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utas + osa

SPE CUL ATE GASP!_GLENORCHY_HOBART adam longo + azizul hakim musa


Prepared for : Dr Pippa Dickson, GASP Executive Officer + Mr Peter Poulet, State Architect 3rd June 2011


Special thanks to Pippa Dickson, Leon Carr, Martin Grose and Mandy Reynolds-Smith for their much appreciated assistance. Thankyou to our supervisors, Peter Poulet (the State Architect), Helen Norrie (UTAS) and Alysia Bennet (OSA).

ii_osa overview

acknowledgements


peter poulet “ I am after a...” ... ‘source file’ of speculative ideas for the cities of Hobart and Launceston... drawing together information from existing reports... ... Booklets of analysis for specific sites in Tasmania that can inform future architectural speculations... “I believe Architects will be in a role to speculate more in the future as our cities grow older, establishing frameworks rather than master plans”

“analysis and data collection can be used to develop different kinds of briefs for the future”


The Tasmanian State Architect (Peter Poulet) is undertaking collaborative research with UTAS and working with Government agencies, industry bodies, and the community. This work will position Tasmania at the forefront of innovative, collaborative and sustainable design thinking and practice.

iv_osa overview

osa statement

Mission and Vision To establish a built environment which helps Tasmania become a healthier, integrated and more vibrant community. To showcase new patterns of living within our clean environment. The design process should utilise the skilled and creative people that supplement the compact and historic cities and town centres.

Objectives To show design leadership in the built environment by utilising the creative skills in our community. To recognise that good design is a matter of public interest. To highlight how good design involves thinking and acting in an innovative manner, constantly questioning existing practices. To recognise the importance of establishing creative linkages between people that value design as a process. The integration of decision making with the design process maximise innovation and opportunity for new ideas, and should be an integral aspect of planning and development processes.


Over the summer, the Office of the State Architect in collaboration with UTAS prepared and compiled a competition entry for the Living Cities Design Competition, with the focus on the city of Hobart. The project title ‘Seeding De-Colonization’ emphasized the notion of developing a sustainable city with ‘many minor moves’ through collaboration with the 5 municipalities that make up the Greater Hobart area. Through such collaborations with both the public and private sectors in conjunction with the community, catalytic change has potential to inform future urban development; iterated in the project’s Five Catalysts of Change: Public Space, Public Edge, Function, Cultural and Transport. These Five Catalysts of Change have been at the foreground of the following thinking within the OSA ADR Selective projects, furthering the ideas ‘seeded’ within the competition.

vi_osa overview

living cities competition


vii_osa overview

problem statements How can a vacant site be progressively [de/re] colonized to provide a catalyst for development?

How can different site interpretations affect urban legibility and dissolve fragmentation of the city?

MACQUARIE POINT

HOBART CBD

SULLIVANS How can the everyday and experiential cultural narratives COVE HOBART inform the development of the future landscape?

How can an underdeveloped site be utilised as a catalyst for interaction, social enterprise and identity, while creating connections to the wider community?

GASP! GLENORCHY

How can a precinct act as a bridging network to break down urban disconnection?

NORTH ESK PRECINCT LAUNCESTON

Each OSA question is interchangeable and can be applied to another site.


group dynamics post-industrial landscapes

urban morphology current character

life/space/buildings

OSA+UTAS

colonisation

URBAN REJUVENATION

HOBART CITY + COVE

NORTH ESK RIVER EDGE WELLINGTON WALK

PUBLIC SPACE

the rivulet

cultural narratives

HISTORICAL ANALYSIS

greening spaces

rehabilitation

identity

GASP

PEDESTRIAN ACCESS

MACQUARIE POINT

URBAN DISCONNECTION

CYCLING NETWORK

SOCIAL ANALYSIS

ACCESS urban legibility

cultural identity staying places

quality

diversity isolated activity comfort

social narratives

The OSA group is a collection of pairs (and one

The reports are informed by personal experiences

individual group) that have developed a series of

of the cities of Hobart and Launceston.

common themes that have evolved out of an interest

generated from these unique experiences are

in people and place. A series of Tasmanian sites

providing different outcomes as some of the

that have been identified for future development

students have grown up in the city studied all

become the basis of the studies, and provide

their lives, whilst others have only been living in

a springboard to speculate on new research

Tasmania for a few years. The reports engage with

methodologies.

the UTAS School of Architectures design values and The Office of the State Architects vison.

Ideas


Raja and Masako got lost in the city of Hobart during the summer break, with Alysia showing them the Raja and got of lost the Surprised city of Hobart during summer break, with Alysia them the locally knownMasako ins and outs theincity. that both of the them concluded their walk with showing different memory/

locally known of insthe andcity, outs of the Surprised that both ofhave thema concluded their walkofwith different between memory/ interpretation they feltcity. Hobart could potentially stronger character connectivity interpretation of the levels city, they Hobart could stronger character they of connectivity between spaces at different andfelt with nature. By potentially looking at have thesea other dimensions, seek a register of spacesmarkers at different levelsimprove and withurban nature. By looking at these they seek a register of urban that could legibility thus leading to other a newdimensions, way of seeing things. urban markers that could improve urban legibility thus leading to a new way of seeing things.

Jenna , as in the meantime working on the Living Cities Design Competition in the OSA office during the Jenna , period as in the working on the Living Cities Design Competition thefindings. OSA office the summer andmeantime all the while overlooking the previous groups workings in and Theduring research summer and alland thefeedback while overlooking the previous groups and findings. The research within theperiod competition from the adjunct professors leadworkings to an accumulation of ideas relating within the competition feedback from the adjunct professors lead that to anhave accumulation of ideas to the layers of use andand hidden cultural memories of the city of Hobart been distilled in therelating urban to the layersofofthe uselandscape and hidden cultural memories the cityofofnew Hobart that been thethat urban morphology - demonstrating the of potential ways of have reading thedistilled familiarincity is morphology of the landscape demonstrating the potential of new ways of reading the familiar city that is not just an objective reading of- place. not just an objective reading of place.

Adam and Zul’s project evolved from a request from Pippa from GASP, this then lead to an interest in Adam andhow Zu’s projectused evolved from be a request from Pippa from GASP, then leadand to an interest in discovering an under site could transformed into a vibrant hub ofthis participation engagement

discovering an underThis used siteway could be transformed vibrant hub of participation engagement amongst the how community. new of viewing a site notinto onlya for it’s potential developmentand of architectural amongst newaway of viewing a sitethat not allows only forthe it’sactivity potential development of architectural form, but the as community. a means to This develop social framework and participation of people to form, buta as a means to develop a social framework that allows the activity and participation of people to improve site, rather than just a new building was an engaging concept to explore. The investigations lead improve a site,concept rather than just a new building was an concept to explore. The investigations lead to community speculation which drew upon theengaging Life-Space-Building approach, a new way of viewing community speculation which drew upon the Life-Space-Building approach, new way of viewing atosituation, butconcept an invaluable lesson in bridging disconnection of both architectural andasocial development. a situation, but an invaluable lesson in bridging disconnection of both architectural and social development.

