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UNITED WAY MADE A WAY OUT OF “NO WAY� FOR ME

Michael is a high school student with a problem that many students face. He has the grades to graduate, but he’s having trouble passing one of his required state tests. United Way partners with school districts in the Metro Area to host state test workshops which help students pass their state tests and graduate on time.

Your United Way’s initiatives are changing lives, right here, right now. Each of us can be the one who helps turn a life into a success story. Together, person by person, we can make lasting change.

September 25 - October 1, 2013

            

             

   

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TRIP BURNS

JACKSONIAN LAUREN DAVIS

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n many cities, the professionals who work downtown are treated to a parade of color and flavor in the form of food trucks. Currently, no such scene in Jackson exists, but that is beginning to change, thanks to Lauren Davis. The lifelong Jackson area resident was to first to fill the void with his truck, LurnyD’s Grille. This isn’t about a trendy version of the McDouble: Davis hopes to foster a food-truck scene similar to larger cities and help revitalize downtown Jackson. While Davis, 41, had been grilling and smoking meat with his family since he was a child, he had no formal culinary training when he opened his truck. He says it was scary, but television shows such as The Cooking Channel’s “Eat Street” inspired him with the knowledge that many in his newly chosen industry were in the same situation. “I think the number was 75 percent of people who got into the food-truck business had no culinary background,” Davis says. “They just had ideas.” Davis, who lives in Jackson with his wife Betsy, pulled from his business background to open his mobile restaurant. Before getting into food trucks, he worked in advertising since graduating from Mississippi College. He noticed that the Jackson food scene was oversaturated with the BBQ-trailer-in-theChevron-parking-lot model, leading him in the direction of burgers. Still, Davis found a way to bring his southern background to the burg-

CONTENTS

ers. One is topped with homemade pimento cheese, and the Southern Burger features fried green tomatoes and comeback dressing. Davis is most proud of his Sloppy Jalopy, which is topped with chili and either deep-fried onions or deep-fried tomatoes. “I can’t find anyone doing that anywhere else in the country,” Davis says. That kind of innovation attracted Jackson restaurateur Tom Ramsey, who introduced Davis to chef Jesse Houston, known for his popup restaurants. Houston and Davis have become collaborators, pushing Davis’ menu into even more gourmet directions. Fondrenites might remember LurnyD’s temporary Asian food makeover this summer, and the Bellwether Church got a Houston-designed gourmet grilled-cheese menu earlier this month. For Davis, working with a Houston is a privilege. “It’s an honor to have a trained chef like Jesse on the truck,” he says. Davis hopes to see other food trucks hit the streets soon. “That was really my ultimate goal: to get the food-truck scene going,” he says. A crew of food trucks means more people going to Smith Park, and more revenue for the city. “If somebody goes downtown, and the (food truck) lines are long, they’re going to eat at a downtown restaurant,” Davis says. Until that scene emerges, you can find where LurnyD’s Grille is parked on Twitter @LurnyDsGrille or at lurnydsgrille.com. —Mo Wilson

Cover photograph of Robert St. John by Melanie Boyd

11 Layers of History

Peek inside the old James O. Eastland Federal Building, which developers hope to turn into a mixed-use space—once they figure out what to do with a controversial mural.

36 Classical Meets Hip-Hop

String duo Black Violin gives a master’s class and performs at Jackson State University next week.

35 Girly Show

“Ellen Langford provides an innocuous painting of a possum, which stands out among the southern landscapes she renders with bold, blocky brushstrokes. Elizabeth Robinson’s glass piece, “Dive Below Reef,” features bubbles carved into the blue-green background. Heidi Pitre’s work may be the boldest of the bunch. A 2012 “Best in Show” winner at the Cedars art show, Pitre’s paintings expose the power and vulnerability of the nude female form. Frequently, her pieces feature a woman holding a paintbrush as a blowtorch, but occasionally her subject is dangling from a cliff or kneeling on a net with a piece of cake.” —Mo Wilson, “Girls Just Want to Make Art”

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ............................. EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ............................................ TALKS 11 .................................. BUSINESS 12 ................................ EDITORIAL 13 .................................... OPINION 14 ............................ COVER STORY 27 .................................... HITCHED 31 .............................. DIVERSIONS 32 ............................... JFP EVENTS 34 ....................................... 8 DAYS 35 .......................................... ARTS 35 ................... GIRL ABOUT TOWN 36 ....................................... MUSIC 37 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 38 ..................................... SPORTS 39 .................................... PUZZLES 41 ....................................... ASTRO

JEREMIAH “ICE” YOUNOSSI, A-LIST AGENCY ; TRIP BURNS

SEPTEMBER 25 - OCTOBER 1, 2013 | VOL. 12 NO. 3

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EDITOR’S note

by Ronni Mott, News and Opinion Editor

Stop the Food Fight

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ometimes, it seems my life centers on food: what kind of coffee with breakfast, where to eat lunch, what’s for dinner. I talk about food while I’m eating with others. Is it good? Have I had better? Did the recipe come out right? What doesn’t often enter into my conversations about eating—and probably doesn’t come into play for most of us—is whether I have the resources to eat today. For millions of Americans—including disaster victims, children, the working poor, unemployed and homeless people, those with disabilities and the elderly—thinking about food isn’t about its quality. Instead, their question is whether they will eat at all today—or tomorrow. The term to describe that state—not knowing where your next meal is coming from—is “food insecurity.” Talking about hunger is an odd, disconnected conversation in America. It’s hard to understand that in the “land of plenty” many people—some estimates say as many as 37 million—won’t eat today. Not because they choose not to. They won’t be able to eat because they can’t afford food. It’s a conundrum. Rural areas, those capable of growing the most food, report the highest levels of hunger. Obesity and diabetes, problems stemming from too much of the wrong foods, are epidemics. We grow vast amounts of edibles to feed other edibles—such as corn to feed cows, pigs and chickens—and ship food all over the world to satisfy our appetite for foods we can’t grow locally. We grow plants for fuel, frequently for a net fuel loss because agriculture uses fossil fuels. Government subsidizes agri-businesses, while promoting the end of programs that feed people in need. Hunger is a severe problem in Mississippi while, at the same time, we have extremely high rates of obesity. “Nearly one in five of Mississippi households struggled to provide enough

food,” Warren Yoder, executive director of the Public Policy Center of Mississippi, says on the nonprofit Inside Mississippi website, about 2009 statistics from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. “Most of these families try to cope by switching to a less healthy diet just to have some food for the family. In four out of 10 of these struggling families—those with very low food security—even those cutbacks were not enough and usually, someone had to go hungry.” Hunger and obesity, which are often two sides of the same coin, both have long-

Hunger, and its corollary, poverty, are not intractable problems, despite their historical prevalence. term consequences on the health, education and productive future of children, states the PPCM website. Hungry children can’t concentrate to learn, and obese children are inherently unhealthy, frequently carrying their bad health into truncated adulthoods. The problem exhibits a fissure between reality and illusion. The illusion is that we can ignore hungry people or that they alone are responsible and can solve their problems on their own. The reality looks more like this: Nearly 331,000 students in Mississippi—67 percent—were eligible for free or reduced lunches in the 2007-08 school year, meaning they come from households with incomes of less than $26,845 for a family of four (to qualify for free lunches). In Jackson, nearly 80 percent of kids qualify. Hunger and its corollary, poverty, are not intractable problems, despite their

historic prevalence. To make an impact, though, we have to become smarter about them—first, by acknowledging their affect us on us. We pay the price every time a hungry child flunks out of school, every time a person chooses illegal activities because no other opportunities exist for them, every time we finance another industry in Mississippi that won’t pay a living wage to its workers, every time an uninsured man or woman makes use of an emergency room because he or she can’t afford basic, preventive health care. It’s a tough, Gordian-Knot kind of problem. Yet, as with numerous social-justice issues, many progressives spend inordinate amounts of energy trying to change the minds of people whose fundamental ideology doesn’t seem to include solving them. We could better use all that energy for solutions. Here are a handful of ideas to begin turning that particular boat around. First, let’s stop trying to prove that today’s free-market economy isn’t working. It’s working just fine for lots of folks, especially for those in charge of spending our treasure. Trying to change their minds is akin to trying to talk your dog into becoming a vegetarian—it won’t work. But the results of hunger and poverty—crime, and an ignorant and unhealthy populace, for example—affect even masters of the universe. It’s those effects progressives must focus on to craft saleable solutions, instead of trying to guilt people who are doing just fine—or those convinced they’ll get there some day—into doing the right thing. Second, stop entertaining the notion that we don’t have enough money. Money is not the problem; it’s merely the prevailing symbol to measure problems. Couching every issue into terms of how much money it will take to solve it leaves us impoverished, spiritually and literally. America, and even Mississippi, has enough money to do what we want to do—if and when we decide to do

it. That’s a big caveat, but fighting over every issue in economic terms is a losing proposition where poor people are involved. Money follows purpose. Progressives desperately need new symbols that resonate and move people to action. Let’s find a conversation that overrides the talking points about our perceived lack of funds for social good. Third, it’s highly unlikely that lasting change will come from on high. The government is not going to solve hunger—especially not in our current political climate—so stop hoping it will. The powers that be won’t magically change their minds on how to spend it. Change comes from the ground up; it won’t flow downhill. (See the cover story on page 14 for a great example of one person making a difference.) Fourth, media must stop giving oxygen to political spin, and news consumers must demand better. Not every story has an equivalency. If someone is lying, it’s not enough to give an opposite and equal soundbite-worthy reaction. Media must say the words: What you just heard is not accurate—and here’s why. That’s anathema to a ravenous 24-hour news cycle, so it’s up to news consumers to choose carefully who we’ll patronize. We must learn to discern between a public-relations statement and real news. We need to tame our prurient instincts and stop letting shiny objects distract us. Fifth, we all have to give up the notion that any of this is easy or that change will happen overnight. It’s significant, and as with all important, vital work, it’s hard and will take time. That’s OK. It’s alright to stumble and even to fail sometimes. Not trying, giving up, or being satisfied with condemnation and hand wringing won’t change a thing. Forget fighting. What counts is action—one foot in front of the other, always taking the next step. Be thankful you’re not hungry, and share your paradigm-busting ideas at www.jfp.ms/hunger.

September 25 - October 1, 2013

CONTRIBUTORS

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Mo Wilson

R.L. Nave

Kathleen Mitchell

Richard Coupe

Genevieve Legacy

Justin Hosemann

Andrea Thomas

Kimberly Griffin

Editorial Intern Mo Wilson is a Millsaps College student. He enjoys pizza, the Internet, dancing alone in his bedroom, social justice, politics and giggling. He wrote the Jacksonian and an art feature.

Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson. Call him at 601-3626121 ext. 12. He contributed to the talk section.

Features Editor Kathleen Mitchell loves food, wine and learning about both. She is on a quest to bake a perfect loaf of French bread. She coordinated and wrote for the cover package.

Richard Coupe, avid fan of the beautiful game, husband, brother and father of four, is still wondering what he wants to be when he grows up. He wrote the events blurb.

Genevieve Legacy is an artist-writer-community development consultant. She works at Hope Enterprise Corporation and lives in Brandon with her husband and youngest son. She wrote a music story.

Editorial Intern Justin Hosemann is a native of Vicksburg. He recently graduated from the University of Southern Mississippi. He helped factcheck for this issue.

Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas is a native of Ridgeland. Andrea is a lover of all genres of music, fashion and good food. She spends her free time exploring everything Jackson has to offer. She designed many of the ads in this issue.

Kimberly Griffin is a fitness buff and foodie who loves chocolate and her mama. She’s also Michelle Obama’s super secret BFF, which explains the Secret Service detail.


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jacksonfreepress.com


Wednesday, Sept. 18 Russian and Syrian officials announce that Syria has turned over information to Russia showing that rebels carried out last month’s chemical weapons attack. ‌ U.S. House Republicans propose legislation to fund the government through Dec. 15 at existing levels while defunding the health-care law. Thursday, Sept. 19 The missing in Colorado’s flooding stands at 200 as authorities reach more victims. Evacuated residents salvage what they can from their homes. ‌ House Republicans line up support for legislation to cut $4 billion a year over 10 years from the federal food-stamp program. Friday, Sept. 20 Syria sends the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons an “initial declarationâ€? outlining its weapons program. ‌ The Obama administration presses tough requirements to limit carbon pollution from new power plants. Saturday, Sept. 21 Technical experts at the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons review disclosures from Syria about its chemical weapons program. ‌ Al-Qaida-linked terrorists attack a mall in Nairobi, Kenya, killing 39 people, injuring 150 and taking others hostage.

September 25 - October 1, 2013

Sunday, Sept. 22 President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama attend a memorial service for victims of the Washington Navy Yard shooting. ‌ The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences presents the 65th annual Primetime Emmy Awards.

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Monday, Sept. 23 Syrian President Bashar Assad announces that he will allow international experts access to Syrian chemical-weapon sites. ‌ An Egyptian court bans the Muslim Brotherhood and orders its assets confiscated, opening the door for a wider crackdown. Tuesday, Sept. 24 U.N. Secretary-General Ban Kimoon urges world leaders to stop fueling the bloodshed in Syria with weapons. ‌ President Obama and former President Bill Clinton appear together to discuss Obama’s health-care law at a Clinton Global Initiative session. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

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Coming Soon: 1-Percent Sales Tax Increase? by Tyler Cleveland

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aced with steep spending increases to meet the challenges of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s consent decree and Jackson’s crumbling roads, Mayor Chokwe Lumumba says he is moving ahead with a 1-percent sales tax. Lumumba announced a deal with the Greater Jackson Chamber over the tax commission’s makeup, but questions over the deal’s legality remain unanswered at press time. The city has been in an ongoing debate over the much-ballyhooed 1-percent sales tax—and the commission that would oversee how the city spends the revenue—since former Gov. Haley Barbour signed Senate Bill 3268 into law in 2009. The bill gives final approval for spending the revenue (an estimated $15 million in Jackson) to a 10person commission. Under the law, the mayor would appoint three commission members, subject to city council approval, and the governor and lieutenant governor would each appoint one member. A local chamber of commerce (in this case, the Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership) would submit a list of eight nominees, of which the mayor would select four. The speaker of the state House of Representatives would appoint the 10th member, although he or she would not have a vote. All commission members would have to be Jackson residents, except for the GJCP’s nominees, who must only have a business in the city. That means the chamber could appoint people that live outside Jackson to have approval over Jackson’s spending. The commission make-up has been the sticking point for former mayors and for Lumumba, who took a hard stance during his

Where the Money Would Go

3% 30% 67%

67% - Road and street repair (reconstruction and resurfacing projects) 30% - Enhanced police and fire protection; emergency road and street repairs 3% - State Tax Commission SOURCE: SENATE BILL 3268

candidacy against the tax commission’s structure and giving up the city’s sovereignty over tax dollars and resources. Arguably, Jackson voters sided with Lumumba when choosing him over businessman Jonathan Lee. Lee’s campaign took an aggressive stance for regionalism, proposing to, among other things, put the 1-percent sales tax with the state-mandated commission to a vote. “We can be right,� Lee famously said, “or we can be happy.� Lumumba shared then-incumbent Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr.’s position that the commission’s makeup was a slap in the face to Jackson’s leadership and could leave decisions in the wrong people’s hands. “So (the Chamber said), ‘Well, we’ll appoint some good people. You don’t have to worry.’� Johnson said in his endorsement interview with the JFP in May. “But this is a 20-year law. I’m the mayor now, and some good people will be appointed now, but what if later on the not-so-good people are appointed? What happens then? ... This is a 10-person commission, so I said to the Chamber, ‘Look: Why don’t you just assign your four members to the city.’�

Johnson said his proposal was rejected on the grounds it might not be legal. “(The chamber) thought about it, and they came back with an opinion saying: ‘You know what? We don’t believe that we can assign a public duty that’s spelled out in law. ... We have lawyers who have that opinion as well, but supposedly, they got an unofficial opinion from the attorney general saying that they couldn’t do it, so we had to back off of that compromise.� Current chamber Chairman Socrates Garrett confirmed that the group had pitched the same deal to Johnson, but did not mention legal problems with it. Lumumba maintains that he hasn’t changed his position on the commission, but says that he and the chamber have reached a compromise. “I can publicly say that the solution we’ve come up with is (that) the (GJCP) has agreed to let us appoint their members to the commission,� Lumumba said Sept. 11. “It’s not perfect, but it would give us a majority on the commission.� The mayor could not be reached about PRUH6$/(67$;VHHSDJH

Mississippi Fresh Produce Availability Calendar get it while you can! September October November Muscadines Beans, Green Beans, Pole Beans, Butter

December

September October November (All year)

Potatoes, Sweet

(Harvest)

Pumpkins

Broccoli

Squash, White

Cabbage

Squash, Winter

Cauliflower

Squash, Yellow

Greens, Collard

Squash, Zucchini Chestnuts

Greens, Mustard Greens, Turnip Okra Peas, Southern

December

Potatoes, Sweet

Honey (All year) Pecans (All year Pecans (Harvest) SOURCE: HTTP://WWW.MDAC.STATE.MS.US/PUBLICATIONS_AND_FORMS/PUBLICATIONS/PDF/MKT_PRODUCEGUIDE.PDF


 

2013 Breast Cancer Awareness Schedule of Events - proceeds benefit fund for the girls.

Jackson Restaurant Week Top 10 Charity Finalist

From September 29 – October 12, 2013, cast your vote for fund for the girls to win $10,000 during Jackson Restaurant Week.

