 601-790-3090; crossroadsfilmfestival.com.

TUESDAY 2/21

Kwame Alexander signs copies of “The Playbook: 52 Rules to Aim, Shoot and Score in This Game Called Life” at 5 p.m. at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate N. 55, Suite 202). $14.99 book; lemuriabooks.com. … “An Evening of Latin Guitar Music” is at 7 p.m. at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.) in Gertrude C. Ford Academic Complex. Latin guitar soloist David Burgess performs. $10 admission, $5 for students; call 974-1130; millsaps.edu.

WEDNESDAY 2/22

“TeamJXN Luncheon—Creative Placemaking” is from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Landmark Building (175 E. Capitol St.). Ben Stone of Smart Growth America discusses the role of arts and culture in community development, placemaking and transportation. $20 for members, $30 for non-members; call 601-336-2028; teamjxn.com.


SPORTS & WELLNESS

Events at New Hope Baptist Church (5202 Watkins Drive) • The Role of the African American Church and Social Justice Feb. 15, 6:30 p.m. The forum discusses the historical relationship of the African American church and social justice. Speakers include local attorneys, pastors and law enforcement. Free; find it on Facebook. • Back in the Day: A Celebration of Black History Feb. 16, 6 p.m. Speakers include retired General Augustus L. Collins, Sebronette Barnes-Aborom and Carl B. Mack. The New Hope Youth Choir, the Jackson Metro Retired Community Choir, the Mississippi School for the Deaf, Paul Porter and Cynthia Palmer perform. Free; newhope-baptist.org.

Make-a-Difference 5K Run/Walk Feb. 18, 8 a.m., at SouthGroup Insurance Services (795 Woodlands Pkwy., Ridgeland). Includes a 5K, a one-mile fun run, door prizes and activities for children. Proceeds benefit Friends of Children’s Hospital. $25 5K, $15 fun run; call 601-9143220; southgroup.net.

River Revelers’ Masked Ball Feb. 18, 6:30 p.m.midnight, at Vicksburg Convention Center (1600 Mulberry St., Vicksburg). Includes cocktails, dinner and live music from Got Groove. Black-tie attire with mask. $50; call 601-6344527; downtownvicksburg.org. Budget Basics Workshop Feb. 21, 9 a.m.-noon, at Mississippi Center for Nonprofits (201 W. Capitol St., Suite 700). Topics include projecting income and expenses for programs and staff support; balancing expenses to align with actual income; and more. $69 for members, $99 for nonmembers; call 968-0061; msnonprofits.org. TeamJXN Luncheon—Creative Placemaking Feb. 22, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., at Landmark Building (175 E. Capitol St.). Ben Stone of Smart Growth America discusses the role of arts and culture in community development, placemaking and transportation. $20 members, $30 nonmembers; call 601-336-2028; email executivedirector@teamjxn.com; teamjxn.

KIDS Be MORE! Youth Summit Feb. 18, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m., at Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo). Includes speakers, activities and discussions of empowering young girls. For girls ages 13 to 16. $15 in advance, $20 admission; call 228-238-4221; email womanhood11@ gmail.com; find it on Facebook.

FOOD & DRINK ’sipp-Sourced: Test Kitchen Feb. 16, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 7 p.m., Feb. 17-18, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Chef Nick Wallace and his team experiment and tinker with a diverse array of concepts and ingredients. Prices vary; msmuseumart.org. Bourbon & Benefactors: A Whiskey Tasting Fundraiser for Autism Awareness Feb. 21, 6-8 p.m., at The Iron Horse Grill (320 W. Pearl St.). Features four courses of cocktail and hors d’oeuvre pairings. Proceeds benefit the Hall Law Group’s auxiliary foundation. $50; email joi@ outbdfltmedia.com; eventbrite.com. Masquerade Fete de Carnaval Feb. 21, 6-9 p.m., at Seafood R’evolution (1000 Highland Colony Pkwy., Suite 9015, Ridgeland). Chef John Folse presents a five-course menu with wine pairings. Masks are required, but ball-gown and black-tie attire optional. $99; call 601-853-3474; seafoodrevolution.com.

Pro Wrestling Ego: Feel Invincible Feb. 18, 7-9 p.m., at The Hideaway (5100 Interstate 55 N.). Wrestlers include Orion Taylor, Days of Rage,

SLATE

“Strange Weather” Film Screening Feb. 20, 7 p.m., at Malco Grandview Cinema (221 Grandview Blvd., Madison). The lyrical drama stars Holly Hunter as a mother, who travels the back roads of the Deep South to settle a score. $15 in advance, $20 general admission; call 7903090; crossroadsfilmfestival.com.