Richard and Hock’s project stemmed from Richard’s interest in using the C. H. Smith site as a catalytic Richard and Hock’s project stemmed from Richard’s interest in to using the C. SmithNorth site as a catalytic node for community engagement, but also the City Councils’ priority develop theH.entire Esk precinct node community but to also City Councils’ priorityhow to develop entire North Eskprecincts precinct as an for urban bridge. engagement, This then lead anthe interest in discovering disusedthe and disengaging as an be urban bridge. This then leadtotoenable an interest in discovering how disused and disengaging precincts could progressively reactivated greater conection between communities and urban zones. could be progressively reactivated to economic enable greater conection communities and and recolonisation urban zones. Exploration into issues including scale, viability, adaptive between reuse, disengagement Exploration intospeculation issues including economic viability, adaptive disengagement and recolonisation resulted in the of anscale, ongoing reactivation process thatreuse, built upon the progressive Life-Spaceresulted approach. in the speculation of an ongoing reactivation process that built upon the progressive Life-SpaceBuilding Building approach.

x_osa overview

Hannah and Bek started in summer break, and visited the control tower on Hobarts waterfront and Hannah and Bekbystarted in summer and visited the control tower Hobarts waterfront and where overwhelmed the shear scale of break, the unknown site, that they had bothon passed by so many times where overwhelmed thenew shear of thethe unknown site, theyissues had both passed so many times but never looked into.by This wayscale of seeing unknown sitethat raised about scale, by vacancy, barriers but never lookedfrom into.both This the newcity wayand of seeing the unknown issuesthe about scale, vacancy, barriers and separation the waterfront (but site alsoraised highlighted potentials for establishing and separation both city and the waterfront (but also highlighted the potentials for establishing ‘something new’ from for the citythe of Hobart). ‘something new’ for the city of Hobart).


osa sites Launceston CBD

GASP

(Richard + Hock)

(Adam + Zul)

HOBART

LAUNCESTON

Hobart CBD

Macquarie Point Hobart

(Raja + Masako)

(Hannah + Bek)

Sullivans Cove Hobart (Jenna)


OSA groups

Theorists

Macquarie Point Hobart

Gehl Chilies Amidon Corner Latz + Partner Rogers Bell

(Hannah + Bek)

Hobart CBD (Raja + Masako)

Sullivans Cove Hobart (Jenna)

GASP

(Adam + Zul)

Amidon Gehl Igarashi Lynch

Hayden Boyer Borden

Gehl Stevens Krupa

Methodology

collating reports

vision statements master plan legislation heritage

mapping/ analysis

temporal changes urban fabric movement pattens scale urban morphology macro connections

precedents

post industrial interventions social enterprise landscape temporary installations

current comparison

urban fabric social enterprise economic development

xii_osa overview

osa process Process

research speculation montages puzzle pieces

Launceston CBD (Richard + Hock)

Boyer Attoe + Logan Gehl

Tactics

Outcomes

hypothetical montage puzzle pieces (new fit) de-colonising re-colonising

people and need study re-evaluation maps montages

collecting collating vision

colonising spilling

hypothetical montage key marker points mapping

seeding life/ space/ buildings character based narratives puzzle pieces

cracking enveloping injecting

future vision speculation

underpinning un/masking

collecting analysis testing social speculation

un/cloaking dissolving

social collaborations speculative montage seed idea promotion discussion generator

rejuvenation

speculations

montage mapping diagrams

Strategies

investigation testing speculation proposition

proposition exploratory montage achievement guidelines


01_project overview How can an underdeveloped site be utilised as a catalyst for interaction, social enterprise and identity, while creating connections to the wider community? Will outline the scope, GASP project and research objectives.

02_research methods Provides the methods we have used and the process we have undertaken to solve the problem.

03_project process How the research was employed and the results and analysis that was found and formulated. Intended to act as seed ideas for further speculation of other groups and assist in the formulation of an architectural brief

04_proposition + speculation Our speculations, seed ideas and recommendations that resulted as a response to our project process. Speculations are intended to act as idea catalysts amoung further groups utilising this report.

01_project overview

abstract


table of contents 00. osa overview

acknowledgements osa statement living cities competition group problem statements group dynamics osa sites + process

ii iv vi viii x xi

01. project overview

abstract introduction GASP problem statement focus area aims

1 5 7 11 13 17

02. research methods

methodology implementation

19 21

03. project process

document analysis architectural precedent theoretical framework coastal solution analysis context investigation focus group analysis physical analysis social interactions usage analysis character development

25 33 37 45 61 69 83 97 103 115

04. proposition + speculation

speculation + recommendations alterations conclusion references image sources

119 151 159 160 161


03_project overview

SPE CUL ATE GASP!_GLENORCHY_HOBART


introduction Elwick Bay + Glenorchy

“We are a Council that acknowledges its important social responsibilities to provide the services and programs that our community needs. We offer practical programs to assist our young people, families and older residents.” - Adrianna Taylor, Mayor of Glenorchy

Nestled between the stunning icons of Mt Wellington and the Derwent River, Glenorchy is Tasmania’s fourth largest city and has a close and deep connection to the Hobart capital. Posessing a rich indigenous history and diverse multicultural residents along with many unique attractions, the embedded value and what brings everything together is Glenorchy’s strong sense of community.

Glenorchy

Hobart


Museum of Old + New Art (MONA)

Derwent Entertainment Centre Glenorchy CBD

Elwick Bay

Glenorchy

Hobart Showgrounds

Elwick Racecourse

05_project overview

One strong feature of Glenorchy is the waterfront location of Elwick Bay. Once part of the tribal area of the Mouheeneener Aboriginal people, Elwick Bay is currently a relatively underutilised public space surrounded by exciting and prominant public attractions and infastructure.


introduction GASP!

The Glenorchy Art and Sculpture Park (GASP!) located along Elwick Bay strongly positions itself as a centre for contemporary site-specific outdoor arts. Acting as the northern gateway to southern Tasmania, it is a catalyst of interaction, thinking, feeling and doing. A place for people and activity. The GASP project intends to promote engagement and participation amoungst the community and act as a destination, rather than a place for visitors from the greater context. It will act as a magnet and platform for all types of festivals and events, promoting engagement.


07_project overview

GASP offers a truly unique public space experience, offering a welcoming and compelling experience that attracts repeat visitors and audiences. The park will achieve this through providing opportunities to experience and explore a wide range or creative and interactive art installations while connecting with the wonderful natural setting of Elwick Bay. It will act as a dynamic gathering place for all groups of people to enjoy a wide range of differing public activities and will provide a much needed ease of access for visitors and the community to notable attractions such as MONA and the DEC through an experiential journey along the boardwalk (figure 1).

figure 1

“Tasmania is on the brink of something big. This is not the time to think small. Go on, Tassie - be a devil.� - Juliana Engberg, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art Artistic Director

figure 2


“Participation and creativity as identity” - GASP Feasibility Plan (2010)

“Community participation is important, meaning that art may be developed and fabricated here in partnership with local businesses, schools and community groups. Links to existing services and organisations will help create a dynamic and well-used space.” - GASP Feasibility Plan (2010)

GASP will contain site specific art based on input from the community across all skill levels from emerging to internationally recognised artists. Visual, performance, sound based, kinetic, interactive and sensory art will be present in the park, some permanent and others temporary. The important underlying aim is increasing participation with the program, promoting engagement with the community and creating a truly socially inclusive space. The boardwalk implementation currently provides a link between MONA, the DEC and Wilkinson’s Point where a future ferry terminal will be placed. This link will provide a better public link to the greater context of Glenorchy and allow ferry access for DEC events. The combination of this infastructure support, artistic activity catalysts and public space focus intends to engage with the community to promote participation and for the GASP development to be accepted and utilised within the existing urban fabric, rather than appearing to function outside of the community. In order for GASP to engage successfully with the community and truly be accepted and integrated it must interact positively with the existing urban fabric. Through architectural analysis and research there are unique concepts and ideas that can be generated to help the development at Elwick Bay engage more successfully with the community. Through examining multiple aspects of the site and the GASP project, investigations can be conducted into social enterprise opportunities that will assist in achieving these goals. Employing a methodology towards a particular focus location of GASP and employing architectural research and analysis which will inform social enterprise concepts that support project goals will benefit both the GASP project and the community by activating this underutilised area.


09_project overview figure 3


problem statement The socially underutilised Elwick Bay aims to engage and promote participation amoungst it’s users and reconnect itself to the community through the GASP project. Stage one of the project has been initiated with the resulting boardwalk currently being implemented. With this boardwalk initialisation comes the aim that the sites current minimal activity will develop and life will be added to both the site and the area. The notion of adding life is easier said than done, with many currently underutilised sites sitting dormant with a discertainty on how to connect with their context and community.

How can an underdeveloped site be utilised as a catalyst for interaction, social enterprise and identity, while creating connections to the wider community?

