Page 1

8/1/2010

ACCG224 Intermediate Financial Accounting W k1 Week 1 Introduction to the regulatory environment: including  theories of regulation and political influence Godfrey Chapter 12 (6e) Godfrey Chapter 3 (7e) Lecture Delivered by: Sunil Dahanayake Rajni Mala

Learning objectives • the theories of regulation that are relevant to  accounting and auditing  • how theories of regulation apply to  accounting and auditing practice accounting and auditing practice  • the regulatory framework for financial  reporting  • the institutional structure for setting  accounting and auditing standards. 

Introduction to the regulatory environment – Who/what regulates accounting? Corporations Act 2001 1. accounting requirements about the way financial data are recorded in  the accounting system 2. Requirements about accounting reports Supervised and enforced by Australian Securities and Investments  Commission (ASIC) under the ASIC Act 1991 Commission (ASIC) under the ASIC Act 1991 • Investigates companies suspected of non‐compliance with the Act or  accounting standards • Issues its own interpretation of the financial reporting requirements of  the Corporations Act Australian Stock Exchange (ASX) • Listing and trading rules • Role in developing Australian financial reporting requirements

1


8/1/2010

Introduction to the regulatory environment – Who/what regulates accounting? 1. Financial Reporting Council • oversees standard setting • 12 members appointed by Federal Govt or  nominated by approved organisations (ASIC, ASX  etc.) • Advises government on standard setting • Appoints members to AASB • Monitors AASB and gives direction • No veto power on standards – the Federal  Parliament has • AASB must follow its broad strategic plan

Introduction to the regulatory environment – Who/what regulates accounting? 2. Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) • Government not a professional body • Makes IAS and IFRS into Australian standards • ‘Australianising’ Australianising  the IASB the IASB’ss Framework Framework • Drafts new standards when required by IASB • Undertakes public consultation on draft standards

Introduction to the regulatory environment – Who/what regulates accounting? 3. International Financial Reporting Interpretations  Committee – Principles based international accounting  standards require global interpretation – Consistency of interpretation is the key challenge  for the accounting profession

2


8/1/2010

Internal regulation of accounting practice • Through accounting standards – that have  government backing – they guide the preparation of  financial statements • From January 2005 Australia adopted International  Accounting Standards (IASs) and International  Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs) developed by  the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB)

Rules vs Principles in Standard Setting • IASB follows a principles‐based approach to standard  setting • Constructed in a broad framework that is not focussed  on specific rules under specific circumstances • Allows for professional judgement in relation to  substance rather than form • Relates to the conceptual framework  (more next week) • Broad guidelines that can be applied to different  situations • Comparability is a problem as is the potential for bias

Rules vs Principles in Standard Setting • Currently FASB follows rules‐based approach  • Misuse in corporate collapses means that FASB is  reconsidering Standards can be very complex • Standards can be very complex • Open to manipulation • Can become very confusing

3


8/1/2010

What is regulation? • Regulation is overseeing, according to predetermined  rules, an activity by an entity not directly involved in  the activity – The government is deliberately intervening in the  production of general purpose financial statements – This control is through a standard setting body (AASB)  which is supposed to be independent of the government

The theories of regulation relevant  to accounting and auditing • Managers have incentives to voluntarily  provide accounting information, so why do we  observe the regulation of financial reporting? • Explanations are provided by: Explanations are provided by: – theory of efficient markets – agency theory – theories of regulation

11

The theories of regulation relevant  to accounting and auditing • Managers have incentives to voluntarily  provide accounting information, so why do we  observe the regulation of financial reporting? • Explanations are provided by: Explanations are provided by: – theory of efficient markets – agency theory – theories of regulation

12

4


8/1/2010

Theory of efficient markets • The forces of supply and demand influence  market behaviour and help keep markets  efficient • This applies to the market for accounting  This applies to the market for accounting information and should determine what  accounting data should be supplied and what  accounting practices should be used to  prepare it 13

Theory of efficient markets • • • • • •

The market for accounting data is not efficient The ‘free‐rider’ problem distorts the market Users cannot agree on what they want Accountants cannot agree on procedures Firms must produce comparable data  The government must therefore intervene

14

Agency theory • The demand for accounting information:  – for stewardship purposes – for decision‐making purposes

• A A framework in which to study the  f k i hi h t t d th relationship between those who provide  accounting information  ‐ e.g. a manager ‐ and  those who use it – e.g. a shareholder or  creditor 15

