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November 7 - 13, 2012

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TRIP BURNS

JACKSONIAN SYD CURRY

B

efore 2008, hairstylist Syd Curry had not set foot in the state of Mississippi in decades. Although his family is from the state, it was a place that he never in his wildest dreams imagined living. Curry’s parents left the South for a job in California and stayed there; Curry was born in Santa Monica, Calif., and raised in Los Angeles. Curry became known in L.A. for an impressive list of celebrity clients. Mariah Carey was his first huge superstar client; after working with her on the “Dreamlover” video, Curry styled Carey for six years. “I saw the world with her,” he says “We went all over the world together.” Curry also worked with Cindy Crawford, President Bill Clinton and Lady Gaga, on her “Bad Romance” video. At a young age, Curry was surrounded by the profession he grew to love. “My mom’s best friends were hairdressers; they would do things, and it would make sense to me,” Curry says. “My parents made a deal with me that if I graduated high school they would send me to beauty school.” “It’s a glamorous job and a great opportunity, but when it comes down to it, it’s a job. They’re just people who happen to be famous,” Curry says. In 2008, Curry returned to Mississip-

CONTENTS

pi with his mother so she could be closer to her family. “I had felt like I didn’t have anything in common with my family. Until I got here, until I walked in the door, and they all hugged and kissed me, and they realized it’s the same person they grew up with,” he says. Curry is finally embracing the South and the new sense of family. “I just feel like I’ve been on a plane for 58 years. I need to be in one place for a minute,” Curry says. “There’s kind of nothing about this place that I’m not in love with right now.” The stylist recently moved from his home in Aberdeen to Jackson to work at SMoak Salon, where he cuts, colors and styles hair. The only thing Curry says he’ll miss about L.A., other than friends, is the inspiration that flourishes among a creative team. “I don’t get to collaborate with my stylist, makeup and photography friends,” Curry says. “But now I’ll be able to do it in a different way here. Hopefully, they will teach me a couple of things.” Curry says he won’t miss the airplanes or the L.A. traffic but will continue to work freelance from time to time in order to keep up his creativity. As for Jackson, Curry is excited to be living in the city. “I smile all the time here.” —Victoria Sherwood

Cover illustration by Kathleen M. Mitchell and Trip Burns

10 Boot Straps and Shoestrings

“Everybody thinks that schools drive this, but it is not just the schools. The children have to come to school prepared to learn, and that involves early childhood education. It requires parents and caring adults around them who read to them and help them build their vocabulary. I think they’re all necessary.” —Alma Powell, “Transforming Jackson from the Kids Up”

35 Southern Comfort

Whipping up a quick and easy compound butter adds gourmet flair to traditional comfort food, perfect for chilly weather.

31 True Passion

Drawing on some intense personal experiences, Passion Pit’s newest album reflects a more ripe and mature sound.

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ..............................EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ................................................ YOU 8 ............................................ TALKS 11 ...... BEST OF JACKSON BALLOT 12 .................................. BUSINESS 14 .................................. EDITORIAL 14 ................. EDITORIAL CARTOON 15 .................................... OPINION 17 ............................ COVER STORY 25 .............................. DIVERSIONS 26 .......................................... FILM 28 ....................................... 8 DAYS 29 ............................... JFP EVENTS 31 ....................................... MUSIC 32 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 33 ..................................... SPORTS 35 ......................................... FOOD 39 ................................. ORGANICS 40 ................... GIRL ABOUT TOWN 41 .............................. ASTROLOGY 42 ...................................... FLY DIY

COURTESY PASSION PIT : SPENCER NESSEL: COURTESY OPERATION SHOESTRING

NOVEMBER 7 13 , 2012 | VOL. 11 NO. 9

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EDITOR’S note

by Kathleen M. Mitchell, Features Editor

Fighting for Beautiful

S

elf-confidence isn’t something that I am naturally blessed with. Growing up, I was very self-conscious. My childhood best friend was one of those naturally attractive, great-bone-structure and perfect-skin types. When I hit my pre-teen and teenage years, I became hyperaware of how my nose, my hair, my acne-prone skin fared compared to her, even as we grew apart. My insecurities could range from mild to crippling depending on the day. It’s not that I was bullied, necessarily, but people I knew and loved were, and that affected me. It made me worry and hope that I was good enough—attractive enough—to escape that fate. I wish I could say I have blossomed into a confident, strong woman who leaves the house ready to take on the world each day. But even today, those same demons often haunt me. You probably wouldn’t know this if we met casually. You wouldn’t see the anxiety and insecurity that bubbles under the surface. You wouldn’t think that I “should” be self-conscious. And maybe I shouldn’t. I did all right in the looks lottery of life: average-to-tall height, no skin deformities or birthmarks, a dress size on the lower end of the spectrum … with makeup and a little work on the hair, I can turn it out pretty well. Hell, on a good week, I can even fit into a pair of jeans I wore in high school. I am clearly a lucky woman. A wonderful and very attractive man married me and tells me I am beautiful. So why is it so hard to believe him sometimes? Why do so many women find it hard to believe they are beautiful? Of course, the simple answer is the influence of the media: Look at the magazine covers Photoshopped to unrecognizable

levels, the celebrity endorsements of product upon product upon product meant to turn your “grotesque” attributes into something a person might actually find appealing, or the fact that 90 percent of the lead characters on television shows and in movies are insanely good-looking. There are shows and blogs and websites devoted to picking women apart: their looks, size or fashion sense.

Why do so many women find it hard to believe they are beautiful? We are increasingly growing up in a world that insists on little girls being “gorgeous” rather than cute, where 8-year-olds suffer from anorexia, and teenagers resort to plastic surgery before they are even out of high school. The media have changed our perception of health and beauty. These days, “healthy” means a size 0, 2 or 4—regardless of the damaging steps many girls take to achieve that dress tag. “Beautiful” has come to suggest utterly flawless skin, hair, face—even though most of the population isn’t born that way. It’s a lot of pressure, and it’s no wonder more and more women are developing eating disorders and workout obsessions (and worse) to keep up. But the complicated answer is that it’s complicated. It’s not just the media—it’s us.

Women constantly feel judged because they are—and not just by men or the fashion police. Far too many females instinctively critique one another. Studies show that the majority of women internally assess, size up and criticize other females upon first meeting them—even if they don’t mean to. Not that we need studies to tell us that—how many times have you made a snap judgment or felt judged within two minutes of meeting someone? I’ll be the first to admit, I love a good snarky website on celebrity fashion, and I’ve been known to talk trash about a Kardashian or five. And if I am truly honest, in my darkest places, I have found myself mentally cutting down the stranger in front of me, despite my best intentions. I’m not proud of that, but it’s evidence of the larger problem. It isn’t a solely female issue, of course. Men suffer from insecurity, judgment and media pressure to reach unobtainable physical goals. Men can be hard on each other, and GI Joe is just as poor of an “ideal” for kids as Barbie is. And these issues get even stickier when less straight-forward (pun intended) ideas of gender and sexuality come into the picture. But women are uniquely targeted, bombarded with the idea of physical perfection to the point that we may surround ourselves with things that are subconsciously damaging without even realizing it. It’s ingrained in us. These insecurities can be a weird thing to talk about, to write about. People often brush off others’ feelings, saying they “shouldn’t” or “don’t deserve” to feel selfconscious because other people have it worse off. But, truthfully, although I know there are plenty of people out there genuinely suffering (from not only real health problems like obesity, but poverty, injustice and more), it doesn’t make my zit feel any

less giant and attention-grabbing. Then there is the advice out there— focus on your positive attributes, learn to laugh at yourself, etc.—which tends to amount to, “Well, just feel good about yourself, already.” But it’s not that simple. There are days I feel stunning. But there are days where I struggle to keep from comparing my own attributes to those so blessed with preternatural beauty—the ones with perfect figures, lustrous hair and a face that needs no makeup. I’m not knocking makeup by any means. I feel most lovely with red lipstick on. And concealer is, in many ways, mankind’s greatest invention. There is an element of luxury associated with a good haircut and quality makeup that makes me feel good. Being active and healthy is obviously important no matter who—or what size—you are. But makeup and exercise should be things that enhance and that celebrate your features, rather than things to be shackled to in the hopes of covering up or hiding yourself. That size 2 over there? She might be hoping her clothes cover up a scar she’s embarrassed of. That woman with the gorgeous head of hair? She might be worried about how big her butt looks in her jeans. That man in the expensive suit? He could be wondering if his date tonight will think he looks old. We’re all going through stuff. Today, tell someone they are radiant. Be specific. Today, look in the mirror and find something you like. Slap some concealer on that blemish and go out into the world knowing that most people won’t even notice it, because they will be so busy hoping you don’t see theirs. Throw that trashy magazine with the headline about “So-and-so’s Magic Diet!” in the garbage. All women should feel beautiful. All people should feel amazing. Let’s start today.

November 7 - 13, 2012

CONTRIBUTORS

4

Tam Curley

Victoria Sherwood

Eddie Outlaw

Julie Skipper

Briana Robinson

Spencer Nessel

Scott Prather

Tait Kellogg

Tam Curley loves telling about her move from liberal California to begin a new life with her hubby and daughter in conservative Mississippi. She is an Arkansas native and enjoys time with her two lab puppies. She wrote for the cover package.

Editorial intern Victoria Sherwood studies communications at Millsaps College. She enjoys watching soccer and one day hopes to own an orange cat. Victoria wrote the Jacksonian.

Eddie Outlaw is co-owner of the William Wallace Salon in Fondren and spends most of his time trying not to embarrass his sweet Delta mother on eddieoutlaw.com. Eddie wrote for the cover package.

Julie is a recovering lawyer now working in development. She lives, works, and plays in downtown Jackson. She hopes to learn to cook one day, but mostly thinks of the kitchen as additional closet space. She wrote for the cover package.

Deputy Editor Briana Robinson’s hobbies include photography, ballet and ballroom dancing. She is a junior at Millsaps College. She wrote a music piece.

Freelance writer Spencer Nessel is a born and raised Jacksonian. A recent Millsaps graduate, he majored in English and spends his free time eating, lounging, and leading a life of gluttony. He wrote a food feature.

Scott Prather is a Jackson native who co-founded indie label Esperanza Plantation. He recently returned home after doctoral work in ethics and theology. His interests include everything that matters. He wrote a music feature.

Tait Kellogg fell in love with Mississippi, despite its flaws, while at Millsaps College. She then tried life as a Manhattanite for several years. Now, she’s back in the South working for Education Services Foundation. She wrote the DIY feature.


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Write us: letters@jacksonfreepress.com Tweet us: @JxnFreePress Facebook: Jackson Free Press

WHO IS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL PERSON YOU KNOW AND WHY?

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Send us a photo of you and your JFP somewhere interesting. You get a $20 gift certificate if we print it.

Joseph Tutor: My wife, and because she was born beautiful. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve made beautiful babies. (I) couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ask for more beauty in a companion. :) Toya Young: My mom ... no one has that grace and compassion! Love you, Bertha L. Snead. Charles Filhiol: My mother, because she is my mother! :) Bill Johnson: My wife, Pam Johnson. Natalie Brooke Long: My older sister Tatia. She has four kids and NO WRINKLES! And no, she wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell me her secret! :) Joe Taylor: My youngest daughter because of her love for her son. Karen Noel Hearn: The most beautiful person I know is Geoffrey Brent Shrewsbury. He has utmost respect for his body so he eats well and exercises and his skin is always perfect and soft. He has a unique, stylish fashion sense and a tremendously compassionate spirit. Handsome doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cut itâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beautiful. Caroline Crawford: My bandmate, Amanda Barber. Never have I met

a more kindred spirit with so many differences. She is honest, supportive, strong, talented, whip-smart, someone I can be myself around, crazy intelligent, and makes me laugh ... and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just the inside. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quite a looker, too. And I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have ever gotten into a kayak around alligators if I had not met her. Yasmeen Banu: Social worker Gloria Elayne Owens of Yazoo City. She truly gives and gives and gives to others expecting nothing in return. She is the most genuine person I know. She is a social worker in every sense of the word. She is an advocate for people, especially children. She loves others as unconditionally as is humanly possible. Her heart and genuine spirit, and her faith in the goodness of others makes her the most beautiful person I know!!! Amanda Spanel: My sister Leslie Byrd, who was killed Oct. 1 by a drunk driver. She is the one from Brandon who was killed that was six months pregnant. She was an amazing mother, a beautiful young woman with her whole life ahead of her. She had a huge heart, and she was always full of smiles and laughter. I love her so much, and I feel so empty without my

precious baby sister. Jane Brownlow Findley: My two children. They amaze me every day with their curiosity, sense of humor and imagination. Monica Daniels: Callie Daniels is the most beautiful person I have ever known. ... Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s her inner beauty that radiates outward like a comet in the night. ... That inner beauty comes from her strong spirit and her tenacity. ....It takes some â&#x20AC;&#x153;ballsâ&#x20AC;? for a young deaf woman to pursue journalism! I learn from my daughter every single day and am happy to be in her world.

#ALLIE$ANIELS Noelle Catherine White: My girlfriend, Alyssa, is the kindest being on this Earth. She is the most beautiful person I have ever known, both inside and out. A loyal friend, caring partner, and an all around gorgeous human.


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Thursday, Nov. 1 Lawyers for three disabled students ask a federal judge to appoint a special education chief for Jackson Public Schools. â&#x20AC;Ś Limited subway service resumes in New York City in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. Power remains out in lower Manhattan. Friday, Nov. 2 Prominent Mississippi GOP members reveal their plans for charter-school legislation in 2013. â&#x20AC;Ś Lack of power and fuel shortages in New York City caused by storm damage result in gas lines stretching as far as 17 blocks. Saturday, Nov. 3 Mississippi Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum and Blair E. Batson Hospital for Children team up to create â&#x20AC;&#x153;Question It? Discover It! Saturdays.â&#x20AC;? Sunday, Nov. 4 Despite the official cancellation of the New York City Marathon, thousands of runners gather in Central Park and hold the marathon on their own.