CONCERTS & FESTIVALS Dixie National Rodeo Feb. 15-17, 7:30 p.m., at Mississippi Coliseum (1207 Mississippi St.).

the best in sports over the next seven days by Bryan Flynn

February is running out quickly, which means college basketball is about to take center stage in March, with conference tournaments and the madness of the season. Thursday, Feb. 16

College basketball (7-9 p.m., SECN+): The MSU women take on Georgia at home. … College basketball (8-10 p.m., SECN): The University of Mississippi women need to make a run to help their postseason chances, and a home win over Auburn is a start. Friday, Feb. 17

College baseball (4-7 p.m., SECN+): Gather your streaming devices: MSU hosts Texas Tech, and East Carolina travels to UM, with both games on at the same time. Saturday, Feb. 18

College basketball (1-3 p.m., ESPN): The MSU men try to take down Florida at home. … College basketball (5-7 p.m., SECN): The Rebels’ men hit the road to face Arkansas. Sunday, Feb. 19

College basketball (2-4 p.m., SECN+): The Rebels’ women hit the road to take on Vanderbilt. … College basketball (4-6 p.m., SECN): The

the Abbey Street Boot Boys, Monty Warbucks, Dark Fury, Joey Abel and the Nightmare. $10 for adults, $6 for ages 5-11; call 601-291-4759; find it on Facebook.

STAGE & SCREEN “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” Feb. 16-17, 10 a.m.-noon, Feb. 17-18, 7-9 p.m., at Mississippi College (200 S. Capitol St., Clinton). In Swor Auditorium. The Shakespeare play is about a group of actors being control by fairies. $10, $7 students & seniors; mc.edu. “Black Beard (Pa Negre)” Film Screening Feb. 17, 7 p.m., at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). The adaptation of Emil Teixidor’s novel tells the story of a young boy named Andreu and his experience with local fascists. Free; call 601-9741000; millsaps.edu.

MSU women face a tough road test against Texas A&M. Monday, Feb. 20

College basketball (8-10 p.m., ESPN2): This slow sports day still features a couple big showdowns in women’s basketball, with No. 2 Baylor traveling to No. 11 Texas to cap off the night. Tuesday, Feb. 21

College basketball (8-10 p.m., ESPN2): The Bulldogs and Rebels meet of their second of two regular-season meetings, this time in Starkville. Wednesday, Feb. 22

College basketball (8-10 p.m., FS1): This top-25 matchup between No. 22 Butler and defending champion Villanova is a highlight on a slow night. It seems like a reach for any Division I school from Mississippi to make the NCAA Tournament, but a strong finish could land a couple of teams into the National Invitation Tournament. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports The rodeo competition includes performances from artists such as Easton Corbin, Maddie & Tae, John Anderson, Joe Diffie, Frankie Ballard, .38 Special and Lee Brice perform. Check the website for a full schedule of events. $16-$25; call 601-353-0603; mdac.ms.gov. The Moonshine Bandits Feb. 17, 9-11:30 p.m., at The Hideaway (5100 Interstate 55 N.). The California-based country-hip-hop band performs. Burnham Road also performs. $16 in advance, $20 at the door, $40 reserved seating; call 601-291-4759; thehideawayms.com. Events at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.) • Bravo! Tchaikovsky! Feb. 18, 7:29 p.m. The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra perform the works of Tchaikovsky. $20-$62; call 601-9601565; msorchestra.com.

• Lyle Lovett & John Hiatt Feb. 19, 8 p.m. The singer-songwriters perform an acoustic set. Doors open at 7 p.m. $30.50-$75.50; call 877-987-6487; ardenland.net. Events at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.) • Cabaret at Duling Hall: The British Invasion of Jackson Feb. 17, 7:30 p.m. The Mississippi Opera presents works from the Beatles, the Dave Clark Five, the Kinks, the Rolling Stones and more. $25; msopera.org. • Isaiah Rashad Feb. 19, 6:30-10 p.m. The Tennessee-born hip-hop artist performs. $15 in advance, $20 at the door, $65 VIP; call 877987-6487; ardenland.net. An Evening of Latin Guitar Music Feb. 21, 7 p.m., at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). In Gertrude C. Ford Academic Complex Recital Hall. Internationally renowned Latin guitar soloist David Burgess performs. $10, $5 for students; call 601-974-1130; millsaps.edu.

LITERARY & SIGNINGS “News of the World” Feb. 16, 5 p.m., at Eudora Welty House (1119 Pinehurst St.). Paulette Jiles signs copies. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $22.99 book; call 601-353-7762; lemuriabooks.com. Awesomely Luvvie Live! Feb. 16, 7 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). The independent blogger and author delivers a keynote address on her book “I’m Judging You: The Do Better Manual” and leads a panel featuring local leaders including JFP Editor Donna Ladd and YMP student Maisie Brown Doors open 6 p.m. $18, $50 VIP; call 877-987-6487; ardenland.net. “The Playbook” Feb. 21, 5 p.m., at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N. Suite 202). Kwame Alexander signs copies. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $14.99 book; call 601-366-7619; lemuriabooks.com.

EXHIBIT OPENINGS Museum After Hours: On the Verge Feb. 16, 5:30 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). The interactive spring art festival includes projects from local artists, such as “Mr. Picasso Head” and “mini Monster Jam.” Also includes pop-up dining experiences, live music, outdoor movies, games and more. Free; call 601960-1515; msmuseumart.org.

BE THE CHANGE Mardi Gras for ALZ Feb. 16, 6:30-10 p.m., at Fitzgerald’s (Hilton Jackson, 1001 E. County Line Road). affle, live music, king cake, appetizers and extended happy hour. Mardi Gras attire encouraged. Proceeds benefit Alzheimer’s Mississippi. Raffle tickets for sale; find on Facebook. Spaytacular in Love Feb. 18, 6-10 p.m., at Table 100 (100 Ridge Way, Flowood). Features a silent auction, photo booth, costume contest and a magic show from Patrick Stanley. Proceeds benefit the Big Fix Clinic. Free; call 420-4202; email table100@eathere.com; find it on Facebook. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings, or to add your own events online. You can also email event details to events@jacksonfreepress.com to be added to the calendar. The deadline is noon the Wednesday prior to the week of publication.