DRAWING OCTOBER 31 – “Fund Days at Renaissance� Raffle

Purchase your $25 “Fund Days at Renaissance� raffle tickets for a chance to win a package valued at $1,500, including meals, merchandise, spa services, lodging and more.

OCTOBER 4 – Power of Pink: Celebrating Women’s Health Day

Take part in important health screenings for glucose, total cholesterol, blood pressure and body mass index (BMI). Appointments start at 9:00 AM. Call 601.948.6262 to register.

OCTOBER 5 – Fund Run for the Girls

Kinkade’s Fine Clothing hosts its first 5K at 8:00 AM, starting from 120 West Jackson Street in Olde Towne Ridgeland. Preregistration is $25, late registration is $30.

OCTOBER 10 – Puttin’ in Pink Golf Tournament

The first Puttin’ in Pink golf tournament will be held at Bay Pointe Country Club. Tee times are 8:00 AM or 1:00 PM with a shotgun start. Prizes will be awarded. $125 per person.

OCTOBER 14 – ZUMBATHON

Join us for “A Dance-Fitness Party For a Cause� from 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM at the Baptist Healthplex Clinton. Door prizes will be awarded. $10 per person.

OCTOBER 15 – Fund Match Tennis Tournament

The Country Club of Jackson will host the Fund Match tennis tournament, with round robin and mixed doubles. Play begins at 5:00 PM. $50 per player, with a $20 guest fee.

OCTOBER 21 – An Overview of Breast Cancer Screenings

Featuring Radiologist James L. Burkhalter, MD, and Breast Navigator Adrienne Russell, RN, MSN, and a clinical breast exam screening for seminar participants. Limited screening appointments are available. Call 601.948.6262 to register.

You can start registering now! Get all details and register online at fundforthegirls.com/fund-times.

jacksonfreepress.com

OCTOBER 31 – Pink Night Out at the Belhaven

Join WLBT’s Power of Pink sponsors for PINK NIGHT OUT and the grand opening of The Belhaven from 5:00 PM until 9:30 PM. Purchase $5 adult tickets online; children, free: t'PPEGSPN+BDLTPOTOFXFTUSFTUBVSBOUT t)BMMPXFFOiUSVOLPSUSFBUJOHwGSPN1.VOUJM1. t-JWFNVTJDGSPNi#BDL4MBTIwBOEi5IF8FFLTw t4JHO8JMTPO,JBT1PXFSPG1JOLDBS t"TQFDJBMFWFOUGPSCSFBTUDBODFSTVSWJWPST

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TALK | city 6$/(67$;IURPSDJH

by Tyler Cleveland

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ackson’s Department of Public Works cil work session that his department would Stamps, who voted against the change order, may have found a way to break the try to clean out the drainage pipe in-house, along with Ward 3 Councilwoman LaRita impasse with the city council that without the help of a private contractor. Cooper Stokes, said he’s still skeptical. has slowed construction on “They broke the order up,� the Fortification Street renovation Stamps said Tuesday morning. project for almost a month. “So if you pass this now and pass Public Works Director Dan another one later, did we save any Gaillet and Mayor Chokwe Lumoney? I believe Mr. Gaillet is bemumba put forth an order Tuesing sincere, but my standpoint with day, Sept. 24, that would partially Public Works hasn’t changed—we fund the change order the council need to invest in building our capacpreviously rejected with a 2-2 vote ity so we can do more work without Aug. 13. The order asks the council contracting it out. to give the mayor authorization to “If it’s an issue of our workers spend $36,988 to replace a damand whether they are well-trained aged pipe and place a fence along enough to do the work, then we Construction on Fortification Street continues, despite the construction site to protect hoshould invest in (improving) our the Jackson City Council’s denial of a change order for meowners from an 8-foot drop “just employees (through) training.� an additional $151,000 to clear a 42-inch drainage line. feet from the resident’s front door,� Stamps believes this will save Gaillet said yesterday. money in the long-run, but didn’t In August, the council rejected the origCity Council President Charles Tillman indicate how he would vote today. City inal change order that would have paid the said he did not want to see the same items Council President Charles Tillman (Ward 5) contractor, Rankin County-based Hemphill come back before the council broken up into and Ward 6 Councilman Tony Yarber voted Construction, $151,000 to complete both smaller pieces. Gaillet responded that Public in favor of the change order in August. All of those tasks, plus blow out 30-plus years of Works genuinely “is planning, at this point, other members were absent. debris clogging up another drainage pipe. to do that work in-house.� Comment at www.jfp.ms. Contact Tyler Gaillet said on Sept. 24 at the city counWard 4 Councilman De’Keither Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com. TRIP BURNS

the legality question before press time. The particulars—whether Lumumba would have complete control to name the chamber’s nominees or if he would simply have input—are also unclear. GJCP President Duane O’Neill has not returned calls, but Chamber Vice President Lewis Slater said that although he hadn’t been directly involved, he believes the outlook for getting the 1-percent tax to a vote is “particularly good.� One of the bill’s authors, Sen. John Horhn, D-Jackson, said hoopla over the commission is overblown. “It’s amazing to me that the city officials always make a mountain out of a molehill,� Horhn said. “The bill simply places the formality of having the city’s plan blessed by the committee, and the city essentially remains in charge of its own master plan.� Another unknown is how Jackson voters will react to the tax, considering the city just raised water and sewer rates to fund a greatly expanded budget. The law requires approval of 60 percent of the city’s voters. If the mayor and city council decide to hold a referendum vote, citizens could be polled as quickly as 21 days after the council posts a public notice.

Fortification Street Funding: Round Two

GET DOWNTOWN!

Brain Injury Association of Mississippi

Art Remix Friday, October 4 7PM featuring Latinismo!

 

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

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September 25 - October 1, 2013

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OCTOBER 5 NOON TIL 6PM FREE ADMISSION FA M I LY F U N ARTISTS & CRAFTSMEN P E R F O R M A N C E S A L L DAY FOOD VENDORS

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$125 per ticket Dinner Buffet For tickets, call (601) 981­1021  Awards Ceremony or go to www.msbia.org.


TALK | state

Jackson: ‘Elephant’ in State Budget Room by R.L. Nave

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he Jackson Fire Department extin- more than 25 percent since 2008. The cuts than the national average, where unemployguished a fire in July at the Hinds prompted Trudy Fisher, the agency’s execu- ment has fallen to 7.3 percent. The DepartCounty Armory, located at the Mis- tive director, to ask the Legislature for a small ment of Revenue requested an additional sissippi Fairgrounds, property the increase for fiscal year 2015. $38.7 million for its budget for the 2015 state owns. Jackson has also taken out milLawmakers most often cite shrinking fiscal year, primarily to beef up its tax-colleclions of dollars in loans with the Mississippi state coffers as a reason to pass on Jackson’s tions personnel. Department of Environmental Quality, and needs, and economic experts do not see Given the tight revenue picture, state the loan repayments have injected much- the outlook improving. Darrin Webb, the leaders were tough on agency directors who needed cash into the state treasury in the state economist, said although Mississippi’s made budget recommendations. When form of interest. Brent Christensen, the Yet, no one uttered executive director of the the word “Jacksonâ€? in Mississippi Development four days of budget hearAuthority, presented his ings last week. agency’s request for a 3 State Sen. Willie percent increase over last Simmons, who represents year’s $21.5 million budthe Mississippi Delta get, Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves town of Cleveland and is took Christensen to task one of three Democratic over several line items members of the Joint from the past fiscal year. Legislative Budget ComOne expenditure mittee, said mentioning Reeves singled out was Jackson makes issues MDA’s practice of using When a fire broke out at the Hinds County Armory, located on state non-starters, even though bond proceeds to pay for property, the Jackson Fire Department put it out. Nevertheless, Jackson is the capital city’s needs are its financial-resources diunlikely to benefit from state budget negotiations. great. “You can’t say you’re vision, which Christensen going to do streets and said has eight employees. not talk about water and Reeves said salaries should sewer,â€? said Simmons, who also chairs the economy is doing better than the U.S. on not be paid from bonds, which are often Senate Transportation Committee. average, the pace is anemic and likely will long-term debt the state takes on. Of the 14 lawmakers on the JLBC, not continue. “Whoever made that decision, however none is from Mississippi’s most populous “I suspect that many of the jobs being many years ago, made a mistake,â€? Reeves said city, which often gets left out in the cold dur- added in the state are relatively low-paying before turning his attention to MDA’s use of ing budget negotiations. This, despite the and possibly part-time, and that is why we the state plane. fact that legislators and their constituents and can have strong job growth but relatively Specifically, Reeves wanted to know the numerous state agencies make full use of the modest income growth. ‌ It also appears agency’s policy for using the plane for in-state city’s infrastructure and services. that many of the jobs being added may and out-of-state travel. He particularly wantIn the most recent legislative session, be temporary jobs, which strengthens the ed information about 14 trips on the statethe city of Jackson received $3 million from argument that the employment data are owned plane where Christensen was not on the bond bill for the Woodrow Wilson Av- overstating the recovery,â€? Webb told law- board, and another expense for sending 15 enue bridge. makers last week. employees—at an average of $3,000 each— State agencies say that they are struggling While the state added 25,000 jobs in to the annual Mississippi Picnic in New York just as much as cities like Jackson. MDEQ, the past year, Mississippi’s 8.5 percent unem- City’s Central Park this past June. for example, has seen state support shrink by ployment rate remains considerably higher Christensen defended the trip, saying it

included meetings with economic prospects in addition to the picnic. “What we’re trying to do this time, this year, is really drill down to some of the individual expenses,� Reeves told reporters after Monday’s budget meeting. Reeves praised agencies that are requesting decreases or only modest increases. The secretary of state’s office and the state Insurance Department requests were smaller than last year’s allocations. The Department of Agriculture and Commerce is seeking about a 1 percent increase. Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann continued his practice of slashing his own department’s spending and asked for a 3 percent decrease, or about $1 million less than his fiscal year 2014 budget. He reiterated that with the recent landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that struck down the pre-clearance provisions of the 1965 Voting Rights Act— which had held up the implementation of Mississippi’s voter-ID law pending U.S. Department of Justice approval—he expects voter ID to be in force by the 2014 congressional primaries. In addition, Hosemann said that his office has not tapped the $100,000 the Legislature appropriated for legal fees related to voter-ID implementation. Hosemann is considered a contender for the U.S. Senate seat of Sen. Thad Cochran should the long-term senator choose to retire; however, Hosemann has said he would not challenge Cochran, in office since 1978, if he decides to run for a seventh term. State revenue has grown about 5 percent annually for each of the past two years, while spending has increased about 2 percent a year. The Budget Committee will release its spending recommendations in December, and the full House and Senate will adopt a budget in the spring.

     



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TALK | justice

A Bullying Dilemma by R.L. Nave

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ayar Johnson, the mother of four daughters in Wayne County, says her girls have been victims of racial bullying for going on close to a decade. “They’ve been called the N-word. It’s been documented where I begged for help,” Johnson said. “I get ‘It’s been handled” or ‘We’ll take care of it.’” Johnson is especially upset about one of the more serious incidents took place in February 2013, when a white classmate of one of Johnson’s daughters brandished a knife, threatened to kill her and gave her a drawing of a swastika with the words “KKK” scrawled on it. Wayne County School District Superintendent Ben Graves told the Wayne County News that “this issue was handled according to school policy and the state codes,” but Johnson disagrees that the school performed its due diligence. Mississippi law states that any student caught with a controlled substance, knife, gun, or other firearm capable of causing bodily harm will be subject to expulsion for one calendar year and allows students to appeal.

Johnson was unclear what punishment the accused bully received, but she got a clearer picture when her daughter reported the alleged bully was aboard the bus for the first day of school last month. Fearing for the girls’ safety, Johnson formally withdrew her children from the district—for the second time since 2010— planning to home school them (she has since re-enrolled them). Pastor Wade Demers, who lives in Meridian and works with New Englandbased social-justice organization Arm of Justice, arranged a meeting between Johnson and top district officials to encourage reconciliation between Johnson’s daughter and the accused bully. “Jesus told us to have mercy,” Demers said. “There’s no reason to put this girl in jail for something she did.” Johnson agrees, calling expulsion and criminal prosecution of the accused bully “the death penalty” that could preclude the girl from completing her education. Christopher Barry, a psychology professor and expert on bullying at the University of Southern Mississippi, said bullying is hard to define, but is typically

characterized by a power differential and repetition. “It is a very fuzzy line,” Barry said. Barry said that in addition to school

‘I want (her) to get help, and I don’t want her to be around my children.’ enforcement, “observers” can play a large role by reporting bullying behavior. At a Sept. 4 meeting, school-district officials stressed to Johnson that a new bullying policy was in place and explained

why the accused bully did not receive the full year’s expulsion. “Even though the district expulsion committee had recommended that this student be expelled for a full calendar year, the superintendent determines the length of expulsion. Mr. Graves allowed this student’s expulsion to be shortened based on her expressed remorse for her actions,” states a written response that Graves, Deputy Superintendent R.P. Staten and Assistant Superintendent DeJuan Walley all signed. Messages left for Wayne County School District officials were not been returned by press time. Johnson appreciates receiving a formal letter that outlines concretes steps the district is taking, but she remains dubious—officials have made similar promises in the past. “I was told I could press charges, but I don’t want to press charges on (the accused bully),” Johnson said. “I want (her) to get help, and I don’t want her to be around my children.” Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email RL Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

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September 25 - October 1, 2013

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We look forward to meeting you. Sunday
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TALK | business

Preserving and Updating the Eastland Courthouse by Tyler Cleveland

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The courtroom on the fourth floor features the controversial 1938 mural on one of its walls that is one part of the James O. Eastland Federal Building that must be preserved, as mandated by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History.

to the left of that is a black sharecrop- the demolition and renovation process to per picking cotton in the fields, while a make sure the building’s history is being white man takes account of its weight. properly preserved. “(The mural) is one point of contention,” said Goree, who is African American. “But that’s a big theme that we are carrying throughout the building: preserving our past and not forgetting where we came from, while renovating and updating the building so it can be modern and relevant again.” The plans for this parThe front of the Eastland Federal Building displays the ticular courtroom, which art-deco style that was popular at the time a firm out has hosted everything from of Cincinnati constructed the building. civil rights cases to the trial of former Klansman James Ford Seale, will make it into a public Along with Goree, Jackson attorspace where residents can lounge, and it neys Tom Tardy, Marcy Croft and Jashould be available for residents to rent son Watkins combine to make up the for events, with catering options from project’s investment team. Watkins is the the first-floor restaurant. son of King Edward Hotel, Standard Life But not all aspects of the building’s Building and Farish Street developer Dahistory are detriments. The marble floors vid Watkins, but Goree said neither the and old pews from the courtrooms are elder Watkins nor his company, Watkins distinct, and Decker said he hopes to Development, is investing or playing a incorporate a lot of the old architecture role in the renovation project. into the finished product. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email City The MSDAH will have an inspec- Reporter Tyler Cleveland at tyler@jacksontor make routine walk-throughs during freepress.com.

