Page 1

GREEN JOBS YOUTH DEVELOPMENT Summer 2011

GJYD summer Apprentices pose, with downtown New Haven in the background, after a successful teambuilding trip to Hopkins’ Adam Krieger Adventure Program ropes course.

Summer 2011

Program Outcome Report

“I have learned more about the environment and I am more motivated to help my community.” – Martineesha Parker “I learned that residents in Westville manor appreciate the things Solar Youth does more than we think” – Zakeiyah Moore


I.

PROGRAM SUMMARY

Solar Youth’s Green Jobs Youth Development program (GJYD) is an after-school and summer Apprenticeship program that hires youth ages 14-19 and provides them with opportunities to develop their job skills, learn about the Green Jobs industry, and realize their role as positive agents of change in their communities. GJYD hires youth from a competitive pool of individuals who meet the minimum requirements and have successfully completed the application and interview process. Once hired, youth become Apprentices and are paid for the work they do and the knowledge and experience they gain. Many of the Apprentices have previously participated in a Solar Youth program, either as interns or campers. During the summer, GJYD is a five-week program and held four days a week for five hours a day, with Fridays primarily devoted to one-on-one meetings with Apprentices and the program coordinator. During the school year, the program is held four days a week for two and a half hours per day. Green Jobs Youth Development follows Solar Youth’s unique program model: Kids Explore! Kids Do! Kids Teach! Following this model, youth investigate the local ecology of their community (Kids Explore!), identify environmental issues that affect the health of people and the natural environment, and seek solutions through a process of problem-solving and youth led action (Kids Do!), then teach what they have learned and accomplished to others through public education projects (Kids Teach!). Environmental topics addressed during the summer 2011 GJYD program:  Sustainability  Climate Change  Tree Identification  Green Jobs  Green Buildings  Planting  Consumerism Developmental topics addressed during the summer 2011 GJYD program:  Job Interview Skills  Goal Setting  Resume Writing  Workplace Etiquette  Presentation Skills  Time Management  Teamwork Skills The expected outcomes for our GJYD Apprentices are: 1) A demonstrated development of, at minimum, nine of the Search Institute's 40 Developmental Assets (the building blocks of positive youth development, the possession of which has shown to have significant effect on youth's ability to resist negative influences and achieve success in adult life). The Developmental Assets we will measure are within the categories of 'empowerment,' 'commitment to learning,' 'positive values,' 'social competencies,' and 'support.' 2) A demonstrated increase in environmental knowledge and commitment to environmental stewardship. 3) A demonstrated increase in “Green Jobs” skills, and general employability skills, like timeliness, work ethic, preparation skills, etc.


II.

SEASON REVIEW

Solar Youth’s Green Jobs Youth Development summer session took place in the Westville Manor public housing development and ran for 5 weeks. Starting in mid-June, prior to the start of program, two new program co-coordinators (Chisom Amaechi and Meredith Cowart) recruited youth applicants, developed and prepared a five-week curriculum, conducted interviews, and hired a total of 14 youth. During the hiring process, 25 youth were interviewed and 14 were selected with seven on a waitlist. Limited resources prevented us from hiring everyone who applied. Of the 14 selected, nine had previously participated in Solar Youth, including 8 in their pre-teen years. Throughout the summer, we reinforced the importance of each Apprentice realizing their potential as a positive agent of change and the power of youth voice. Through hands-on learning, GJYD Apprentices gained experience that will help them succeed academically and professionally. Kids Explore! Theme

Activity Description

Week 1

This week Apprentices had their first experience working outdoors in the community. They used four problem-solving steps - Identify the problem, Choose a solution, Develop an action plan, Take action - to revamp several previous GJYD projects, the Corner Garden, the Butterfly Garden, and the Solar Youth front and back yards. Apprentices also learned about job expectations, like proper work ethic, attitude, and behavior. To foster a strong team unit between the Apprentices, the week ended with a trip to the ropes course at Hopkins’ Adam Krieger Adventure Program, where the Apprentices spent a day participating in teambuilding activities and building trust. This week, Apprentices learned how to identify trees and started their tree project, where they were assigned a specific tree and had to prepare a presentation on their tree to peers and staff of GJYD. The Apprentices used the skills they learned the first week to improve the site location of the New Haven Bike Collective and learned about the gift economy through another trip to the New Haven Free Store. GJYD Apprentices embarked on an outdoor wilderness adventure during a two day camping trip to the Yale Myers Forest. They went on a nature hike and learned about the forest ecosystem and were able to see most of their assigned trees upclose. Apprentices witnessed a logging demonstration and were able to talk with professionals about their line of work. Along with other traditional camping activities like, wading in the lake (Bigelow Hollow), setting up tents, starting a fire, making S’mores, singing songs, and telling stories, the Apprentices also took a night hike, which helped reduce their anxiety and fear of sleeping outdoors. In order to make the Apprentices educated consumers, we taught them about the lifecycle of their favorite foods, which helped them understand

