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#4 #5

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This project aims to investigate the relationship between wind and the landscapes it acts upon. We planned to explore how topographical conditions impacted wind flow, while at the same time analysing how wind impacted these conditions at a micro scale. Using an anemometer we recorded wind data in order to gain a quantative understanding of its workings on site. Accompanying this, our crafted instrument provided more qualitative data, in the form of drawings, which enhanced our understanding of the wind conditions. We also formed visual registrations of our instrument, allowing us to further scrutinize the wind’s exchange with the surrounding territory. Through employing this data we were able to adopt a clearer understanding of how these natural obstructions were disturbing the wind flow and in turn the movement of the drawing machine. Something which we then highlighted as a field of interest were points of tension and resistance in the instrument due to our craftsmanship which impacted the transition of kinetic energy from the balloon through to the paper. This relates to points of tension and resistance amongst the landscape where wind is confined by obstacles and where obstacles are put under pressure from the wind, creating tension. What we are beginning to develop is an understanding of how small changes in the wind’s flow will influence the landscape in turn effecting the ecology of the island leading to a recalibration of the ecosystem, especially at a micro-scale. The artefacts that we collected on site are specific to those particular landscapes, as a consequence of the wind’s effect on those particular topographies. These alterations create a new set of conditions for the organisms to react to and therefore greatly impact the composition of the territory.

~ This book is a record of our findings on the Isle of Rum ~


#1 The site was on the east coast of the Isle of Rum, positioned between the sea and a narrow strip of foliage. There were intermittent gusts of north easterly wind due to the nature of the sea breeze. There were no immediate obstructions affecting the wind’s path. As a result this was a relatively exposed site, yet due to its low altitude wind speeds were comparatively low.

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#2 The site was positioned in the woods directly adjacent to the Allt Slugan a Choilich river. It was heavily sheltered by dense foliage and neighbouring buildings. The wind was coming from a north easterly direction, however it had minimal effect on the site due to the numerous surrounding obstructions.


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#3 The third site was at a higher altitude than the previous two sites. The wind was once again coming from a north easterly direction. It was buffered by a ‘horse-shoe’ of vegetation sitting alongside a shielding mound, which reduced the wind velocity on the site.


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#4 The fourth site was located on a ridge further up the hillside. The north easterly trajectory of the wind was far more noticable here as a result of a distinct lack of topographical and vegetational interference. The protrusion of the ridge from the immediate landscape meant that it was more susceptible to the effects of the wind.


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#5 The site at Corie Dubh was of the highest comparative altitude. The north easterly wind was channelled through the U valley of the Meall Breac and Canapan Breaca peaks, subsequently the wind velocity was at its highest here. The man made gorge directly adjacent to the site dissipated the wind flow thus effecting the wind’s registration on site.


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Findings on the Isle of Rum