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where people will want to live,” Decker said. “You’ll be able to look at the building and see its charm, but you’ll see where we’ve made some renovations and updated it. You’ll be able to see the layers of history.” The first layer is evident almost everywhere you go. The building itself is named after one of the most well-known racists in Mississippi’s history, former U.S. Sen. James Eastland. Eastland was staunchly opposed to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and called the disappearance of three civil rights workers in Neshoba County a “publicity stunt” before their bodies were recovered in 1964. The main courtroom on the fourth floor is wide open with vaulted ceilings. On one of its walls is a gigantic 1938 mural that depicts southern life in the early 1900s. At the center of the mural is a depiction of a white Mississippi family “adjusting to social problems through the advice of a court representative and a minister.” Directly to the Architect Roy Decker hopes the courtroom where left is an African AmeriFrank Melton’s federal trial was held will make a perfect can man playing a banjo spot for an up-scale restaurant on the first floor. and singing spirituals, and

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ooking at the view from a corner office on the fourth floor of the James O. Eastland Federal Building, it’s easy to see why someone would want to live in the 80-year-old building at the corner of Capitol and West streets. The interior of the 115,000-squarefoot building looks, unmistakably, like a courthouse. Right now, you’ll see courtrooms, jury deliberation rooms, vaults, judge’s chambers and even two holding cells. But Roy Decker, of Jackson firm Duvall Decker Architects, looks at the floor plan and sees potential for 49 rental apartments, a fine-dining restaurant, a bar and lounge, and commercial space. Investor and lead developer Jason Goree hired Decker to transform the historic Art Deco building into a mixedused space that could be open to residents in about a year. “2014—that’s our hope,” Goree said Monday, Sept. 23. “We’d like to open up the fifth-floor residential area by summer of 2014, and if we hit that mark, we should be able to open the rest of the building by the end of the year.” The $20 million project is ambitious on a couple of fronts. First, the building needs new heat and air-conditioning units, and each residential space needs its own temperature control. It also needs a stairwell, as the only point of egress is a flight of stairs on one side of the U-shaped building. The second challenge, and the one that Decker is the most excited about, is the balance he must strike between updating the building and preserving its past. The Mississippi Department of Archives and History placed the building on the National Registry of protected buildings in 1976 as part of the Smith Park Architectural District, so Decker must consider some of the building’s oldest and most distinct features. “There are a lot of things we must preserve while at the same time bringing the building into the modern era

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Be Aware, Remain Safe

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ev. Cletus: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Welcome to a very special radio broadcast of the Rev. Cletus Car Sales Church program. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It looks like this world we live in has revealed itself in the forms of turmoil, hatred and insanity. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes, I wonder if listeners of this broadcast really notice whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on these days. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just a few days ago, something terrible happened in a place called Syria, and the world was about to go to war. It reminded me of something I read in the book of Revelation regarding wars and rumors of wars, followed by nation rising against nation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But wait, there is more. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The first-ever Indian American (not to be confused with Native American) woman won the Miss America pageant and received a backlash of racist rants on Twitter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Also, on an early Saturday morning, an African American man survived a car wreck in a neighborhood in Charlotte, N.C. While seeking assistance, a police officer shot this man 10 times and killed him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Washington, D.C., a Navy contractor and former reservist heard voices and decided to open fire at the Naval Sea Systems Command, killing 12 people before police shot him dead. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Folks, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to be aware and remain safe. Therefore, the Rev. Cletus Car Sales Church will launch a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Praise the Lord and Protect the Saints from Hostility, Confusion and Evil Community Self Defense Program.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;I will provide more information about the program later. In the meantime, remember: Those who endure to the end will be saved. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Amen.â&#x20AC;?

Cutting SNAP Cuts Lifelines

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September 25 - October 1, 2013

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Why it stinks: Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives have attempted to repeal the Affordable Care Act, President Barack Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signature legislation, more than 30 times. Mr. Wicker, similar to the rest of the Republican rank-and-file, is resorting to talking points designed to frighten the American people into opposing it, something the GOP has accomplished with varying degrees of success. In reality, the ACA will provide millions of Americans with an opportunity to purchase health insurance they can afford. For far too many of those people, health care is out of reach financially, leaving them with no option but to wait until conditions are so bad as to warrant an emergency-room visitâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but without having any ability to pay the bill. That costs every American taxpayer. We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help but wonder what the result could be if Republicans would put their energies into coming up with alternatives that work instead of the constant harangues about repealing the law. The ACA is based, after all, on a conservative plan to provide Americans with health insurance.

few days ago, Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Republican congressional delegation in the U.S. House of Representatives voted in favor of cutting the federal food-stamp program, aka the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, to the tune of $40 billion over the next 10 years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nobody wants to see children go hungry because their parents cannot or will not provide for them,â&#x20AC;? Rep. Alan Nunnelee, R-1st District, told The Hattiesburg American. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unfortunately, the program has grown out of control, doubling over the past five years. Even as the economy has slowly recovered, spending has not declined.â&#x20AC;? In other words, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not picking on people, Nunnelee rationalizes; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the wasteful government program weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re cuttingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as if actual, flesh-and-blood people will not be hurt. Of course, poor people are easy targetsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not campaign contributors or lobbyists, after all. Once the party of â&#x20AC;&#x153;No,â&#x20AC;? national Republicans now seem to be becoming the party of plain garden-variety mean and nasty. Nunnelee is accurate that the federal foodstamp rolls have increasedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from 26 million in 2007 to almost 48 million nowâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not quite doubling over six years. Last week, Darrin Webb, Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s state economist, provided a huge clue to the Joint Legislative Budget Committee about why thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happening. In Mississippi, the state added 25,000 jobs in the past year, but Webb believes most of those jobs

are low paying, part-time or temporary. Mississippi isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t alone with its lousy jobs picture. Economists say that while income for the top 1 percent of Americans increased by 31 percent between 2007 and 2012, incomes for the poor and lower middle-classâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the bottom 40 percentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;have fallen by 6 percent. Ordinary working people who lost jobs during the Great Recession replaced them with whatever they could find and, on average, those jobs pay less and may not provide full-time, permanent employment. Food stamps are hardly extravagant. In Mississippi, the average monthly benefit in 2012 was $123.76 per person, a little more than $4 a dayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; not exactly a lobster-and-caviar food budget. Children, the elderly and the disabled make up almost two-thirds of SNAP beneficiaries, and most of the rest are adults with children. SNAP is one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s safety-net programs that helps keep families from falling off the edge into poverty. In Mississippi, the proposed cuts would affect about 52,000 people out of roughly 670,000 recipientsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;folks with the least economic resilience because, for them, every financial setback brings them closer to disaster. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are lots of folks who will claim we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care about the poor,â&#x20AC;? Rep. Steven Palazzo, R-4th District, told The Hattiesburg American. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s simply not true.â&#x20AC;? What Palazzo, Nunnelee and the rest of the Republican cabal in Washington fail to understand is that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nigh impossible to see it any other way.

Email letters and opinion to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity, as well as factchecked.


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AMBER HELSEL

A M A LC O T H E AT R E

EDITORIAL News and Opinion Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Tyler Cleveland, R.L. Nave Music Editor Briana Robinson JFP Daily Editor Dustin Cardon Editorial Assistant Amber Helsel Events Editor Latasha Willis Music Listings Editor Tommy Burton Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Ross Cabell Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Bryan Flynn, Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith, Micah Smith Bloggers Dominic DeLeo, Jesse Houston Editorial Interns Justin Hosemann, Mo Wilson Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Design Intern Lindsay Fox Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographer Tate K. Nations ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin Account Managers Gina Haug, David Rahaim BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Director of Operations David Joseph Bookkeeper Aprile Smith Distribution Manager Richard Laswell Distribution Raymond Carmeans, John Cooper Jordan Cooper, Clint Dear, Ruby Parks ONLINE Web Editor Dustin Cardon Web Designer Montroe Headd Multimedia Editor Trip Burns CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Queries submissions@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Fashion style@jacksonfreepress.com Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2013 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

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t’s almost taboo these days to simply enjoy food. Everyone is health-conscious, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. We could all stand to eat a few more vegetables and less fried food. Striving to be healthy is a great idea until people start making you feel bad for liking food. The idea that you can’t enjoy yourself when you eat is part of our culture now. You must graze like a sheep. You must only eat for the nutrients. You can’t simply take pleasure in the hamburger, or even that salad, you’re chewing on right now. Food is either our worst enemy or our greatest friend. It’s such a wonderful and terrible thing that many of us won’t be rational about eating. Instead, we go to extremes: We eat way too much and hate ourselves, or we eat like rabbits and pretend we enjoy being woodland creatures. The idea of eating “on purpose” is so intoxicating that we can’t just be normal and just —I don’t know—eat. A new dietary phenomenon, called the French Paradox, isn’t really a diet in the sense most of us think of diets—a proscribed eating plan—although people have written books outlining one, such as “French Women Don’t Get Fat” by Mereille Guiliano (Vintage, 2007, $16) and “The French Diet: Why French Women Don’t Get Fat” by Michel Montignac (DK Adult, 2005, $3.89 on Amazon). The paradox lies in observations of how the French eat and how they perceive food: The French eat fatty foods, such as bread and at almost every meal, but they have a lower obesity rate than the United States and other European countries. Much of it has to do with how they regard food. French people understand the beauty of a balanced diet, but they don’t frown on eating breads and cakes and are no strangers to using fat. They want to eat those things, and they do. Even some people who visit France remark that they eat crazily unhealthy things on their trip, but they still lose weight. Part of why this happens is the small French portions—much smaller than the gargantuan, super-sized, all-you-caneat American portions. And, whereas Americans may eat a lot of food in a short amount of time, French people linger over food. They can take three hours to eat just one meal. They savor every bite and don’t get distracted as much, while we

Americans tend to turn on the TV, play computer or cell-phone games, and text at mealtimes. The takeaway from the French Paradox is that the key to enjoying food is learning to savor the moments—to really appreciate meals, even that peanut-butterand-jelly sandwich you made because you were too lazy to cook. Part of our inability to enjoy food flows from a wake of negativity in our increasingly health-conscious world. New diet plans pop up like daisies every day, and at an alarmingly faster and faster pace. Diets are spinning out of control and, in some ways, they’re getting more and more ridiculous. You hear about some of these new diets—the air diet, oddly enough a French diet plan, requires you to prepare food, put it up to your mouth and then just breathe the meal in. You can’t actually eat it. The French magazine “Grazia” dubbed the diet “L’Air Fooding” in their story on it in 2010. Some people latch on to dieting, and then try to tell you how to live your life. Don’t eat sugar, they’ll say. It’s loaded with calories (even though, like everything else, it’s OK in moderation). Don’t eat potatoes—they’re too starchy (even though, as long as you cook them without a lot of extra stuff, they’re fairly beneficial and provide sustained energy). Don’t eat bread—it has too many carbs (even though you need carbohydrates to live and work and play). Sometimes it seems like every diet on the planet makes you feel like you can’t have fun. It’s that sort of negativity about food that makes people who diet think they can’t enjoy themselves. That sort of negativity makes us feel crappy about anything we eat, even a small slice of birthday cake. You’re human. You need that cake sometimes. Chocolate does give you endorphins. Pizza does taste like heaven. We shouldn’t diet, anyway—not in the way Americans think of that word. We should be aware of our daily food intake, but that should make us better, not kill the joy of food. I’m not saying we should fill our diets with nothing but bread, pastries and French fries, and I’m not advocating ignoring doctors’ warnings about the dangers of an unhealthy diet. But we should stop going from one extreme to the other. Food has a happy medium. Enjoy what you eat.

Sometimes it seems like every diet on the planet makes you feel like you can’t have fun..

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September 25 - October 1, 2013

™ So, tell me about growing up here in Hattiesburg. Did you always want to be a chef?

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I grew up about four blocks that way. My dad died when I was 6. My mom was a schoolteacher, never remarried, raised my brother and me. She was a single mom kind of before single moms were cool. Still to this day, she’s 80 years old and still teaching school. So, a great childhood. I started working when I was about in the sixth grade, mowing yards and whatnot. We didn’t have a lot of money, so if I was going to have something to spend, I had to work. When I was 15, I became a (radio) DJ. I worked 40 hours a week all through school and went off to Mississippi State in 1979 and thought I’d major in communications. After a couple years, that wasn’t working out for me, and Mississippi State decided they no longer needed my services in Starkville. So I left with whatever my grade point average was—there was nothing on the left side of the decimal point, whatever it was. It was bad. But it’s really, in retrospect, probably the best thing that ever happened to me. Because after flunking out of school, I came back to Hattiesburg and started working in a restaurant.

How did that go?

Two ladies wanted to open a delicatessen. They’d never been in the restaurant business before, which is evident because they hired me, as a 19-year-old college dropout, as the manager of the place. I had been a bartender at Starkville at a place where they would let you drink free beer while you worked—I thought, “This makes a lot of sense, I can make money and drink free beer, and this is where I’m going to be anyway.” That was all the experience I had in my hospitalitymanagement career (before working at this restaurant). And I just fell in love with the restaurant business. So I went back to USM after a couple years and got through pretty quickly—18 to 20 hours, summer school, the whole deal (while working 40 hours a week). I was pretty single-minded. I wanted to open a restaurant. In ’87—I was 26—I opened Purple Parrot Café.

MELANIE BOYD

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o say Robert St. John is modest about what led to his success is to put it lightly. The Hattiesburg, Miss., native insists he “sort of fell backward” into the overwhelming success he’s enjoyed as a chef, restaurateur, author, businessman and philanthropist. But despite stumbling blocks and unexpected twists, today St. John is one of the state’s most beloved chefs. At the end of the day, St. John says his greatest role is being a dad to daughter Holleman, 16, and son Harrison, 12. I sat down with St. John in his newest establishment, the upscale cocktails-and-small-plates bar Branch in Hattiesburg—part of a grand renovation and expansion of his restaurant complex—to talk about flunking college, best-selling cookbooks, battling food insecurity and everything in between.

Were you cooking as well?

The extent of my cooking knowledge when we opened was that I had asked for and received an Easy Bake Oven when I was 6 years old for Christmas. That was it. We had to fire our chef opening night, so night number two, I got kind of thrown to the wolves and in the fire. There have been a lot of those things in my life where it looked like a bad situation or catastrophe or the worst thing that could possibly happen. In retrospect over some years, you look back and go: You know what? It’s better it happened that way. It’s better we got rid of him opening night because I might never have gotten in the kitchen.