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City Settling Into Metrocenter by Jacob D. Fuller

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he city began the long-awaited move of several departments into Metrocenter Mall last week. Jackson Police Department Precinct 2 has completed its move from the old Atmos building on West Capitol Street into the former Belk department Store building at the mall. Building superintendent Bruce Weathersby told the Jackson Free Press Nov. 2 that the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parks and Recreation Department, which was formerly located in the Jackson Medical Mall, had also moved into the building. Weathersby said city employees have told him the newly renovated building is â&#x20AC;&#x153;marvelous.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been in some of those places where they were before, and I understand what their appreciation is about. This is a much newer, cleaner and more modernly updated facility. They are gong to enjoy it,â&#x20AC;? Weatherby told the Jackson Free Press. The city hopes to revive Metrocenter from near total abandonment. In recent years, the mall has lost all of its anchor stores, including Belk, Dillardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Sears. The city is moving nearly 300 employees to the building at the corner of U.S. Highway 80 and Robinson Road in west Jackson. The city is also moving the Department of Human and Cultural Services and

the Water and Sewer Department from the Jackson Medical Mall, and the Public Edu-

fill the soon-to-be former offices of the Department of Human and Cultural Ser-

Retro Metro has completed renovations of the former Belk building at Metrocenter Mall. Six city departments have begun or completed the move into the building.

cation and Government TV studio from the Atmos building to Metrocenter. Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. said he suspects the Jackson Medical Mall, a thriving hub for retail stores, food service, health care and medical suppliers on Woodrow Wilson Avenue, will quickly

vices, Water and Sewer Department and Parks and Recreation Departments. The mayor said the Jackson Redevelopment Authority owns and leases the Atmos Building and it will decide what to do with vacant space there. Johnson presented a copy of

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Tuesday, Nov. 6 Federal court records indicate that Anthony Ricardo Payne, one of three former Jackson police officers indicted on charges of accepting bribes to protect drug shipments, will plead guilty. â&#x20AC;Ś Polls around the country experience problems on Election Day as Americans turn out to choose the president for the next four years.

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November 7 - 13, 2012

Monday, Nov. 5 Mississippi State Conference NAACP President Derrick Johnson says that as of Friday, the Hinds County circuit clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office had failed to enter many voters into its voter-registration database. â&#x20AC;Ś Schools reopened and services resumed in New York City, just as another storm is set to hit Wednesday.

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Wednesday, Oct. 31 Gov. Phil Bryant stated he believes voters should voluntarily show their IDs on Election Day, even though voter ID is not required in Mississippi. â&#x20AC;Ś Mitt Romney comes under fire from General Motors and Chrysler for ads attacking President Obama filled with inaccurate information about the two companies.

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XQGHIHDWHG man Charles Tillman, who has been one of the most vocal advocates of the audit, insisted on hearing from Asemota. Asemota said he talked to all three Retro Metro partners, reviewed their invoices and receipts for the rewiring, and walked through the building with an independent expert who understands the wiring process better than he does. Tillman asked if Asemota talked to developer David Watkins, who left the project earlier this year to focus on the Farish Street entertainment district. Asemota said he did not talk to Watkins, but that he did review the receipts from Watkinsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; payments to the subcontractors for the project. Asemota said he did not find any problems with how Retro Metro used the $50,000. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Jacob D. Fuller at jacob@jacksonfreepress.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

an audit the Jackson City Council requested to show how developer Retro Metro spent $50,000 of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s funds for new electrical and telecommunications wiring at the former Belk building at a regular council meeting Oct. 30. A few council members had said they would not OK the move into the building until the audit was complete. The city hired certified public accountant Sammy Asemota to perform the audit. After listening to Asemotaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s report, no council members raised any objections. Council President Tony Yarber said because the council did not have any more discussion, the mayor was free to move forward with the project. The move will take a couple of weeks to complete, Johnson said. Socrates Garrett, one of three managing partners in Retro Metro, said the building was completed and ready for the move Oct. 29, which was the completion date Retro Metro gave the council months ago. Retro Metro originally scheduled the project for completion in the fall of 2011, but miscommunication between the city and the developers on the full price of (and who was paying for) wiring upgrades stalled the project for several months. The project was challenging, Garrett said. He hopes its completion will help him and his partners get more development jobs in the city. Garrett and his partners, LeRoy Walker and Howard Catchings, are African American. Garrett pointed out to the council that local minorities led the entire project, from Retro Metro to the general contractor to sub-contractors. Johnson presented copies of the audit to the council, but Ward 5 Council-

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TALK | city

Transforming Jackson From the Kids Up by R.L. Nave

T

COURTESY OPERATION SHOESTRING; PATRICE GILBERT

Isaacson visits Jackson Nov. 12 with Ala., and sits on numerous nonprofit boards he past few months have been rocky for American journalism. Alma Powell, chairwoman of America’s of directors, said Jackson possesses all the This summer, The Times-Picayune, Promise Alliance, a coalition that works necessary institutions to transform the city. New Orleans’ newspaper, an- on children’s issues, to discuss strategies “Everybody thinks that schools drive nounced it was cutting back from daily for transforming communities. Operation this, but it is not just the schools. The chilpublishing to three days a week. dren have to come to school Just last month, Newsweek, the prepared to learn, and that venerable 79-year-old weekly involves early childhood edumagazine, announced it would cation. It requires parents and go to an all-digital format. caring adults around them Walter Isaacson watched who read to them and help the developments closely. Isaathem build their vocabulary,” cson is a New Orleans native Powell said. and what people once called a Mississippi’s challenges are newsman, having worked at immense, however. In the Anthe Times-Pic’s predecessor, nie E. Casey Foundation’s most New Orleans Times-Picayune/ recent report on the state of Alma Powell and Walter Isaacson, both heavyweights of the nonprofit world, will engage Jackson residents on ways to States-Item, and Time magaAmerica’s children, Mississippi transform our community at a Nov. 12 forum. zine, where he was editor-inlanded in dead last place for chief. Isaacson helmed CNN overall kids’ wellbeing. Health from 2001 to 2003 when he departed to Shoestring, a not-for-profit that focuses on outcomes for children and adults, though head the Aspen Institute, a nonpartisan non- children and family issues, hosts the discus- improving, still represent an uphill climb. profit that promotes discussion of current is- sion that will be moderated by Jackson busi- In education, Mississippi’s ACT scores and sues headquartered in Washington, D.C. nessman and philanthropist Jim Barksdale. high-school graduation lag other states. “I think the Times-Picayune made a Isaacson—a Rhodes scholar who has Both Powell and Isaacson call for an horrible mistake and is no longer serving written biographies about Benjamin Frank- “all-hands on all decks” approach. the community as well,” Isaacson said about lin, Albert Einstein, Henry Kissinger and Isaacson called for competing school the move to a three-day-a-week publication Steve Jobs—believes local media can be criti- systems, trying out charter schools, expandschedule that makes New Orleans the larg- cal in shaping communities if “every single ing afterschool programs and programs such est American city without a daily paper. “It’s story and every single paragraph in that story as Teach for America, which Isaacson chairs absolutely huge to have engaged watchdog is something that’s useful and credible.” nationally. He lauded endeavors such as the journalism that is beholden to readers.” Powell, who grew up in Birmingham, Barksdale Reading Institute, a joint project

between the Mississippi Department of Education and the state’s public universities for which Barksdale provided the seed money. Education is a perennial fight in the Mississippi Legislature. For eight of the past 10 years, lawmakers have failed to fund public education according to its own funding formula known as the Mississippi Adequate Education Program, and now there’s talk about doing away with the formula altogether. After several failed attempts, Republicans plan to reignite the campaign to bring charter schools, public institutions that are privately run, to the state. “Improving K-12 education is the single most important thing any community can do. It’s not just out of kindness, it’s out of a community’s self-interest because if it has educated citizens it’ll thrive,” Isaacson said. Powell, the wife of former Secretary of State Colin Powell, agrees with Isaacson that education affects the economic condition of a community. “We have to understand that the children are the future,” Powell said. “Those are the people who are going to be the leaders in the years to come. “ Operation Shoestring’s “A Conversation about Community” is Monday, Nov. 12, at noon at the Jackson Convention Complex. Visit operationshoestring.org for more information. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Contact R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

HUD Approves City Grants by Jacob D. Fuller

November 6 - 12, 2012

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The city will spread the $1.85 million in CDBG funds to a range of programs, including the Summer Youth Employment Initiative, AmeriCorps Capital City Rebuilds Public Service Program, new bridges, new playground equipment at parks and the Housing Rehab Program. Two of the most popular recipients of CDBG money in recent years have been the Small Business Development Grant and the Storefront Improvement Grant programs. Under Johnson’s administration, the city has handed out nearly $700,000 to small businesses through the grants to help them hire new employees, retain current workers, make improvements to buildings and more. “Obviously, if the overall (CDBG) pot money is cut, there also has to be cuts up and down the board. I’m not sure we’re going to be able to devote as much money as we have in the past to the (Small Business Development Grant) program, but we intend to keep it,” Johnson said. The city will not directly administer the $1.14 million it will receive for the Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS. In-

TRIP BURNS

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he U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development recently approved the city’s One Year Action Plan and will administer grant funding to Jackson for neighborhood revitalization, community services, and housing and economic development opportunities. Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. will sign an agreement with HUD to receive funding from a range of programs, including the Community Development Block Grant program, Emergency Solutions Grant, Emergency Shelter Grant and Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS. For a second straight year, the city saw a drop in CDBG funds. The city will receive $1.85 million for fiscal year 2012-2013, compared to $2.2 million in 2011-2012 and $2.7 million the year before. “My concern ... is that this program will go away, as Congress starts looking at programs to cut. This program has been severely cut over the years. We used to receive much, much more money,” Johnson said Nov. 1. “I remind people every time I get a chance how important this program is.”

The city once again saw cuts to the grants it receives from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

stead, the city saves on administrative costs by passing the money on to the state Department of Health, which then administers the funds throughout the Jackson metro area, including Hinds, Rankin, Madison, Copiah and Simpson counties. DOH also receives other HUD money to implement the program statewide. Dr. Nicholas Mosca, director of the HIV/STD office at the state health department, said DOH uses the money to help

people with HIV and AIDS who need emergency help. “These are people that are about to lose their housing,” Mosca told the JFP. When people with HIV/AIDS are in danger of being kicked out of a rental property, DOH will provide rental assistance for up to 21 weeks to help keep them from becoming homeless. “Having stable housing helps people to stay in their therapies for HIV disease,” Mosca said. Patients with HIV/AIDS often have case managers from various charitable organizations. Mosca said those workers help identify patients in need of help from the HOPWA program and tell them how to apply. Also, the patient’s primary care provider can connect them with the program. The Emergency Solutions and Shelter Grants, totaling more than $257,000, will also go toward fighting homelessness. Johnson said the city gives the funds to charitable organizations which provide services to homeless people, including Stewpot and the Billy Brumfield Shelter. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Jacob D. Fuller at jacob@jacksonfreepress.com.


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11


TALK | business

GOP Praises Canada, Presents Agenda by RL Nave

D Marketing and Sales Support Ninja Do you live and breathe customer service?

The JFP/BOOM Jackson advertising department needs your help keeping our advertisers and partners happy and prosperous! Your key duties include social media management for clients, plus planning and supporting marketing events, so some evening and weekend flexibility is recommend. Other duties include ad copy updates, Web updates, creating reports, taking photos and helping with logistics. Parttime and hourly to start, but the right person can expand this position.

November 7 - 13, 2012

Send cover letter and resume to kimberly@jacksonfreepress.com.

12

R.L. NAVE

NEEDED

ozens of Canadian flags hung provided a sneak peak at some of the initiafrom the rafters and adorned the tives the GOP, which controls the Legislature tables as an army band played “O and most statewide offices, will champion in Canada,” the national anthem the coming legislative session. for the United States’ northern neighbor. Lawmakers promised to continue purIt could have been a scene from a National suing policies that Republicans regard as Hockey League showdown, but it was, in producing the most “pro-business” session in fact, the annual confab of businesspeople history and returning to other items on the and politicians known as the Mississippi Hobnob. This year’s Hobnob put the state’s trading relationship with Canada in the spotlight. Mississippi trades more with Canucks than any other foreign nation. Sixteen percent of all foreign bound goods leaving the state are headed to Canada, which buys $1.8 billion in Mississippi goods annually. Mississippi imports $815 million worth of trade every year and attracts 76,500 Canadian tourists, while 20,500 Missis- Republican Lt. Gov.Tate Reeves plans to reignite the sippians visit Canada. charter school debate in the next legislative session. Mississippi hopes to expand that relationship and grow the state’s economy with three en- GOP wish list that went unfulfilled. ergy projects now under development. After an army band introduced him Sumagrown, a Hattiesburg-based firm, to the tune of Sam and Dave’s civil-rights recently signed its first customer license era classic “Soul Man,” Lt. Gov. Tate in Canada, while Genesis LP, a refinery in Reeves took the stage and bragged about Natchez, is expanding to handle Canadian such “strong, conservative, pro-growth” oil sands. Additionally, Quebec biofuels bills passed last session such as eliminating company Enerkem plans to break ground the inventory tax and reforming the workon a biorefinery in Pontotoc County in late ers compensation system. 2012 that will create 70 jobs using $130 “We wanted to create that level playmillion in grants from the U.S. Depart- ing field between employers and employment of Agriculture. ees so that we could encourage businesses Energy development is critical to Mis- in our state to invest capital in our state,” sissippi’s economic-development strategy, Reeves said. along with reforming the state’s education As more evidence, Reeves boasted of system and making the state more amenable the legislative award he received from the to businesses, Republican leaders said. Dur- U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Institute for ing the Mississippi Economic Council-spon- Legal Reform, which promotes tort-reform sored Hobnob at the Agriculture Museum, efforts, for passing a bill allowing state agenMississippi’s top Republican elected officials cies to hire outside attorneys instead of us-

ing the Mississippi attorney general’s office. Reeves shared in the award with fellow Republicans Speaker Philip Gunn, Rep. Mark Baker of Brandon, and Sen. Briggs Hobson of Vicksburg. Despite creating an environment where businesses could thrive, Mississippi’s economy continues to trail the rest of the nation. The 9.2 percent state unemployment rate remains higher than the U.S. average of 7.9 percent. As rah-rah as Republicans are behind what they deem job creators, speakers made a number of overtures stressing the link between education and the economy. For the past few sessions, Republicans and a handful of Democrats have put their proverbial eggs into charter schools, but each time they brought up charter-school legislation, opposition shot the measures down. Last year’s charter bill failed to make it out of the House Education Committee thanks to three Republican holdouts in districts where local elected superintendents did not favor a charter bill. Reeves signaled that he planned to introduce legislation to eliminate the system of electing superintendents. Gov. Phil Bryant said the upcoming session, when proponents will renew the push for charters, promises to be the single most progressive session on education in Mississippi history. “Charter schools (are) desperately needed, particularly in the failing school districts. I’ve seen them. I’ve been there. I’m a disciple. I’ve been to West Helena, Arkansas. I’ve been to New Orleans. Those systems will work,” Bryant said, referring to the presence of charter schools in other states. Bryant also hinted at legislation for a merit-based teacher compensation system. “It is not fair I believe to have the very best teachers in the classroom being paid the same as those who are not making an effort,” he said. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.


Saturday Nov. 10th â&#x20AC;¢ 8am-12pm 7 - 8am Early Bird Sale ($5 donation fee)

University of Mississippi Medical Center Norman C. Nelson Student Union 2500 North State Street Jackson, Mississippi 39216-4505 This event was organized by UMMC students and is open to the public. Over 1,000 items have already been donated! All proceeds go to Jackson Free Clinic and any unsold items will go to Salvation Army.