February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

COMMUNITY

25


DIVERSIONS | music

Sweet Lillies, Southbound by Micah Smith to record a full album with the band for free, but that also meant the musicians had to finish everything in two days and record live, save for guitar, which Gussaroff played since Zyniecki hadn’t joined yet. “It has gotten amazing responses across the country,” Gussaroff says of the album. “(Lunsford) is so good with everything he does, and our songs are so arranged and put together that it was no problem for us to just sit down and record them. The harmonies were accurate, the parts were accurate, so it was easy, in a way.” With the success of the album, the band is already preparing material for a sophomore release and is considering working with Lunsford again, albeit with a bit more time to spare on the second outing. Gussaroff says one thing that making band’s first album cemented for her is the importance of having the songs ready beforehand. “Do not go in there thinking, ‘I’m going to work this out in the studio,’ because the stress and the work of recording is so real that you want to have everything done before you walk in the door,” she says. “I want the band to be ready to walk in and record those songs.” The Sweet Lillies perform at 9 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 21, at Martin’s Restaurant & Bar (214 S. State St.). Doors open at 8 p.m. For more information, visit sweetlillies.com. JAMES DEWALT

S

The Sweet Lillies are currently touring in support of ince forming in late 2013, Boulder, Colo.based Americana act The Sweet Lillies has their debut self-titled album, which the band recorded with been working its way around the country, carv- engineer Andrew Gragg Lunsford, who has worked with ing a name for itself in the string-band music scene across Colorado and beyond. The band makes its way to Mississippi for the first time on Tuesday, Feb. 21, for a performance at Martin’s Restaurant & Bar. One thing that makes The Sweet Lillies unique is that the band members—bassist Julie Gussaroff, viola player Becca Bisque, banjo player Danjo Lynn, vocalist Melly Frances and guitarist Loren Zyniecki—are all songwriters and bring their own sensibilities, experience and material to the group. Having five songwriters could be tough to navigate, especially because most of the musicians met each other through the band, but Gussaroff says their personalities and shared passion have made it an easier fit. “Luckily, we have a band full of people that (Left to right) Loren Zyniecki, Julie Gussaroff, Melly Frances, Becca Bisque and Danjo Lynn of The Sweet Lillies perform are really team players,” Gussaroff says. “Everyone Tuesday, Feb. 21, at Martin’s Restaurant & Bar. works hard to get along and to be useful, but there are funny things when you don’t really know each other that well. There are things you learn as you go, like artists such as Tyler Grant, Irma Thomas, John Mahey and who needs more leg room, who needs to eat at what time Pat Metheny. Lunsford was in Boulder working at Mounof day, but we’ve been very lucky that there are such good- tain Star Studio at the time and wanted to record a string band in order to get a better feel for the space. He offered hearted people in the group.”

ThE WoRlD’S LaRgEsT SnAkE February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

OpEn NoW ThRoUgH ApRiL 23

26

MDWFP’s Museum of Natural Science’s newest exhibit, Titanoboa, features a 17-foot replica and two vertebrae casts made from the original fossils of the world’s largest snake. Known as Titanoboa, the world’s largest snake slithered in at 48 feet long and weighed an estimated one-and-a-half tons. Titanoboa: Monster Snake is a collaboration of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, the Florida Museum of Natural History, the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, and the Smithsonian Channel.


Music listings are due noon Monday to be included in print and online listings: music@jacksonfreepress.com.

Alumni House - Acoustic Crossroads 5:30-7:30 p.m. Char - Tommie Vaughn 6 p.m. Fitzgerald’s - Joseph LaSalla 7:30 p.m. Kathryn’s - Chris Link & Doug Hurd 6:30 p.m. free MS Coliseum - Dixie National Rodeo feat. Dustin Lynch 7:30 p.m. $20-$35 Shucker’s - Silverado 7:30 p.m. free

FEB. 16 - THURSDAY Burgers & Blues - Shaun Patterson 6 p.m. Char - Tommie Vaughn 6 p.m. F. Jones Corner - Blues Challenge w/ Dexter Allen 10 p.m. Fitzgerald’s - Mardi Gras for ALZ feat. Chris Gill, Roberto Moreira & Steve Cook 6:30-9 p.m. Georgia Blue, Flowood - Jonathan Alexander Georgia Blue, Madison - Jim Tomlinson Hal & Mal’s - Taylor Hildebrand free Iron Horse Grill - Jaimoe’s Jasssz Band 7 p.m. Kathryn’s - Greenfish 6:30 p.m. free Martin’s - And the Echo w/ El Obo 9 p.m. Shucker’s - Sid Thompson & DoubleShotz 7:30 p.m. free Soulshine, Flowood - Thomas Jackson 7 p.m. Sylvia’s - Thursday Night Live feat. The Blues Man & Sunshine McGhee 9 p.m. free