This project entails an investigation into ways of activating underutilised sites and using GASP as a casestudy to both speculate methods in relation to social enterprise concepts and ways to connect and engage with a wider community. The research will address the problem statement by examining a focus area of Elwick Bay and GASP through conducting and collecting multiple streams of information and analysis that will inform speculations of social enterprise opportunities that could be employed that assist the site and GASP in engaging with the community. The analysis conducted will be presented and will be able to be utilised to provide seed ideas for further speculation from other groups and will inform the develop of an architectural brief if required. The analysis will address the problem statement by considering how to create new patterns of use and interaction between existing users of the site, and in turn, create new activities and users while engaging with the wider community context and heavily drawing upon a ‘life-space-building’ (Gehl 1987) methodoology.


11_project overview

enquiry Speculate + propose the potential use, design + development of collaborative relationships and social enterprise + community concepts within the focus area at Montrose Bay which support existing programs + intentions of GASP and of broader elements such as the Glenorchy City Council Plan.

The proposed architectural research project may result in the development of a brief that may be used for an open design competition leading to the development of the open spaces + potential design + construction of a new community based facility.

Investigations will also examine existing infastructure such as carparking and toilets within the focus area to determine if relocation or alteration could potentially add positive attributes to the site and GASP.

The speculations will be based directly from the analysis conducted into the focus area and will provide seed ideas and discussion points for further speculation. The analysis and findings presented will provide the general framework for groups to implement more specific architectural and social solutions. This method allows adaptability to ever-changing variables, as opposed to a fixed masterplan.


focus area Industrial Manufacturing Montrose Bay High School Montrose Bay Yacht Club Glenorchy Rowing Club

Brooker Highway

Playground

Fo

cu

sA

Existing Grove Sculpture Park

re

a

Montrose Bay

Elwick Bay


This area is currently the most diversely used and utilised area of Elwick Bay containing 3 primary program groups;

Montrose Bay High

- Montrose Bay High School - Glenorchy Rowing Club - Montrose Bay Yacht Club The focus area also contains a large sized playground with supporting BBQ and seating spaces. To address the problem statement this focus area and it’s existing users will be analysed and speculation on collaborative relationships and social enterprises will be formed. The concepts arising from this focus area investigation can lead to enriching the GASP brief by the implementation of the speculated concepts in order to more successfully engage with the community, promote interaction, participation and strenghten and establish a positive identity.

Glenorchy Rowing Club

Future GASP boardwalk development

Montrose Bay Yacht Club

figure 5

13_project overview

The focus area of the GASP development that is being investigated is the northern end of Elwick Bay in the smaller Montrose Bay location.


The focus area functions primarily as a recreational space. While underutilised it is in a prime northfacing waterfront location with generous open space. Understanding the relative size of the area in comparison to standard elements is beneficial in truly understanding the size of a location and it’s possible potential, rather than just viewing a space as a few lines on a page.

figure 6


15_project overview

454 car parking capacity DEC can hold 1400

124 tennis court capacity

19 olympic swimming pools capacity

1 existing Glenorchy Big W complex


aims

social enterprise + concept drivers “The Social Enterprise (SE) intends to be a profitable business that will facilitate and encourage a range of community development activities and skills and generally build engagement at Elwick Bay. The intention is that the SE will respond to existing need and build vibrancy and increase participation. The identities of each of the current users should be retained.” - Pippa Dickson, Advisory Meeting Minutes (2011)

Strengthening

support GASP! project drivers + concepts focus on participation and ‘creativity as identity’

Responding

potential character development of Elwick Bay through creative and social endeavours

focus on existing need while adding opportunities Providing

SE provides social and economical opportunities for both the engaging individual, GASP and the wider context build interaction + engagement with the wider community integrating Elwick Bay and GASP into urban fabric

Identity

maintain focus group individual identity while providing catalysts for collaborative relationships providing benefits for each group, but also as a collective


Public + GASP

Fo

Solution

cu

sA

re

a

Collaborative Relationships

Rowing Club

yacht Club

GASP

Montrose Bay Yacht Club

Montrose Bay High

Focus Area Groups

Glenorchy Rowing Club

Social Enterprise Speculations

17_project overview

School


methodology The research methodology developed to address the problem statement and provide the most suitable speculation and recommendations for GASP focusses on different tiers of analysis and testing. Utilsing an analysis methodology comprising of multiple different scales of investigations ranging from purely theoretical to the physical investigation allows a much richer and varied method to reach conclusions. Through beginning to analyse the overlaying components of the focus area and GASP, such as documents and possible precedents, provides a richer understanding when the time comes to investigate and collect data of the physical elements of the site. Analysing coastal solutions in the proximity of the focus area and surrounding features allows informed decisions regarding the possible linkages and effects the focus area may experience and could potentially engage with. Through the previous methodology steps the researcher is already well-equipped with both knowledge of the physical surrounds of the site and of potential overlaying relevant theoretical ideas and analysis that could be applied to the focus area before any direct physical analysis occurs. Examining the physical site at this stage of the methodology allows further concepts and speculation to be realised through previous investigations that were not strictly based on the physical site. Relations of the focus area will now be examined which will provide a deeper understanding of previously investigated methodology steps through existing use and other non-physical patterns being examined.

With completed component analysis accomplished, the methodology will focus on developing a number of test characters that represent a mixture of differing demographics and groups that have been discovered through the component analysis stage. These characters will help to objectively test speculations and recommendations to determine validity. Through both component analysis and testing methodology stages being complete it will be possible to draw upon specific analysis, apply the character testing and speculate on multiple propositions in regards to the development of collaborative relationships, social enterprise and community concepts which support the focus area, GASP and the community. These will be presented as analysis, montages and diagrams in order to promote further speculation from other groups who utilise the research and analysis.


19_research methods

component analysis document analysis overlaying

precedent analysis architectural theory analysis

proximity

surrounding coastal solutions analysis context analysis

direct

analysis of focus groups physical site analysis

relations

social site analysis social usage analysis

testing methodology implementation of character + objective testing

social speculation + montages

seed ideas and speculations to act as architectural + social development catalysts


implementation 1. Document

3. Architectural theory

Gather important documents involving GASP + focus area. Analyse and determine key principles and factors that will drive development of social concepts and provide idealogy framework for speculation

Investigate architectural theory involving public space, user appropriation, adding life, identity and promoting participation in order to allow further development of speculation concepts and deeper component analysis

component analysis overlaying

2. Precedent Analyse key precedents involving social and spatial engagement and promoting partcipation in underutilised sites. Use findings to inform analysis and investigations into further precedents

proximity

4. Coastal solutions Investigate surrounding coastal solutions and determine successful and unsuccessful elements which could be potentially integrated into concepts and utilised as precedent studies


21_research methods

5. Context

7. Physical site

Investigate the wider context to determine possible linkages between focus area and GASP to surrounding areas to increase potential engagement, participation and integration into the existing community urban fabric and identity

Analyse the physical components of the focus area and determine positive and negative features. Will help to determine suitable areas for social concepts and potential architectural development

direct

relations

6. Focus groups

8. Social site

Analyse the groups within the focus area to determine their needs and priorities and their potential to engage and fuel social concepts both within the focus area, GASP and the greater context

Investigations into the social aspects of the focus area such as differing user groups and popular locations of social interaction which will inform speculation


9. Social usage Analyse the usage of the site by different focus groups in order to determine the most heavily utilised areas and which groups are most active and could potentially support proposed concepts

testing methodology

10. Character development Utilising a set of characters derived from the analysis conducted which alows objective based testing of social enterprise and community concepts


23_research methods

11. Speculate Conclusions drawn from analysis and social enterprise and community concepts are recommended and explored through diagrams, montages and supporting information.

!

Proposed speculation concepts presented act as seed ideas and discussion points for further groups to further speculate and create their own new concepts using the research + findings

!

social speculation + montages completed analysis and research

!