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jacksonfreepress.com

UMMC Charity Garage Sale

13


World Peace and Rent Money

M

iss Doodle Mae: â&#x20AC;&#x153;During this time of uncertainty and anxiety, business activity at Jojoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Discount Dollar Store has been very steady. Unfortunately, the setbacks of a struggling economy and high unemployment have affected people from all walks of life. Nevertheless, Jojo is very pleased to serve a new and diverse influx of affluent and middle-class individuals bargain shopping with our financially challenged customers. However, our new caliber of customers seems to struggle with the reality of buying discounted goods from a common dollar store. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This upcoming holiday season, Jojo and his staff are ready to make some adjustments to better serve his loyal and new customers. Chief Crazy Brother, our store display and operations manager, will produce and organize more diverse store and cultural events to entertain and educate customers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jojo hired the unemployed deejays and emcees to enhance our customersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; holiday shopping experience with soothing music and personal ambiance. Also, Congressman Smokey â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Robinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; McBride and the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Deltoneticsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; will sing some soulful Christmas songs in isle 7 and 1/2 on Christmas Eve. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jojo believes our new customers will enjoy the Sausage Sandwich Sistersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; store-wide holiday unity electric slide session for world peace, rent money and toys for tots. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Back by popular demand are the Kwanzaa and Hanukkah squads, ready to culturally entertain and educate shoppers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jojoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Discount Dollar Storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal for this holiday season is to simply provide loyal and new customers a pleasant shopping experience. And the prices will remain the sameâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;one dollar.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;illegalâ&#x20AC;?

November 7 - 13, 2012

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14

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Voting Suppression Must Be National Priority

A

s we go to press Tuesday, we do not yet know who won the elections. But we do know that the electorate lost big when it came to how elections were handled right here in Hinds County and beyond. We spent much of the last few days reporting on elections problemsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;both purposeful and negligent as the entire country watched Republican elected officials use their offices around the nation to try to limit the number of non-white voters. Florida was a prime example with one election official refusing to extend early voting except in one largely white, Republican precinct. Nothing could be more obvious. Then there was the Arizona Republican candidate who robocalled bad poll information to Democrats. And so many more. Here in the metro, we spent time correcting numerous false emails and posts put out to give false information to votes. As we write this, we are chasing reports of poll places in Rankin County illegally dividing people into Democratic and Republican lines (a long-time cheating practice in our state). We hear of police officers parked outside a Flowood polling place with lights flashingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;another long-time voter suppression tactic. Then, of course, the Republicansâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;including Gov. Phil Bryantâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;are all tweeting that they are showing their voter IDs anyway at the polls even though they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t legally require it yet. It is shameful on a day with apparently record turnout for our state officials to engage in protest activity inside the polls that can confuse and hold up voting. But voter ID is designed to limit voting; we pray that people

fully prove today that it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work as a voter-suppression tool, as well as being expensive and without evidence that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll actually help a thing. Then, of course, is the incompetence that ends up being a voter-suppression tool even if accidental. One of our editors came to work today reporting that the poll manager at her Presidential Hills precinct had â&#x20AC;&#x153;forgotten the keyâ&#x20AC;? and left voters lined up outside waiting while they scrambled to locate it. And R.L. Nave reported the day before Election Day that his own voterregistration form, filed through the NAACP, either had not been delivered to the Hinds County Circuit Clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office, or had not been entered. Considering that the NAACP registered 10,000 new Hinds County voters, this was a real concern that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still trying to sort out. The problem is that we will get busy and forget about this until the next big election if weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not carefulâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or the next small one when the cheating goes unnoticed. This will not do. It does not benefit the people of the United States to have our voting rights curtailed in any way, whether purposefully or not. We must, as a nation, start taking this problem much more seriously from the local to the federal level. If not, we give up our power before we ever get to the polls. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s talk about it, America, and demand action from our leaders. Oh, and kick any bum out that tries to limit our voting rights or use their government position to promote a political strategy (looking at you, secretary of state). They do not deserve to be public servants.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your Turnâ&#x20AC;? and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


FUNMI ‘QUEEN’ FRANKLIN

Thick and Proud EDITORIAL News Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Jacob Fuller, R.L. Nave Events Editor Latasha Willis Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editors Dustin Cardon, Molly Lehmuller Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Quita Bride, Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Scott Dennis Jim Pathfinder Ewing, Bryan Flynn, Garrad Lee Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Casey Purvis, Debbie Raddin, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith Editorial Interns Elyane Alexander, Matthew Bolian Piko Ewoodzie,Whitney Menogan, Sam Suttle Victoria Sherwood, Dylan Watson Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Production Designer Latasha Willis Graphic Designer Eric Bennett Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographers William Patrick Butler, Tate K. Nations, Amile Wilson Graphic Design Interns Terrence Jones, Ariss King ADVERTISING SALES Sales Director Kimberly Griffin Advertising Coordinator Monique Davis Account Executive Stephanie Bowering BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Executive Assistant Erica Crunkilton Bookkeeper Montroe Headd Distribution Manager Matt Heindl Distribution Avery Cahee, Raymond Carmeans, Jeff Cooper, Clint Dear, Jody Windham ONLINE Web Developer Matt Heindl Web Editor Dustin Cardon Multimedia Editor Trip Burns Web Producer Korey Harrion CONTACT US: Letters Editorial Queries Listings Advertising Publisher News tips Fashion

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ossessing a full-figured body isn’t something women regularly celebrate. Why would we? This society has taught us from pre-adolescence that if you’re not a size 4, you’re unattractive. The most celebrated beauties of our time aren’t plus sized. Magazine covers don’t feature full-bodied beauties. We have been led to believe that if you are not the size of Mila Kunis, we need to work toward getting there. If we are the size of Jill Scott or Queen Latifah, our skills better be extraordinary for anyone to overlook our size. Even then, we are an exception to the rule. Those women can barely get through a feature-story interview without being asked: “How do you feel about being a plussize woman?” Or, the inevitable statement, “She’s beautiful—for a full-figured woman,” as if we must be categorized differently from the other women of the world who are truly beautiful. Not only is that a big bunch of crap, but those attitudes have created a web of self-doubt and uncertainty in full-figured women that prevents us from self-love and appreciation. As life has become as familiar with me as I have with it, I have learned to accept who I am and love the idea that I am not a stick figure. I love the fact that when I turn sideways to the mirror, I see curves instead of straight past my own body. I have grown to appreciate the fact that my hips dance when I walk. I have learned to accept that I can’t go into a store and buy off the rack without taking a moment to try on the items. I’m cool with that, now. For most of my life, I was embarrassed at my mirror’s reflection; I believed that I should be ashamed of myself for looking the way I looked. I did not feel beautiful, and that lead to self-doubt, selfpity and self-hatred. Then I began to be angry and scornful. Today, though, no one dictates my beauty or my worth. Only I can do that. My husband, as much as his opinion matters to me, couldn’t convince me that I am not a stunning piece of work. I refuse to allow any man, woman or magazine tell me that because I happen to be shopping in a part of the store hugely labeled “Plus

Size” that I am not fit to adorn their covers or be featured on their runways or in their fashion magazines. I will also not allow my sisters who have been plagued by this same daunting attitude to be swayed into this mindset either. So, I’ve gathered some of my friends, and we’ve formed a full-framed power movement: Thick And Proud Sisters. We have come together to destroy the idea of beauty that society has imposed upon us. We have decided that this is an epidemic that has gone on long enough. It has ruined our relationships because we don’t have the self-esteem to trust. It has conflicted with our career paths because we are not confident enough in our abilities to rise to challenges. It has torn apart friendships and sisterhoods because we are insecure and project that apprehension into our relationships with other women. It has dictated how we live our lives, and it must stop. We must take back our lives, create our own place in society and announce: “We are thick, and we are proud.” We must teach ourselves how to truly love who we are—which means learning how to treat our temples well. We must learn how to live healthy and encourage exercise—not as a punishment for failing to look like the stereotypical vision of perfection, but because we love ourselves enough to want to live full lives in healthy bodies. We want to do this because we have children and dreams. We have goals to accomplish. Along with all of that, we are simply tired of being relegated to one spot that fits the world’s opinions. From now on, we will create our own place by defining our own terms for beauty. We’ve allowed society to steal our joy, happiness and self-esteem for quite long enough. Now it’s time that we prove that just because our clothes are bigger than yours doesn’t mean that we are not still fly. We are still stylish. We are still intelligent. We are still powerful. We are still career oriented. We are still sexy. We are still strong. We are still women, and we are beautiful. Funmi “Queen” Franklin is a word lover, poet and advocate for sisterhood. Queen has a weakness for reality shows and her puppy, Shaka.

My husband couldn’t convince me that I am not a stunning piece of work.

jacksonfreepress.com

Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

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TRIP BURNS

NATURAL SUCCESS by Kathleen M. Mitchell

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t took a lot of closed doors for Amy Head to get where she is now. Her original plan was to become a doctor, she says, but that all fell apart. “You know how you’re going to grow up and do this, have your business plan and just follow it, and everything’s real neat and tied up in a box with a bow on it?” she says. ���Just the opposite of that. Everything unraveled. … I was lost, I didn’t know what I was going to do and had to sort of

AMY’S BEST TIP “The most consistent tip that is relevant to every single feature that you embellish with makeup is to sketch, to feather it on, as opposed to dragging your pencil, dragging your brush, dragging your sponge across the skin. If you pat and dab and sketch and feather, then you will be way more in control of the quality of the look. “For example with foundation, don’t rub it like it’s lotion, like something you’re trying to rub in, but feather it on—it takes 50 percent less. To apply some lipliner to make the lips look shaped and crisp against the face, the last thing you want to do is drag it across because it looks unnatural, unfashionable, versus that elusive edge.”

pull myself together.” Head began working jobs in retail, office jobs, waiting tables—just trying to figure out what was next—and eventually found her way into modeling. “That sort of got my mind thinking in this way, about the power of makeup,” she says. It was that power in the wrong hands that set her on the path to becoming the cosmetics company owner 51-year-old Head is today. “I had a hired makeup artist just wreak havoc on my face, and I said, ‘This won’t work, I’ll do it myself,’” she recalls. Head began to study the art of makeup and quickly established a reputation as a commercial makeup artist. She grew up painting and experimenting with color and fashion, so she found she had a knack for the job. “Just innately, I am talented with color, but I thought everyone was,” she says. After 15 years doing makeup and modeling, Head branched out, with her husband, Harold, and a laboratory—the same one that launched Bobbi Brown’s makeup line—to create her own distinct line of makeup products. That first launch, over 25 years ago, was small. “It was maybe eight eye shadows, four blushes and one formula foundation that I loved for all skin types, a powder… basics that I knew that I could use to make the face come alive for just about anyone,” Head says. Since then, the brand has expanded to include four different foundation formulas, three powder

formulas, 50 eye shadows, 50 lipsticks, cream liners, pencils, bronzers, highlighters, shimmers, glosses—you name it. The keyword for the Amy Head aesthetic is “natural.” Head believes makeup should make features appear more beautiful without calling attention to the makeup itself. “That was where my study began, and that’s what I still do today, and what I teach my girls, my staff to know how to do,” she says. “Like make the eyes appear bigger, but you can’t tell what happened; make the skin appear more radiant, but not know what was done to do it.” Head’s products reflect that mentality. “The most important thing is that it not just be easy for me to use, but that it be easy for the common person to use,” she says. She wants her colors to be “nameless” on the skin. A blush, for example, could have a little pink, a bit of coral and some slight brown shades in it. “You can’t really say what it is. That means it’s natural on the skin.” Around 11 years ago, Head went through perhaps the most career-shaping closed door of all. The brand was in talks with high-end department store Saks 5th Avenue to close a deal launching Amy Head cosmetics as an exclusive makeup line in its anchor store. In addition to her product and concept, Saks liked that Head was southern, that she could be photographed and worked well on-screen. But at the final meeting to close the deal, Saks refused to sign the non-compete agreement Head had sent to the

jacksonfreepress.com

At her flagship store in Ridgeland, Amy Head provides one-on-one makeup consultations.

MORE BEAUTY, SEE PAGE 18

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MORE BEAUTY, FROM PAGE 17

AMY HEAD

HAROLD HEAD

cer-free,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are a couple other chemicals that typically show up in nail polish (that) have been found to have toxicity associated with them. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re able to do it without that and have good coverage and staying power.â&#x20AC;? Even with the new line, Head says she is taking expansion a slow step at a time. As she continues into Amy Head has spent the her 50s, she says she canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t last 25 years bringing say where the company is out Mississippi womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s headed next, but she just natural beauty. wants to continue bringing out the best in women. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was never interested in going to L.A. or New York or being a part of the fashion industry with it.â&#x20AC;? Head says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was more just how to make you and me and the woman next door feel amazing. I find

FIND

TRIP BURNS

storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lawyers to get approved. The non-compete meant that Saks could not use Headâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s concept without her. When they wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sign, she walked away. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So we drove home saying, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do our idea ourselves,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what you get when you go into the Amy Head store, a version of what I was designing to be boutiqued out in the main Saks 5th Avenue stores, the way I train (the in-store makeup artists) and everything.â&#x20AC;? In addition to the flagship Amy Head store in Ridgeland, she also has stores in Birmingham, Ala., and Oxford. Amy Head products are also available in select cities across the state. Recently, Head also launched a secondary brand called Poppy by Amy Head. The first products in the line are 16 shades of nail polish. While the main Amy Head line is more about classic products that, once a client learns to use correctly, she will use daily, Poppy is more on-trend. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s geared toward college-aged and young women, who want products for a certain season or occasion. Still, Head ensured that the polishes fit with into the principles of the rest of her company. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Poppy is the latest branch of Headâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business, launching a proud of the formula. Its new line of nail polish. formaldehyde-free and can-

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AMY RECOMMENDS Foundation: â&#x20AC;&#x153; I wish I could broadcast the importance of foundation to everyone. There are so many bad experiences with foundation that it has given the good side of foundation a bad name. But everyone, every face, all eyes get prettier with a beautiful foundation. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no way you can do beautiful eye makeup without having that part done first. It all kind of comes together better. So Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a huge fan of foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but of course it has to be not too heavy or too dark, of course it has to be the right one.â&#x20AC;?

that, gosh, women just need to feel good. They need to feel a certain level of attractive and its not comparable to the magazines, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not to be judged, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just what they need for their own selves. I just love being able to help that.â&#x20AC;? "IRMINGHAM WK6WUHHW6RXWK6XLWH +RPHZRRG$/ 

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A BEAUTIFUL LEGACY by Tam Curley

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when we have documents to prove what happened. So much of our history has been destroyed, dismissed, or viewed as not important. I believe that when I can touch something that my grandparents touched, I am touching a piece of them. I am a writer and historian, and having records is really important when proving our contributions to others. Our history has often been erased or denied.

feel like, with natural hair, we are in a renaissance period with such amazing hair. DO YOU THINK HAIR IS WHAT MAKES A WOMAN BEAUTIFUL?