™ Since that second day in the kitchen, how would you describe

Robert’s Bibliography “A Southern Palate,” with Wyatt Waters (Purple Parrot Co. Inc., 2002) “Nobody’s Poet: the Food Columns of Robert St. John,” with Marshall Ramsey (Different Drummer Press, 2004) “Deep South Staples: or How to Survive in a Southern Kitchen Without a Can of Cream of Mushroom Soup” (Hyperion, 2006, $19.95) “Deep South Parties: How to Survive the Southern Cocktail Hour Without a Box of French Onion Soup Mix, A Block of Processed Cheese, or A Cocktail Weenie” (Hyperion, 2006, $19.95) “Southern Seasons,” with Wyatt Waters (Purple Parrot Co. Inc., 2007) “New South Grilling: Fresh and Exciting Recipes from the Third Coast” (Hyperion, 2008, $29.95) “Dispatches from My South: Reflections and Recipes from a Southern Food Scribe” (Purple Parrot Co. Inc., 2009) “An Italian Palate,” with Wyatt Waters (Purple Parrot Co. Inc., 2013)


COURTESY NEW SOUTH RESTAURANT GROUP

Meet the New South Restaurant Group The Crescent City Grill opened along with the Purple Parrot Café as the Purple Parrot Grill, as a lowerprice option for diners. After realizing the two names only confused patrons, St. John changed the name to the Crescent City Grill and adopted the New Orleans-inspired seafood-rich menu it offers today. The Mahogany Bar (or The Hog as many locals call it) opened in

your growth as a chef?

™ How did you get into writing cookbooks? Here’s the deal: I’m a mediocre chef, an average writer and a good restaurateur. But I hope to be a great dad, so there’s that. But the cookbook thing happened because I started writing a column. It was pretty bad at first but then I started developing a passion for that, too, and I really liked that. A lady who eats here all the time was always trying to get me to do stuff. She started saying, “Robert, you need to do a cookbook.” And she kept on, and kept on and then one day she was sitting out at table 3 at the Purple Parrot with a gentleman, and she said, “Robert, come sit down. This is so-and-so with a publishing company. Tell him about your cookbook.” Well, I hadn’t even thought about it other than telling her I didn’t want to do it. So, trying to think quickly on my feet, I said: “Well, if I was going to do a cookbook, I’d have recipes I’ve developed here at the restaurant. I would have stories about the South and food of the South. And then I would have watercolors by Wyatt Waters.” And without missing a beat, this guy says, “Well, if you get Wyatt Waters, you’ve got a deal.” The problem was, I didn’t know Wyatt Waters at the time. … So very unlike me, the next day I drove up to his gallery in Clinton, walked in and introduced myself. And about six hours later, I think I left. We just hit it off instantly, and within a month or two we were best friends. We did that book, which was called “A Southern Palate,” and it was just this crazy thing.

How so?

Well (we ended up self-publishing). So this book came out maybe the end of October, and we sold out before Thanksgiving. It was just nuts. There will never be anything like that, and there hasn’t been. … It was all we could do to keep up. We were out in three weeks, and we almost sold out the second printing without even having the book. We were selling these little packages that had a promise for a book.

™ “An Italian Palate” is your ninth book as author and third collaboration with Wyatt Waters. How did it come together? Again, by accident. I don’t plan a lot; things just sort of happen. My friend David Trigiani in Jackson is a dual-citizen Italian, and he’s a great Italian cook, so I would go up once a week and spend time with him in his house learning his mama’s gravy and this sort of thing. Wyatt would come over a lot, and the three of us would have lunch. I had been planning a trip with my wife and two kids to Europe—we did 17 countries on two continents in six months—and as I planned this trip, I brought it up to Wyatt and said, “Why don’t you come over—maybe our next book is done in Italy?” And it was like (snaps fingers): Boom, he was in. (My family) had been over in Europe; we had hit about 10 countries by the first of October, when we picked Wyatt up. He had been in Venice for 10 days, and then he spent the next 10 weeks with us. We covered from the southernmost tip of Sicily to the Alps. In the morning we’d get in the car and go into Florence or wherever, and … he would go paint, and I would go eat. He had the tougher job, really. Sometimes I would be back in the kitchen with the chefs in their restaurants. We made a lot of friends over there, and I would go to their homes and cook. The thing about it was, Wyatt had never been in a situation where all he had to do was paint. … In 10 weeks, he finished 128 watercolors. He was a machine over there. It’s some of the most beautiful work he’s ever done.

™ Tell me about your nonprofit, Extra Table. We’ve always been plugged in to the community here. We just want to help everybody we can help, so we get a lot of calls. I got a call one day from the Edward Street Fellowship Center, which is a mission pantry here in town that fed about 800 families a month (at the time—now it feeds 1,200). They had completely run out of food, and they were freaking out, and they said, “Is there anything you can do to help us?” So I said, “Sure.” I figured the easiest, best, quickest way to help them would be to call my Sysco rep, just put together an order and have them drop-ship the truck to the agency. And I started thinking, bet people would give more often and more freely if there was an easier way to do it. So I went ahead and grouped all those foods I had found

St. John’s restaurant complex recently underwent a huge renovation and expansion.

LIZ LANCASTER

You know, I’ve been voted Best Chef in Mississippi (by Mississippi Magazine) three times, and I promise you I’m not even the best chef in my own restaurant. There are five or six guys that can run circles around me in this place. To be honest, I’m a pretty mediocre chef who has just gotten really lucky. I’m a much better eater than I am a chef.

1991 and boasts extensive craft beer and whiskey selections. A New Orleans-style courtyard offers outdoor seating off the bar. Branch, which opened just under two months ago, is the newest addition, an upscale cocktailsand-small-plates bar with a gorgeous wine cellar in view of diners holding some of the more than 1,000 wine labels offered.

Jackson restaurateurs Jeff Good (left) and Dan Blumenthal (not pictured) partnered with St. John (right) and Extra Table to provide healthy food to local mission pantries and soup kitchens.

into three packages—$250, $500 and $750. And I went to Sysco and said, “I’ve got this idea: What if every restaurant, business and home had an extra table where they could feed those in need?” (Sysco agreed to) deliver the food and give us rock-bottom wholesale prices. Then I started traveling the state going to soup kitchens and mission pantries, and to be honest with you, I hate to admit it, but I was even a little skeptical that we had a hunger problem. This is the United States of America. And I learned quickly how wrong I was. It was a cold slap in the face of reality. I ran into single moms, like I had, who were holding down two jobs and trying to make ends meet. Seniors—a lot of what you see at soup kitchens are seniors living on fixed incomes trying to figure out, “Can I pay the more ST. JOHN see page 17

jacksonfreepress.com

Robert St. John’s restaurants and watering holes can all be found in the same location (3810 Hardy St., Hattiesburg), but each offers its own atmosphere and dining experience. The Purple Parrot Café is the flagship, which St. John opened in 1987. It’s one of the oldest whitetablecloth fine dining restaurants in Hattiesburg still enjoying success more than two and a half decades later.

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ST. JOHN, from page 15 light bill, or can I go to the grocery store?” And the worst of all are kids. There are over 200,000 kids in Mississippi who eat a school breakfast, a school lunch and then don’t eat again until the next day. So what we have is over 638,000—over 300,000 seniors and over 200,000 kids—who are what the government calls “food insecure.” Which really means they don’t know where their next meal is coming from. Now you think of kids who are having school breakfast, school lunch and don’t eat again until the next day, and then you think about summer. What happens there?

™ What is different about the food you provide?

“An Italian Palate” is the third collaboration between St. John and watercolorist Wyatt Waters.

A lot of mission pantries are funded by food drives by churches and businesses, but unfortunately, a lot of the time what happens is people use it as an opportunity to clean out their pantry. So it’s old food, it’s dented cans, and you’ll go through the shelves and see something like cherry-pie filling. People don’t need that to live. These people are looking for food to live. In doing the research on these places, what I learned is there is high instances of diabetes and obesity. And that’s part of the problem that I couldn’t make a connection. How could we be the most food insecure state in the country—and we are—and the most obese? But what I learned is those two always go hand-in-hand. Because if you don’t have enough money to buy proper

food, you go to a convenience store and buy junk food and fruity drinks, and that’s what you live on. That’s where obesity and diabetes comes from. So all Extra Table food is shelf-stable, low-fat proteins, low-sugar fruits, low-sodium vegetables, healthy grains. It’s a great system. Plus, if you wanted to give to Stewpot, say, and you went to the grocery store and bought a shopping cart full of food—well, because we are using our shopping power and buying wholesale, we can buy two shopping carts for the same amount of money. Here’s an example: Edward Street Fellowship Cen-

ter here in Hattiesburg that was running out of food a few years ago, this year, because of Extra Table, from January through June didn’t even have to buy food. The beauty of that is they have other programs. So the money they have budgeted for food they can put to afterschool programs with at-risk youth, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, a community garden. … Stewpot, you know, has had to drop a couple of their services. Now thanks to Jeff (Good) and Dan (Blumenthal, both of Mangia Bene)—we’re about to have a big launch up there for Jackson—we hope to get to the point where we’re shipping enough food to Stewpot that they can take the money and put it back into some of those services that they are missing.

™ It seems like Extra Table is growing quickly. What is next? I don’t want to talk about moving out of Mississippi, yet, but our goal right now is to be supplying the Coast by the end of the year and then in the first half of 2014 we’ll be in north Mississippi. We’ve got a couple grants out there that we are working on and hope to be supplying food to every county in Mississippi. That’s our goal next year, to be shipping food to all 82 counties in Mississippi. Visit robertstjohn.com and extratable.org for more information on the chef and his nonprofit. Robert St. John owns the Purple Parrot Cafe, Crescent City Grill, the Mahogany Bar and Branch.

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Buffalo Chicken Pizza AMBER HELSEL

Dough:

1 package active dry yeast 1/4 cup non-fat dry milk 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1 tablespoon honey 1 1/3 cup luke warm water 2 cups all-purpose flour 2 cups whole wheat flour 3 tablespoons olive oil 1/2 tablespoon garlic, minced

I

made pizzas at one of my previous jobs. Not from scratch, mind you—it was a streamlined and simple process: thaw out bricks of pizza dough, flour and roll them to the correct size, and then pile on the ingredients. But I considered the possibility of making my own pizza. The first few times I did, I used pre-made crusts and sauces—easier and more budget-friendly, on the surface of it. The pizzas came out great but lacked a homemade touch. In college, I made dough from scratch a few times, but it always came out too chewy. I gave up for a little while because, while it’s simple, making dough is a tedious and messy task. You have to be able to stand long periods of folding and molding, and you have to get past the fact that you have gooey dough all over your hands—but, to me, there’s nothing better than getting elbow-deep in flour and water and yeast. Pizza recipes are pretty basic all around, but you can substitute different ingredients. For instance, I use honey instead of sugar. When baking, the yeast has to grow, and bakers sometimes use a sugar or starch to aid in the proofing. A sweetener isn’t necessary, but it adds a different element to the flavor. The non-fat dry milk, which up until this point I’ve never used, makes the pizza a little softer—something I’ve struggled with in the past. I threw the minced garlic into the crust to give it a more Italian flavor. This makes a lot of dough. You can cut the recipe down or freeze extra for later.

Buffalo sauce:

2/3 cup cayenne pepper sauce 1/2 cup cold unsalted butter 1/4 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour

Chicken:

1 tablespoon olive oil 1 1/2 tablespoon creole seasoning 1 pound raw chicken tenders

Additional Toppings:

1 cup of mozzarella + any other cheese you want Whatever vegetables you want—I recommend red onions and peppers (I like sweet bell peppers and banana peppers). If you want freshness with your spice, try celery and shredded carrots.

Directions: Put active dry yeast, non-fat dry milk, salt and honey into a large bowl. Pour the water in and stir until the ingredients are combined and there is a light foam on the top. Let the mixture sit for three minutes. Pour in two tablespoons of olive oil and the garlic and stir again. Add the flours and stir until the mixture starts to combine. This is the point where you must get your hands dirty. Mix the dough with your hands until it forms a ball and the flour is absorbed. I recommend putting flour on your hands for this part to keep the dough on your hands to a minimum. If the dough is dry and flaky, add a little water to the bottom of

Dressed in

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HELLO!

Making your own pizza dough from scratch is a slow process, but the homemade taste is worth your while.

the bowl. Keep rolling and folding until a large dough ball is formed and everything is combined. Flour a parchment sheet or pan and add the dough ball to it. Knead the dough for about 10 minutes: press, fold and stretch the dough until it’s flat, round and thick. Divide the dough into four equal parts. Wrap however much you want to save in plastic wrap or a Ziploc bag. Set the dough into an airtight container and put it into the freezer. For the rest of the dough, grab a rolling pin or large glass bottle and roll the dough into a circle. Start from the center and work your way out, being sure not to roll the center too thin. Roll in different directions to get the dough consistency right. If you get holes, just pinch the dough together and use a tiny bit of water on to seal the fold. If the dough feels too thin, you can always knead it back into a ball and try again. Add the last tablespoon of olive oil to a pizza pan. Use a paper towel to spread it around. Carefully place the dough onto the pan, cover it and let it sit in a warm place for an hour and a half. While the dough is rising, start the chicken. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Add the tenders to a large bowl and pour in the seasoning and olive oil. Toss until the chicken is coated in seasoning and oil. Place the tenders in an oven-safe pan and cook for 30 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through and the center temperature is 165 degrees. Let the chicken cool while you make the sauce. Combine the pepper sauce, butter and Worcestershire in a microwave-safe glass bowl. Microwave for 20, 30 and 60 seconds, stirring between each interval. The sauce is done cooking when the butter is fully melted. To thicken, gradually add the tablespoon of flour, whisking as you do so to prevent clumps. Prepare your cheese, cut up the chicken and get any other toppings ready. When the dough is done rising, preheat the oven to 475 degrees. Add the sauce, cheese, chicken and toppings. Cook the pizza until the cheese is bubbling and the edges of the dough are just barely browned. All together, you’ll spend about two hours making this pizza. It’s a hefty amount of time, but the only way to make a great pizza is to practice patience. The added bonus is that you now have preprepped pizza dough to experiment with other kinds of pizza.

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r. Leo Huddleston, doctor of Huddleston says that a lot of what naturopathy and chiropractic we eat is overcooked. We abuse food by medicine, has been a “living-food eating processed foods. “The useful enenthusiast” for over 20 years. He is also a certified personal trainer. The raw food movement distances the eater, or the “living-food enthusiast,” from the industrial food chain we have today in America, he says. The diet consists of foods in their natural, uncooked, “live” state. Foods in the living-food lifestyle consist of mainly fruits and veggies, sprouts, nuts and seeds, roots, and fresh herbs or raw spices. These foods should only be cooked at 112 degrees Fahrenheit or below. Above 112 de- A major rule of the raw food movement grees temperature, food is said to lose forbids cooking food at higher than 112 degrees Fahrenheit, so chefs have to think outside the box its nutrients. when it comes to food preparation. “After seven years of being a living-food enthusiast, you got a different body. It’s an age-less type body,” zymes that process our food have been Huddleston says. “A lot of people get depleted of the proper nutrients required over many degenerative diseases based for the body to metabolize and assimilate on the fact that they get off the pro- food,” he says. cessed foods and move toward the living The living-food enthusiast wants food culture.” to keep these nutrients in their diet and

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maintain these healthy levels of enzymes. One main tool for raw foodies is a dehydrator, because it doesn’t cook food above the required temperature. Kale chips are a popular snack made using this process. Food processors and juicers also come in handy when preparing raw-food dishes. Adapting a “raw” lifestyle takes work. “When we think in terms of a change, you want to change according to your reality,” Huddleston says. “What makes this lifestyle different is you have to find your reality and find where you are most comfortable, or you will crash and burn.” If you would like to learn more about raw food, Huddleston has a living-food potluck that meet the second Saturday each month at the A Aachen Back & Neck Pain Clinic. Please RSVP at 601-956-0010. Organizers ask that guests either bring a dish or donate $10. Rainbow Natural Grocery and CoOp (2807 Old Canton Road, 601-3661602) is also a good local resource.