5


8/1/2010

Agency theory • Because of imbalances between data suppliers  and data users, uncertainty and risk exist • Resources and risk are likely to be mis‐ allocated between the parties allocated between the parties • To the extent the market mechanism is  inefficient, accounting regulation is required  to reduce inefficient and inequitable  outcomes  16

Theories of regulation • There are three theories of regulation: – public interest theory – regulatory capture theory – private interest theory private interest theory

17

Public interest theory • Government regulation is required in the  ‘public interest’ whenever there is market  failure (inefficiency) due to:  – lack of competition lack of competition – barriers to entry – information asymmetry – public‐good products

18

6


8/1/2010

Public interest theory • Governments intervene: – to get votes   – because public interest groups demand  intervention – because they are neutral arbiters

19

Regulatory capture theory • The public interest is not protected because  those being regulated come to control or  dominate the regulator • The regulated protect or increase their wealth The regulated protect or increase their wealth • Assumes the regulator has no independent  role to play but is simply an arbiter between  battling interest groups

20

Regulatory capture theory • The public interest is not protected because  those being regulated come to control or  dominate the regulator • The regulated protect or increase their wealth The regulated protect or increase their wealth • Assumes the regulator has no independent  role to play but is simply an arbiter between  battling interest groups

21

7


8/1/2010

Private interest theory • Governments are not independent arbiters,  but are rationally self‐interested • They seek re‐election • They will ‘sell’ their power to coerce or  h ill ‘ ll’ h i transfer wealth to those most likely to achieve  their re‐election (if they are elected officials)  or increase their wealth (if they are appointed  officials) or both 22

Application of public interest  theory • The Sarbanes‐Oxley Act (US, 2002) • Accounting Standards Review Board (AUS,  1984) • But: – Managers have incentives to voluntarily correct  market failure perceptions about their firms

23

What is behind the regulation of accounting in  Australia? • Corporate failures • Wide reaching effects of accounting • Government intervention to increase its regulatory  role • Legal enforcement of financial reporting and auditor  independence

8


8/1/2010

Introduction to the regulatory environment – Who/what regulates accounting? • Why is accounting so regulated – Agency problem – Reporting needs to be monitored – Protection of owners and creditors Protection of owners and creditors – Complexity of entities and transactions – Governments act in the public interest to ensure  efficient market for information – Accounting is a complex product

Introduction to the regulatory environment – the role of professional judgement • Accounting treatment of some transactions is  unregulated (eg. depreciation, residual value) • Difficult to accept that accounting standards are  neutral and unbiased when economic and social  consequences of standard setting • Different  accounting assumptions and judgements  can lead to reporting profits/losses 

Rationale for regulation • Regulation is necessary because: – Markets for information are inefficient and not  enough good information will be made available – Average efficiency in the market puts at risk the  savings of investors who rely on unregulated  d l disclosures – Those with limited power may be unable to get  information – Investors need protection against misleading  information – public confidence – Regulation leads to uniformity

9


8/1/2010

Rationale for regulation • Regulation is not necessary because: – Financial information is a good and people are  prepared to pay for it – this will lead to an optimal  supply of information – Failure to supply information will mean the  organisation will be punished by the capital market – It leads to an over‐supply of costly information – It restricts accounting choice and leads to a ‘one size  fits all’ problem – It encourages lobbying

Politics of standard setting • IASB sets accounting standards – AASB  Australianises them • what are the opportunities for lobbying? There is an Australian member of the IASB Europe is a powerful bloc FASB is resisting and wants US GAAP to dominate Multinational businesses – including big 4 accounting  firms – Politicians – Responses to EDs

– – – –

Concluding comments • Accounting is highly regulated by government  regulatory bodies • Accounting standards have gone global but are  regulated locally • There are arguments that regulation has failed – Th h l i h f il d just  j look at the corporate collapses  • Does accounting in Australia require more or less  regulation? • Does the production of GPFS require more or less  accounting standards? 

10


8/1/2010

Summary In this chapter: we reviewed theories proposed to explain the  practice and regulation of financial reporting and  auditing we reviewed the regulatory framework for financial  reporting and the institutional structure for setting  accounting and auditing standards

31

Theory in Action (page 64) • Describe current Accounting practices for  leases as outlined in this article? • Why does the author call leasing standards  ‘silly silly accounting rules accounting rules’?? • What are the advantages of capitalising leases  ?Given that most companies usually reporting  operating leases, will they oppose new leasing  rules?

11

ACCG224- Week 1-Student Notes-Theories of Regulation  

Who/what regulates accounting ? 1 Introduction to the regulatory environment – W k 1Week1 Introduction to the regulatory environment: includ...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you