I think that hair that is groomed, clean and healthy is beautiful hair to me. We all feel better if our hair looks the COURTESY A’LELIA BUNDLES

’Lelia Bundles truly has a beautiful heritage. Bundles is president of Madam Walker/A’Lelia Walker Family Archives and author of “On Her Own ground: The life and times of Madam C.J. Walker” (Scribner, 2002 reprint, $17.99). She is the greatgreat granddaughter of the late Madam C.J. Walker (born Sarah Breedlove). Walker was a businesswoman who created an ointment for the dry scalp condition that caused her to bald. Rumors swirl that she also invented the pressing/hot comb and chemical relaxers, but those are just myths. What is true is that many consider Walker to be the first self-made female African American millionaire, paving the way for many more women of all races today. It’s true that she overcame the odds to success in a time when that seemed near impossible. A’Lelia continues to grow her greatgrandmother’s legacy. WHAT DOES HEALTH AND BEAUTY MEAN TO YOU?

HOW ARE YOU ABLE TO DELIVER THE STORY ABOUT YOUR GREAT-GREAT GRANDMOTHER?

Madam C.J. Walker’s story has so many different dimensions. I talk to schools including college and elementary, and I talk to businesses about my grandmother’s personal transformations, how she was inspired by trying to deal with her own problem. She helped others by employing over thousands of people. If people have a problem, they have to start by trying to solve that problem. Someone who has a better idea about anything should focus on how to take it to the next level. WHAT IS YOUR PURPOSE AT THE WALKER FAMILY ARCHIVES?

First of all, it is not a foundation; it is a collection of photos, clothing and personal artifacts so that I can share information about my great-great grandmother with scholars. It’s a way to preserve documented evidence of African American lives. I feel that people will believe in our history

A’Lelia Bundles, left, brings the story of her great-grandmother Madame C.J. Walker to a new generation.

HOW DOYOU FEEL ABOUTTHE STATUS OF AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN?

We are in an amazing era of time. African American women are running major corporations, they are presidents of those corporations, they are scientists, and they have made a lot of accomplishments. Many African American women struggle and are having a hard time raising their family. Some do not have good job opportunities or can’t help their children receive a good public education. There has always been a spirit in our community to give the gift of blessing and helping others. Madam C.J. Walker was a single mother; she was abused. She was able to get help from her church who reached out to her and helped educate her children. ARE YOU NATURAL?

Right now I am natural. I have been natural most of my adult life, which is about 40 years. I have worn my hair short for 20 years, but decided about two years ago to let my hair grow longer. I guess it’s a phase I am going through. I want to see what happens if I let my hair grow out. I have more gray now and want to see what it looks like longer. I admire women who spend time on making their hair beautiful. There is a huge difference with young women who go natural—they have a wide variety of styles like locks and crowns—I see so many amazing styles on young women. I

way we want it to look. There are different styles for different women with varying lifestyles. Women who go to the gym and sweat a lot may find that wearing micro-braids is best for them. The two most important things in my opinion is clean and healthy hair. DO YOU FEEL THE MEDIA OR PROPAGANDA HAS A LOT TO DO WITH HOW MUCH MONEY AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN SPEND ONTHEIR HAIR?

Advertisement companies and the consumer industry have products to sell. We are a consumer-oriented country. We are all vulnerable and susceptible to that. When mothers comb their daughter’s hair everyday, they are giving them a message about their hair. We have a responsibility to think about what images we share with others. WHAT DO YOU WANT YOUNG, AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMENTO KNOW ABOUT BLACK CULTURE?YOU?

As African-Americans, we have been involved in helping to build this country. We built the capital, worked in factories, and invented great things. We have contributed to the success of America, and no one can take those contributions away. I am a writer who loves sharing Madam C.J. Walker’s story. I will be working on a biography about her and her daughter’s life in Harlem in the 1920s. 19 Read more: madamcjwalker.com.

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Health and beauty go hand and hand. It’s about taking care of your mental health as much as your physical health. You have to eat right and exercise. I know this is so cliché, but ‘beauty is in the eye of the beholder.’ Women all around the world can be so unrealistic when it comes to beauty, but it is much easier to embrace natural beauty. Taking care of self takes time, and there are no shortcuts. I am 60 now, and have gone through all sorts of styles: chemicals, straight, long, and short hair. One must become familiar with their natural hair. There is a real beauty to one’s natural hair. I like the texture of my natural hair. I think it’s healthy to know what your natural texture is. I am not a fan of weaves. Weaves can get too out of hand. We have everyday lives—we are not Beyoncé—who has someone to do her hair every five minutes. We don’t live on a stage. We try to adopt unrealistic looks to obtain a certain standard of beauty. I watched “Good Hair” by Chris Rock, and it really bothered me to see women who spent hundreds of dollars on their weaves a month. They had a choice to pay bills or pay for their weaves, and they chose to not pay a bill so that they could pay for their weaves. I feel that if you can afford to spend that kind of money on weaves, then you should be able to invest in a few stocks or start a savings for your child’s future. I am not the hair police. I do believe we should have fun with styles.


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nless youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been living under a rock lately, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve probably noticed that fingernails garner a lot of attention these days. From Olympic coverage taking note of the female swimmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; patriotic polish to a social media frenzy over Michelle Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shade of gray during the Democratic National Convention to E! Entertainment Televisionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mani-Camâ&#x20AC;? on the Emmys red carpet, nails are experiencing a major moment in the spotlight. And why shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t they? Polish is a fun way to have fun with a pop of color without breaking the bank or making a major commitment the way, say, chopping off your hair would. With all this focus on the fingers, there are plenty of new trends and techniques popping up, allowing you to easily take your manicure to the next level. One easy update is to file your nails differently. Instead of a rounded oval, try an edgier shape, like an pointed nails. Becky Mayoros of SMoak Salon in Fondren, advises that the current version is a medium-length oval with a point, not â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s long.â&#x20AC;? Popular with stars like Adele, Fergie, and Rhianna, this dramatic look is not for everyone; whether you think of them like finger stilettoes or claws, it can understandably be a bit intimidating for the faint of heart (or, perhaps, those who work with children). However, if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re brave enough, it can release your inner rock star (especially if you add a big cocktail ring or three) and elongate your hands. In terms of polish, long-lasting shellacs and gels (CND and OPI are among the most popular brands) are the latest breakthrough in technology. These gels are specially formulatedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;once painted on, they get hardened under a UV light. In addition to lasting for up to three weeks per application, shellacs are instantly dryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re able to immediately leave the salon without any fear of chipping or smudging. But thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more to these long-lasting manicures than a simple color: the new thing to incorporate into your gel manicure is an additive. Mayoros has started experimenting with clients interested in playing with these powdered colors. She advises that people in more

Ombre is everywhere, and this season the trend hits nails as well.

conservative work environments shy away from them, but with endless options and color combinations, looks ranging from subtle to extreme can satisfy just about anyone. After she paints and hardens a base coat color, Mayoros applies the fine powder additive on top with a brush. The additive changes the color of the base polishâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;for instance a purple base coat with a red additive layered on the top half of the nail bed creates a subtle ombre effect. Younger clients or those in more creative professions get more adventurous, pairing a silver basecoat with black additive for a punkier look, or silver and blue for a sleek modern effect. In addition to ombre, Mayoros can use different brushes to create designsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;lines, dots, or other shapes with a fine point brush, or a faded effect with a fan brush. A topcoat seals and hardens the additive. Shellac or gel manicures at local salons and spas range from $30-$55 and should be removed by a trained professional.

GRAY DAYS ARE COMING

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his season, â&#x20AC;&#x153;50 Shades of Greyâ&#x20AC;? isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just a terrible fan fic-turned-bestselling novel. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a theme in nail salons all over. Nearly every polish manufacturer has a new shade of gray or its hard-to-define cousin, â&#x20AC;&#x153;greigeâ&#x20AC;? (a combination of gray and beige) out this fall. Michelle Obama, ever the fashionable First Lady, was way ahead of the trend with her version, Artistic Nail Design polish in Vogue at the Democratic National Convention.

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â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

Gray Burgundy and wine Bronze Jade green

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Nudeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but unlike the pale skintones of the past, this fall's shades range from cream to chocolate. Orangey-red

COURTESY ARTISTIC NAIL DESIGN

November 7 - 13, 2012

HOT POLISH COLORS THIS FALL


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21


by Eddie Outlaw

T

November 7 - 13, 2012

he American Society of Plastic Surgeons reports men are increasingly seeking minimally invasive cosmetic procedures. In fact, Botox is up 8 percent from 2010, and injectable fillers are up are up 11 percent. “Many men are constantly looking at threats from the younger, more tech-savvy generation and they’re doing anything they can to make themselves more savvy: developing technical skill, dressing like them, trying to look younger.” according to Dr. Phil Haeck, ASPS president, as ABC reported in March. He says men are more comfortable with the idea of looking more youthful because of the popularity of reality shows and the normalization for cosmetic surgery for men. “Men are willing to try out skin care products and it’s not thought of as gay,” he adds. How thoroughly modern of you, Dr. Haeck. While the good doctor could have made the point with a bit more finesse, I do see his point. After all, straight men are no longer afraid to wear pink, pop the collar on their Izods, carry satchels and openly talk about the benefits of using sunscreen while golfing. Y’all have us gays to thank for that. Our work is never done though, as Ed Hardy still runs rampant in the suburbs. I’m nothing, if not generous and in the spirit of sharing, I’m now going to pull back the veil on modern skin care, in hopes that heterosexual men everywhere will take better care if their skin.

22

Sometime around 2007, Justin posed a question to me “Would you like some Botox?” He mentioned it casually, as if he’d offered to make me another drink or take over the wheel while I fished for a piece of gum. “Pardon?” I blurted, sprinting to a mirror. “I’m getting some; I think you should too,” he replied. Men are turning to injectables as they become savvy to cosmetic surgery. And that’s where it all began: this ongoing cycle of renovation to keep me looking somewhere around 37. Dr. Ferguson’s business partner, Diane Henson, an esDr. Mitzi Ferguson of Skin by MD in Highland Vil- thetician for almost 20 years, is skilled at putting out fires lage (4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 215, 601-212-0955) has and prescribing a maintenance program that has given me skillfully lifted my brow, calmed the crow’s feet and halted a youthful glow, despite my best efforts to drink and smoke the downward slide of my cheeks. Aside from the Botox my skin into something akin to Quentin Crisp’s. She credits injections, she’s also used Juvaderm to eliminate the tell-tale breakthroughs like refined acids, dermabrasion and the use of drooping under my eyes and filled out areas that become hol- vitamin C to repair damaged skin. I just call her my “Youth low with age. She’s plumped up my lips a bit, too. The only Fairy” and clock out while she works her sorcery. Diane often downside to all of this is, instead of the reoccurring nightmare takes a mother’s tone with me. If she’s not chiding me for of finding myself naked in the middle of the supermarket, I not coming in more often, she’s admonishing me for lack of often wake up dripping in sweat because I dreamed that I bit sunscreen while she zaps the latest sun spot. She is the closest my lip and the filler squirted out like a stream of silly string. thing I’ll ever have to a big sister. Some of you might be shocked but let me assure you, Listen, guys, these days you have no excuse to let yournone of this is as bizarre as it reads. I’m 41, and I’ve been wres- self—or your face—go. You only have one face. If for no tling with ear hair and papaw brows for years. Being popped other reason than to be more appealing to your significant in the face with needles is nothing compared to having your other, take care of it. There’s no reason to look like Walter nostrils waxed. Can I get an amen? Matthau. We have the technology. We can make you better.

COURTESY SXC.HC

NO EXCUSES, MEN


By Vets

For Vets

EAT FREE WITH

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Every Monday in November, prize-seeking pilgrims will play for a share of $6,250 in BonusPLAY! Top prize is $1,000! Alert the chatty colonists: registration starts at 3pm at the RUSH Rewards Club. Winners must be present at 8pm to claim their prize.

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Kim Goodson WEDNESDAY 11/7

Daine Edwards (Singer/Songwriter)

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Karaoke w/ Matt TUESDAY 11/13

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November 7 - 13, 2012

Wednesday: Roast Beef Thursday : Chicken Diane

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or Grilled Pork Chop Friday : Meatloaf or

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FILM p 26 | 8 DAYS p 28 | MUSIC p 31 | SPORTS p 33

Coming Home to Hope by Scott Prather

J

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY THE WEEKS

ust over 10 years ago, I walked up to the elevated stage der his own name (“Butcher’s Bird,” 2011), Ledford and shared efforts. The chart of local musicians in the JFP’s recent inside a youth-filled Assemblies of God church and company showcased new material. music issue (“A Family Affair”) confirms that what’s true for told the members of Fletcher, a now-defunct indie-rock The Weeks closed out the celebration with high-energy Esperanza is true for the greater Jackson community. Our band, that I wanted to sign them. Sign them to what? At and style, demonstrating, alongside Coppenbarger’s artistic artistic endeavors, like all higher human things, thrive most that point, Esperanza Plantation did not exist. What existed angst and Ledford’s soulful country-blues, the musical depth when we recognize our interdependence and use our gifts for was a longing for a flourishing artistic collective that was not and diversity that have always characterized Esperanza. As the nurturing of common goods. grounded in any economic reality. with Ledford, The Weeks stepped onto the Plantation after I In business terms, Esperanza is still a small venture, doAt the time, my band, Bellador, and our friends’ bands were linked together on a crappy free website, and I was buying records wholesale from Jade Tree and Sub Pop Records to sell at concerts. Not long after that first “signing,” newly licensed lawyer and exemplary Jacksonian Chaney Nichols came along and put flesh and blood to our dreams. Mutual musician-friends introduced Chaney to me at a wedding. Food was shared, and a few months later, a split 7-inch record was born. I’m not sure exactly when or if we ever officially handed the reins over to Chaney. The truth is that Esperanza was always a shared hope. Like any business venture, its realization as “Esperanza Plantation” depended entirely on the right person coming along—with passion, resources and clarity—at the right moment. I left Jackson in 2004, trading in my bass guitar for grad-school books. Recently, at Esperanza’s 10th anniversary show on Oct. 17, I caught a glimpse of what I’m now coming home to eight years later. Jesse Coppenbarger (El Obo) began his set with about 60 listeners gathered on the main floor space of Morningbell Records in Fondren. Coppenbarger performed two electric solo versions of tracks from “Oxford Basement CollecThe Weeks are just one of the popular bands represented by Esperanza Plantation. tion” before debuting new material—all wellcrafted tunes that, whether bluesy or grunge, provided rhythmic melodies that allowed his vocal and intel- left, so I was glad to be introduced to them as another pedal- ing well to survive in today’s competitive “post-apocalyptic lectual capacities to shine. Since his time as Fletcher’s front- to-the-metal rock band that can bring out the crowds. digital superhighway,” as Chaney recently put it. Our role is man, I’ve always known Jesse as a songwriter who is mature Throughout the night, more than 150 Jacksonians still to serve “as a springboard or avenue” that enables local beyond his years. With lyrics that more directly evoked life’s came to listen and party. Rumors have it that Esperanza’s artists we believe in to “do what they do” on a wider scale. enmeshment in the social and the political, this new material annual holiday showcase averages several hundred (so “If those artists are able to move on to bigger labels, misreaffirmed that truth. go ahead and mark your calendars for an extra-special sion accomplished,” Chaney says. “But those same artists will Tommy Bryan Ledford followed with full band and Dec. 22). That local indie and rock music can still attract always be a part of our family and will hopefully carry our fiddle, providing a foot-stomping display of vintage south- both kids and the older passersby—especially to newer mission statement (of hope) forward.” ern rock. Ledford, who happens to be Nichols’ brother-in- venues like Morningbell that are brave enough to open For me, returning home as Esperanza turned 10 law, is a clear aficionado of what he calls “electric catfish their doors in our digital age—is another indicator that the evoked past dreams that have been carried into the present music,” a heartfelt, down-in-the-dirt blend of folk, blues Jackson scene is alive and well. in new, exciting forms. The music of hope has always set and gospel. It’s a good sign for Esperanza and for our lager Esperanza has always been about family, mutual sup- Mississippi apart, and in at least one Jackson family, hope 25 music community that, after his first full-length album un- port and the promise of things to come emerging out of our still has a home.