Speculations inform potential directions of GASP social enterprise development through the ability to valueadd to the brief and help the project engage with the community and promote participation

Research and analysis provides framework for more detailed solutions to be investigated, such as specific architectural solutions or refined social enterprise built responses


document analysis Analysing important documents involving GASP + focus area determining key principles and factors that will drive development of social concepts and provide idealogy framework for speculation concepts to ensure they support GASP directions


25_project process

SPE CUL ATE GASP!_GLENORCHY_HOBART


document analysis GASP! Feasibility Plan 2010-2013

The GASP feasibility report outlines many aspects of both GASP’s project aims and the process of implementation it will be undertaking through 2010-2013. Within this document a number of imporant points can be utilised to direct social enterprise and community speculation processes.

Endorsed by the Glenorchy City Council in July 2010 Feasibility plan available at: http://www.gasp.gcc.tas.gov.au/

“GASP! will be a unique and enjoyable experience for visitors and locals delivering important emotional, physical, social benefits through the range of activities, art, interpretative work, landscape and environmental factors not available at other parks and gardens in Tasmania.� - Feasibility Plan, 2010, pp 20

From the analysis of the document it is clear that the desire to engage with the community and become a socially inclusive space is extremely prominant. In particularly the aim to develop participation, pride, awareness and to develop relationships with existing organisations while allowing individuals to further their opportunities. Social enterprise concepts could assist GASP by focussing the speculations towards achieving these goals. The desire to place a full time GASP officer somewhere within the area could provide an opportunity within the focus area to accomodate this within one of the proposed concepts. The document outlines a number of target groups that GASP specifically attempts to target. These demographics could provide suitable inspiration for character development for the testing methodology. The document provides an important insight into GASP desires, in particularly how the project wishes to create relationships with the community, engage and promote paritcipation and which key demographics this is directed towards.


GASP! must be socially inclusive and accessible for all members of the community Inclusion through partnerships with community organisations, schools and social enterprises Maintain and build relevance to the community in the local and global context Develop community participation, awareness, engagement and vibrancy

pride,

GASP! aims to foster and nurture relationships with existing organisations to partner in presenting art and supporting new and innovative programs and activities. Opportunities for people who face physical, financial, social or cultural challenges to participate in recreation GASP! Staff appointed & office established by 3rd quarter 2011

Location for permanent GASP officer

Nurture relationships from existing conditions

Aims to strategically target specific groups: Young people at risk of leaving school Primary, secondary and tertiary students, educators & decision makers Under and un-employed people Parents and families with young children Local people from culturally diverse backgrounds Locals and visitors to parks and gardens in greater Hobart Arts audiences (gallery, museum and performing arts audiences), festival audiences Regional communities and travellers in Tasmania and interstate National and international arts patrons, collectors, artists and producers

Develop wider community participation

Add to user’s skills and opportunities

27_project process

Opportunity to build labouring skills and traineeships through social enterprises


document analysis Glenorchy Community Plan 2005-2025

Team GlenorchyLeading the Community Plan

strength

better future Prepared for Glenorchy City Council Community plan available at: http://www.gcc.tas.gov.au

2005-2025

pride growth

Glenorchy Community Plan

vision

The Glenorchy Community Plan is based upon a vision of the city that the council would like to see evolve over the next twenty years. It was formulated throuigh extensive community consultation and researching what the community thought was important to the development of the city. The vision for the city is grouped into five categories (right) and the elements of those which could inform speculation have been investigated. Through focussing social concepts around addressing these community aims it will assist the focus area and GASP in achieving a positive relationship with the community. Important values that arose within the document focussed around community and the need to promote prude and the notion of self help and providing services for individuals and groups to better themselves. This allows the social enterprise concepts a unique opportunity to allow existing residents of the area to directly engage with the focus area and GASP to benefit their own individual lives through participation, whether this be through education or simply an experience. The speculative concepts should address the five community vision topics in order to successfully engage with the community.

“Our Vision is to ensure Glenorchy is the best place in Tasmania to live, work and play; both now and into the future. We want Glenorchy to be a City where we all care for each other and act together to improve our lifestyle and environment through a strong sense of community.� - Glenorchy Community Plan, 2005, pp 7


An empowered community – to build on our proud civic tradition of self help, cultural diversity and our strong sense of identity and community. An informed community – to ensure that people have access to the information that they need. Social A safer community – to work together so we can feel and be safe where we work, live and play. A caring community - to ensure the needs of our citizens for essential services are being met and that families and neighbourhoods are not at risk Economic A challenging and creative community – to continue to expand entertainment and tourism opportunities An innovative job-creating community - to be the leading centre in the State for new investment and innovative growing businesses with the potential and diversity to generate new training and new jobs Environment An exciting rewarding lifestyle – to continue to beautify the City and improve facilities An environmentally sustainable community – to maintain sound guidelines for sustainability concepts Infastructure A well planned, people friendly City – to make sure that development is appropriate and is people friendly.

Generation of new training + opportunities

People focussed infastructure

Strong sense of community + identity

Extend entertainment and social opportunities

29_project process

Community Leadership + Participation


document analysis GASP Feasibility Plan 2010-2013

The Wilkinson’s Point and Elwick Bay Master Plan was conducted by ‘Inspiring Place’ at the request of thre Glenorchy City Council to help development a master plan to help proiivde development guidelines in odrder to realise their vision for the site as an iconic waterfront location.

INSPIRE: n. the arousing of feelings, ideas and impulses that lead to a creative activity. v. to uplift the mind of spirit. PLACE: n. the connection between nature and culturewhich gives meaning to our everyday life. v. to position or arrange. NOTHOFAGUS GUNNII: n. Deciduous beech, the only native deciduous tree endemic to the island of Tasmania, Australia.

I

N S P I R I N G

P

L A C E

The brief recognised the needs for a master plan to create a dynamic mixed use precinct that responds to the physical and cultural qualities of the site and establishes strong connections to the surrounding features of Glenorchy and Hobart. It essentially combines numerous studies conducted into the area and provides a cohesive framework for development that addresses Glenorchy City Council community aims.

Wilkinsons Point and Elwick Bay Precinct

Master Plan

The master plan examines the wider Elwick Bay area but examines specific locations within, including the focus area. The points listed to the right were drawn from the document which outlines a number of possibilites and opportunities that could be integrated with the proposed social concepts. By speculating with these points in mind, it will help to produce more integrated and succinct community proposals.

prepared for Glenorchy City Council Inspiring Place Pty Ltd April 2008

Prepared for Glenorchy City Council by ‘Inspiring Place’ 2008 Master Plan available at: http://www.gcc.tas.gov.au

“(Elwick Bay should act) as an iconic waterfront location with quality environments and structures that complement each other, integrate well into the surroundings and contribute towards a richly vibrant and textured waterfront precinct – a place that is engaging, contemporary and culturally relevant” - Master Plan, 2008, pp 9


Desired directions

upgrading or possible relocation of toilets and visitor information booth

allow for expansion of club facilities to facilitate community needs

improvement of pedestrian access

investigate small-scale development to serve users of the playground and public spaces

complimenting features already found in focus area implementation of ‘joint venture’ programs in association with existing features on site Positives the area already has a number of existing recreational facilities and open spaces that cater well for current local community and visitor use; the area is highly visible from the Brooker Highway with the capacity to cater for some regional recreational needs; the area is closer to existing school facilities and nearby residences; the consolidation of facilities within a recreational hub helps to reduce the Council’s capital and maintenance costs.

Upgrading + integration of existing features

Investigation of joint venture programs

retain 90% of focus area for public un-built use retain waterfront access for the public redevelopment of existing car park to a carfree zone for future play structures and public extensions possible collaborations between existing clubs in order to allow recreational rental such as bicycles and water equipment upgrade of pontoon structures for public accessibility relocation of existing entry road to the focus area on southern side of playground pedestrianising the area to promote acitivty and user participation and engagement

Investigation into carpark areas as social

Hub for pedestrian circulation and recreation

31_project process

Possibilities


precedent analysis Analyse key precedents involving social and spatial engagement and promoting participation in underutilised sites. The findings will inform components of further analysis and lead to investigations into further precedents throughout the analysis stage.