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APPETIZER

CAESAR SALAD

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CAESAR SALAD

ENTREÉ choice of

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SPAGHETTI

ENTREÉ choice of

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FETTUCCINE CHICKEN ALFREDO Fettuccine Pasta tossed in a Parmesan Cream Sauce served with Flamed Grilled Chicken

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Restaurant Week Prix Fixe Lunch Menu $15

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APPETIZER choice of

APPETIZER choice of

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SPINACH CRISP

ENTREÉ choice of

SALAD choice of

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DAILY SPECIAL

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BEEF BOURGUIGNON

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Mixed greens with your choice of pulled chicken or ground beef in a tortilla shell with mixed cheeses, pico de gallo, guacamole, sour cream, scallions, black olives, grape tomatoes & comeback dressing.

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DESSERT choice of

FISH TACOS

WARM BUTTER CRUNCH CAKE

French Vanilla Ice Cream, Tequila Caramel Sauce

BAJA BROWNIE

Brownie, Cinnamon Ice Cream, Cajeta Sauce

Flour Tortilla, Choice of Pulled Chicken, Ground Beef. Choice of Red Chile, Green Chile, Rachero, Christmas Sauce or Cheese Sauce. Served with refried beans and mexican rice. Corn or Flour Tortilla, Beer Battered Catfish, Jalapeno Cole Slaw, Tomatillo Avocado Salsa. Served with refried beans and mexican rice.

DESSERT choice of WARM BUTTER CRUNCH CAKE BAJA BROWNIE

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[ PAID ADVERTISING SECTION ] MENU GUIDE FOR JACKSON RESTAURANT WEEK 9/29/13 - 10/12/13

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SIDES (choose one) Side Salad of the Day, Field Greens Salad, Caesar Salad, Soup of the Day, Pretzels or Zapps Potato Chips

DESSERT Cookie Chocolate Chip, Chocolate Supreme, Peanut Butter or Cowboy

Jackson Restaurant Week Menus

4465 N Hwy 55 #101, Jackson â&#x20AC;˘ 601.362.2900 â&#x20AC;˘ broadstbakery.com

LUNCH $18

DINNER $28

APPETIZERS (choose one)

APPETIZERS (choose one)

Soup of the Day or our House Specialty Tomato Basil Soup Caesar or Field Greens Salad

Soup Soup of the Day or our House Specialty Tomato Basil Soup Salad Caesar or Field Greens

ENTRĂ&#x2030;ES (choose one) Angel Hair with Jumbo Shrimp, Mint, and Basil Penne with Beef & Portabello Mushrooms Tri-Colored Cheese Tortellini Roma Tomato and Fresh Basil Penne BRAVO! Lasagna Classico Linguine with Crawfish and Andouille BRAVO! â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spaghettiâ&#x20AC;? Classic Fettuccine Alfredo September 25 - October 1, 2013

DESSERT

22

Half Size Brownie Served with ice cream

ENTRĂ&#x2030;ES (choose one) Pork Chop â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zatarainaiseâ&#x20AC;? Double-cut Loin Chop, Creole Mustard-Cream Sauce, Yukon Mashed Potatoes, Seasonal Vegetables Crispy Wahoo With a Tomato Caper Salsa over Creamy Polenta and Bacon Shallot â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jamâ&#x20AC;?

DESSERT Half Size Tiramisu

Jackson Restaurant Week Prix Fixe Menus

4500 Interstate 55 Frontage Rd. â&#x20AC;˘ 601.982.8111 â&#x20AC;˘ bravobuzz.com

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

  DAILY PIZZA SLICE SPECIAL

2 Slices of Pizza, Side Salad, One Regular Drink and Scoop of Ice Cream (choose from all the best flavors)

  DINNER PASTA (choose one) Chicken Parmigiana Eggplant Parmigiana Chicken Cacciatore Ziti a la Vodka Chicken Marsala Spaghetti with Meatballs Spaghetti with Shrimp Alfredo Ziti with Wild Mushrooms and Pancetta With Side Salad, One Regular Drink and Scoop of Ice Cream (choose from all the best flavors!)

Jackson Restaurant Week Menus

565 Taylor St., Jackson â&#x20AC;˘ 601.368.1919 â&#x20AC;˘ salandmookies.com

Restaurant Week Fixed Price Menu Lunch Menu $13

Dinner Menu $16

EntreĂŠ Choice of 4oz BNB Burger OR Pulled Pork Sandwich

Appetizer Choice of Homemade Tamales or Loaded Potato Skins EntreĂŠ Choice of 8oz BNB Burger OR Shrimp Poboy

Sides Choice of Fries, Tots, or Idaho Chips Dessert Choice of Bread Pudding or Banana Pudding

Sides Choice of Fries, Tots, or Idaho Chips

1060 E County Line Road, Ridgeland, Ms 601.213.8705 www.burgersblues.com


[ PAID ADVERTISING SECTION ] MENU GUIDE FOR JACKSON RESTAURANT WEEK 9/29/13 - 10/12/13

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Restaurant Week Menu Lunch Dinner

Halâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vancleave Po-boy - sauteed shrimp topped with a white wine, butter and crabmeat sauce with cheddar cheese. $12.00

Appetizer Crystal Shrimp sauteed shrimp with crystal cream sauce with homemade pepper jelly and pickled okra. $8.75

Entree Grits and Grillades $12.75

JFPmenus.com

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Roasted Duck Sandwich - roasted duck on rye with comeback, spinach, bacon & horseradish with cheddar and chive cheese w/ fries. $10.75

23


P

FLICKR/DAVID REBER’S HAMMER PHOTOGRAPHY

eople are going back to their “hunter-gatherer” roots paleo cookbook and a version of the diet aimed at athletes. and attempting to emulate caveman eating habits. The managing director of Mississippi Crossfit, Janelle This growing lifestyle Johnson, highly recommends the trend is called the paleo— paleo diet. “Getting through the first short for paleolithic—diet. week is the hardest, because cutting The rules of the diet include back on sugars and processed foods eating only grass-fed animals, fish is hard,” Johnson says. “(But) your and seafood, fresh fruits and vegbody starts to feel better, because you etables, nuts and seeds, and eggs. are not inhaling processed chemicals.” Paleo dieters also only use healthy Eating paleo requires that 35 oils to cook food. to 45 percent of your daily calories The concept is to consume intake comes from non-starchy fresh foods that have around for centufruits and vegetables. The diet elimiries and foods that are as processed nates all processed and junk foods, as little as possible. Cereal grains, added sugars, and refined grains. legumes (even peanuts), dairy, Though many health profesrefined sugar, potatoes, processed sionals and fitness experts recomfoods, salt, and refined vegetable mend it, the paleo diet isn’t the easiThe Paleo diet is one of the most popular oils are all on the “Don’t Eat” list. est to adopt. American restaurants food trends in the nation these days. It Although versions of the and grocery stores are full of profocuses on eating foods that have been paleolithic diet have been around cessed foods, carbohydrates and high processed as little as possible. for years, the lifestyle is seeing a fats. It can be difficult to completely resurgence thanks in some part to eliminate these foods. Loren Cordain, who has a doctorate in health and has studied Also, due to the rising cost of fresh goods, maintaining diet and disease on an evolutionary basis. Cordain has pub- the rules of the paleo diet can be expensive. Johnson suggests lished several books, including “The Paleo Diet: Lose Weigh shopping on the perimeters of grocery stores to find staple and Get Healthy by Eating the Foods You Were Designed to items (a good tip for finding less processed food no matter Eat,” (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Revised 2013, $14.95), a your dietary lifestyle).

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September 25 - October 1, 2013

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24

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But the paleo diet doesn’t have to be all or nothing. Slowly changing your diet to include fewer processed foods, even if you can’t commit to going full caveman, is still a positive change. Despite the barriers, eating paleo and “eating clean” is becoming increasingly popular across the country. One reason is because dieters don’t have to deal with counting calories. You eat when you’re hungry and stop when you’re full. If you want to try paleo, ask your doctor. Trying to drastically change your diet cold turkey can be dangerous. Some tips for hunter-gatherers: • Experiment: Try the diet in increments. Cut something out

for a week, see how you feel, and continue to build on those weeks. • Remove temptation: If you want to jump into paleo head on, the first step is to remove all junk food. • Cook: Since the paleo diet is based from whole and fresh foods, it is easier to cook meals at home. • Find a community: It’s normal to cheat, but don’t feel like a failure. Many blogs, forums and support groups exist to help you connect with others and get back on track. • Read labels: Be sure to read ingredient lists closely when buying packaged products. • Read: Besides Loren Cordain’s books, beginners could try: "Practical Paleo: A Customized Approach to Health and a Whole-Foods Lifestyle," by Diane Sanfilippo (Victory Belt Publishing, 2012, $39.95).


MEDITERRANEAN GRILL & GROCERY

BEAVERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S POND PRESS

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paleo Pals: Jimmy and the Carrot Rocket Ship,â&#x20AC;? by Sarah Fragoso ($19.95, Victory Belt Publishing, 2012)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eat Like a Dinosaur: Recipe & Guidebook for Gluten-Free Kids,â&#x20AC;? by Stacy Toth and Matthew McCarry, ($29.95, Victory Belt Publishing, 2012) â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Gluten-Free Birthday for Me!â&#x20AC;? by Susan Fliess ($16.99, Albert Whitman and Company, 2013) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Gluten Glitch,â&#x20AC;? by Stasie John (16.95, Beaverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pond Press, 2012)

Veganism

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DINE-IN OR TAKE-OUT! Sun-Thurs: 11am - 10pm Fri-Sat: 11am - 11pm VISIT OUR OTHER LOCATION 163 Ridge Way - Ste. E â&#x20AC;˘ Flowood, MS Tel: 601-922-7338 â&#x20AC;˘ Fax: 601-992-7339 WE DELIVER! Fondren / Belhaven / UMC area WE ALSO CATER! VISIT OUR GROCERY STORE NEXT DOOR.

NEW! Mahi Mahi Special served w/ rice, salad, hummus & sautĂŠ veggies $15.99

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;V is for Vegan: The ABCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of Being Kind,â&#x20AC;? ($12.95, North Atlantic Books, 2013), â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Why We Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Eat Animals: A Book about Vegans, Vegetarians and All Living Things,â&#x20AC;? ($16.95, North Atlantic Books, 2009) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vegan is Love: Having Heart and Taking Action,â&#x20AC;? ($16.95, North Atlantic Books, 2012), all by Ruby Roth.

Allergy FYI $86VWXG\GLVFRYHUHGWKHIROORZLQJ WKLQJVDERXWIRRGDOOHUJLHV Â&#x2021;SHUFHQWRINLGV\RXQJHUWKDQDJHDUH DOOHUJLFWRDWOHDVWRQHIRRGZKLFKLVKLJKHU WKDQDJRYHUQPHQWVXUYH\ZKHUHWKH QXPEHUZDVSHUFHQW Â&#x2021;$OOHUJLHVWRSHDQXWVDUHPRVWFRPPRQ DIIHFWLQJSHUFHQWRINLGV2WKHUDOOHUJLHV LQFOXGHPLONVKHOOÂżVKWUHHQXWVHJJÂżQÂżVK VWUDZEHUU\ZKHDWDQGVR\ Â&#x2021;$OOHUJLHVFDQUDQJHIURPPLOGWRVHYHUHZLWK VRPHUHDFWLRQVOHDGLQJWRGHDWK Â&#x2021;)RUW\SHUFHQWRIFKLOGUHQVWXGLHGH[SHUL HQFHGVHYHUHV\PSWRPVVXFKDVZKHH]LQJ DQGDQDSK\OD[LV GLIÂżFXOW\EUHDWKLQJDQGD VXGGHQGURSLQEORRGSUHVVXUH  Â&#x2021;)RRGDOOHUJLHVZHUHKLJKHVWLQSUHVFKRROHUV SHDNLQJEHWZHHQWR\HDUVRIDJH SOURCE: JFP.MS/FOODALLERGIES

jacksonfreepress.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;To Market, to Market,â&#x20AC;? by Nikki McClure ($17.95, Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2011) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Food from Farms,â&#x20AC;? by Nancy Dickmann ($5.99, Heinemann, 2010) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market Day,â&#x20AC;? by Shanda Trent ($12.95, Tiger Tales, 2013) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rainbow Stew,â&#x20AC;? by Cathryn Falwell ($17.95, Lee and Low Books, 2013)

Paleo

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Farm to Table

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n Proverbs 22:6 (NIV) it says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Start children off on the way they should go and, even when they are old, they will not turn from it.â&#x20AC;? Even if you are not religious, this biblical principle is a smart rule of thumb when approaching various aspects of childrearing. When it comes to food, introducing your child to healthy options from infancy will benefit him or her in the long run. Based on the 2009 Pediatric Nutrition Surveillance System data, one in three low-income children become obese or overweight before their fifth birthday. As a result, obese children are more likely to become obese adults. Adult obesity is associated with a number of serious health conditions including heart disease, diabetes and some cancers. Eating healthy is not always easy, but over time it becomes habit and second nature for your children. In addition to serving up healthy meals and keeping healthy snacks on hand, consider exposing your child to other health-related topics such as organic foods, the farm-to-fork movement, paleo-based menus, gluten-free foods and vegetarianism. Spend a morning at the farmers market in your community or take your children on a supermarket field trip to Rainbow Grocery (2807 Old Canton Road, 601-366-1602) in Fondren. Books for children can help them understand these concepts on their level. Here are some resources to try:

730 Lakeland Dr. â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson, MS Tel: 601-366-3613 or 601-366-6033 Fax: 601-366-7122

25


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26

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LIFE&STYLE |

Wedding Day, the Kid-Friendly Way by Kathleen M. Mitchell

K

ELIZABETH RAY PHOTOGRAPHY

ids at weddings is a polarizing topic. Some brides Whatever your stance, you have to admit that kids canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t imagine even walking down the aisle with- are almost always unpredictable. When I got married, out an adorable flower-crowned little girl in a my husbandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s niece and two nephews served as flower poufy dress and a girl and banner bearers, mop-headed little boy in respectively. All three a teeny suit going before were younger than age 4 her. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a touching way at the time. During the to involve family memrehearsal, they were overbersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; or friendsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; children. whelmed by everything Sometimes, the bride and going on, and getting all groom have children that three of them down the they want to incorporate aisle with no tears on the into the ceremony in a big day seemed tenuous. meaningful way. But then the wedOn the other hand, ding day arrived and, demany couples are wary spite a bit of (hilarious) of having kids at their pouting during the famIncorporating kids into a wedding day can be a touching big day. After all, wedily photo sessions earlier gesture, but it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t for everyone. dings are often at upscale in the day, all three kids venues with expensive or made it down the aisle valuable surroundings. Some brides and grooms go so far with big smiles and completely charmed all the guests. as to establish a no-children rule and request that parents The great thing about kids is that usually even their leave the tykes at home with a babysitter. Although this mistakes tend to be more adorableâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;our niece forgot to can be alienating or frustrating for parents, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important drop flower petals down the aisle and, when she saw her to remember that the couple probably isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t banning your grandparents motioning for her to do so, she upended children out of malice, and guests should respect the cou- the basket, dropping them all in one place and eliciting a pleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision. round of laughter from everybody watching.

7AYSTOINVOLVECHILDREN

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January 2014 Wedding Announcement

*All payments and materials due by October 31

For more information and to submit your information visit www.boomjackson.com/ hitched.html

Welcome

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To The Ride of Your Life We Make It Happen!

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Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss out the opportunity to be have your nuptials featured in this inaugural issue of Hitched. This glossy edition of Hitched will be a keepsake for you, your family and friends.