FEB. 17 - FRIDAY Ameristar, Vicksburg - Derryl Perry 8 p.m. free Burgers & Blues - Larry Brewer & Doug Hurd 6 p.m. Char - Ronnie Brown 6 p.m. Duling Hall - MS Opera’s “Cabaret at Duling Hall: The British Invasion of Jackson” 7:30 p.m. $25 F. Jones Corner - The Blues Man 10 p.m. $1 Fenian’s - Becca Rose 9:30 p.m. Fitzgerald’s - Will & Linda 7:30 p.m. Georgia Blue, Flowood - Andy Tanas Georgia Blue, Madison - Shaun Patterson Hairone Salon - Early Humans, Alex Fraser & Lisbon Deaths 8:30 p.m. $5 Hal & Mal’s - Captain Midnight Band w/ The Hustlers 9 p.m. $5 advance $10 door ardenland.net The Hideaway - Moonshine Bandits w/ Burnham Road

9 p.m. $16 advance $20 door $40 reserved seating Iron Horse Grill - Adib Sabir Trio 9 p.m. Kathryn’s - Faze 4 7 p.m. free M Bar - Flirt Fridays feat. DJ 901 free Martin’s - Wild Adriatic 10 p.m. Reed Pierce’s, Byram - PinniShook 9 p.m. free Shucker’s - Road Hogs 5:30 p.m. free; Snazz 8 p.m. $5; Brian Jones 10 p.m. free Soulshine, Flowood - Holiday House 7 p.m. Soulshine, Ridgeland - Thomas Jackson 7 p.m. WonderLust - DJ Taboo 8 p.m.2 a.m.

FEB. 18 - SATURDAY Ameristar, Vicksburg - Eddie Cotton 8 p.m. $10 Anjou - Stevie Cain 6 p.m. Bonnie Blair’s - Sid Thompson 7-11 p.m. Burgers & Blues - Brian Smith & Scott Stricklin 6 p.m. F. Jones Corner - Big Money Mel & Small Change Wayne 10 p.m. $1; Fred T midnight $10

FEB. 19 - SUNDAY Anjou - David Keary 11:30 a.m. Char - Big Easy Three 11 a.m.; Tommie Vaughn 6 p.m. Duling Hall - Isaiah Rashad w/ Lancy Skiiiwalker & Jay IDK 6:30 p.m. $15 admission $65 VIP meet & greet ardenland.net The Hideaway - Mike & Marty’s Jam Session Kathryn’s - Fade2Blue 6 p.m. free Shucker’s - Greenfish 3:30 p.m. free Sombra Mexican Kitchen - John Mora 11 a.m. Table 100 - Jazz Brunch feat. Raphael Semmes Trio 11 a.m.2 p.m. Thalia Mara Hall - Lyle Lovett & John Hiatt 8 p.m. $30.50-$75.50 ardenland.net Wellington’s - Andy Hardwick 11 a.m.

Georgia Blue, Flowood - May Day Georgia Blue, Madison - Brandon Greer Hal & Mal’s - Mike Dean Band free The Hideaway - Spank the Monkey 9 p.m. $10 Iron Horse Grill - Joe Carroll & Cooper Mills 9 p.m. Kathryn’s - Luckenbach (Willie Nelson Tribute) 7 p.m. free Lynch Street CME Church - Male Choir Extravaganza 3 p.m. Martin’s - CBDB 10 p.m. Northpark Mall - Lee Brenner 2-5 p.m. Pop’s Saloon - Cody Cooke & the Bayou Outlaws 9 p.m. Reed Pierce’s, Byram - Hired Guns 9 p.m. free Shucker’s - Andrew Pates 3:30 p.m. free; Snazz 8 p.m. $5; Jonathan Alexander 10 p.m. free Soulshine, Flowood - Barry Leach 7 p.m. Soulshine, Ridgeland - Jason Turner 7 p.m. WonderLust - Drag Performance & Dance Party feat. DJ Taboo 8 p.m.-3 a.m. free before 10 p.m.

WEDNESDAY 2/15 Restaurant Open as Usual _________________________

Char - Tommie Vaughn 6 p.m. Fenian’s - Open Mic Fitzgerald’s - Larry Brewer & Doug Hurd 7:30 p.m. Kathryn’s - Rockin’ the Keys 6:30 p.m. free Last Call Sports Grill - Top-Shelf Tuesdays feat. DJ Spoon 9 p.m. Martin’s - The Sweet Lillies 9 p.m.

FEB. 22 - WEDNESDAY Alumni House - Pearl Jamz 5:30-7:30 p.m. Char - Tommie Vaughn 6 p.m. Fitzgerald’s - Sonny Brooks & Don Grant 7:30 p.m. Hal & Mal’s - New Bourbon Street Jazz Band free Kathryn’s - Jeff Maddox 6:30 p.m. free Martin’s - Modern Measure w/ Project Aspect 8 p.m. Shucker’s - Lovin Ledbetter 7:30 p.m. free

2/16 - Rorey Carroll - Proud Larry’s, Oxford 2/17 - Yes - IP Casino, Resort & Spa, Biloxi 2/18 - Foreigner - Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, Biloxi 2/22 - Russell Welch Hot Quartet - House of Blues, New Orleans

Submit listings to music@ jacksonfreepress. com by noon Monday for inclusion in the next issue.