6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING

Listings 11/9 – Skyfall

for Thur.

PG13

Flight

R

Man With The Iron Fists R 3-D Wreck It Ralph PG

Cloud Atlas Paranormal Activity 4

R R

Alex Cross PG13 Argo

R

Here Comes The Boom PG

Sinister

R

The Perks Of Being A Wallflower PG13 Taken 2

PG13

Pitch Perfect PG13 Hotel Transylvania (non 3-D) PG

Thursday 11/15 Twilight Saga Marathon (first 4 films) 11:00am PG13 Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Pt. 2 10:00pm PG13

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

November 7 - 13, 2012

Movieline: 355-9311

26

Landing a Miracle by Anita Modak-Truran

L

eaving the theater where I saw The investigation by the National “Flight,” I felt the way survivors of Transportation Safety Board reveals more plane crashes must feel when they are than mechanical failure. The toxicology transported from the site of carnage: report indicates that Whitaker was legally exhausted and relieved. Directed by Robert intoxicated at the time of the crash (three Zemeckis, this film simmers on the fate of times the legal limit) and was high on coCaptain Whip Whitaker (Denzel Washing- caine. The question is no longer a nagging ton), a commercial airline pilot who saves the lives of nearly all the passengers on what should have been a short and easy flight from Orlando to Atlanta. Bad weather, turbulence and equipment failure, however, lead Whitaker to crash land the plane in a field. Four passengers and two crew members die. One of the dead crew members is Whitaker’s girlfriend (Nadine Velazquez), with whom he had spent the night partying at the Oscar-winning actor Denzel Washington gives a stellar American Value Suites. performance as a man lost in denial in “Flight. Is Whitaker to blame? It starts as a pesky thought ricocheting around Whitaker’s mind. He represses it: “No one could thought. It’s on the table of possible causes. have landed the plane like I did,” he says. Is Whitaker to blame? Laid up in a hospital bed with a Charlie Anderson (Bruce Greenwood) banged-up leg and half his head ban- from the pilots’ union hires a smart defense daged, Whitaker watches the news cover- attorney named Hugh Lang (Don Cheadle) age through one blood-shot eye. He sees to handle Whitaker’s criminal negligence the cell-phone videos replayed for viewers case. Whitaker can’t quite wrap his head that show Whitaker flipping the plane around the fact that he could face life-imupside down to slow the gravitational pull prisonment for his actions. and then flipping it right side up to glide The plane crash is essentially the film’s the plane into a pasture where a small prologue; it’s certainly the visual high point. group of evangelists are holding a revival. The story is Whitaker’s personal nosedive The right wing clips a church steeple dur- into self-destruction. A recovering junkie ing the descent. The plane breaks up on (Kelly Reilly) tries to get Whitaker to adlanding. The fires are minimal because dress his addiction, but Whitaker is lost in a Whitaker dumped the fuel before the thick fog of denial. As internal and external crash. Experts opine that the landing was pressures mount, Whitaker’s image of connothing short of a miracle. The media fidence evaporates. hails Whitaker as a hero. This movie demonstrates what a film But Whitaker keeps silent. can give an audience that a book can’t: It’s The unspoken question, a bit more the glory of the performers—performers tangible as the investigation develops, bob- like Washington and Cheadle whose faces bles up again: Is Whitaker to blame? have been written on by time and skill, perDivorced and estranged from his ex- formers with rich voices who tell stories in a wife and son, Whitaker lives a care-free and blink of an eye. worry-free bachelor’s life with escalating alWashington’s performance takes its cohol and drug abuse. But he’s a high-func- own miraculous flight, soaring above everytioning alcoholic and cocaine addict; he’s thing else in the film. His noble face becomes solid under pressure and says all the right a mask of doubt and pain. Every expression things for the black box. is an emotional time bomb. His intelligence Harling Mays (John Goodman), and craft are subsumed in something raw, Whitaker’s drug dealer and only friend, powerful and transformative. We mourn pumps out the gloom from the hospital for Captain Whitaker because he is revealed room. Pulling open the curtains to show the to himself as less than he thought he was. crowds of people lined up outside, he says, He is the master of his fate. You won’t know “You’re a rock star.” whether to applaud or cry.

COURTESY PARAMOUNT PICTURES

Wreck It Ralph (non 3-D) PG

Fri. 11/15

DIVERSIONS | film


27

jacksonfreepress.com


WEDNESDAY 11/7

THURSDAY 11/8

Mistletoe Marketplace opens at 11 a.m. at the Trade Mart.

Pryor and the Tombstones perform at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall.

SATURDAY 11/10 The Veterans Day Parade is at 10 a.m. in downtown Jackson.

BEST BETS NOV. 7-14, 2012

JOAN MARCUS

The Harvest Festival continues at the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive) through Nov. 10. Open daily from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. $5, $4 seniors, $3 ages 5-18, $1 ages 3-4, children under 3 free; call 601-432-4500. … Mistletoe Marketplace kicks off at 11 a.m. at the Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.); runs through Nov. 10. Benefits the Junior League of Jackson. The JFP sponsors. $10, $20 three-day pass, $5 ages 6-12 and seniors; call 888-324-0027. … Will Morgan and Amanda Lyons talk about the World War II Dutch fliers during History Is Lunch at noon at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Free; call 601-576-6998. … The California Wine Dinner is at 6:30 p.m. at Anjou Restaurant (361 Township Ave., Ridgeland). RSVP. $70 plus tax and tip; call 601-707-0587.

Lukas Poost plays Shrek in “Shrek:The Musical” Nov. 12-13 at 8 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall.

THURSDAY 11/8

November 7 - 13, 2012

The opening reception for the VSA Mississippi Exhibit is from 5-7 p.m. at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Free; call 601-960-1557. … The High Note Jam with Time to Move is from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Watch the film “Cookie’s Fortune” at 7 p.m. Free admission; call 601-960-1515. … The “Control and Release” Art Show is from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Lisette’s Photography and Gallery (1800 N. State St.). Free; call 601-497-2899; email info@lisette.co. … The play “Southern Hospitality” is at 7:30 p.m. at Black Rose Theatre (103 Black St., Brandon); runs through Nov. 18. $15, $10 seniors and students; call 601-825-1293. … The play “Distracted” is at 7:30 p.m. at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.), in room 215; runs through Nov. 11. Contains adult language. $10, $5 for Millsaps students, staff and alumni; call 601-974-1422. … The Jackson Choral Society presents 28 “Mostly Mozart” at 7:30 p.m. at Broadmeadow United

HERMAN RODRIGUEZ

WEDNESDAY 11/7

Methodist Church (4419 Broadmeadow Drive). $10, $8 seniors and students; call 601-927-9604. … Pryor and the Tombstones perform at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall. $8 in advance, $10 at the door; call 601292-7121 or 800-745-3000. … BY LATASHA WILLIS Squat & Gobble is at 6 p.m. at Reservoir Pointe (140 Madison JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM Landing Circle, Ridgeland); includes a silent auction. Benefits FAX: 601-510-9019 domestic violence shelters. $40, DAILY UPDATES AT $70 couple, $5 raffle ticket; call JFPEVENTS.COM 601-955-1677.

EVENTS@

FRIDAY 11/9

The pop-up craft show 809 Handmade debuts with a preview party from 6-9 p.m. at Bottletree Studios (809 Adkins Blvd.); sale Nov. 10 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Items $100 or less; call 601-260-9423. … The play “Yesterday Was Five Minutes Ago” is at 7 p.m. at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.) in Rose McCoy Auditorium. $15$20; call 601-218-2479. … The Orchestras and Strings Concert is at 7:30 p.m. at Belhaven University Center for the Arts. Free; call 601-974-6494. … The “Recognize the Real” Tour with 7even Thirty, Kamikaze and 5th Child is at 9 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s Red Room. $7 advance, $10 at door; call 601-317-5444.

SATURDAY 11/10

The Olde Towne Holiday Market is from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at Jefferson Street, Clinton. Free; call 601-924-5472. … The Veterans Day Parade is at 10 a.m. in downtown Jackson. Free; call 601-979-1365. … The Magnolia Ballroom Dancers’ Association’s monthly dance is from 8-11 p.m. at Madison Square Center for the Arts (2103 Main St., Madison). $15, $10 members; call 601-506-4591. … The Jackson Comedy Festival with D.L. Hughley, Dominique, Eddie Griffin and Earthquake is at 8 p.m. at Jackson Convention Complex. $37.50-$45.50; call 800-745-3000.

SUNDAY 11/11

Salsa Mississippi’s Dance for Mountain Child is from 5-10 p.m. at Duling Hall. Benefits Mountain Child, a nonprofit that helps needy Himalayan children. $25 advance, $30 at door; call 601-213-6355. … Actor and playwright John Maxwell presents “The Prodigal” at 5:30 p.m. at Northminster Baptist Church (3955 Ridgewood Road). Free; call 601-982-4703.

Eddie Griffin performs at the Jackson Comedy Festival Nov. 10 at 8 p.m. at the Jackson Convention Complex.

MONDAY 11/12

The DFM Invitational is at 1 p.m. at Annandale Golf Club (419 Annandale Parkway, Madison). Benefits the Diabetes Foundation of Mississippi. Fees vary; call 601957-7878. … The JFP-sponsored Conversation About Community is at noon at the Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). Benefits Operation Shoestring. RSVP. $50; call 601-353-6336. … “Shrek the Musical” is at 8 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall; encore Nov. 13. $25-$62.50; call 800-745-3000.

TUESDAY 11/13

The Jackson Touchdown Club Meeting with New Orleans Saints radio announcer Jim Henderson is at 6 p.m. at River Hills Club (3600 Ridgewood Road). $30 non-members; call 601-506-3186. … The program “One Writer’s Garden: New Perspectives from the Authors” is at 7 p.m. at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). $10, $5 students; call 601-974-1130.

WEDNESDAY 11/ 14

Singer-songwriter A.J. Croce performs at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall. Cocktails at 6 p.m. For ages 18 and up. $15 advance, $20 at door; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000. More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.


*&0 30/.3/2%$%6%.43 Jackson 2000 Friendship Honoree Nomination. Jackson 2000 seeks nominees who have promoted racial harmony in the community to recognize at the 2013 Friendship Ball. Submit nominations by Nov. 19. Email bevelyn_branch@att.net to request a nomination form.

(/,)$!9 Holiday Happening Nov. 11, 2-5 p.m., in downtown Clinton. Participating businesses hold open houses for the holidays. The Clinton Chamber of Commerce and Main Street Clinton are the sponsors. Free; call 601-924-5472.

#/--5.)49 Events at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.). â&#x20AC;˘ Veterans Awareness Day Nov. 8, 1 p.m. The discussion on education benefits, academic degree plans and government agency assistance is until 2:30 p.m. in the Reddix Building. The VA Medical Center Outreach Mobile Van Unit is at Gibbs-Green Plaza until 6 p.m. for VA benefit assistance. Free; call 601-979-1365. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Perspectives of Empowerment: How Graphic Design Affects Black Americaâ&#x20AC;? Nov. 14, 2 p.m., in the Dollye M.E. Robinson Liberal Arts Building, room 166/266. Graphic design professor and JFP pioneer Jimmy Mumford is the speaker. He is this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Humanities Teacher Award recipient. Free; call 601-979-7040. Events at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shakespeare and Immigrationâ&#x20AC;? Nov. 8, 4 p.m., at Ford Academic Complex, room 215. The speaker is Eric Griffin, Millsaps English department chair and Humanities Teacher of the Year. Free; email griffej2@ millsaps.edu. â&#x20AC;˘ Millsaps Friday Forum: Visiting Artist Gallery Talk Nov. 9, 12:30 p.m., at Ford Academic Complex. The speaker is printmaker and Minnesota State University professor Jonathan

McFadden. His works is on display on campus at Lewis Art Gallery. Free; call 601-974-1305. â&#x20AC;˘ Neuroscience Lecture Nov. 7, 7 p.m., in Olin Hall, room 100. UMMCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dr. Kimberly L. Simpson speaks on the topic â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Pervasive Effects of Neurotransmitter Manipulation on Brain Development.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601-974-1755. Diva Night Nov. 7, 7 p.m., at Fleet Feet Sports (Trace Station, 500 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland). The event includes bra fittings, refreshments, music from Kolbe Alsobrooks and door prizes. Make a purchase and receive a gift. Space limited; RSVP. Free; call 601-899-9696. The Zinghoppers Nov. 8, 9 a.m., at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). The group does educational hip-hop for young children. Also meet MPBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ed Said. Superhero costumes welcome. $4.50; call 800-970-0563. Quality Customer Service Nov. 8, 1-3 p.m., at Mississippi e-Center at Jackson State University (1230 Raymond Road). Learn how to maintain good customer relations in the business world. Registration required; seating limited. Free; call 601-979-2795; mssbdc.org. Evening for Educators Nov. 8, 5:30-7 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Teachers tour exhibitions, meet museum staff, learn about school programs, and enjoy music in the Art Garden. Free; call 601-960-1515. Precinct 2 COPS Meeting Nov. 8, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 2 (711 W. Capitol St.). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues. Free; call 601-960-0002. Robert Clark Symposium Nov. 8, 6:30 p.m., at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), in the College of Science, Engineering, and Technology Auditorium. Speakers include civil rights activist Charles Evers and Oleta Garrett Fitzgerald, director of the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Defense Fund. Free; call 601-979-2055. Musical Miles 5K Nov. 10, 8 a.m., at Madison Central High School (1417 Highland Colony more EVENTS, page 30