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September 26 Zoo Party Highland Village September 28 WellsFest Jamie Fowler Boyll Park September 28 International Gumbo Festival Smith Park October 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;13 Mississippi State Fair State Fairgrounds September 25 - October 1, 2013

October 3 4th Annual Pink Tie Gala Jackson Convention Complex For a complete listing of all Jackson events, hit visitjackson.com

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The Neighborhood’s 904

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September 25 - October 1, 2013

n a corner of Belhaven once occupied by a family-favorite soda fountain and drugstore, Basil’s 904 beckons as an example of a new generation’s “neighborhood” restaurant. Backed by the dining wisdom developed over decades in his family restaurants, Nathan Glenn has simple intent for his 904 location. Glenn sees the restaurant as an establishment deeply rooted in the neighborhood, where couples share a relaxing evening and their favorite dishes, parents bring their kids for an after-school treat, young professionals unwind with local craft beer (chilled to 32 degrees), and college students come to escape their books and cafeteria offerings with deck-oven pizza (baked to 600 degrees). The restaurant’s open-floor plan is inviting and comfortable with repurposed wood accents, brickwork, custom booths, bright greenery, artwork from local artists, and flyers for upcoming music shows and events around town. The Basil’s 904 menu collects

30

customer favorites from the Glenn family’s other restaurants—and sometimes embellishes those recipes in exciting ways. A quick glance at the creative assortment of pizzas, the always popular panini sandwiches, Rooster’s-inspired burgers, pasta dishes, pan-seared fish dinners, and shrimp-and-grits shows Basil’s 904 offers something for everyone to enjoy at Basil’s 904. Still, Glenn believes there is always room to improve. He’s the first to admit the restaurant is a workin-progress. He plans to develop the ivy-hung patio into a verdant beer garden. He’s remained handson with changes to the menu, and he’s constantly brainstorming new local partnerships and events, ranging from eventual screenings of Saints games to making space for a homebrew club’s regular meetings. This fall, Basil’s 904 will extend its Friday and Saturday hours to 10 p.m., with nightly pizza and beer specials. It is Nathan’s idea for

904 to become a launching point for locals before they head out to explore Jackson’s many evening entertainment spots. “We want you to start your weekend off with us,” he said. No matter how you slice it, a great idea takes time and involvement to develop, and Nathan Glenn’s Basil’s 904 is the perfect example. It’s hard to imagine it any other way—Basil’s 904 looks, feels and truly functions as a Belhaven restaurant ultimately built on community involvement and support.

The Ulmers Buy Kristos

E

ven if you don’t know Anne and Joe Ulmer, you probably know their businesses. The Jackson couple created and own the Beagle Bagels in Jackson and Ridgeland and Ulmer’s Stride Rite, also in Jackson. Joe manages the Jackson Beagle Bagel in Highland Village with his trademark smile and good cheer, while Anne oversees the Ridgeland store—often dashing off to deliver catering orders herself. “We love what we do. Our customers are like our family. We often know what they are going to order when they walk in the door,” Anne said. Never ones to rest on past success, the Ulmers recently acquired Kristos Greek Restaurant. “We opened Beagle Bagel because it was a niche that hadn’t

been penetrated in this area. It’s the same reason we bought Kristos. There’s nothing like it in Madison,” Anne said. When asked why she wanted to own another restaurant, the mother of three and grandmother of two paused. “It’s just a wonderful opportunity. It’s a great location with wonderful Greek-inspired food. We’ve put together an amazing team,” she said. The extensive menu features everything from authentic gyros to Greek nachos. There’s a full bar, and they can cater any event large or small. They often host live music events. “This is a casual family place just like our other restaurants. You can come in after church or after a game of tennis,” Anne said. And best of all? You now know it’ll feature that Ulmer family touch of quality and care. Visit today!

971 Madison Avenue Madison , MS 39110 601.605.2266 www.kristosofmadison.com

Join Us at The

International Gumbo Festival in Smith Park, Downtown Jackson

Saturday, September 28th

We’ll be cooking up that Award Winning Gumbo you love and will count on your taste-test! 904B E. Fortification Street Belhaven, Jackson, MS 601.352.2002

Join Us Every Sunday for Authentic New Orleans Style Brunch 2801 North State Street • Fondren District 601-981-2520 • www.QueSeraMS.com


8 DAYS p 34 | ARTS p 35 | MUSIC p 36 | SPORTS p 38

Capturing the Zeitgeist by Kathleen M. Mitchell

F

or the last year, three 20-somethings have traveled the state seeking to peel back the layers of Mississippi cultures. Now, filmmakers Vincent Jude Chaney, Greg Gandy and Lauren Cioffi are bringing their completed documentary project, “subSIPPI,” to the Mississippi Museum of Art for a Jackson premiere. Chaney sat down with us to discuss the film.

The biggest transformation is that it has manifested itself from an abstract to a grassroots, real event. What can people expect at the screenings?

What this film offers, and the venues we screen at reflects this, is solidarity and bringing people together and community to say, “Hey, there’s this event that we can get dolled COURTESY VINCENT CHANEY

people and their missions, usually, when filming in Mississippi—they want to show a certain demographic or certain agenda. And that’s what they go for, and they can find it, and they shoot it. But with any good art or meaningful conversation, you see that there is some complexity to people. One of my favorite experiences was being able to film David Grossman, a cotton producer in the Delta. Going into it, I thought: “This guy owns thousands of acres of cotton in the Delta. He’s going to be this archetype of Mississippi that is sort of the antithesis of the whole subSIPPI movement.” But he’s one of the nicest people I’ve ever met. He took us up in his little private plane, and that’s some of the best shots we have, of flying over his thousands of acres of cotton in his plane. So being able to reinforce the idea that there’s more than meets the eye—not to be superficial or judgmental— but seeing Mississippians as a unified group. When it came to deciding what would make the final cut, what was your process?

How would you say the project transformed as you went through it?

The entire process has been driven by community, from funding (using a crowdsourced Kickstarter campaign) to (people) pointing us in the right directions. We’ve tried to use social media as our main way of getting people involved in the project, by way of them writing on our feed or recommending things we should do. In the very beginning, that was an abstract mission: to get people engaged online. Ultimately, our vision, which is still in process, is creating an online space where people can go and have a uniform resource, a place where they can find where to plug in, what’s going on—kind of a space for Mississippians to be able to talk. … December-ish, we’re going to have a website, which is the second aspect of the project. It will include the film (free to watch), a lot more of the content that wasn’t in the film and an overview of the philosophy behind the film. And it will have some element that will be able to engage people to carry on the philosophy behind the project.

up for. It’s something important.” It’s also a way of building infrastructure and having that conversation get started with people from every walk of life, every demographic and every generation. We have people in their 80s and people that are 8 years old. These screenings are more than just a movie screening. We have DJs, a photo booth, but more than just the individual things that make it up, it’s a place where people can come experience the energy that’s present in the state, the undercurrent. The—what do they call it?—zeitgeist. The feeling of the time. Did you film any people or groups that surprised you, where you went in expecting one thing and learned something from filming them?

I felt like (going in to the project) there was this polarity between the subcultures and the dominant culture. I had this polarity between the rednecks and other people, the kind that usually leave Mississippi. But (through the project, I was) able to see the humanity in everybody. There is this superficiality when it comes to

jacksonfreepress.com

Lauren Cioffi, Greg Gandy and Vincent Jude Chaney (left to right) are behind the documentary “subSIPPI,” which will make its Jackson premiere at the art museum Sept. 27.

This is really the reason we have the themes we do: I studied religion and philosophy. So, showing that there is religious diversity in the state and that we need to promote religious tolerance in a place that was really restrictive and closed to those kinds of ideas—I was bringing that to the table. Cioffi does film, but she also does organic gardening. So the big focus there was that transition from a cotton culture to smaller-scale organic gardening (and agriculture). And Greg was really influential in art and building communities for artists. There are really four sub-themes you see throughout and then one meta-narrative. The sub-themes are religion, art, agriculture and then a kind of catchall—lifestyle—which includes various things, skateboarding and whatnot. And then the meta-narrative is that Mississippi was a very hostile place to diversity; it was a closed society. We’ve got William Winter talking about being a segregationist and being on the wrong side. The second chapter is “Leave or Stay,” and it’s (Jackson Free Press Editor-in-Chief) Donna Ladd talking about growing up and building an infrastructure. And the third one is “Transforming our Suffering into Fruits of Happiness.” So it’s this general theme of, OK, we know where we’ve come from, now what are we going to do with tomorrow? “subSIPPI” premieres in Jackson Friday, Sept. 27, at 7:30 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St., 601960-1515) followed by a Q&A with the director. The all-ages screening is free; donations welcome. A cash bar will be avail31 able. Visit subsippi.com for more information.


*&0 30/.3/2%$%6%.43 Jackson 2000 Friendship Golf Outing Sept. 26, 8:30 a.m., at Colonial Country Club (5635 Old Canton Road). The shotgun start is at 8:30 a.m., and lunch is at 1 p.m. Door prizes included. Proceeds benefit Jackson 2000, an organization devoted to racial harmony. Sponsorships available. $125 individual (will be matched to a team), $500 team of four; call 601-948-3071 or 601-957-0434; jackson2000.org. Breakfast and Learn Sept. 26, 8:30-9:30 a.m., at Sal & Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s New York Pizza and Ice Cream Joint (565 Taylor St.). Local business owners and managers are welcome to attend and learn more about how the pushlocal network can grow their businesses. RSVP. Free, food prices vary; call 3681919; email liz@dollarsandsensecreative.com.

Zoo Party Unleashed Sept. 26, 7-10 p.m., at Highland Village (4500 Interstate 55 N.). The annual fundraiser includes local food samples, beer and music from Dr. Zarrâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Amazing Funk Monster Band, Jesse Robinson, Pam Confer and DJ George Chuck. For ages 21 and up. $75, $250 group of four; call 601-352-2500; email cwoodson@jacksonzoo.org; jacksonzoo.org. WellsFest Sept. 28, 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m., at Jamie Fowler Boyll Park (1398 Lakeland Drive). The annual event includes a 5K race at 8 a.m., a pet parade at 9 a.m., and a festival at 10 a.m. with food, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities, music from Fred Knobloch and the Bluz Boyz, a silent auction and vendors. Proceeds benefit the Good Samaritan Center. Free admission, fees apply for race; call 601-3530658; wellsfest.org. BankPlus International Gumbo Festival Sept. 28, noon, at Smith Park (302 E. Amite St.). Includes a gumbo cook-off and music from the Wild Magnolias, the Honey Island Swamp Band, Good Enough for Good Times, Star and Micey, Jimbo Mathus and the Tri-State Coalition, and Southern Halo. Benefits the Harold T. White Memorial Scholarship Fund. $10 (advance tickets), cooking team registration fee starts at $200; call 601292-7121 or 601-832-3020; find International Gumbo Festival on Facebook. Jackson Restaurant Week 2013 Sept. 29Oct. 12, at participating local Jackson restaurants. Dine at participating restaurants by ordering from the Restaurant Week menu, and vote at the end of the meal for one of five selected charities to receive $10,000. Food prices vary; jacksonrestaurantweek.com.

September 25 - October 1, 2013

#/--5.)49

32

Events at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.). â&#x20AC;˘ Newly-elected Black Mayorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Summit Sept. 26, 9:30 a.m., in the Dollye M.E. Robinson Building, room 166/266. The theme is, â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Perspective on the First 100 Days.â&#x20AC;? Includes a panel discussion and a public reception. Free; call 601-979-1571 or 601-979-1483. â&#x20AC;˘ 30th Annual Fannie Lou Hamer Memorial Symposium Oct. 2- 3. The theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crusade, 1963-2013: From Youth Activism to Youth Advocacy.â&#x20AC;? The opening reception is Oct. 2 at 6 p.m. at Gallery1, and the symposium is Oct. 3 at 10 a.m. at the

Events at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). â&#x20AC;˘ Else School of Management Fall Forum Sept. 25, 8 a.m. In the Leggett Center. The speakers are Greg Daco, senior principal economist for the U.S. Macroeconomics Group of IHS, and state economist Darrin Webb. Doors open at 7:45 a.m. Continental breakfast included. Free; call 601-974-1254; millsaps.edu. â&#x20AC;˘ Leadership Development Series: CEOs and Fundraising Sept. 26, 4-6 p.m. Learn essential

Hinds County School District Teen Dropout Prevention Summit Sept. 26, 8:30 a.m.-1:30

A Photographic Nature TRIP BURNS

Purple for Peace Gala Sept. 26, 6-9 p.m., at Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). The annual event includes a silent auction and dinner. The guest speaker is Deborah D. Tucker, executive director of the National Center on Domestic and Sexual Violence. Proceeds benefit the Mississippi Coalition Against Domestic Violence. $30; call 601-981-9196; email arian.thigpen@mcadv.org; mcadv.org.

â&#x20AC;˘ Artifact and Collectible Identification Program Sept. 25, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. The MDAH staff identifies documents and objects of historical value, including potential donations to the Museum of Mississippi History and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum. Free; call 601576-6850. â&#x20AC;˘ History Is Lunch Oct. 2, noon. As part of Archives Month, Jeff Rogers and Alanna Patrick present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Searching the Online Catalog.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601-576-6998.

Liberal Arts Building. Register online. Free; call 601-979-1562 or 601-979-1563; email hamer. institute@jsums.edu; jsums.edu/hamer.institute.

The best nature photo at the naturalscience museum could win a prize package at next springâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NatureFEST!

N

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strategies and avoid common CEO mistakes to lead effective fundraising. Registration required. $35, $25 members; call 601-968-0061; msnonprofits.org. â&#x20AC;˘ Introduction to Bird Watching Sept. 26, 6-8 p.m. The instructor is Chris King, education chair of the Jackson Audubon Society. Classes are Thursday evenings from 6-8 p.m. through Oct. 24, and the field trip to LeFleurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bluff State Park is Oct. 26. Registration required. $100, textbook purchased separately; call 601974-1130; millsaps.edu/conted. â&#x20AC;˘ Serving Your Community: Board Service 101 Sept. 26, 6-7:30 p.m. Joe Donovan of the Mississippi Center for Nonprofits and Millsaps Else School of Management is the instructor. Discover the pros and cons of being a board member to determine if it is right for you. Registration required. $25; call 601-974-1130; millsaps.edu/conted. Events at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). â&#x20AC;˘ History Is Lunch Sept. 25, noon. MDAH historic resource specialist Clarence Hunter presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;Martin, Medgar and Marshall Bring Justice to Mississippi.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601-576-6998.

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p.m., at Eagle Ridge Conference Center (1500 Raymond Lake Road, Highway 18 S., Raymond). The theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go Hard - Graduation Matters!â&#x20AC;? High school and community college students welcome. Topics include cyber bullying, suicide, college, and drinking and driving. Free; call 601-857-5222. AIA Mississippi Pecha Kucha Night Sept. 26, 6-8:30 p.m., at Julep Restaurant and Bar (4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 105). In the rear dining area. Enjoy socializing and 20-slide, 20-second presentations. For ages 21 and up. Free, food prices vary; call 362-1411; email mollygleason@gmail. com; find Pecha Kucha Jackson on Facebook. Homebuyer Education Class Sept. 28, 8:30 a.m.5 p.m., at Jackson Housing Authority Homeownership Center (256 E. Fortification St.). Topics include personal finances, home inspections and the role of lenders and real estate agents. Registration required. The class is required to qualify for a Jackson Housing Authority loan. Free; call 601398-0446. Girlz Night Out Sept. 28, 6-9 p.m., at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.), at Center Stage. Natural U Salon owner Melody Washington is the host. Includes makeup and

hair tutorials, fashion tips, product swap vendors and a fashion show. Participants include Vanity by Dani-T and BishieChrissi Boutique. $5; call 601-364-2869. Mississippi State Fair Oct. 2-13, at Mississippi State Fairgrounds (1207 Mississippi St.). The annual fair includes livestock shows, rides, food, games and concerts. $5, children under 6 free, parking and ride tickets start at $5, free admission and parking weekdays from 10 a.m.-1 pm.; call 601-961-4000 or 601-353-0603; msfair.net.