Sunday, February 19

THURSDAY 2/16

TAYLOR HILDEBRAND

lance skiiiwalker + jay idk hybrid of new & old school hip hop and abstract soul

Restaurant - Free

_________________________

FEB. 20 - MONDAY Char - Tommie Vaughn 6 p.m. Fitzgerald’s - Hunter Gibson & Chris Link 7:30 p.m. Hal & Mal’s - Central MS Blues Society (rest) 7 p.m. Kathryn’s - Joseph LaSalla 6:30 p.m. free

FEB. 21 - TUESDAY

Jaimoe’s Jasssz Band

COMING UP

_________________________

FRIDAY 2/17

CAPTAIN MIDNIGHT BAND

Doors 8pm - Show 9pm Tickets $5 Advance, $10 at Door Order tickets at 877-987-6487 There will be a $3 upcharge for persons under 21

_________________________

SATURDAY 2/18

MIKE DEAN BAND Restaurant - Free

_________________________

Thursday, February 23

LOVEBOMB GO-GO dj young venom + lisbon deaths intergalactic marching freaks from outer space

Saturday, February 25

EDWIN HOLT

& RED CLAY ROADHOUSE “the orignal soulful sring band”

Wednesday, March 1

EILEN JEWELL holley peel

crafting a unique style that mixes poetic ballads with swinging rockers

Friday, March 3 JAKE SLINKARD & CO EP RELEASE

MONDAY 2/20 CENTRAL MS BLUES SOCIETY PRESENTS:

BLUE MONDAY Restaurant - 7 - 10pm $3 Members $5 Non-Members

_________________________

TUESDAY 2/21

PUB QUIZ

w/ Jimmy Quinn

Brew Pub - 7:30pm - $2 to Play

_________________________ OFFICIAL

HOUSE VODKA

Visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888 200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, MS

empty atlas

“parallels” is a collection of songs that serve as anthems of youth and relation

Saturday, March 4 GRADY CHAMPION

with Special Guest Big Yayo & An Acoustic Experience

Thursday, February Friday, March 31 23 THE MARCUS KING BAND

just announced!

soul-influenced psychedelic southern rock

JX//RX

COMPLETE SHOW LISTINGS & TICKETS

dulinghall.com

February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

FEB. 15 - WEDNESDAY

COURTESY CARL VERNULD

MUSIC | live

27


Last Week’s Answers

BY MATT JONES

43 Pokemon protagonist 44 Like some trees or tales 45 Like old rawhide bones 47 Pacific salmon variety 49 Cutty ___ (Scotch whisky) 50 Keystone’s place 51 Wendi ___-Covey of “The Goldbergs” 55 Benjamin Netanyahu’s nickname 57 Non-literal expression 59 Christmas lights location 60 Menaces to hobbits 61 Bourne of “The Bourne Ultimatum” 62 It has its points 63 Hotel counts 64 1997 environmental treaty site 65 “Note to ___ ...”

for short? 31 Catch a whiff of 35 “___ of Two Cities” 36 Smooth quality 44 Clue hunter, informally 46 Political org. from 962 to 1806 48 Mr. Kringle 49 “Get outta here!” 51 Soybean soup 52 3/5, for example 53 Avocado shape

54 Soft toy substance 55 Literature Nobelist Dylan 56 Burning anger 58 Box on a calendar ©2017 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@ jonesincrosswords.com)

For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800 655-6548. Reference puzzle #811.

BY MATT JONES

Down

“Four on the Floor” —putting your order down. Across

1 Pound cake ingredients 5 Like apples ready to bake 10 Torre pendente di ___ (European landmark, to locals) 14 Short pants? 15 Speed skater ___ Anton Ohno 16 “SVU” part 17 Diamond’s diametric opposite on the Mohs scale 18 Former Orange Bowl site 19 Walk back and forth 20 Cut ties with, on social media 22 I’d be lion if I said it

24 Lane who sang with Xavier Cugat 25 Title for several Trump cabinet picks 28 Musical miscellany 31 Indeterminate quantity 32 Corp.’s stock market debut 33 Nondairy dairy case item 34 Buccaneers’ bay 36 Pack away 37 1040 filers 38 Cheri once of “SNL” 39 Olympic vehicle 40 Find loathsome 41 Clip joint? 42 Like eight

1 Caesar’s “And you?” 2 “___ Torino” (Clint Eastwood film) 3 Strange sport? 4 Splenda, mainly 5 “I’m here so I can greet you ... not!”? 6 Declare one’s view 7 It may have a fork 8 Shade caster 9 “You really think zen master is on my list of attributes?!”? 10 Chrysalides 11 “Birdman” director’s Beetle, e.g.? 12 “Attack, dog!” 13 Finished off 21 “May ___ excused?” 23 “Lit” binary digit 25 Camera used in extreme sports 26 Farthest orbital point from earth 27 Bottom-of-the-line 28 Coffee orders 29 Ciudad Juarez neighbor 30 Item that plays “Soul Meets Body,”

Last Week’s Answers

“Sum Sudoku”

Put one digit from 1-9 in each square of this Sudoku so that the following three conditions are met: 1) each row, column, and 3x3 box (as marked off by heavy lines in the grid) contains the digits 1-9 exactly one time; 2) no digit is repeated within any of the areas marked off by dotted lines; and 3) the sums of the numbers in each area marked off by dotted lines total the little number given in each of those areas. Now do what I tell you— solve!! psychosudoku@gmail.com