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29


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Parkway, Madison). Check in by 7:30 a.m. The run, walk and one-mile fun run is a fundraiser for the Madison Central High School Choral Department; awards given. Register by Nov. 8. $25 run/walk, $10 fun run, $75 family or team (3-10 people); call 601-853-2047; active.com. ’Sader Run Nov. 10, 8 a.m., at Hinds Community College, Rankin Campus (3805 Highway 80 E., Pearl). The race is a fundraiser for Park Place Christian Academy. $20 walk/run, $10 fun run; call 601-939-6229. Basic Computer Fundamentals: Level 3 Nov. 10, 9 a.m.-noon, at Tulane University (2115 Main St., Madison). Learn to use Microsoft PowerPoint, email attachments and cloud storage. Pre-registration required. $10; call 601-605-0007. BSidesJackson 2012 Nov. 10, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). The conference is for those who work in information, cyber security or physical security. Free tickets; email bsidesjackson@gmail.com. Critters and Crawlers Nov. 10, 10 a.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). The program is for toddlers ages 2-3 and their caregivers. Prices vary; call 601-352-2580, ext. 241. Princess Fiona Visits MCM Nov. 10, 10 a.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive) Princess Fiona from “Shrek: The Musical” shares ogre tales. $8, children 12 months and under free; call 601-981-5469. Living Food Potluck Nov. 10, 1-2 p.m., at the office of Dr. Leo Huddleston (6500 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland). Brong a dish or a $10 donation; call 601-956-0010. Camp Kandu Nov. 10-11, at Twin Lakes Camp and Conference Center (155 Milner Road, Florence). The Diabetes Foundation of Mississippi hosts the camp for children with diabetes and their families. Free; call 877-DFM-CURE. 9 Lives for $9 Cat Adoption Promotion Nov. 10-18, at Community Animal Rescue and Adoption (CARA) (960 N. Flag Chapel Road). Adopt cats ages nine months and older. $9 per cat (regularly $75); call 601-842-4404. Veterans Day in Vicksburg: Honoring All Who Serve Nov. 11-12, at Vicksburg Convention Center (1600 Mulberry St., Vicksburg). The memorial service is Nov. 11 at 11 a.m. at the Municipal Rose Garden on Monroe Street. Nov. 12 from 10 a.m.-3 p.m., activities include a parade, a military display, information booths, etc.. Veterans must RSVP for lunch. Free; call 601-630-2929. Veterans Day Tribute and Sculpture Dedication Nov. 11, 2 p.m., at Clinton Visitor Center (1300 Pinehaven Road, Clinton). The program includes a dedication of Dr. Sam Gore’s “Fallen Comrade” sculpture. Free; call 601-924-5472. Dutch Fliers Commemoration Ceremony Nov. 12, 2 p.m., at Cedar Lawn Cemetery (2434 W. Capitol St.). World War II veterans and families welcome. Free; call 601-576-6850.

November 7 - 13, 2012

Mayor’s Ward 5 Community Meeting Nov. 13, 6 p.m., at Southside Assembly of God (665 Raymond Road). Address concerns, and receive information on city services. Free; call 601-960-1084.

30

W.I.N.E. (Women Inquiring, Networking and Engaging) Meeting Nov. 13, 6:30 p.m., at Wright Salon (135 Grand Ave.). Marianne Hill of the Institutions of Higher Learning is the speaker. RSVP. Free; email winejackson@gmail.com. Sell Yourself: The Basics of Identity and Selfpromotion Nov. 13, 6:30 p.m., at Lisette’s Photography and Gallery (1800 N. State St.). Rebecca White of So White Design and Illustration is the instructor. Free; call 901-496-1035.

Farm to Institution Conference Nov. 14, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., at Hinds Community College, Rankin, Campus (515 Country Place Parkway, Pearl), at the Clyde Muse Center. The conference includes presentations, a training session for growers and a networking session. Registration required. $25, $15 members, $5 school officials and farmers; call 617-710-4217.

&!-),9 Family Slumber Safari Nov. 9, 7 p.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Families enjoy an overnight stay, a zoo hike and a continental breakfast. For ages 7 and up. $35, $30 members; call 601-352-2580, ext. 241.

34!'%!.$3#2%%. “A Christmas Memory” Dog Auditions Nov. 8, 4:30 p.m., at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). The theater is looking for a small-to-medium terrier-type dog to play “Queenie.” Dog must follow basic commands and have a good disposition. Production dates are Nov. 29-Dec. 16. Leash required. Free; call 601-948-3533, ext. 224.

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Applause! Writing Series Nov. 8, 1 p.m., at Eudora Welty Library (300 N. State St.). In the Ellen Douglas Room. Speakers include Bridget Edwards of the Eudora Welty House, and author Carolyn J. Brown. Free; call 601-968-5820. Events at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Call 601366-7619. • “The Hunters: Brotherband Chronicles” Nov. 14, 4 p.m. John Flanagan signs books. $18.99 book. • Lemuria Story Time. Saturdays at 11 a.m., children enjoy a story and crafts. Free. Visiting Writers Series: Alan Shapiro Nov. 8, 7 p.m., at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.), in Leggett Center. Shapiro has published 10 poetry books. Free; call 601-974-1305.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Wine and Cooking School Nov. 7, 6 p.m., at Table 100 (100 Ridge Way, Flowood). This month’s class features three Rieslings and a Dornfelder, and how to make weiner schnitzel. RSVP. $39; call 601-420-4202.

%8()")43!.$/0%.).'3 “Mirrors of Clay” Gallery Talk Nov. 8, 6 p.m., at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), at the Dollye M.E. Robinson Liberal Arts Gallery. JSU art professor Yumi Park is the speaker. Free; call 601-979-2121. Open Studio Nov. 11, 1:30-4 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Learn about the creative process behind an artist or exhibit, and create art. Adults must accompany children. $5, members free; call 601-960-1515. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.


DIVERSIONS | music

POWER TO THE PEOPLE

Passion Pit’s New Approach

This week, we saw democracy in action once again. If you’re still in the political mood, here are some songs to listen to. Hear the playlist at jfp.ms/powerplaylist.

P

“I needed to talk about personal things on this record; I needed to do it in a way that was interesting and I wanted to do it in a way that would excite the listener with different sounds and different worlds and different movements. It moves like an opera,” Angelakos to NME magazine.

Electro-pop group Passion Pit’s newest album addresses some heavy themes:“It’s more in-depth, and there’s a lot going on.”

“It’s more in-depth, and there’s a lot more going on. With instrumentation is more broad, from electronic instruments to acoustic instruments. There are string players and horn players and all that. It’s just a little more well done and mature. There’s definitely an older person that wrote it compared to the old record,” Donmoyer to the Jackson Free Press.

natalie’s notes

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COURTESY RCA RECORDS

“It’s autobiographical for Mike. … It’s just an experience that he was going through during the last record’s tour and the beginning of this album. There’s some pretty dark stuff in there. “Take a Walk” is in the eyes of his grandfather and his father going through economic adversity,” Passion Pit drummer Nate Donmoyer to the Jackson Free Press.

JASON NOCITO/COURTESY COLUMBIA RECORDS

assion Pit’s latest album, “Gossamer,” finds lead singer Michael Angelakos coming out of a tough spot. Shortly before the release of 2009’s “Manners” Angelakos checked into a hospital to deal with his mental instability. This year, the band cancelled several tour dates so that he could continue to improve his mental health. “Gossamer,” which came out this summer, reflects some of this while still being positive. Although the music sounds just as upbeat, it isn’t all rose petals. Angelakos abandons the high-pitched falsetto that Passion Pit has become known for during the majority of most of the songs for a more realistic tone. This newer approach, coupled with lyrics about greedy love and mature problems such as financial issues, makes for a generally ripe album. Passion Pit on the new album:

COURTESY EPIC RECORDS

by Briana Robinson

by Natalie Long

The Daytripper ever, and since it is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. seven days a week, I knew I had to drop by for lunch. Please stop by next time you’re in the area. Owner Arthur Davis even COURTESY THE FLYING CHAIR

T.B. Ledford’s album “Butcher Bird” (album art by The Flying Chair) proved to be the perfect soundtrack to a day trip.

sang to the patrons his song, “My Mama Was The Cornbread Cooking Queen.” And yes, the chicken as well as the peach cobbler are the best. Ever. After lunch, I decided to visit the Ruins of Windsor, and though Jackson artist and former Kudzu King member T.B. Ledford’s album “Butcher Bird” would be the perfect soundtrack as I ventured what seemed for miles down gravel and paved roads until I reached the Ruins of Wind-

sor (15095 Rodney Road, Port Gibson). Admiring the ruins while Ledford’s “The Judge’s Daughter” and “Cold Red Clay” blared from my Civic made me appreciate a part of our state’s history, as well as Ledford’s songwriting. I then decided to visit the ghost town of Rodney. I found the easiest way to get to Rodney was to go through the campus of Alcorn State University (1000 ASU Drive, Alcorn State) It’s weird that at the very back of the gorgeous campus, there’s a gravel backroad right behind student housing. As I drove through what looked like a tunnel, with the high, red clay bluffs and moss hanging from the trees, I found it only appropriate that my super shuffle started playing “Car Wheels Down a Gravel Road” by Lucinda Williams, followed by “Country Roads Take Me Home” by John Denver. As I entered the town of Rodney, I found it eerie, yet peaceful, quiet around this ghost town. Seeing the cannonball at the Rodney Presbyterian Church, and seeing it while Neil Young’s “Powderfinger” played even made the experience better. As I found my way back to ASU, I hit the Natchez Trace, jamming out “Sunspot Baby” by Bob Seger, then found the show

Acoustic Café, which introduced me to singer/songwriter Joseph Arthur. His song “Good About Me” was fitting I was off to visit another ghost town, Rocky Springs (Highway 27 or Utica-Regantown Road Trailhead (Milepost 59)). Driving through this once-thriving river town was very serene and peaceful, and playing Neil Young’s album “Everybody Knows This Was Nowhere” was the perfect soundtrack to take in the beauty of the Rocky Springs, as well as my trip headed back to Jackson going down the Natchez Trace. And to my great surprise, I found one of my all-time favorite CD’s “Six Points By The Valley” by one of Mississippi’s own Law of Nature. I loved them while attending MSU, and I turned it up and sang along as I made my way into the city limits of Jackson. My daytripping experience was awesome, and it cost me nearly nothing. Grab up your favorite tunes, gas up the car and get out and explore this great state. Something about the music playing that day and getting to sight-see right by myself totally recalibrated my soul and my attitude, which needed a tune up. And next time you feel like take a little road trip, I’ll be more than happy to be 31 along for the ride.

jacksonfreepress.copm

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his weekend, on a beautiful fall day, I decided at a moment’s notice to get in the car and go for a little road trip. Looking at my bleak checking account, I knew I would have to venture out to find things off the beaten path and explore all the hidden treasures our state takes pride in, but they would have to be in this poor teacher’s budget. I also was thankful I had placed a box of CDs in my car the night before, so I set out with meager change and my music box. As I traveled down Highway 18 headed toward the small, yet cute, towns of Raymond and Utica, the musical stylings of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers Live Anthology blared. I took in the beautiful scenes of neatly rolled haybales, the foliage of the trees, and sprawling green fields. I couldn’t think of a better album to listen to, and as I entered the city of Port Gibson and traveled onto Highway 61, as I took in the beautiful homes and centuries-old buildings that make Port Gibson absolutely precious, Petty’s “Have Love Will Travel” played. I have heard from friends and family members that The Old Country Store in Lorman (18801 Highway 61 S., Lorman 601-437-3661) had the best fried chicken


MUSIC | live

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New Blue Plate Special

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music nov 7 - 13

Gypsy Riot Friday, November 9 & Saturday, November 10

wed | november 7 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30-9:30p thu | november 8 Aaron Coker 5:30-9:30p fri | november 9 Jason Miller Unplugged 6:30-10:30p sat | november 10 Lucky Hand Blues Band 6:30-10:30p sun | november 11 Bradley Owen 4:00 - 8:00p mon | november 12 Karaoke tue | november 13 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30-9:30p

1060
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Ridgeland Open
Sun‐Thurs
11am‐10pm Fri‐Sat
11am‐Midnight
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601‐899‐0038

./6 4(523$!9

- Thursday Night: Ladies Night

with DJ Reign -Karaoke with Matt (Wed - Sat) 824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com • 601.487.8710

Wednesday - November 7 KARAOKE CONTEST 9:00pm - 2:00 am

Thursday - November 8

LADIES NIGHT with Snazz

Friday - November 9

Rowdy South Saturday - November 10

Rowdy South Sunday - November 11

November 7 - 13, 2012

9 Ball Tournament 7pm

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Monday - November 12 Monday Night Football $1.50 Mugs & 2-for-1 Domestics During the Game

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

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DIVERSIONS | jfp sports

the best in sports over the next seven days

SLATE

(Mostly) Blowouts and Letdowns

The football season is starting to slowly come to a close. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry; the NBA season has already started, and college basketball is coming.

by Bryan Flynn

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JFP Top 25: Week 11

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THURSDAY, NOV 8 College football (6:30-10 p.m. ESPN): Florida State hopes to keep its slim title chance alive against Virginia Tech. â&#x20AC;Ś NFL (7:20-11 p.m. NFL Network): See the No. 1 pick in last Aprilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s draft as Andrew Luck and the Indianapolis Colts face the Jacksonville Jaguars. FRIDAY, NOV 9 College football (7-10 p.m. ESPN 2): Go to bed early, or watch the Big East showdown between two teams looking to keep their bowl hopes alive as Pittsburgh travels to Connecticut. SATURDAY, NOV 10 College football (6-9 p.m. ESPN): Mississippi State looks to break a two-game losing streak against an angry LSU. â&#x20AC;Ś (6-9 p.m. ESPN U): Ole Miss gets possibly its last shot against Vanderbilt. SUNDAY, NOV. 11 NFL (12-3 p.m. Fox): The New Orleans Saints get a shot to end NFC South division rivals Atlanta Falconsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; undefeated season and possibly keep their slim playoff hopes alive. MONDAY, NOV. 12 NFL (7:30-11 p.m. ESPN): Kansas City brings its turnover machine to the Steel City against a team that knows how to force plenty of them, the Pittsburgh Steelers. TUESDAY, NOV. 13 College basketball (midnight-11 p.m. ESPN): 24 straight hours of hoops is highlighted by Michigan State against Kansas and Duke versus Kentucky. WEDNESDAY, NOV. 14 College football (8-11 p.m. ESPN 2 or ESPN U): Northern Illinois and Toledo meet in a game that could determine the winner of the West Division. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m still trying to decide which would be a better game. Notre Dame against Alabama or Oregon versus the Tide ... Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports         