33_project process

SPE CUL ATE GASP!_GLENORCHY_HOBART


precedent analysis Pop Up Enterprises_Kickstand_NY

utilising temporary social enterprises fueled by existing demographics and groups to promote development of social interaction + to promote increased activity in an undeveloped space through many-minor-moves which could potentially lead to more formal development solutions

Detroit Collaborative Design Centre _Detroit

developing the connection between art and infastructure to inject and act as catalysts for the development of life, social engagement and economic development. Targets space that has been neglected and disregarded and activates it through creative concepts and communiy focus and participation

Renew Newcastle_NSW

finds artists, cultural projects and community groups to use and maintain buildings/spaces until they become commercially viable. Utilised to increase social interactions and enterprises within underperforming spaces to increase life and engagement within the existing urban community


35_project process

Allows the possibility to be utilised withing GASP and focus area through temporary, portable enterprise solutions that can be adapted and moved to areas of activty and events around the site. Small start-up costs and potential to engage with community and run by existing focus groups on site figure 7

Possibility to further develop GASP priorities of art and infastructure by strengthening the link between the two through cycleway development and connecting the neglected space around the focus group buildings back into the vital infastructure to connect to the wider context and engage figure 8

Allows the possibility to utilise the underperforming spaces of the focus group buildings as artistic catalysts that can be used for more than their single, current purpose. Allowing multiple use will draw new users to the area and the artistic drawcards will help the buildings promote participation and identity figure 9


architectural theory analysis Investigate architectural theory involving public space, user appropriation, adding life, identity and promoting participation to allow for an increased range of social speculations and deeper component analysis.


37_project process

SPE CUL ATE GASP!_GLENORCHY_HOBART


architectural theory gehl, jan_life-space-building process + user activity generation

adam, robert_establishing local identity through architecture davis, mike_looseness of public space to engage with all users

fredirique, krupa_privatisation of public space + user engagement

ran, ami_appropriation of public space

stevens, quintin_user engagement through looseness

bacon_edmund_engaging movement through urban environment

sternberg, esther m_place memory


39_project process

Creating life before architecture in order to support the development and allow engagement

Creating an identity of creativity that synthesizes + engages with the Glenorchy community identity

Speculating on social concepts that allow users to colonise elements of public GASP space

Allowing users + public community to use + engage the space, rather than simply allowing them to view it

Utilising the memory of the site, in particularly the social memory to help engage with the identity of Glenorchy

Not focussing on a particular demographic for GASP social enterprises but rather utilising looseness to engage with all

Ensuring that social enterprise + new relationships of existing groups do not privatise the public realm

figure 10

Not to create a spectacle for the onlooker, but rather an event in which many could take part in


architectural theory Jan Gehl

life-space-building process + user activity generation Jan Gehl describes the impoprance of the process of “life-space-building” (Gehl 1987) as opposed to the typical development solution of relying on the formation of architectural form to add life to a space. Gehl argues that building design is “more a means to an end” (Gehl 1987), rather than the end itself and that the life between buildings derserve much more careful treatment. It is Gehl’s view that it is here that social interaction and the sensory experience of a space take place, not inside a structure. It is important to apply to GASP and the focus area this methodology of thinking to ensure that the social concepts are not simply relying on a large piece of architecture to try and engage with the community, but must focus on more on this life-space-building concept. The social concepts speculated should attempt to provide life to the focus area and GASP without relying on an iconic strucutre, but rather through specific engagement to create the type of life required in the area. This will allow for “gradual transformations” rather than blunt solutions, allowing for changes to be sustainable and for people to adapt to physical changes and experiment with the new way of experiencing the space. Gehl also describes the notion of the “necessary, optional and the social activity” (Gehl 1987). Necessary taking place no matter the conditions, optional if the conditions are suitable and social is based on the quality and length of the other activities. It is important that the focus area and GASP engage with these types of activites simultaneously, this will provide for a more engaging and living space where the activities “feed off one another” (Gehl 1987). The existing walking and cycling infastructure of GASP already provides a certain necessary activity through circulation paths, there are opportunities where the other types of activites could support and strengthen this.

Life

Space

Building

Focus on ‘the inbetween’ spaces rather than an iconic form as solution

Integrate the necessary with the optional through improving conditions, resulting in social activies

necessary optional


41_project process

architectural theory Ami Ran

appropriation of public space Ami Ran argues the importance of user appropriation in all spaces. Ran suggests that every socio-spatial struggle entails space appropritation and that every act of appropriation is a key factor in defining urban space, particularly the way that it is experienced. He describes urban and public space as “space in use” (Ran 2008) and that appropriation is important in achieving “defensible space” (Newman 1972) both during the day through activity or at night through residents living in close proximity to prevent the feeling that the space is unobserved and therefore not safe. The constant activity and use of the focus area and GASP will help to provide a safe environment, which was a Glenorchy City Council community value aim. Through allowing increased user appropriation and minimising simple thoroughfare “capsular” (Jencks 1985) movement where users move from point A to B with no engagement or awareness of the space they are moving through, such as a person walking with headphones oblivious to the world, it will be possible for GASP to engage and attract users into focus areas and experiences. Ran describes that architecture is simply “the arena” and that appropriation is “it’s unique character” (Ran 2008). This can be viewed in the same way that a market space is nothing without the market stalls. As GASP aims to provide unique character through unique and intereesting artistic experiences it it possible for social enterprise concepts to further develop this unique character through promoting unique appropriation methods. These appropriation opportunities should attempt to engage with users and the wider community and provide multiple options to remain on site and appropriate whether that be claiming existing space temporarily, creating space, modifying the appropriation method or implying a sense of self into a space while minimising privatisation.

Appropriation defines how users view and experience public space

Minmising capsular movement by allowing appropriation allowing major circulation routes and promote activity staying spaces

Allow participation and appropriation to develop the character of space, architecture only provides the arena


architectural theory Quentin Stevens

user engagement through looseness Stevens describes the notion of “looseness” (Stevens + Franck 2008) in space. Stevens describes negative space where strictly defined methods of appropriation and users have been set and the design and functions of these spaces have been utilised to address these limited parameters. While addressing a particular strict field of enquiry or user, it disregards other potential uses and users and prevents engagement and participation at a wider community level. These strictly designed spaces are referred to as “tight architecture” and theorist Robert Sommer describes them as like a “classroom with all the chairs bolted to the floor” (Sommers 1974). Stevens loose theory contradicts this hard architecture, acting more like a classroom with moveable chairs and desks offering a range of experiences, participation and engagement no matter the demographic. GASP and the focus area would benefit from proposed concepts that engage with this looseness. Currently there is minimal activity around the yacht and rowing club due to their strict user group and use, but promoting this looseness incorporating these groups and facilities will help to achieve a more successful engagement with the community and promote participation. Stevens describes the ability for existing spaces to become loose through activity occuring that is not originally intended for the said locations. The most successful activities for generating this looseness are associated with entertainment, self or politcal-self expression, reflection and social interaction which all are removed from the daily routine of fixed schedules and functions. These events may occur regularly or only once, but in essence should be temporary to engage with looseness and consequently, the community. The support of GASP for temporary events within the focus area will help to achieve a more successful public space.

‘Tight’ single demographic successful engagement

‘Loose’ multiple demographic successful engagement

Utilise loose space in currently underutilised spaces due to focussed user groups and limited uses

Investigate temporary events in open spaces to assist in generating activity, interest and engagement with the focus area through looseness


43_project process figure 11

Chicago pathway posesses elements not typicaly experienced in a circulation space. Allows multiple types of engagement from multiple types of users, providing a sense of looseness

figure 12

‘Park(ing)’ utilises car parking spaces in the urban environment and creates catalysts of looseness by installing green seating areas for temporary periods of time, prompting user interest and engagement


coastal solution analysis Investigate surrounding coastal solutions and determine successful and unsuccessful elements which could be potentially integrated into concepts and utilised as precedent studies


45_project process

SPE CUL ATE GASP!_GLENORCHY_HOBART


Site visit visit around around Hobart Hobart Site

GASP! GASP!