Custom Doesn't Mean Costly |Layaway Available

February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

Located in LeFleur’s Gallery 4800 I 55 N, Jackson | 601.665.4642 | beckhamjewelry.com

28

C U P S E S P R E S S O C A F E.C O M


AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

Here’s your mantra for the next three weeks: “I know what I want, and I know how to glide it into my life.” Say this out loud 11 times right after you wake up each morning, and 11 more times before lunch and 11 more times at bedtime. “I know what I want, and I know how to glide it into my life.” Whenever you do this little chant, summon an upflow of smiling confidence—a serene certainty that no matter how long the magic might take, it will ultimately work. “I know what I want, and I know how to glide it into my life.” Don’t let any little voice in your head undermine your link to this simple truth. Lift your heart to the highest source of vitality you can imagine.

“We cannot simply sit and stare at our wounds forever,” writes Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami. “We must stand up and move on to the next action.” That’s your slightly scolding but ultimately inspirational advice, Pisces. According to my astrological analysis, you have done heroic work to identify and investigate your suffering. You have summoned a tremendous amount of intelligence in order to understand it and further the healing. But right now it’s time to turn your focus to other matters. Like what? How about rebirth?

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

By my estimates, 72 percent of you Aries are in unusually good moods. The world seems friendlier, more cooperative. Fifty-six percent of you feel more in love with life than you have in a long time. You may even imagine that the birds and trees and stars are flirting with you. I’m also guessing that 14 percent of you are weaving in and out of being absurdly, deliriously happy, sometimes without any apparent explanation. As a result of your generosity of spirit, you may be the recipient of seemingly impossible rewards like free money or toasted ice cream or unconditional tenderness. And I bet that at least 10 percent of you are experiencing all of the above.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

I am launching a campaign to undo obsolete stereotypes about you Bulls. There are still backwards astrologers out there who perpetrate the lie that many of you are stingy, stolid, stubborn slowpokes. As an antidote, I plan to heighten everyone’s awareness of your sensual, soulful sweetness, your tastefully pragmatic sensitivity, and your diligent, dynamic productivity. That should be easy in the coming weeks, since you’ll be at the height of your ability to express those superpowers. Luckily, people will also have an enhanced capacity to appreciate you for who you really are. It will be a favorable time to clarify and strengthen your reputation.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

Will Giovanni surreptitiously replace Allesandra’s birthcontrol pills with placebos? Will Camille take a hidden crowbar to her rendezvous with the blackmailer? Will Josie steal Jose’s diary and sell it on eBay? Given the current astrological omens, you may have an unconscious attraction to soap opera-type events like those. The glamour of melodrama is tempting you. But I’m hoping and predicting that you will express the cosmic currents in less toxic ways. Maybe you’ll hear a searing but healing confession after midnight in the pouring rain, for instance. Perhaps you’ll break an outworn taboo with ingenious grace, or forge a fertile link with a reformed rascal, or recover a lost memory in a dusty basement.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

All naturally occurring matter on earth is composed of 92 basic elements arranged in various combinations. Since some of these appear in trace amounts, they took a long time for humans to discover. In the 18th and 19th centuries, chemists were exuberant when they tracked down seven of the 92 in a single location: an underground mine on the Swedish island of Ytterby. That small place was a mother lode. I’m predicting a metaphorically similar experience for you, Cancerian: new access to a concentrated source that will yield much illumination.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

The next four weeks will be an excellent time to upgrade your understanding of the important characters in your life. In fact, I suspect you will generate good fortune and

meaningful synchronicities whenever you seek greater insight into anyone who affects you. Get to know people better, Leo! If there are intriguing acquaintances who pique your curiosity, find out more about them. Study the oddballs you’re allergic to with the intention to discern their hidden workings. In general, practice being objective as you improve your skill at reading human nature.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

In 1787, English captain Arthur Phillip led an eight-month naval expedition to the southeastern part of the continent now known as Australia. Upon arrival, he claimed the land for England, despite the fact that 250,000 Aboriginal people were living there, just as their ancestors had for 2,000 generations. Two hundred years later, an Aboriginal activist named Burnum Burnum planted the Aboriginal flag on the White Cliffs of Dover, claiming England for his people. I encourage you to make a comparably artful or symbolic act like Burnum’s sometime soon, Virgo—a ritual or gesture to assert your sovereignty or evoke a well-deserved reversal or express your unconquerable spirit.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

The ancient Roman rhetorician Quintilian authored a 12volume textbook on the art of oratory. As ample as it was, it could have been longer. “Erasure is as important as writing,” he said. According to my reading of the astrological omens, that counsel should be a rewarding and even exciting theme for you in the coming weeks. For the long-term health of your labor of love or your masterpiece, you should focus for a while on what to edit out of it. How could you improve it by making it shorter and more concise?