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       15 

jacksonfreepress.com

bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rant

10-7 very late in the second quarter. Has there ever been a bigger non-scandal Georgia quarterback Aaron Murray fall from graceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from conference chamtook a snap right before pions to conference half and scrambled in chumpsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;like there has the pocket before findbeen at the University ing Tavarres King for of Southern Mississippi a 40-yard touchdown this season? to give the Bulldogs a JSU (5-4) wasted 14-10 halftime lead. The little time beating up on Rebels never seemed to SWAC rival Grambling recover after giving up State. JSU jumped out the late touchdown. Ole to a 32-3 halftime lead Miss fell 37-10 as the and never looked back. Georgia defense clamped Jackson State is a down the Rebels offense game away from first in the second half. place in the SWAC If you went outside Jackson State is one game out of East after its 53-17 around 9 p.m. Satur- first place in the SWAC East after win over Grambling day and listened closely, its win this week. State. Jackson State is you could hear a loud on track to play in the hacking sound. That sound was coming conference championship game after startfrom Hattiesburg as Southern Miss (0-9) ing 2-4 halfway through the season. coughed up a 16-0 halftime lead to UAB. Mississippi Valley State (3-6) took AlIt looked like the night had finally come corn State (3-6) behind the woodshed this for the Golden Eagles to get their first win weekend. The Delta Devils broke their five this season, but USM only managed a field game losing streak to with a 33-9 win. goal in the second half while the Blazers outMSVU has been very competitive this scored them 27-3 in final half for a 27-19 win. season, even though it has not shown up always in the win column. Alcorn struggled at times but seems to be on the right track. A tough season in Cleveland got tougher on Saturday for Delta State (3-6) after a 33-18 loss to the University of Indianapolis. The Statesmen are on a three game losing  ,WPDNHVVHQVHIRUDPDQWRZDQWWREHQHDUKLV streak with one more game left this season. FKLOGUHQ HVSHFLDOO\ ZLWK WKH GHPDQGV RI EHLQJ DQ 1)/KHDGFRDFKRQKLVWLPH$Q\FKDQFHWREHFORVH Millsaps (7-2) got back to winning this WRKLVNLGVZLWKDOLWWOHGRZQWLPHGXULQJWKHVHDVRQ week after holding on at home for a 36-34 KDVWREHRQ3D\WRQÂśVPLQG win over Austin College. The Majors can fin ,KDYHWRZRQGHULI3D\WRQZRXOGZDQWWROHDYH 1HZ2UOHDQVDQ\ZD\DIWHUEHLQJVXVSHQGHGIRUWKH ish undefeated in conference play with a win HQWLUHVHDVRQIRUERXQW\JDWH,ZRXOGWKLQN3D\WRQ this Saturday over Birmingham-Southern. ZRXOGZDQWWRFRPHEDFNWR1HZ2UOHDQVDQGZLQD No one has closed the season better WLWOHQH[WVHDVRQMXVWWRWKURZLWLQWKH1)/ÂśVIDFH than Belhaven (6-4) this year. The Blazers  $ JX\ OLNH 3D\WRQ ZRXOG ZDQW WR UHWXUQ WR WKH 6DLQWVDQGSURYHWKDWZLWKKLPEDFNDWKHDGFRDFK started the season 2-4 but have won their last WKHWHDPFRXOGZLQZLWKRXWDQ\TXHVWLRQVRIERXQ four after their 24-14 win over University WLHVRQRSSRVLQJSOD\HUV,GRXEW3D\WRQZRXOGZDQW of Pikeville. A win in its final game of the WROHDYHDFLW\KHLVORYHGLQIRUEULQJD6XSHU%RZO WLWOHWRDORQJVXIIHULQJIUDQFKLVH season against Bethel University could result  7KHELJJHVWZLQQHUZLWKWKLVQHZVLV6HDQ3D\ in a playoff berth for Belhaven. No matter WRQ+HZLOOKDYHDOOWKHOHYHUDJHDJDLQVWWKH6DLQWV how the game end this Saturday, Blazers are IRUDQHZFRQWUDFWDQGZLOOJHWRIIHUVIURPDQ\WHDP assured a winning season in 2012. ZLWKDMRERSHQLQJDIWHUFRDFKHVJHWÂżUHGGXULQJWKLV VHDVRQDQGDIWHU Mississippi College (2-7) dropped its  , KDYH D IHHOLQJ WKDW 3D\WRQ ZLOO FRPH EDFN WR fi nal home game of the season in a 70-28 1HZ2UOHDQVDQGKHDQG%HQVRQZLOOUHDFKDGHDO rout to Louisiana College. The Choctaws %XWQHYHUXQGHUHVWLPDWHKRZPXFKVRPHRQHÂśVSHU VRQDOOLIHDIIHFWVKLVEXVLQHVVOLIH season will come to an end this Saturday against Mary Hardin-Baylor. COURTESY JACKSON STATE UNIVERSITY

I

t was a rough week for the three FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) college football teams in Mississippi. Two suffered blowout losses, and one had a massive second-half letdown. It was tough to watch all three games on Saturday because I want to see every Mississippi school do well and have great seasons. I wonder if A&M alum Todd Stauffer was doing a happy dance in a room by himself somewhere Saturday afternoon unseen by Mississippi State grad Donna Ladd. Mississippi State (7-2) played its second ranked team in a row, hosting SEC newcomer Texas A&M at home. The Bulldogsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defense couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tackle, cover receivers or stop Johnny Football (aka Aggies quarterback Johnny Manziel). Texas A&M steamrolled to a 24-0 halftime lead and never looked back against MSU for a 38-13 win. The Aggies did whatever they wanted on offense for 693 yards with Manziel having 311 yards passing and adding 129 yards on the ground. Ole Miss (5-4) was looking for its sixth win to become bowl-eligible against Georgia between the hedges in Athens. The Rebels were looking good in the first half leading

by Bryan Flynn

33


LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

WEDNESDAY

11/07

LADIES NIGHT

1/2 OFF DRINKS FOR LADIES 5PM - UNTIL MUSIC STARTS AT 8PM

GIVEAWAYS FROM THE W BY AZWELL THURSDAY

11/08

THURSDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL & COLLEGE NIGHT 7PM - UNTIL • 9 FLAT SCREENS

$2.25 LONGNECKS • $3.25 WELL DRINKS Friday

11/09

9.99

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November 8

LADIES NIGHT

w/ DJ Stache LADIES DRINK FREE Friday November 9

Static Ensemble

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5 P.M. UNTIL! 30% OFF ALL DRINKS! “YOU TAKE CARE OF US, NOW LET US TAKE CARE OF YOU!” COME WATCH THE GAMES WITH US! SUNDAY TICKET, NFL NETWORK. MONDAY

11/12

MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL &

GUYS NIGHT COLLEGE NIGHT 7pm - until|

$2.25 longnecks $3.25 well drinks

OPEN MIC 10pm TUESDAY

11/13

November 7 - 13, 2012

34

Saturday

November 10

Private Tuesday

November 13

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Wednesday November 14 FREE WiFi Open Mon-Sat, Restaurant open Mon-Fri

11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

BILL & TEMPERANCE

(Bluegrass) 7-10, No Cover, Wine Specials All Night

Thursday, November 8th

GOLD MAGNOLIAS

(R&B) 7-10, No Cover

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BOOKER WALKER

(Blues/Jazz) 9-1, $10 Cover

Saturday, November 10th

EDEN BRENT

(Piano Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

MONDAY 11/12

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11/17: England in 1819 w Ice for Eagles - Patio 11/23: Molly Ringwalds - Big Room 11/27: Dylan LeBlanc - Red Room $8 Cover

2-for-1 Drafts

November 12

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SATURDAY 11/10 Peter Simon (Dining Room)

Blue Plate Lunch

Monday

KARAOKE w/ DJ STACHE

DOWNTOWN JACKSON

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Party

$1 PBR & HIGHLIFE $2 MARGARITAS 10 - 12pm Miller Lite Girls Giveaway at 7 214 S. STATE ST. • 601.354.9712

FRIDAY 11/09

11/28: The Intellectual Bulimics Comedy Show - Red Room

Open Mic w/ Jason Turner

SEE OUR NEW MENU WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

Jason Turner (Dining Room) PaperClip Scientists (Red Room)

Coming Soon

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KARAOKE

THURSDAY 11/08

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TUESDAY 11/13

11/10

The Electric Mudd

Sunday

WEDNESDAY 11/07

MS Blues Society’s Blue Mondays

Mike Dillion Band SATURDAY

THIS WEEK

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

JIMMY JARRETT

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MONDAY - FRIDAY

with corn bread and tea or coffee

$8

25

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily. Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

COMING SOON NOVEMBER 21, 2012

Bonfire Orchestra

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visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

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119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com


ORGANICS p 39 GIRL ABOUT TOWN p 40 ASTRO p 41

Chicken thighs with cauliflower puree and caramelized carrots is the ultimate fall comfort meal—warm and hearty, with big, earthy flavors.

Like Buttah

A COURTESY SPENCER NESSEL

Homemade compound butter, with herbs and spices, is an easy way to enhance almost any dish.

crispy skin for me, and the best way to do this is by making a compound butter to stuff underneath the skin.

2 sticks butter 1/8 cup rosemary leaves 1/4 cup fresh sage 1/8 cup fresh thyme 5 cloves garlic, minced 1-2 teaspoons lemon zest

There are a few different ways to make a compound butter, but I simply leave the butter out for 30 minutes to an hour until soft, and then scrape and mix all the ingredients together in a large bowl with a spatula or fork. You can also use a food processor or standing mixer to mix everything together.

Cauliflower Puree

by Spencer Nessel

utumn, to me, screams for comfort food and earthy, warm flavors. I turn away from lighter herbs such as tarragon and dill toward bolder, heartier herbs like sage and rosemary. It is the season that brings us a vast array of root vegetables and dark fruits. A juicy chicken thigh with crispy skin and warm root vegetables will always be my welcoming meal to fall. It’s all about the

Compound Butter

A compound butter is butter with herbs, spices and whatever you think is tasty. For fall, my compound butter consists of minced garlic, rosemary, sage, a touch of lemon zest, salt and pepper. The wonder of the compound butter when it is underneath the chicken skin is that it automatically bastes the chicken in the oven and turns the skin into a cracklin’. Not only is this butter the secret to a perfect chicken thigh, but it is also great in a pan to cook eggs, as a blob of it on top of a warm steak or spread on your toast in the morning—the possibilities are endless and delicious. My recipe has a lot of garlic and other big flavors, which are not for everyone, but you can make it your own with flavors that appeal to you. Think of it as a canvas for your own spice and herb combinations. To accompany the chicken thigh, I like a smooth cauliflower puree and glazed baby carrots. Nothing fancy or difficult to make, but the creamy element of the cauliflower and the sweet caremelization of the baby carrots will complement the chicken nicely and make for a balanced meal that has a richness to it that does not overwhelm the palate.

1 head cauliflower 1-1/5 cups whole milk ¼ cup any hard Italian cheese, such as Salt and pepper

Trim and cut the cauliflower into florets of similar size, and steam them with boiling salted water for about 15 minutes. If you decide to boil the cauliflower, be sure to throw them in the oven for a few minutes to dry them out afterward. Puree the cauliflower in batches with the milk. You can use heavy cream if you please, but for me it dilutes the flavors and makes it a touch too rich. Add the cheese, salt and pepper to taste. Simple, easy and it keeps in the fridge well.

To plate, spoon a dollop of the cauliflower puree across the plate, rest the chicken thigh on top of it and lean the carrots against the thigh. I also like to finish the dish with some toasted pine nuts to round it out. With the milky color of the puree, the brown of the chicken and the orange carrots, the plate will need some color to liven it up, so garnish with fresh thyme or

Chicken Thigh with Compound Butter 4 chicken thighs

The thigh is perfect because it’s a dark piece of meat, on the bone with rich flavors. Make sure you get your thigh on the bone with the skin on (boneless+skinless=less flavor). The key to a perfect thigh is crispy skin and a juicy interior. Take the thighs, and massage about half a tablespoon of compound butter underneath the skin of each. Be gentle so you do not take the skin off. Salt and pepper both sides of the thigh and place in an oven-proof dish or pan. Bake at 425 degrees for about 10 minutes and then lower the heat to 325 degrees for about 40 minutes. To ensure crispy skin, put the broiler on the chicken for just a minute.

Glazed Carrots 1 pound carrots 1/4 cup water 1 orange 1/4 cup agave nectar or honey 1/4 tsp allspice

Cut the carrots into smaller pieces—similar to the shape of a baby carrot. Trim, wash and dry the carrots. Then, combine the water, agave nectar, allspice and the juice and half the zest of the orange in a saucepan, and bring to a boil. Add the carrots, reduce the heat, and let them simmer. After 12 to 15 minutes, they should be properly glazed. Salt to taste.

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY SPENCER NESSEL

COURTESY SPENCER NESSEL

FLY DIY p 42

even some flat leaf parsley. Chicken with carrots and cauliflower is nothing fancy, but with some finesse and time it is easy to make these simple ingredients extraordi35 nary and flavorful.


DINEJackson Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE

Now Open on Saturdays • 11-2 during JSU home games

Go Tigers!

- also acceppting JSU Supercards-

In Town & in the USA -Best of Jackson 2003-2011-

-Food & Wine Magazine-

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm • Sun: 11am - 3pm

Where Raul Knows Everyone’s Name Raul Sierra Manager Since 1996

-Best Barbecue in Jackson- 2003 • 2006 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 1491 Canton Mart Rd. • Jackson • 601.956.7079

910 Lake Harbour Dr. Ridgeland, MS

November 7 - 13, 2012

601-956-2929

36

Now Open On Sundays Brunch 11:00 am - 2:00 pm Dinner 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Egg, benedict and omelet dishes, pancakes, waffles, specialties, burgers, salads and sandwiches. Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Frequent Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a buffet of great choices Lunch only. Mon-Fri, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) You won’t want to mix the large yellow house just off Metro Parkway. Koinonia’s expanded lunch menu includes pizza, sandwiches and soups.

BAKERY

Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events.

PIZZA

The Pizza Shack (925 E. Fortification 601-352-2001) The 2009-2012 winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. New locations in Belhaven and a second spot in Colonial Mart on Old Canton Rd. in Northeast Jackson. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Best Kid’s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2011 Best of Jackson. Plus, Pi(e) Lounge in front offers great drinks and a fun atmosphere for catching up with friends. Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza. Offering choices such as hummus, magic mushroom soup, wings, stuffed portobello, meatball hoagies, local brews and more!! Open Monday - Friday 11-10 and Saturday 11-11.

ITALIAN

BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes.