Cornelian Bay Cornelian Bay

Kangaroo Bay Kangaroo Bay

Featherstone Reserve Featherstone Reserve Sandy Bay Waterfront Sandy Bay Waterfront

Lower Sandy Bay Lower Sandy Bay

Examining Examining coastal coastal solutions solutions within within the the broader context allowed us broader context allowed us to to gain gain an an understanding understanding into into the the identity identity of of the greater Hobart area by examining the greater Hobart area by examining what what methods methods were were most most common, common, what was successful + what was successful + what what wasn’t wasn’t

47_project process

Coastal Response


Lowersolutions Sandy Bay coastal analysis Lower Sandy Bay


ACTIVITIES

SIghTSeeIng CyCLIng JoggIng ReadIng dog waLkIng FIShIng SwIMMIng BoaTIng CanoeIng

EDGES

49_project process

Lower Sandy Bay, one of the coastal area that have been developed and officially opened in March 2010. Before the construction, the proposal has gone through extensive community consultation to determine what people wanted for the area, the Council engaged consultants to assist with the redevelopment and design of the wateredge. The project commenced in March 2008 with the aim of improving the recreational amenity of the area by creating a more attractive public space.This development has multiple type of wateredges that draws multiple activities to happen along the site. It has become a major node for the surrounding area due to its loose elements, which engage multiple-demographic at a time.


Purpose

Contrast

natural

Split level

Thorough

Loose


51_project process

Discoveries: Multi types of wateredge are able to attract people of different interests and needs into multiple engagements at one place + Loose elements is applied to allow flexible use by visitors Toilet relocation + connection to existing facilities without disregard their security.


coastal solutions analysis Kangaroo Bay Kangaroo Bay


The kangaroo Bay foreshore area is located in a strategically important position between the City’s central business district and the suburb of Bellerive. a large part of the kangaroo Bay foreshore area is degraded and provides poor urban environment and public amenity. at present the infrastructure restricts access to the waterfront and restrain the movement of people to and through the Bay.

Discoveries : Continuation of cycle path and the intersection with boat parking and loading bay + provide repair/rent/recycle bicycle concept of social enterprise + portable stage that can be utilized by the students and mobilized to revitalize any negative space.

53_project process

kangaroo Bay is in the City of Clarence in southern Tasmania. The City of Clarence is located on the eastern coast of the river derwent, across the harbour from the capital city of hobart.


coastal solutions analysis Featherstone Reserve


Discoveries : Identifying other potential parties/attractions that will influence site’s program + boat building facilities that engage communal participation without disregard local identity.

55_project process

This site is located a short walk from Salamanca Place and the waterfront via Kelly’s Steps and it retains the character of a Cornish fishing village of the last century. The development of the Battery Point Waterfront which mainly focused on a single point is disconnected to nearby aJ white Park which officially opened in december 2003. It caused the aJ white Park to become like a hidden place, a backyard for houses and secreted from the public. Mono-edge treatment at Battery Point waterfront attract less people to the site. The private properties that extend to the water edge like jetty and boat ramp denied the access of public to the other site.


coastal solutions analysis

Sandy Bay Sandy Bay


57_project process

Sandy Bay hobart. has few facilities such as yacht Club, Rowing Club, Canoe Club and Multi purpose hall. The development seems to focus on individual structure, rather than overall site. Dead end in some building edges made the some part of the site to be underutilized. The yacht Club with its marina has physically privatized some portion of water edges without proper/clear continuation of footpath. The multi-purpose hall is used for different purposed throughout a year and contributes for a vibrant park during events.

Sandy Bay

Discoveries : Wateredge can be made public as opposed to private + Some arts installations by community to encourage communal participation and engagement + temporary performance stage for events.


coastal solutions analysis Cornelian Bay


another facility is playground, located adjacent to the existing car park. however, both of these facilities are far from each other and not connected by any footpath. The sports facility is focused on land rather than water. The authority prohibits the users from swimming in the water due to water quality, which leads to the absent of water sports at this bay.

Discoveries: food-based popup business can attract people to underdeveloped site instantly + catering educational training that engage community and school student + developing other infrastructure incrementally to minimize initial cost.

59_project process

Cornelian Bay is a small suburb in hobart, Tasmania, australia. It lies just north of the urban parkland, the Queens domain. The bay itself is a safe anchorage for yacht owners. a waterfront restaurant and boathouses line the foreshore. The restaurant is the catalyst of the area, the main attraction for the majority of visitors. This site is the starting point of Cornelian Walk, which is situated in a natural bush setting with water features.


context analysis Investigate the wider context to determine possible linkages between the focus area and surrounding areas in order to increase potential engagement, participation and integration into the existing community urban fabric and identity through social enterprise and community concepts


61_project process

SPE CUL ATE GASP!_GLENORCHY_HOBART


gouLd’S Lagoon

Context Analysis

na uRe naT aRTS SPoRTS CoMMeRCIaL hISToRIC

The site is surrounded by various type of nodes, ranging from natural, art, commercial, sport and historic attractions. The site is potential to become nodes (catalyst) of all other scattered attractions, for example, hub for Creative Stuff, water Sports, eco-tourism etc. The existing features on site ease the site to establish its identity. Mona

GASP! - Rowing + Yacht Club - Groove Reserve - Sculpture Park

dowSIng PoInT deRwenT enTeRTa RT InMenT RTa CenTeR eLw L ICk RaCeLw COURSE gLenoRChy oLy L MPIC PooL Ly - Intercity cycle way - Glenorchy Aquatic Centre

T SManIan TRanSPoRT Ta MuSeuM

ROYAL SHOWgRound

noRThgaT hga e ShoPPIng hgaT CoMPLex Moonah aRTS CenTeR ISLand MaRkeT ToLoSa MounTa T In BIke Ta ToLoSa Pa P Rk


63_project process

Derwent Entertainment Center (DEC)

It is regarded as the premier entertainment venue in Tasmania. This centre used for concerts, conventions, exhibitions, dinners, trade shows and meetings which can accommodate 5,400 people fully seated or 7,500 people for general admission events + 1500 banquet events. It provides formal on site car parking for 900 cars and informal car parking for 500 cars. This car parking are always vacant but fully housed with cars during events. The deC is located approximately 850meters from our focused area. during events, this center might become the source of people coming to the site. deC’s events are always held once a month.

DEC’s appearance during event at night.

0.85 km


Tasmanian Transport Museum The Tasmanian Transport Museum has several buildings which exhibit railway locomotives, carriages, wagons, trams, trolley buses, motor buses and steam engines. Other than exhibiting old transport, this center provides locomotives train rides to and from the city of Hobart with minimal fees. This service provides an access for people to come to glenorchy, which is just a kilometer walk from the study area.

2.13 km

Ferry (Wilkinson Point) + (MONA) A number of private operators provide ferry services along the derwent River including river cruises and historic tours. at this site, there are two ferry jetty available which are at wilkinson Point (underconstruction) and Mona. Ferry is one of major transportation that provide access to the site from other places. The site is strategically located in between two terminal has potential as thoroughfare place, which provides visitor to stay longer.

2.22 km

1.46 km


This Racecourse hosts 30 meetings per year for thoroughbred racing and has attendance for events is between 600 and 1,000 spectators. The Racecourse can hold functions for up to 900 people at a time. The ground floor space is also suitable for trade shows or exhibitions. It also provides a ‘heritage dining room, a small bar on the ground floor and four meeting rooms. 500 lots for Car parking are available on site, plus additional 500 spaces on a vacant parcelof land across goodwood Street. Elwick Racecourse hosts the Hobart Cup annually during February attracting approximately 12,000 spectators. The common method of transport to elwick Racecourse is by car.

65_project process

Elwick Racecourse

1.12 km

The Glenorchy + Royal Showgrounds The glenorchy Showgrounds market is held every Sunday at the Royal Showgrounds (except during the Royal hobart Show week). There are around 160 stalls set up including food vans which serve a range of fast foods. The Royal Show draws in around 50,000 people over the week-long event. Visitors to the annual show mainly come from southern Tasmania and the Greater Hobart Region and some interstate visitors as well as commercial exhibitors from interstate. along side the Sunday markets, the Showgrounds holds regular weekend events including dog shows (every month), cat shows (every two months) horse shows (2 a year).