DISH TV Our company is looking for Equipment DISH TV - BEST DEAL EVER! Only $39.99/mo. Operators and Laborers for Overhead Plus $14.99/mo Internet (where avail.) FREE Power line work. Utility Construction Streaming. FREE Install (up to 6 rooms.) FREE experience is preferred. Class A or B Drivers HD-DVR. Call 1-800-398-0901 License is preferred. Work is located in the AT&T U-verse Vicksburg / Port Gibson area. Please go to NEW AT&T INTERNET OFFER. $20 and $30/ TeamPowerGroup.com to apply. mo plans available when you bundle. 99% Reliable 100% Affordable. HURRY, OFFER NOW HIRING DRIVERS ENDS SOON. New Customers Only. CALL NOW J&D Transit is hiring non-emergency drivers. 1-800-670-8371 Must be 25 yo, clear MVR, background, and Meet Singles! drug screen. Come to 120 Southpointe Dr, Meet singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, Byram MS or call 601-203-2136. exchange messages and connect live. Try it Print and Digital Marketing Representative We’re looking to add a special new member to free. Call now: 800-513-9842 the JFP/BOOM Jackson sales team. You should have sales or customer service (retail, restaurant) experience, along with a drive to build your career News Reporter while helping local businesses get ahead in the The JFP is hiring a new city reporter to cover Jackson Metro. You must be personable, outgoing, local government, politics and criminal justice. persistent, and willing to learn. Commission-driven Must have a great attitude and the energy to position with a paid training period and access to dig out the “why” and the “how.” The desire to benefits; potential $3,000-$5,000/mo and beyond! write narrative and get far beyond the inverted pyramid is vital. Write donna@jacksonfreepress. Visit our Jobs Page to apply.

Help Wanted

FOR SALE

com with resume and three samples. No calls. Teachers Wanted RePublic Schools is looking for dynamic, determined 1999 Ford F-150 Lariat 4 Door Extended Cab 5.4Liter V8 teachers to join our Jackson middle schools. Must 4WD, Automatic transmission. $ 2200. have an unwavering belief that all children can achieve at high levels and change the world. Must be Call: 504-434-0548 willing to obtain certification if not currently licensed. 1994 NEW HOLLAND Competitive salary and full benefits. Visit http://www. 3930 WITH QUICK TACH LOADER ,1800 hours 50 Hp $2100 Call me:7692063747 republiccharterschools.org/careers to apply.

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

Post an ad, call 601-362-6121, ext. 11 or fax to 601-510-9019. Deadline: Mondays at Noon.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

Do you know about the long-running kids’ show “Sesame Street”? Are you familiar with Big Bird, the talking 8-feettall yellow canary who’s one of the main characters? I hope so, because your horoscope is built around them. In the “Sesame Street” episode called “Don’t Eat the Pictures,” Big Bird solves a riddle that frees a 4,000-year-old Egyptian prince from an ancient curse. I think this vignette can serve as a model for your own liberation. How? You can finally outwit and outmaneuver a very old problem with the help of some playful, even child-like energy. Don’t assume that you’ve got to be relentlessly serious and dour in order to shed the ancient burden. In fact, just the opposite is true. Trust blithe and rowdy spirits.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Your lessons in communication are reaching a climax. Here are five tips to help you do well on your “final exam.” 1. Focus more on listening for what you need to know rather than on expressing what you already know. 2. Keep white lies and convenient deceptions to a bare minimum. 3. Tell the truth as strong and free as you dare, but always—if possible—with shrewd kindness. 4. You are more likely to help your cause if you spread bright, shiny gossip instead of the grubby kind. 5. Experiment with being unpredictable; try to infuse your transmissions with unexpected information and turns of phrase.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

The meaning of the Latin phrase crambe repetita is “cabbage reheated, twice-cooked.” I urge you to avoid partaking of such a dish in the coming weeks, both literally and figuratively. If you’re truly hungry for cooked cabbage, eat it fresh. Likewise, if you have a ravenous appetite for stories, revelations, entertainment and information—which I suspect you will—don’t accept the warmed-over, recycled variety. Insist on the brisk, crisp stuff that excites your curiosity and appeals to your sense of wonder.

Homework: Imagine you have time-traveled to one of your favorite places in the year 2020. What do you see? I’m at Truthrooster@gmail.com

February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

BULLE TIN BOARD: Classifieds As low as $25! Services Equipment Operators and Laborers Wanted

29


PAID ADVERTISING SECTION. CALL 601-362-6121 X11 TO LIST YOUR BUSINESS

THURSDAY

2/16

AND THE ECHO

------------- H E A LT H C A R E / W E L L N E S S ---------------The Headache Center

Renaissance at Colony Park, Suite #7205, Ridgeland, (601)366-0855 Accurately diagnoses headache syndromes and tailors an individualized treatment plan for you that includes lifestyle modification and FDA-approved medical treatments.

W/ JESSE COPPENBARGER 9 P.M.

FRIDAY

-------------------- HOME SERVICES --------------------

2/17

Solar Control

WILD ADRIATIC 10 P.M.

SATURDAY

CBDB 10 P.M.

291 US-51 E4, Ridgeland, MS 39157 (601)707-5596 Mississippi’s only full-service 3M Authorized window film dealer. Services include, residential, graffiti shield and automotive tinting.

Tri-county Tree Service

Jackson, (601)940-5499 Personalized and courteous services to valued customers in Madison, Hinds, Rankin or Jackson County. Contact us today for a FREE NO HASSLE ESTIMATE.