7%,,.%33 HealthTalk Seminar Sept. 26, noon, at Quisenberry Library (605 E. Northside Drive, Clinton). The topic is CMMCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new ACE (Acute Care for the Elderly) Unit. Lunch and door prizes includes. RSVP. Free; call 877-907-7642. Health and Wellness Expo Sept. 28, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., at St. John M.B. Church (4895 Medgar Evers Blvd.). Includes health screenings, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities, school supply giveaways and a drawing to win a dinner for two. Free; call 601-566-5474; email jackie5228@yahoo.com.

34!'%!.$3#2%%. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pompeii from the British Museumâ&#x20AC;? Sept. 25, 7:30 p.m., at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). The film is a private view of the exhibit Life and Death in Pompeii and Herculaneum. $14, $13 seniors and students, $12 children; call 601936-5856; cinemark.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ice Islandâ&#x20AC;? Sept. 25-28, 7:30 p.m., and Sept. 28, 2 p.m., at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive), in Blackbox Theatre. The play is about Sir Ernest Shackletonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s failed attempt to cross Antarctica in 1914. Doors open 30 minutes before the show. $10, $5 seniors and students, free for Belhaven students and employees; call 601-965-7026; belhaven.edu. â&#x20AC;&#x153;subSIPPIâ&#x20AC;? Film Screening Sept. 27, 7:30 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). See the documentary about Mississippi subcultures. Includes a cash bar, merchandise for sale and a Q&A with director Vincent Chaney. Free, donations welcome; call 960-1515; subsippi.com. Power of the Mic Comedy Show Sept. 28, 8 p.m. and 10 p.m., at Mediterranean Fish and Grill (6550 Old Canton Road). Comedians include Silk, Stevie Stacks, Fiyaman, Antoine Booger Brown, Nic Guyton, Rocky Davis and Mike Townsend. Enjoy music from No Script featuring Mimi and DJ Sean Mac. $10; call 646-801-1275; find Power of the Mic on Facebook. Battle of the Bands Sept. 29, 2 p.m., at Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium (2531 N. State St.). Enjoy performances from marching bands and drill teams. 2 Chainz, the OMG Girlz and Kierra Sheard also perform. Gates open at 1 p.m. $10, ages 5 and under free; call 800-745-3000.

-53)# Jim White Oct. 2, 8 p.m. at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 Commerce St.). The alt-country singer-songwriter incorporates storytelling and discussions with the audience in the performances. Doors open at 7 p.m. For ages 18 and up. $8 in advance, $10 at the door; call 601-292-7121; email jane@ halandmals.com; ardenland.net. Township of Livingston Concert Series Sept. 27, 7 p.m., at Town of Livingston (Highway 463 and Highway 22, Madison). Performers include Lee Brice, Samantha Landrum and Ty Brown. $35; call 800-745-3000.




Craig Taubman Sept. 28, 7:30 p.m., at Beth Israel Congregation (5315 Old Canton Road). The guitarist has an eclectic musical style that bridges Jewish themes with contemporary life. Free; call 601-956-6216. El Obo, Tony Presley of Real Live Tigers and Hunter Stewart Sept. 28, 8-10 p.m., at Morningbell Records and Studios (622 Duling Ave., Suite 205A). El Obo is the solo side-project of Colour Revolt frontman and Jacksonian Jesse Coppenbarger, Tony Presley is a singer/songwriter from Austin, Tex., and Hunter Stewart is a performer who is a Jackson native that lives in Austin. All-ages show. Free; call 769-2337468; email info@morningbellrecords.com; morningbellrecords.com. Black Violin Oct. 2, noon, and Oct. 3, 7 p.m., at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), at McCoy Auditorium. The ensemble offers a blend of classical, hip-hop, rock, R&B and bluegrass music. The master class with students is Oct. 2 at noon, and the performance is at 7 p.m. $15, $5 JSU students, $50 signature event season ticket; call 601-979-7036.

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Events at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Call 601-366-7619; email info@lemuriabooks.com; lemuriabooks.com. • “Lookaway, Lookaway” Sept. 25, 5 p.m. Wilton Barnhardt signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $25.99 book. • “Charlie Goes to School” Sept. 25, 5 p.m. Ree Drummond signs books. $17.99 book. • “The Morning Star” Sept. 26, 5 p.m. Robin Bridges signs books. $17.99 book. • “Church Street: The Sugar Hill of Jackson, Mississippi” Sept. 28, 1 p.m. Grace B. Sweet and Benjamin Bradley sign books. $19.99 book. • “Every Day is Election Day” Oct. 1, 5 p.m. Rebecca Sive signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $17.95 book. • Lemuria Story Time Saturdays, 11 a.m. Children enjoy a story and make a related craft. Call for the book title. Free. Southern Writers Program Oct. 1, 7 p.m., at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). Speakers include Michael Kardos (“The Three Day Affair”) and Matthew Guinn (“The Resurrectionist”). $10, $5 students; call 601-974-1130; millsaps.edu/conted.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Events at Warehouse Theatre (1000 Monroe St.). Call 601-948-3533, ext. 232; email education@ newstagetheatre.com. • Young Actor Troupe Class Registration through Sept. 28. Kerri Sanders, Catherine Mounger and Chris Roebuck of New Stage Theatre are the instructors. Students learn from exercises and rehearsing for performances in the metro area. Sessions are Saturdays from 10 a.m.noon. Register by Sept. 28. $100 per session, $3 processing fee for credit card payments; Adult Acting Class Registration through Nov. 1. New Stage veteran and acting teacher John Maxwell is the instructor. Sessions are from Nov. 5-26

on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Register by Nov. 1. For ages 18 and up; space limited. $125.

THIS WEEK

“A Piece of Security” and “Sew ‘N’ So” Quilting Project Wednesdays, 9:30 a.m. through May 28, at Pearl Street AME Church (2519 Robinson St.). The Pearl Street Community Development Corporation is the host, and the goal is to renew interest, bring awareness and continue the Mississippi tradition of quilt making. Free; call 60155-0001; email debgiles@comcast.net.

WEDNESDAY 9/25:

%8()")43!.$/0%.).'3 True Colors: A Higher Learning Art Exhibition Sept. 26, 4:30-7:30 p.m., at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.). See paintings from Tony Davenport and George “Sky” Miles in Johnson Hall Gallery. Free; call 601-979-2040; email art@jsums.edu. Pastel Society of Mississippi Art Exhibit through Oct. 29, at Mississippi Library Commission (Education and Research Center, 3881 Eastwood Drive). Exhibitors include Cecilia Baker, Sallie Schott, Lyn Smith and Susan Mayfield. The opening reception is Sept. 26 from 5-7 p.m. Free; call 601-432-4056; email gloriajw@mlc.lib.ms.us; mlc.lib.ms.us.

New Bourbon Street Jazz (Restaurant)

THURSDAY 9/26:

Scott Albert Johnson (Restaurant)

FRIDAY 9/27:

Crooked Creek (Restaurant) Mustache (Red Room) SATURDAY 9/28:

BankPlus International

GUMBO FESTIVAL Benefitting the

Harold T. White Scholarship Fund Smith Park • 11am-10pm For more info visit

"%4(%#(!.'%

www.jacksongumbo.com

Events at Country Club of Jackson (345 St. Andrews Drive). • Champagne & Chocolate: A Garden Party Sept. 27, 7-9 p.m. Enjoy champagne, chocolate, 1960s beach music and shag dancing. Wear garden party attire; the best dressed couple wins a prize. Proceeds benefit the Mississippi Burn Foundation. $50, $500 table of eight; call 601540-2995; msburn.org. • Salute to Our Heroes Gala Sept. 28, 6 p.m. The annual event includes a silent auction, a cash bar, a buffet and an awards ceremony. Proceeds benefit the Mississippi Brain Injury Association. $125, sponsorships available; call 601-981-1021; msbia.org.

MONDAY 9/31:

Events at Lake Caroline Golf Course (118 Caroline Club Circle, Madison). • Wendy’s Children’s Golf Classic Sept. 26, 11:30 a.m. Registration is at 11:30 a.m., lunch is at noon and tee time is at 1 p.m. An awards reception and silent auction follows the event. Proceeds benefit Mississippi Families for Kids. $100 individuals, $400 team of four; call 601957-7670; mffk.org. • Howard Wilson Memorial Golf Classic Oct. 2. Tee times are at 8:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. Lunch at 11:30 a.m. Proceeds benefit Habitat for Humanity Mississippi Capital Area. $150, $650 team of four, $20 for two mulligans; call 601-353-6060; habitatjackson.org. • Salute to Our Heroes Charity Golf Classic Sept. 27, 1 p.m. The format is an 18-hole scramble; awards and door prizes given. Lunch included. Fee also covers a Pairings Party Sept. 26. Proceeds benefit the Brain Injury Association of Mississippi. $150, $600 team, sponsorships available; call 601-981-1021; msbia.org.

Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601-510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

9.99

Weekly Lunch Specials

$ 2happyfor 1 well drinks hour m-f 4-7 pm Open for dinner Sat. 4-10 2 for 1 house wine

starting at •

pm

Thursday September 26

LADIES NIGHT W/ DJ Stache • Ladies Drink Free

Friday September 27

Gaslight Street

Central MS Blues Society presents Blue Monday (Restaurant)

TUESDAY 10/1:

Pub Quiz with Erin Pearson & Friends (Restaurant)

BUY GROWLERS

Saturday September 28

Star and Micey w/ European Theater

O F Y O U R F AV O R I T E BEER TO TAKE HOME

$24

for first time fill for high gravity beer Refills are $20.00

$19

for first time fill for regular beer Refills are $15.00

Tuesday October 1 2 for 1 Highlife & PBR

Open Mic

with Wesley Edwards

Wednesday October 2

KARAOKE

with DJ STACHE Visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888 200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

FREE WiFi 416 George Street, Jackson Open Mon-Sat Restaurant Open Mon-Fri 11am-10pm & Sat 4-10pm

jacksonfreepress.com

Paul Thorn Sept. 27, 8 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). The Americana singer-songwriter is a Tupelo native. Tommy Malone also performs. Doors open at 7 p.m. For ages 18 and up. $20 in advance, $25 at the door, $3 service charge at the door for ticket holders under age 21; call 601-291-7373; ardenland.net.

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

33

601-960-2700


THURSDAY 9/26

SATURDAY 9/28

WEDNESDAY 10/2

Degas Pastel Society Exhibition is at Lauren Rogers Museum of Art.

4 the Record Swap is at Hal & Mal’s.

Mississippi Bike Summit is at the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum.

BEST BETS SEPT. 25 - OCT. 2, 2 0 1 3

COURTESY THE BLACK CROWES

WEDNESDAY 9/25

Jobs for Jacksonians Job Fair: Graduation Matters is from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at Metrocenter Mall (1395 Metrocenter Drive). Free; call 601-960-0377; jacksonms.gov. … The Black Crowes performs at 8 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). $39.50-$65; call 800-745-3000; ardenland.net.

THURSDAY 9/26

COURTESY BRENT HENDRIXSON

Degas Pastel Society: 18th Membership Exhibition gallery talk, awards ceremony and reception are at 5:30 p.m. at Lauren Rogers Museum of Art (565 N. Fifth Ave., Laurel). Free; call 601-649-6374; lrma.org. … House of Panache Model and Talent Search is at 6:30 p.m. at Smoak Salon (622 Duling Ave., Suite 206). Free; call 769-218-8862, 601947-5591 or 601-291-5919; email houseofpanachejackson@ gmail.com or newfacemodelsjackson@gmail.com; find House of Panache on Facebook.

The Black Crowes performs at 8 p.m. Sept. 25 at Thalia Mara Hall.

Smith Park to City Hall. Free; call 601-960-1084. … Community Bike Ride is at 6 p.m. at Rainbow Natural Grocery Cooperative (2807 Old Canton Road). Free; call 366-1602; email co-opgm@rainbowcoop.org; find Jackson Bike Advocates on Facebook.

students and military (tickets at brownpapertickets.com); call 601-664-0930; email actorsplayhouse@gmail.com; actorsplayhouse.net. … “One Monkey Don’t Stop No Show” is at 7:30 p.m. at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.) at McCoy Auditorium. Free; call 601-979-7036.

SATURDAY 9/28

MONDAY 9/30

WellsFest is from 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. at Jamie Fowler Boyll Park (1398 Lakeland Drive). Free admission; call 601-353-0658; wellsfest.org. … 4 the Record Swap is from noon-5 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s (200 Commerce St.). $5 admission until 2 p.m., $2 general admission after 2 p.m., $25 vendors; call 601-376-9404; email 4therecordjxn@gmail.com; BY BRIANA ROBINSON 4therecordswap.com. … BankPlus International Gumbo FesJACKSONFREEPRESS.COM tival is at noon at Smith Park (302 E. Amite St.). Includes a FAX: 601-510-9019 gumbo cook-off and music from DAILY UPDATES AT the Wild Magnolias, the Honey JFPEVENTS.COM Island Swamp Band, Star and Micey, Jimbo Mathus and the Tri-State Coalition. $10 (advance tickets), $200 cooking team registration; call 601-292-7121 or 601-832-3020; find International Gumbo Festival on Facebook.

Creative Economy Business After Hours is at 5 p.m. at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Free; call 601-832-5592; madisoncountybusinessleague.com. … Six in the City is from 6-8 p.m. at The Penguin Restaurant & Bar (1100 John R. Lynch St.) in the Penguin Room. Free; call 601-790-0501; email info@thepenguinms.com.

September 25 - October 1, 2013

EVENTS@ TUESDAY 10/1

Dr. Brent Hendrixson talks about North American tarantulas on Oct. 1 at the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science.

FRIDAY 9/27

National Night Out is from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. at Jackson City Hall (219 S. President St.). JSU’s Sonic Boom March34 ing Band leads the “Confidence March Against Crime” from

SUNDAY 9/29

Battle of the Bands is at 2 p.m. at Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium (2531 N. State St.). 2 Chainz, the OMG Girlz and Kierra Sheard perform. $10; call 800-745-3000. … “Charlotte’s Web” is at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. at Actor’s Playhouse (121 Paul Truitt Lane, Pearl). $15, $10 seniors,

Millsaps biology professor Dr. Brent Hendrixson speaks at noon at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). Free with museum admission; call 601-576-6000; msnaturalscience.org.… Israel Houghton and T-Bone perform at 7 p.m. at Clyde Muse Center (515 Country Place Parkway, Pearl). $24-$39; call 800-745-3000.

WEDNESDAY 10/2

Mississippi Bike Summit is from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive). $40, discounts available; call 601-432-4500; email bikewalk@bikewalkmississippi.org; msbikesummit.com. … Beth Ann Fennelly and Tom Franklin sign “The Tilted World” at 5 p.m. at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Reading at 5:30 p.m. $25.99 book. Call 601-3667619; email info@lemuriabooks.com; lemuriabooks.com.


DIVERSIONS | arts

Girls Just Wanna Make Art by Mo Wilson TRIP BURNS

The Mississippi Arts Commission’s latest show juxtaposes several women artists’ approaches to femininity.