2.01 km


Museum of Old and New Arts (Mona) Mona ona is an art museum located on the northwest of gaSP! site. It is the largest privately funded museum in australia.The museum presents antiquities, modern and contemporary art from the david walsh collection. The museum covers 9500 sq m, including 1300 sq m reserved for touring exhibitions. Visitors have option to get the by ferry, bicycle, bus or car from the city of hobart. however, there is limited parking space available for car users.

2.22 km


67_project process

MONA WILKINSON FERRY

FOCUSED AREA DEC

TT. MUSEUM

SHOWGROUND

Discoveries The deC, the Showgrounds, the Racecourse and the Mona consistently draw in a large number of visitors to the area. however, there are very few attractions surrounding these major visitor magnets that retain visitors in the area. Catering at the derwent events Centre and the Showgrounds is very limited. The entrance of the site from the two jetty should be celebrated to welcome visitors. The nearby public transportation site especial ferry and train will determine the mode of transportation of visitors coming to the site


focus group analysis Analysis of the groups within the focus area to determine their needs and priorities and their potential to engage and fuel social enterprise and social concepts both within the focus area, GASP and the greater context


69_project process

SPE CUL ATE GASP!_GLENORCHY_HOBART


focus group analysis Montrose Bay High School

The largest group within the focus area is the Montrose Bay High School. The school is seperated from the primary focus area due to it’s sporting grounds but it has the largest critical mass to potentially fuel and support social enterprise concepts. The school is already involved in particular collaborative relationships with some of the focus groups and utilises a great deal of the area in it’s daily activities. Investigating ways that this social catalyst can inform and support social concepts will allow for a deeper level of engagement and higher level of success for these concepts and speculations.

“catalyst”


71_project process

co-educational, comprehensive high school established in 1965 two campuses; main campus (focus area) catering for years 7-10, and The Big Picture School which caters for select year 9 and 10 students 820 students and 124 staff recently renovated facilities providing art workshops and studio facilities beautiful outlook over the Derwent and Mt Wellington backdrop sportsgrounds located within focus area on the south eastern side of the school part of the ‘adopt a foreshore’ program take part in major arts productions occasionally utilises the yacht club for special education needs

“Our school aims to provide success for all of our students by working in partnership with our parents and the wider community” - Montrose Bay High website welcome address

figure 13


analysis

Montrose Bay High School Existing relationship with yacht club and larger focus area for Health and Well Being program activities

Parents drop children off at side of highway to cross at overpass, resulting in an activity hub but dangerous conditions as cars merge into an 80km/h zone from a standing start

X

School must utilise off-site facilities for larger gatherings in the order of 300+ people

School sportsground functions as extended carparking for occasional focus area activities

Currently organising relationship with the rowing club for small kitchen use. Fishing groups and kayaking school activities occur in area

School part of ‘Adopt a Foreshore’ program and undertake 3 clean-ups per year. Past projects have included weed removal and interpretaion signage installations


73_project process

needs + possibilities Montrose Bay High School

support for catering education and programs

Potential surrounding school support

further participation in water recreation and programs potential for pedagogy relationships between focus area groups and school creative support initiatives that support school’s creative programs and GASP project drivers potential boat building and develop of MDT subjects with a wider and more real-world focus initiatives allow large school gatherings to occur within focus area which support other focus groups

high

further integration with community concepts and events within the focus area and wider context, rather than just supplying the school oval for car parking potential partnership with other schools from the area for competitive activities and events within the focus area which support focus groups and GASP project drivers

Potential to fuel social enterprise

primary

special

high

high

med

med

low

low potential to utilise existing features

Comments The schools critical mass allows it to be a very important and strong driver and supporter of social enterprise concepts through the student population and possible integration with subject teaching. However the school is too far located from the primary focus area and the issues of safety and privacy arise when considering utilising it’s existing structures for community concept development. Speculations should be based around the primary focus area and address the needs of the school and how they can be integrated with the needs of other groups and the community. The formulation of relationships currently is positive and can be strengthend by these new proposed concepts, perhaps linking to other schools in the area and providing low development solutions, such as an outdoor assembly area in which the school can utilise without having to go off-site. Careful consideration to school terms must be applied in concepts ( see page 103)


focus group analysis Glenorchy Rowing Club

The Glenorchy Rowing Club is the most centrally located and smallest group within the focus area. While the intensity of the activities of the club vary from year to year depending on membership it typically functions in small activities with the occasional staging of a large function or partaking in a larger event. The Glenorchy Rowing Club is an important asset to the focus area through its focus on social participation and engagement. It does conduct competitive rowing events but it’s prime focus is training, education and participation which fit perfectly into GASP project drivers and social enterprise concepts. The already strong participation focus of the rowing club would be strengthed through collaborative relationships

“participation + activity attraction”


small clubroom that contains a small kitchen and meeting area, toilets and showers small weight and fitness facility with showers available offers memberships, rows competitively but focusses more on training and social rowing. Small number of adult and adaptive rowers (rowers with a disability) offers an Adult Education program held under the guidance of TAFE Tasmania large storage area which is currently almost at capacity function room can be hired, typically for fundraising events can cater for up to 30 simultaneous school rowers, has done so in the past occasional meetings of up to 100 people are sometimes held in the club, monthly meetings by rowing council provide a small amount of monthly attempts to engage with the glenorchy regatta, once had around 80 rowers lkaunching from the jetty pontoon although for the past 3 years limited participation has restricted the enabling of any events

75_project process

fleet of boats that include single, double and quad sculls along with sweep fours and eights


analysis

Glenorchy Rowing Club Rowing club posesses small kitchen and small function room but is currently underutilised with no direct engagement with multiple programming opportunities

Rowing club jetty acts as a catalyst of activity both for the rowing club activities but also for secondary appropriation methods such as fishing and acts as a feature to the bay

Rowing club jetty acts as a catalyst of activity both for the rowing club activities but also for secondary appropriation methods such as fishing and acts as a feature to the bay

X

X

Rowing club building currently very insular and unengaging with community and surroundings and typically ignores the nonrowing club activity around it

Club activities dictate a certain amount of space is utilised for storage and loading and transportation of rowing vessels and equipment. Current storage is at capacity, while north facade completely disregards the amazing orientation and view on offer

Collaborative relationship with school being developed which will provide increased activity and engagement. Identity should be maintained but also united with other focus groups as a larger supporting whole


77_project process

needs +possibilities Glenorchy Rowing Club

collaborative use of kitchen and function room by other focus groups and groups from the wider context to promote activity and participation strengthening of the existing engagement the rowing club attempts with differing groups through enhancement of surroundings and features focus on the jetty and waterfront outside rowing club as a focus area containing multiple types of ‘loose’ appropriation increased membership resulting from a more engaging rowing club frontage to the community and site users including a more approachable aspect to the sport of rowing

possible social enterprise staging area - major visual exposure zone and future GASP walkway

establish a rowing presence in the area and along jetty that allows public use but also displays rowing club facility as a social catalyst utilise close proximity of rowing club to other focus groups and activity areas (such as the playground) as a potential staging ground for social enterprise concepts due to exposure

Comments

Potential to fuel social enterprise

high

high

med

med

low

low potential to utilise existing features

The rowing club and the immediate surroundings are the best location within the focus area that captures the character and visual exposure of Montrose Bay. By focussing social concepts around utilising this area and the nearby activity catalysts of the waterfront, jetty and playground it will make it easier to achieve further community participation and activity generation. Investigating collaborative uses of the existing rowing club features should be explored including the jetty and kitchen space as they are currently underutilised and only rarely used. The proposed concepts should respect the loading and storage restrictions on the rowing club and proposals should either be temporary or transform to support the existing requirements. There is a potential for the rowing club through social concepts to strengthen it’s engagement with the community through establishing a visual presence of activity within the bay and unite with GASP events to make the activity more approachable, resulting in more potential club members and a greater sense of community recreation. (refer to page 103 for use)


focus group analysis Montrose Bay Yacht Club

The Montrose Bay Yacht Club posesses the best equipped features within the primary focus area and also contains the most space around it’s context. With this comes the associated costs though and the club survives financially by hiring their licensed halls for events. The social enterprise speculations should integrate the yacht club facilities or activities to both provide increased activity and exposure, therefore increasing potential membership and hall hire, but also to allow the club to be part of the activity of the focus area. Similar to the rowing club, the yacht club building is very insular along with a very strict focus of activity. Through collaboration the club could expand it’s exposure and participation.