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING

Islander Seafood and Oyster House (601-366-5441) Seafood, po’boys and oyster house. Casual fine dining that’s family-friendly with a beach vibe. Great steaks, burgers, raw bar, yellowfin tuna and more! Maywood Mart. Crab’s (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crab’s Seafood Shack offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Full bar & TVs for all of your favorite sporting events. Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the “polished casual” dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino. The Penguin (1100 John R Lynch Street, 769.251.5222) Fine dining at its best. Located in the historic West Jackson, the Penguin features an extensive lunch and dinner menu along with live music Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights. Try the famous hot dog special which uses 1960’s Penguin’s original recipe.

SOUTH OF THE BORDER

Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Fresh guacamole at the table, fish tacos, empanada, smoked pork sholders, Mexican street corn—Jackson’s “Best Mexican” & “Best of Jackson 2012” magaritas. Jaco’s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. Tacos come with a side of butter-based mantequilla sauce for dipping. Enjoy the the patio and full bar. La Morena (6610 Old Canton Road Suite J, Ridgeland, 601-899-8821) Tortillas made fresh order. Authentic, Mexican Cuisine (not Tex-Mex). Mexican Cokes!


DINEJackson

Paid advertising section.

Fernando’s Fajita Factory (5647 Hwy 80 E in Pearl, 601-932-8728 and 149 Old Fannin Rd in Brandon, 601-992-6686) A culinary treat of traditional Mexican food using the best meats, vegetables and spices.

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK

Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or evenings with friends.

“HardLuck” Chuck Friday, November 9, 2012 9:00pm | Cover $5

BARBEQUE

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads, and their famous Hershey bar pie.

D’Lo Trio

Every Thursday • 6:30 pm

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson

COFFEE HOUSES

5A44 FX5X

Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

ASIAN AND INDIAN

Mr. Chen’s (5465 I 55 North, 601-978-1865) Fresh authentic Chinese Food, located within an actual grocery store with many unique produce offerings. Winner of 2011 and 2012 Best Chinese Food Category by the Jackson Free Press. Ruchi India (862 Avery Blvd @ County Line Rd. 601-991-3110) Classic Indian recipes, lost delicacies, alluring aromas and exotic ingredients. Fantastic Indian cuisine from multiple regions. Lamb, vegetarian, chicken, shrimp and more. Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and buildyour-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Thai House (1405 Old Square, 601-982-9991) Voted one of Jackson’s best Asian 2003-2012,offers a variety of freshly made springrolls, pad thai, moo satay, curry, cashew chicken, pork and vegetarian dishes.

VEGETARIAN

High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant adjacent to Rainbow Whole Foods.

CRAB CAKES No Filler

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

NEW MENU Happy Hour Wed - Fri 4 - 6pm

601-961-7001

318 South State Street | Jackson, MS | www.jacostacos.com

jacksonfreepress.com

Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2012! Check out their signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each day’s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Multiple Best of Jackson awards. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7p M-F. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, chili-rubbed filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order.

37


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LIFE&STYLE | organics

Organic Foodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nutrition Not Controversial by Jim PathFinder Ewing

American Cheese No Longer â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cheesyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; COURTESY CULICURIOUS

by Jim PathFinder Ewing

Cheese these days isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t what it used to be.

P

robably most Americans who grew up prior to the millennium consider American cheese to be synonymous with â&#x20AC;&#x153;cheesy,â&#x20AC;? or of little worth. They may think of â&#x20AC;&#x153;processed â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;cheeseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; product,â&#x20AC;? or individually wrapped slices of a yellowish substance masquerading as cheese. But, today, there are artisanal varieties of truly astounding American cheeses that measure up well against European offerings. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because there is a growing movement of artisanal cheesemakers who sell raw-milk cheeses. Most cheeses found in the grocery are extensively pasteurized; that kills germs, including â&#x20AC;&#x153;goodâ&#x20AC;? bacteria that make cheese healthful and flavorful. European cheeses are not commonly pasteurized. As the holiday season nears, our family enjoys raw milk cheeses. While only a few varieties are available locally (extensively aged), the Internet is ripe (excuse the pun!) with such cheeses. I prefer to order from artisanalcheese.com. Doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cheese have a lot of fat? Well, yes. But most

Saag Paneer

(curried greens with cheese) health professionals point out that the amount of fat in a food is not the sole determinant of whether one becomes fat; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the total intake of calories and the amount of calories expended through exercise. The Artisanal Cheese blog (News From the Cheese Caves, blog.artisanalcheese.com) gives a more complete picture. Fat curbs our appetites by triggering the release of cholecystokinin, a hormone that yields a feeling of satiety and is directly involved in the metabolysis of proteins and fats. Other hunger suppressors found in cheese include certain peptides and their amino acids. Many of the proteins, as well as many of the vitamins and minerals that cheese contain, all help to metabolize the foods we consume. Cheese is simply preserved milk; a near-complete food which (except for vitamin C and fiber) provides all the nutrients we require. If the Legislature would allow raw milk cheese production and sale, Mississippi could join this movement, too. Make Your Own Cheese Why not make your own cheese? And serve it over your own homegrown organic greens? While most the exquisite artisanal cheeses are the product of painstaking effort, you can make a simple cheese at home using even regular milk found at the grocery (if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fresh and not ultrapasturized). /NLINE!BOUT#HEESE +DQGPDGHFKHHVHPDNHUV YLGHR FKHHVHE\KDQGFRP &KHHVHEORJ :LVFRQVLQ FKHHVHXQGHUJURXQGEORJVSRWFRP 7KH$PHULFDQ&KHHVH6RFLHW\IRUDOOWKLQJVFKHHVHFKHHVHVRFLHW\RUJ &KHHVHEORJIRUWKHVHULRXVFDVHRSKLOHVWUDQVODWHGIURPWKH)UHQFK DERXWLQWHUQDWLRQDOFKHHVHFRPSHWLWLRQVHWFIURPDJLXPW\SHSDG FRPFDVHRSKLOH

Paneer (Simple Cheese)

6 cups milk 1 cup water Half cup vinegar

Heat milk gently to simmer, not boil. Add water to vinegar, then slowly pour it into the milk. When the milk curdles (separates) completely, stop pouring. Strain the curds in a mesh strainer lined with cheesecloth. Let it dry for 15-20 minutes.

Curried Greens

3 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium sweet onion 2-4 cloves fresh garlic, minced 1 tablespoon fresh grated ginger 1 tablespoon fresh grated turmeric (optional, can use 1/4 teaspoon dried) 2 tablespoons sliced almonds 1 tablespoon brown mustard seeds 1/2 teaspoon chili power or curry powder 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander A mess of mustard, turnip, spinach or other greens, chopped

Gently fry spices and nuts in a few tablespoons of olive oil, add greens cover and cook until tender. You can crumble the paneer into the cooked greens before serving as is, or brown it in an oiled non-stick pan first. Serve over mixed whole grain rice, with a carrot or apple salad as a side dish.

jacksonfreepress.com

L

ast month, a Stanford â&#x20AC;&#x153;megastudyâ&#x20AC;? that supposedly found organic produce was no more nutritious than â&#x20AC;&#x153;conventionallyâ&#x20AC;? farmed crops (read: chemicals) made a few quiet corrections to demonstrably alter that conclusion. The New York Times reported that, while the Stanford study sparked a firestorm of controversy, an equally valid study the year before found the opposite conclusion but drew little attention. (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Parsing of Data Led to Mixed Messages on Organic Foodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Value,â&#x20AC;? Oct. 15: jfp.ms/stanfordorganics) Published in April 2011, scientists at Newcastle University in England found organically grown food more nutritious, with more vitamin C, on average, and many more of the plant-defense molecules that help shield against cancer and heart disease in people. The reason, according to the Times,

was first due to a different meththan food that is grown without odology used in quantifying much care, in depleted soils bol(counting) separate instances stered by manmade chemicals and of crops, while also allowing for bathed in deadly toxins. differences in climate and soil The reason megastudies such conditions. Secondly, the Stanas Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Newcastleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reach ford study didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t differentiate widely divergent conclusions is the types of chemicalsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;flavobecause farms vary, too. Not evnoidsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that can affect health. ery conventional farm is a wornThe Stanford study apout toxic dump run by chemical parently confused or didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t difhoseheads; nor is every organic ferentiate between â&#x20AC;&#x153;flavonoids,â&#x20AC;? farm a garden of Eden tended by â&#x20AC;&#x153;flavonolsâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;flavanols.â&#x20AC;? angels. As industrial farming has As the Times reported, overtaken organics, with farms of Despite Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s study suggesting otherwise, all signs point â&#x20AC;&#x153;flavanols are a class of comthousands of acres grown the same to the superiority of organic vegetables. pounds that plants produce for as their conventional counterparts self-defense. Flavanols are found, but without synthetic chemicals, for example, in cocoa and green tea, and are crops otherwise eradicated; the flavanols the lines have blurred. thought to help prevent against cancer, heart provide a richer flavor to organically grown Frankly, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to tell what foods are disease and other ills in humans. Flavonoids crops and also have human health benefits. truly healthful and good for you. As Hipare a larger class that includes flavanols.â&#x20AC;? The Stanford study created such a fire- pocrates noted, food should heal, not harm. Organically grown crops have more storm is because it runs against common Organically grown crops, tended with care, flavanols because they must produce them senseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;food grown with care, in healthy soil are healthfulâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;regardless of the methodoloto fight against pests that chemically grown should be good for you, and better for you gies of studies and their controversies. WIKICOMMONS/ZABDIEL

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let food be your medicine and medicine be your food.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Hippocrates

39


LIFE&STYLE | girl about town by Julie Skipper

Fitness! No!

S

November 7 - 13, 2012

TERRY SULLIVAN

ince childhood, I’ve been two afterward, so you know you’ll get a reward things: a bit of a clotheshorse and for finishing and some socializing, too—and fitness-minded. The two comple- that’s important. (When I first started runment each other nicely: Working ning 5Ks, which tend to be on Saturday out helps me feel more confident in my mornings, a friend and I always immediately clothes. But my commitment to being fit is headed to brunch at Julep afterward—she more about being healthy than fitting into for waffles, I for a Bloody Mary.) There’s a certain dress size. I intend to live to a Ripe nothing wrong with a little liquid motivaOld Age, while looking and feeling as good tion to get through the home stretch. as possible doing so. As such, diet, exercise, For those who like team sports, tennis not smoking and daily application of SPF is a great way to get active. A few years ago, 50 are important to me and have always I signed up for lessons at Parham Bridges been part of my routine. I sat snugly in my infant carrier on the sideline of the Central United Methodist Church basketball court in Meridian’ while my mother led ladies in Jane Fonda workouts before I was old enough to walk. As a preschooler, I wore out my copy of Disney’s “Mousercise” on my Fischer Price record playLiveRIGHTnow hosts weekly runs on Old Canton Road. er. The day I was old enough, I joined a fitness center and attended step aerobics every day. While at Tennis Center (5055 Old Canton Road, Millsaps College, I joined the downtown 601-956-1105, mississippitennis.com) and YMCA and fell in love with kickboxing. As quickly found myself on a team in the laan adult, I discovered that marathon train- dies’ league. Between lessons, practice with ing gave me time to clear my mind from a team and weekly matches, there’s no shortthe stresses of law practice. These days, I do age of opportunities to work up a sweat. cardio on the elliptical or spin bike three to And then there’s a different type of five times a week and, since January, started group motivation and encouragement. For incorporating thrice-weekly weight train- cardio, I generally stick to the downtown ing into the mix. Courthouse Racquet & Fitness (100 E. Exercising is “me” time; when working Capitol St., 601-948.-688), but for weight up a sweat, I’m focused solely on that mo- training, my workout partner mandates that ment, not on anyone or anything else. Ad- we use the Courthouse’s Lakeland location ditionally, there’s a sense of accomplishment (2625 Courthouse Circle, 601-932-4800), and pride when you achieve a goal and push for its bigger, more hard core weights. There, your body to do things you didn’t think you we get to observe the guys who have become could—whether it’s running a distance or, some of my new favorite people (though I more recently for me, doing deadlifts and don’t know their names, other than having power cleans. Cardiovascular activity is so heard one yelled at as “Mike”). It’s a group of important for heart health and weight-bear- around eight to 10 men, with an average age ing exercise for preventing osteoporosis. I of 40-something, who pump iron and talk don’t want brittle bones—a walker would smack three mornings a week. totally cramp my style when I get older. In the spirit of testosterone-driven rivalFor all those reasons, I’m excited to see ry, they’re holding weekly competitions on more and more fitness options around town. Fridays. It began with a donut-eating contest Finding what fits your personality and hav- (OK, that one wasn’t really fitness-minded) ing a support system to keep you account- but, in subsequent weeks, included pull-ups able and motivated are key to sticking with and push-ups. I can’t wait to see what’s next. it. These days, you can likely find something Maybe one day I’ll get brave and ask to join that works for you. in. Regardless, I enjoy watching, and their The local running community is friendly contest reminds me to keep pushstrong, and it’s easy to quickly feel a part of ing my own limits as I work out. this network. Fleet Feet Sports (500 HighThanks to a variety of local options, it’s way 51, Ridgeland, 601-899-9696, fleetfeet easy to get (and stay) moving. And while yes, jackson.com) and liveRIGHTnow (terry@ it will help you feel (and look) better in your liverightnowonline.com, 601-717-2012, live clothes, it’s really about what you’re doing for rightnowonline.com) organize regular group what’s on the inside—in terms of your heart, runs and training programs for races from muscle, and bone health and the mind-body your first 5K to marathons. Some of the connection—that counts. So get out there runs even involve heading to a bar for a brew and find what’s right for you!

40


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41


Mississippi Mantra by Tait Kellogg

A

fter getting my degree at Millsaps College, I left for graduate school at Columbia in New York City. After living two years in the liberal pocket of the Chelsea neighborhood, I returned to Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;specifically West Point. Explaining my intended departure from the Empire State to the rural Deep South was downright foreign to many Manhattanites, and I found myself not-so-jokingly telling everyone I was leaving New York because I wanted to move back to America. Living in West Point and traveling around

to high schools all around the state in my job at Education Services Foundation is quite a change from the fast pace of the Big Apple, to say the least. But I have adopted William Faulknerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s words, â&#x20AC;&#x153;To understand the world, you must first understand a place like Mississippi,â&#x20AC;? as my mantra for this stage of my life. In learning about Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;top to bottom and side to sideâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I am learning a bit more about the world, too. Lately Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been obsessed with art and craft projects involving globes and maps, and this quote seemed perfect to make a statement with maps on my own wall.

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Start by cutting your map to fit the board. Mod-podge it to the board and let it fully dry. Place sticker letters on the map to write out your phrase of choice and trace around them. Peel the stickers off and fill in the letters with paint. If lettering is your thing, you can skip this step, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good cheat for those DIYers like me with teenage boy handwriting. I finished by embellishing some of the letters with black to make them stand out, and using brown paint (you could also use wood stainâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;just be sure to have a light hand!) to make the map look a bit more vintage.

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