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4


the basis of food and their connection to the earth. A trip to the Yale Farm allowed them to see the growing process of many fruits and vegetables and the upkeep required. They also learned about the Green Jobs industry and Green Buildings during a trip to the New Haven Neighborhood Housing Authority’s Home Improvement & Energy Conservation Laboratory building.

Apprentices learn the importance of effective communication and teamwork during an activity at the Hopkins ropes course.

Apprentices learn about the logging industry during a demonstration at the Yale Myers Forest.

David Roman III and Martineesha Parker relax on the Green roof of the Neighborhood Housing Authority’s LEED certified demonstration home.

Kids Do! (Weeks 3-5) Each GJYD Apprentice completed a community survey that required them to answer questions about the Westville Manor as they took a tour of the community. The survey identified potential issues that the Apprentices could take on as their Community Service Action Project (C-SAP). After all the surveys were completed, the top four issues that most Apprentices identified were the basis of four C-SAP groups. The Apprentices then joined the group with the topic they were most interested in working on. Using Solar Youth’s 9-step C-SAP cycle, the Apprentices were given a great deal of responsibility and ownership of completing the projects. Each group had to devise a budget, materials list, and timeline for project completion. They wrote a proposal and presented it to the Solar Youth Executive Director, Joanne Sciulli, who provided them with feedback and suggestions. The Apprentices also had multiple consultations with the GJYD program coordinators, Chisom Amaechi and Meredith Cowart. The groups had one week for planning and about one week to complete their projects. In the end, each Apprentice was recognized by the City of New Haven and received an Official Citation for their work on their CSAPs. Project

Community Service Action Project Description

YARD DEVELOPMENT

The goal of this group was to revamp the front lawns of two residents of the Westville Manor. The two residents were chosen based on a rubric created by the Apprentices in this group. They conducted a door-to-door survey, prior to selection of the two residents, to gather a pool of applicants. This group designed the layout of each lawn and then educated the residents on upkeep of their newly renovated lawn. Members of the signage group were in charge of creating permanent signs in the Westville Manor to showcase projects done by Solar Youth participants and the Westville Manor community, and also to prevent further vandalism. This group was able to receive a generous donation of three aluminum signs from American Sign Inc.

SIGNAGE


PARK CLEANUP/ RETAINING WALL

BOARDS

Since the inception of the KaBOOM! playground two years ago, the park area and playground has received considerable cosmetic and physical damage. This group focused on cleaning the area and piggybacked on a soil erosion lesson during the GJYD program, to build a retaining wall on the side of a hill near the Solar Youth office. This group was very receptive to the impact vacant, boarded houses can have on the overall aesthetics and morale of the community. This group painted almost half of the boarded houses in Westville Manor based on a color scheme they chose and then conducted a community survey to gauge the response from the community. The survey results were in support of the work done.

Jorell James and Royshon Ferguson shovel excess dirt from Charlease Carter’s front lawn

Norman Harrison and Eddie Kendricks, with assistance from the Solar Youth Executive Director Joanne Sciulli glue down bricks for the retaining wall.

Zakeiyah Moore and Martineesha Parker paint boards on the vacant houses yellow and orange.

Kids Teach! The summer culminated with the presentation of the Apprentices CSAPs at Kroon Hall on the campus of Yale University. Each group presented a PowerPoint on their projects to an audience comprised of members from the Board of Directors of Solar Youth, members from the Housing Authority of New Haven, Yale University community members, current and previous Solar Youth staff, and parents. The Apprentices received a lot of positive feedback and praise from all that they were able to accomplish.

Apprentices, in business casual attire, grab a bite to eat before they present at Kroon Hall.

Malaik Suggs and Tyquan Harrison, members of the Signage group, answer questions from the audience.

GJYD Apprentices give their undivided attention to their colleagues as they present on their CSAP.


III.

OUTCOMES

Solar Youth’s Evaluation Process Solar Youth measures its programs with a combination of evaluation tools, including Pre/Post surveys, Portfolios (evidence and examples of youth community service and public education work), Youth Feedback Forms, Family Feedback Forms, and Community Feedback Forms. The feedback forms are based on best-practice evaluation tools developed by the Search Institute. Our pre/post survey measures improvement of ecological literacy.