2/18

---------------------- AUTOMOTIVE ----------------------J & J Wholesale Service & Repair

3246 Hwy 80 W., Jackson, (601) 360-2444 Certified Technician, David Rucker, has 40+ years of experience. Mr. Rucker specializes in a/c, front end, part replacement, brakes, select services and repairs. Appointments only.

OPEN MIC NIGHT $5 APPETIZERS (D O )

MONDAY

TUESDAY

THE

INE IN

NLY

2/20

-------------------- BANKS/FINANCIAL ------------------Members Exchange

107 Marketridge Dr. Ridgeland, 5640 I-55 South Frontage Rd. Byram 101 MetroPlex Blvd. Pearl, (601)922-3250 Members Exchange takes the bank out of banking. You will know right away that you are not just a customer, you are a member.

Guaranty Trust

2/21

2 Professional Parkway, Ste A Ridgeland, (601)307-5008 Your friendly source for mortgage advice and service in FHA, USDA, VA, Jumbo and conventional mortgages.

SWEET LILLIES

------------------- FOOD/DRINK/GIFTS -------------------

9 P.M.

WEDNESDAY

MODERN MEASURE

Beckham Jewelry

2/22

4800 N Hwy 55 #35, Jackson, (601)665-4642 With over 20 years experience Beckham Jewelry, manufactures, repairs and services all types of jewelry. Many repairs can be done the same day! They also offer full-service watch and clock repair.

Fondren Cellars

633 Duling Ave, Jackson, (769)216-2323 Quality wines and spirits in a relaxed environment. Voted Best Wine and Liquor store by Jackson Free Press readers.

(1320 RECORDS) W/ PROJECT ASPECT

Nandy’s Candy

Maywood Mart, 1220 E Northside Dr #380, Jackson, (601)362-9553 Small batch confections do more than satisfy a sweet tooth, they foster fond traditions and strong relationships. Plus, enjoy sno-balls, gifts for any occasion and more!

9 P.M. // 18+

UPCOMING SHOWS

February 15 - 21, 2017 • jfp.ms

2/24 - FLVSH BVNG! Art & Music Showcase Vol. 2 feat. KTRL 2/25 - Garry Burnside Band 3/3 - The Stolen Faces (A Tribute to the Grateful Dead) 3/11 - Cory Branan (Bloodshot Records) 3/18 - Martin’s St. Paddy’s Blowout w/ Flow Tribe & more 3/20 - Joecephus and the George Jonestown Massacre 3/22 - Spoonfed Tribe 3/25 - Vibe Street

30

4/6 - Papadosio (Pattern Integrities Spring Tour) 4/28 - The Weeks Record Release Show

See Our New Menu

WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

214 S. STATE ST. DOWNTOWN JACKSON

601.354.9712

McDade’s Wine

Maywood Mart, 1220 E Northside Dr #320, Jackson, (601)366-5676 McDade’s Wine and Spirits offers Northeast Jackson’s largest showroom of fine wine and spirits. Visit to learn about the latest offerings and get professional tips from the friendly staff!

Playtime Entertainment

1009 Hampstead Blvd, Clinton, (601)926-1511 Clinton’s newest high energy video gaming and sports grille destination.

-------------------- TOURISM/ARTS ----------------------Mississippi Museum of Art

380 South Lamar St. Jackson, (601) 960-1515 MMA strives to be a fountainhead attracting people from all walks to discuss the issues and glories of the past and present, while continuing to inspire progress in the future.

Ardenland

7ZRORFDWLRQV WRVHUYH\RX

2SHQVHYHQGD\VDZHHN 1030-A Hwy 51 • Madison Behind the McDonalds in Madison Station

601.790.7999

1002 Treetops Blvd • Flowood Behind the Applebee’s on Lakeland

601.664.7588

2906 North State St. Suite 207, Jackson, (601) 292-7121 Jackson’s premiere music promoter with concerts around the Metro including at Duling Hall in Fondren. www.ardenland.net

Natural Science Museum

2148 Riverside Dr, Jackson, (601) 576-6000 Stop by the museum and enjoy their 300-acre natural landscape, an open-air amphitheater, along with 2.5 miles of nature trails. Inside, meet over 200 living species in the 100,000 gallon aquarium network.

Mississippi Children's Museum

2145 Museum Boulevard, Jackson, (601) 981-5469 The Mississippi Children’s Museum provides unparalleled experiences that ignite a thirst for discovery, knowledge and learning in all children through hands-on and engaging exhibits and programs focusing on literacy, the arts, science, health and nutrition.

---------------- BEAUTY SHOP/SALON ------------------Barnette’s Highland Bluff

4400 Old Canton Rd, Jackson, (769) 230-4648 Barnette’s specializes in custom hair color as well as beautiful precision cuts.


31

February 15 - 21, 2017 â&#x20AC;¢ jfp.ms


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b

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Crawfish (LIVE & BOILED) SEAFOOD GUMBO POâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;BOYS SHRIMP & CRAB LEGS HAMBURGERS FRIED SEAFOOD

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If you are qualified and interested, please come see us. For more information, contact Jeremy @ 479.462.2756, email bthomas@darlingii.com, or fax resume to 479.229.3734. EOE/M/F/Vet/Disabled

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681 S. Pear Orchard Rd. Ridgeland www.smokinsouthbbqms.com facebook.com/smokinsouthbbq (769) 300-2500


V15n24 - Murder in the City