W

alking into the Mississippi Arts Commission’s office, you’re treated to a cacophony of acquired art and kitsch. When you make your way past the Elvis cutouts and glittery signposts which, instead of pointing to destinations, read “folk art,” you’ll find an office that doubles as an art exhibit. In and among the desks are works of art from Mississippi women, including painters Ellen Langford, Heidi Pitre, Ginger Williams-Cook, as well as doll maker and painter Shannon Valentine, and glass artist Elizabeth Robinson. Together, the women’s art make up the “Girls of Summer” exhibit. The Mississippi Arts Commission has been putting on shows like this every two months or so for about the past three years, Public Relations Director Susan Liles says. The commission’s business is to promote the arts in Mississippi, give artists grants to support their work, host events and educate Jacksonians on the importance of the arts. “Bet you didn’t know your tax dollars went to that,” Liles says with a smile. Those tax dollars help fund art such as Shannon Valentine’s Frida Kahlo dolls. Valentine’s work pushes identity politics, just as her doll’s namesake did. One doll’s hoop skirt doubles as a cage for a bird, prompting thoughts of the restric-

tion in gender roles. Valentine also makes forays into canvas work, with a scene of black workers celebrating in a field. The piece is labeled “Cotton Club,” reminding us of our state’s less-tolerant past. A doll with widespread arms called “Free Hugs” adds a dose of whimsy. Ginger Williams-Cook’s contributions include a series of cartoonish portraits of sour-faced women. Ellen Langford provides an innocuous painting of a possum, which stands out among the southern landscapes she renders with bold, blocky brushstrokes. Elizabeth Robinson’s glass piece, “Dive Below Reef,” features bubbles carved into the bluegreen background. Heidi Pitre’s work may be the boldest of the bunch. A 2012 “Best in Show” winner at the Cedars art show, Pitre’s paintings expose the power and vulnerability of the nude female form. Frequently, her pieces feature a woman holding a paintbrush as a blowtorch, but occasionally her subject is dangling from a cliff or kneeling on a net with a piece of cake. The Girls of Summer exhibit will be up until Sept. 27 at the art commission building (501 N. West St., Suite 701B, 601359-6030). Admission is free. Keep your eye on the Mississippi Arts Commission Facebook page for future events.

LIFE&STYLE | girl about town by Julie Skipper

Of Beer and Building Community

The owners of Lucky Town Brewery explained how they want to be part of the regrowth of midtown at a community meeting at CS’s.

cess—which seems to be effective in large part because it emphasized current residents’ needs and voices. Decker sees the process as a model that can be adapted and used in other neighborhoods; in fact, a similar effort is now underway in west Jackson. One thing we’ve circled back to in our group is the fact that economic development of an area falls on housing. It is really interesting how closely—and how quickly—housing and other development go hand-in-hand. With that perspective, I was excited to receive an email about a meeting at CS’s with the folks from Lucky Town Brewing Company. The company is ready to house its own brewing facility here in Jackson. Lucky Town built its brand and product over the past three years while contracting with a third party in Alabama to actually brew the craft beer. The

space the company identified as a perfect site is in midtown, and the brewmasters want to meet with residents and other supporters as they go through the process of applying for a zoning variance. Not unlike midtown’s (re)development, Lucky Town Brewing Company grew strategically and over several years. Brewmaster Lucas Simmons started homebrewing beer almost ten years ago as a hobby. As his homebased tastings attracted ever-growing crowds, he envisioned bringing his beers to an even wider audience. About three years ago, he joined forces with Chip Jones, and they started the process that led to Lucky Town. Today, the company brews three beers— Ballistic Blonde, Flare Incident and Pub Ale—that can be found on tap at local bars and restaurants. Ballistic Blonde was a Top 5

on-premise seller for Capital City Beverages. “We knew that Midtown is where people make things and, while people think of brewing as manufacturing, there’s really a craft to it, so it’s a natural fit with that aspect of things that’s going on here (with studios like 121),” says Jones of the neighborhood’s artist community, such as studios like 121. “There’s also an industrial history in midtown, and the community is unique in having aspects of art, industry and residential,” Simmons adds. “It’s special, and we want to be a part of that.” Hearing interaction between the brewers and residents of the neighborhood that night at CS’s, I was struck by how community development really happens. A lot of times we think about it in abstract terms, or of big faceless developers coming in and building massive projects. But, really, when it happens effectively, it’s like this: local entrepreneurs taking a chance on their dream and on an area; residents who stay in a neighborhood when others flee and new ones coming in because they see potential, and, most importantly, all of those folks talking to each other along the way. Neighborhood by neighborhood, this is happening all around us. It’s exciting to be a part of it, to learn about and to support it. Wherever you live, work or play, I hope that you’ll look around, take interest, and get involved. That’s how vision becomes reality. 35

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY WHITNEY GRANT

A

s I write this, I’m preparing for a meeting by looking over a task list of the Housing Subcommittee of the Core City task group of the Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership’s Vision 2022 effort. Vision 2022 provides a framework for the Greater Jackson region to combine economic development and livability for the area. A number of committees and subcommittees are implementing the program. Those groups are made up of residents, business leaders, activists, municipal employees—any citizen who wants to be involved. Their task is to address specific areas. The committee’s goals are mapped out with timetables for achievement, but we have flexibility for members to identify what—and whose involvement—is needed to get there. The Housing Subcommittee of the Core City group (Core City is addressing issues specifically within the City of Jackson’s limits) meets regularly at Koinonia. This diverse group identified macro-issues, such as needing more density of housing and different types of housing, and use of vacant land. Next, we’re conducting research on best practices and taking steps to address the issues. We’ve looked at the midtown area’s recent development and implementation of a neighborhood plan for revitalization as an example. Architect Roy Decker, of Duvall Decker, was instrumental in that pro-


DIVERSIONS | music

Bowing Outside the Box by Genevieve Legacy

JEREMIAH “ICE” YOUNOSSI, A-LIST AGENCY

W

hen school and orchestra rehearsals were over, Wilner “Wil B.” Baptiste and Kevin “Kev Marcus” Sylvester would put away their sheet music and listen to Tupac, reggae or whatever was popular on the radio at the time. Unlike most of their Fort Lauderdale, Fla., high school classmates, they didn’t just sit back and listen, though. Baptiste and Sylvester opened their viola cases, tightened their bows and played along. Those early improvisational jam sessions—spurred by the restless energy of two teenagers dreaming of making a mark on the world—were the beginning of the genre-defying string duo, Black Violin. “The whole merger of classical meets hip-hop is something we’ve always done,” Baptiste says. “It was natural for us to put the two together. We were part of both worlds— it was seamless.” After high school, both went to college on music scholarships: Baptiste attended Florida State University, and Sylvester went to Florida International University. Eventu-

Black Violin is “Wil B.” Baptiste (left) and “Kev Marcus” Sylvester.

ally, they met up again, this time in Miama, Fla., where they worked with other musicians and artists. The duo began improvising on top of hip-hop tracks, but something was missing.

Baptiste and Sylvester flipped a coin to decide who would give up viola and switch to violin. Sylvester lost. “After college, we realized the need for musical balance. A soprano and an alto is better than two altos,” Sylvester says. Their first big break was in 2005. After submitting a video a year or so earlier, Black Violin was invited to perform Showtime at the Apollo at Harlem’s Apollo Theater. Believing in their music, they prepared and headed to New York. “We grew up watching Apollo,” Baptiste says. “Every time we performed, people told us we were amazing. … We were 2005 Apollo legends.” In the years since, Black Violin has collaborated and performed with various musical artists such as Kanye West, John Legend, Aerosmith and Alicia Keys. The duo played at President Obama’s 2012 Inaugural Ball, where they met the president and exchanged hugs. They performed in New York numerous times, including a sold-out run at the New Victory Theater on Broadway last year.

Black Violin released its second album, “Classically Trained,” in May. Remaining outside genre specificity, Baptiste and Sylvester mix it up with a rich sampling of their talent and yogic musicality. The collection begins with a near-gypsy “Overture” in minor tones with deep chords that warm the ear and wet the palette. By the time the third track “Virtuoso” begins, they have all the cred they need to pull off the song’s simple lyrics. The collection streams on, showing the range of their skills—their taste for numerous forms and flavors—swinging from light jazz to R&B, even a rock anthem. Listen for the pizzicato (plucked) and strummed track with vocal, a furtive and oddly satisfying track called “Interlude (Tiffany).” Black Violin gives a master’s class at noon Oct. 2 at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St., 601-979-7036) in the Rose E. McCoy Auditorium. The duo performs at 7 p.m. Oct. 3 in the auditorium. Tickets are $15 or $5 for JSU students. Visit blackviolin.net.

Pushing the Blues by Briana Robinson

September 25 - October 1, 2013

36

LOVEJOYSTUDIOS/LAURATOWLE

A

lthough it had been about a decade since Brian “Voo” Davis played guitar, it seemed to be the best thing to help fill the void when his first wife passed from blood clot complications in 2009. “I realized that I needed to do things that make me happy, and music has always made me happy,” Davis says. He recorded and released a full-length album, “A Place for Secrets,” three years later. On Sept. 10 this year, Davis, 40, released a follow-up about moving on to new things: “Vicious Things.” “I think ‘Vicious Things’ is something that I’m going to look back on—the whole experience—and just be happy with,” Davis says. He and a group of Chicago musicians recorded the album in eight days in Lousiana. Davis, born in Anniston, Ala., moved to the Chicago, Ill., area with his family as a child. He says that the south often feels more like home than Illinois, where he still lives today. Audiences here seem more receptive to his playing style. “It’s like a second home almost. I’ve made six or seven trips down to Louisiana and Mississippi just this year alone,” Davis says. “When they hear an over-driven acoustic guitar in Mississippi and Louisiana, it’s intriguing; whereas in Illinois they really want you to play that Strat or play that Gibson and play shuffles and play everybody else’s songs. That’s not really what I do; I play my songs.” Davis admits that he started learning the guitar late— he was already 20 years old—but he quickly understood the instrument. “While my friends would be going out or doing whatever they do, I would be locking myself in a room just playing,” he says. Davis was on the road with Eddie King after about six years of playing. Initially, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughn were two big influences, but Davis wanted more.

“I found that a lot of people were mimicking their sound, so I went in search of other things,” Davis says. The slide guitar piqued his interest, and then he sought to play more like Alvin Youngblood Hart or Mississippi John Hurt. They used their thumb and fingers to fret the guitar at once, creating the illusion of a piece of music having two guitar players. “To me, that seemed intriguing and kind of a challenge,” Davis says. Davis tries to write music that transcends the generic blues formula, incorporating more detailed lyrics. He wants his Voo Davis plays at Underground 119 Sept. 28. listeners to also pay attention to the words. “On ‘Vicious Things,’ I’m trying to write lyrics that are song. The next track, “Whisper,” is more rock-based. On it, more intelligent,” he says. “A lot of times, musicians, when Davis comments on the music industry. “Phantom Womthey’re writing blues songs, they keep it really simple. … I an,” however, has somewhat of a jazzy chord structure. tried to push the lyric writing on all of my songs, not just the “‘Phantom Woman’ is about being in Chicago,” Davis blues songs. I tried to push the concepts.” says. “There were some late nights driving home from a show The album also goes beyond blues—although that’s when I’d be the only one on Lakeshore Drive.” The song what Davis is known for—with its instrumentation. Fea- talks about being on that road, perhaps the only one to see a tured instruments on “Vicious Things” include the usual beautiful sunrise over the lake. guitar, bass and drums, but also include a B3 organ, clavinet, Davis wrote the last song on the album, “Put Your vibraslap, ukulele, fiddle, mandolin and Wurlitzer. Head on My Shoulder,” for his current wife, Brooke, when “I just did blues for years, so I think that’s part of the sound. she was pregnant. But that’s not the only sound. This album has everything from “I woke up one morning and sat on a dock at Dockside swamp pop to jazz to rock to Americana, and I try not to pi- Studio overlooking a river and wrote the song,” he says. “We geonhole myself,” Davis says. “I try to let the songs speak.” recorded it that day, and it was done.” While each song has some of the same main elements, Voo Davis plays at 9 p.m. Sept. 28 at Underground 119 each one also tends to lean in different directions. Davis de- (119 S. President St., 601-352-2322). The cover price is $10. scribes the opening track, “One for the Habit, One for the His newest album, “Vicious Things,” is available for purchase Road,” as more of an “overdriven blues” acoustic slide-guitar online. Visit voodavis.com.


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SHRIMP BOIL

W /

Pub Quiz

with Andrew McLarty

T /

Jil and Don F /

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Karaoke w/ Matt T /

Open Mic

with A Guy Named George

5 - 10 PM

5 - 9 & 10 - close

$1 PBR & HIGHLIFE $2 MARGARITAS 10 - 12pm

(Big Sam formerly of Dirty Dozen Brass Band)

10.19: The Revivalists 10.24: Nadis Warriors 10.26: Cedric Burnside Project 11.8: The Unknown Hinson 11.9: Black Taxi

SCAN

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37


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports the best in sports over the next seven days

SLATE

Several NFL teamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; seasons might be over before October. In fact, some might be done before week four.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 26 NFL (7-11 p.m., NFL Network): A key NFC West matchup sees the St. Louis Rams host the San Francisco 49ers in a game both teams need to win to keep pace with the Seattle Seahawks.

MONDAY, SEPT. 30 NFL (7:30-11 p.m., ESPN): The undefeated Miami Dolphins come to the Superdome to face the undefeated New Orleans Saints in a marquee match just four weeks into the NFL season.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 27 College football (8-11 p.m., ESPN/ ESPN U): Flip back and forth between a pair of college football games: San Jose State hosts Utah State, and Middle Tennessee travels to BYU.

TUESDAY, OCT. 1 MLB (Time TBA, TBS): In the National League Wild Card game, two wild-card teams from the NL meet, and the loser goes home for good.

by Bryan Flynn

SATURDAY, SEPT. 28 College football (5:30-9 p.m., ESPN): Ole Miss hopes to show the Rebels are a contender by upsetting top-ranked Alabama on the road. â&#x20AC;¦ College football (9 p.m.-midnight, ESPN U): Southern Miss looks to end its 16-game losing streak in a match with Boise State. SUNDAY, SEPT. 29 NFL (7-11 p.m., NBC): The New England Patriots hope to stay perfect as they travel south to take on the Atlanta Falcons who need a win after losing to Miami.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 2 MLB (Time TBA, TBS): The American League Wild Card game uses the same format as the NL version: the winner moves on the playoffs, and the loserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s season is over. Seven NFL teams are currently 0-3 to start the season including surprises such as the New York Giants, Washington Redskins and Pittsburgh Steelers. Since 1978, only five teams have made the playoffs after a 0-3 start. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.

bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rant Time to End College Athletics

September 25 - October 1, 2013

T

38

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See this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College Football Top 25 poll at jfp.ms/2013pollweek4 and look for it to return to the paper in next weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issue.


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39


Coming in October

JOIN FOR ONLY $8 901 Lakeland Place, Suite #10 Flowood, MS (in front of Walmart) flowood@anytimefitness.com

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Mississippi's only full service Hilton Hotel has kicked off a major renovation project. The renovation plan calls for updates in the hotel lobby, restaurants, 276 guest rooms, and a few more exciting enhancements. Entire project is scheduled to wrap up by the end of the year. We are excited about our renovation and look forward to providing you with an even better hotel! For room reservations please visit hilton.com or call 601-957-2800

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www.anytimefitness.com Voted One of the Best Places to Work Out Best of Jackson 2010-2012 1001 East County Line Road | Jackson | MS 39211 | USA ©2013 Hilton Worldwide

Untitled - Page: 1

2013-06-27 15:51:19 +0100

20%

OFF September 25 - October 1, 2013

complete pair of glasses with mention of this ad

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40 Tarantula_JacksonFreePress_38P4C_v01.indd 1

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Zphb!Uifsbqz!with JJ Gormley-Etchells, E-RYT-500 September 27 - 28, 2013 Friday - 6:00 - 8:30 pm Yoga for a Healthy Back and Relief from Sacro-iliac Pain $50 Saturday 12:00 - 2:00 pm Yoga for Shoulders, Neck and Upper Back Tension $40

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JJ Gormley-Etchells has been a student of yoga since 1979 and a teacher since 1989. She began teaching teachers and using yoga therapeutically in 1994. She has studied from many traditions including Ashtanga, Iyengar, Kundalini, Anusara and Viniyoga. She calls her yoga education well-rounded and draws from each tradition that which she loves.

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