Feedback from Participating Youth and Parents CATEGORY

% OF PARTICIPATING YOUTH WHO AGREED

% OF PARENTS WHO AGREED

58%

72%

100%

N/A

92%

100%

100%

91%

92%

91%

83%

100%

92%

N/A

92%

N/A

100%

100%

N/A

73%

92%

100%

100%

100%

92%

91%

N/A

100%

75%

N/A

Youth Development Outcomes Empowerment  

Because of Solar Youth, the participant feels that the community values him. Because of Solar Youth, the participant feels that they play a positive role in the community.

Commitment to Learning  

Because of Solar Youth, participant is actively engaged in learning. Because of Solar Youth, participant is motivated to do well in school.

Positive Values   

Because of Solar Youth, participant places a high value on helping others. Because of Solar Youth, participant is more accountable for his/her actions. Because of Solar Youth, participant’s selfconfidence has improved.

Social Competencies       

Because of Solar Youth, participant’s communication skills have improved. Because of Solar Youth, participant’s leadership ability has improved. Because of Solar Youth, participant has become more mature. Because of Solar Youth, participant’s planning and decision-making skills have improved. Because of Solar Youth, participant has learned to be a better friend. Because of Solar Youth, participant feels they are more sensitive to the feelings of others. Because of Solar Youth, participant is more respectful.

Support 

Because of Solar Youth, participant’s ability to get along with people at home has improved.


  

Because of Solar Youth, participant’s behavior has improved at home. Participant feels that there is at least one person in their home that cares about them. After being in Solar Youth, participant feels that there is at least one person at Solar Youth that cares about them.

N/A

82%

92%

N/A

92%

N/A

100%

N/A

92%

N/A

100%

100%

92%

91%

Environmental Outcomes  

Because of Solar Youth, participant’s knowledge about the environment improved. Because of Solar Youth, participant believes they can and should help solve problems in the environment and community.

Quality Assurance  

I would recommend Solar Youth to my friends/other parents Participant/parent would like to see participant attend Solar Youth in the future.

Results from Youth Outcome Evaluation CATEGORY

% OF PARTICIPATING YOUTH WHO AGREED

Employability Skills Outcomes 

Because of Solar Youth, I am more willing to try new things.

89%

90% 100%

Because of Solar Youth, I am more likely to use appropriate language in the workplace. Because of Solar Youth, I am more respectful to fellow co-workers and supervisors. After being an intern in Solar Youth, I feel that my timeliness has improved.

After being an intern in Solar Youth, my preparation skills have improved.

100%

After being an intern in Solar Youth, my public speaking skills have improved.

90%

After being an intern in Solar Youth, my work ethic has improved.

100%

After being an intern in Solar Youth, my commitment to excellence has improved.

100%

100%

Long-Term Impact of Solar Youth    

My overall experience with Solar Youth, both this season and in the past, has prepared me for future employment. My overall experience with Solar Youth, both this season and in the past, has encouraged me to continue my education. My overall experience with Solar Youth, both this season and in the past, has encouraged me to live a healthier lifestyle. My overall experience with Solar Youth, both this season and in the past, has motivated me to seek out opportunities to help my community.

100% 100% 78% 89%


 

My overall experience with Solar Youth, both this season and in the past, has helped me to develop a more positive sense of self. My overall experience with Solar Youth, both this season and in the past, has taught me to consider the impact of my actions on the health of the environment.

100% 100%

Quotes and Testimonials BECAUSE OF SOLAR YOUTH… “I have learned more things about the environment, and made more friends” -Zakeiyah Moore “I feel more comfortable in my own skin and enjoy working outdoors” -Tyquan Harrison “I had an awesome empowering summer and got to experience going camping for the first time” -Quintaisja Harrison “Adults respect me now” -Royshon Ferguson “I feel more responsible and mature” -David Roman, III “I am more respectful” -Paulina Rosario “I’ve learned how to control myself a little better” -Maliak Suggs “I learned how to prepare for a presentation” -Jasmine Peterson


IV. ENROLLMENT/DEMOGRAPHIC DATA TOTAL Total Enrollment

14

Female

36%

Male

64%

African-American

86%

Latino

14%

Caucasian

7%*

Other

0%

*One participant is biracial, part Caucasian and part African-American

Green Jobs Youth Development Program Outcome Report - Summer 2011  

Activities and Outcomes on Solar Youth's Green Jobs Youth Development program during Summer 2011.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you