“contained potential”


large internal boat storage area external lock up cage for dragon boat storage, dragon boat group considering establishing a headquarters in the focus area contains a members lounge with a bar (the club has a liquor licence), kitchen/kiosk and change room facilities multi-purpose hall that can seat up to 130 people which can be hired for parties, weddings and other community events upstairs room used by race officials during racing events occasionally the school utilises the yacht club for special education needs operates a kiosk each Sunday from October to the end of April to coincide with sailing events grassed area on the water side of the building is utilised for rigging and launching of boats jetty utilised for boat mooring sailing typically restricted to within the bay except for an annual long distance race small annual regatta at the club including irregular races and visits from other yacht clubs and even the occasional state championships

79_project process

substantial clubrooms built in 1960’s and extended in the 1970’s


analysis

Montrose Bay Yacht Club Posesses liquor licence and good facilities that could be integrated into GASP events and possible social enterprise concepts

Surrounding north space is utilised for unloading and staging of yachts, careful consideration of this existing use and proposed future GASP developed walkway should be taken when advising social concepts

Sailing allows wider context links and a possible moving advertisement for the character and activity in the focus area. Potential sailing races from yacht club to Wilkinson’s Point and back could be explored

Location between future GASP walkway and access road positions yacht club as a potential transport intersecting hub where cars can be parked and bicycles or yachts can be utilised

Dragon boat external cage locker claims valuable north facing waterside space. Integration with the yacht club for either storage or Dragon Boat headquarters shared development could allow cross programming activity

Northern facade of yacht club could potentially engage more heavily with the users of the walking track, promoting the club and the yachting experience and activities. Currently very insular


81_project process

needs + possibilities Montrose Bay Yacht Club

Capitalise on existing yacht club features in supporting focus group events and GASP initiatives that could benefit from a liqour licenced venue. Promote social participation through further sailing trial opportunities that allow no pressure engagement with the club and link to the wider context Establish collaborative relationships where the yacht clubs hall could be utilised for major events and social programs (boat building)

Current major activity areas of yacht club will allow exposure to future GASP walkway. Opening up north facade will allow increased internal quality and display of yacht club activity and features to passersby

Formulation of a possible Dragon Boats headquarters that either partners with the yacht club or shares facilities and which helps engage with the community through supporting social concepts Open yacht club building to the north, exposing it’s activity and potential to passersby on the future GASP walkway Middleground between road and walkway provides possbility of thoroughfare activity of people parking cars and moving along track. Potential yacht club exposure increase

Comments

Potential to fuel social enterprise

high

high

med

med

low

low potential to utilise existing features

The yacht club’s existing features and strong connection to both the waterfront, roadway, open space to the north and the future GASP walkway position it as a prime component which could help support social enterprise concepts. It is more disconnected visually than the rowing club, to existing features such as the playground, but the added level of facilities and size allow it to be a good base of operations. While rowing can be casually and socially experienced with little training, sailing requires more and cannot be participated in by the community as easily as other activites such as rowing can. Social concepts should attempt to focus on the integration of the yacht club building rather than strictly the sailing activity. The collaboration of the building will allow for further exposure to activity for the club and an increased number of the community willing to try sailing. The size of the yachts will also be helpful in establishing a presence of activity in the bay while promoting possible nautical and marine enterprises such as boat building or a collaborative water activity between all the focus groups. For activity and use, see page 103.


physical site analysis Analysis of the physical components of the focus area and determining positive and negative physical features. This will help inform suitable areas for social concepts and future potential architectural development


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SPE CUL ATE GASP!_GLENORCHY_HOBART


physical site analysis focus area division

The focus area comprises a number of different zones which through analysis are seen to cater to specific individuals and activities. For the purpose of this analysis the area is broken down into 5 groups. Breaking the area into these groups allows a more refined analysis of both the individual activities and physical features that occur within the groups, and their relationship to the larger focus area


85_project process

school sector

yacht sector

rowing sector

play area

park thoroughfare


physical site analysis park thoroughfare

The park thoroughfare sector of the focus area acts as the direct link to the GASP boardwalk and further development at Wilkinson’s Point while creating a direct link to the Derwent Entertainment Centre. Currently there is little development in the sector with typically just a narrow pathway which winds around the existing foilage with sheltered seating areas in adjacent areas. While quite a large area, it contains wide open, cleared spaces along the waterfront. Most likely intended for users to appropriate through picnics and other social methods but this does not seem to be the case. The potential for this area to support social enterprise concepts should be analysed with more a development on the support of activities, than the development of supporting structures.

most suitable and engaging locations for social concepts to be staged existing pathway terminates at carpark, future GASP walkway will continue along water’s edge path situated approx 25m from water’s edge

large open space not screened by foilage to highway

sheltered seating spaces and table scattered around area

no possible way to cross the highway in this sector


park thoroughfare

currently fairly underutilised consisting of large, unused open space in a prime location

xx x x x x

seating shelters are rarely used, located in typically undesirable areas or where they make the user stand out in the public space and put them on display

pathway acts as a simple thoroughfare with nothing engaging around it, potential to utilise neglected spaces as catalytic social spaces that perform a number of functions such as performances or morning yoga

large green space features potential to engage with social events, with other sectors providing support opportunity to promote the ‘journey’ along the walking track with artistic catalytic installation or social enterrpise concepts, such as small, portable stages for community shows foilage succeeds in screening traffic noise from path, but open green space still recieves large road noise

pathway is disconnected from both the water’s edge and the grass thoroughfare walking route. Enabling a cross link of social features or installations could link user activity and engagement all the way from the highway to the water’s edge

pathway is disconnected from water’s edge with open space in between but the open space features no drawcard, shade or activity to utilise use and is neglected outdoor exercise equipment located on pathway, rarely used due to user being directly on circulation and treated as a spectacle no way to cross the highway into this sector this sector acts more of a scenic walk than a recreation area. There is no engagement along the pathway resulting in users not taking part in the space but walking along in their own “capsules” (Tyrhwitt 1979)

x

south of pathway grass appropriation by users favoured over designated sheltered seating due to privacy and looseness possbilities

Comments

Utilising the park thoroughfare sector’s large spaces and connecting pathway through a series of community catalysts such as small performance or creative insertions is highly recommended. The focus on using this sector for events and temporary participatory concepts such as outdoor markets would result in both increased activity to the other focus areas and potential exposure to the highway for advertising social activity while promoting ‘the journey’.

87_project process

analysis


physical site analysis play area

Currently the most active location within the focus area is the play area. The playground is a major catalyst of activity, even on weekdays. The sector contains supporting facilities built around the playground such as a toilet block and shaded seating and bbq features. From research conducted it was not seen that the shaded seating structures were heavily utilised, only a few moments where people appropriated them were visible, despite their strong connection to the activity of the site. The toilet block is in dire need of repair, replacement or relocation which should be investigated, while the tourist information display is both hidden from the public, outdated and in need of much better signage. The space currently functions as a large play area for children, acting as an extension of the playground and would benefit from social cross programming.

most suitable and engaging locations for social concepts to be staged

entry road leading to primary carpark

toilet building

large open space occasionally utilised for events tourist information display large playground

no possible way to cross the highway in this sector


social enterprise concepts could integrate the playground activity catalyst engaging both children and parents, for example, mothers knitting group while children play

play area

playground acts as a major catalyst of loose activity and is easily the currently most utilised feature in the focus area the road to the car park on the southern side of the playground provides a slower barrier before the highway but covers a very long distance. Investigations into relocating the carpark or access road should be explored

utilisation of green space areas which connect to both the playground and facilities while allowing road advertisement of activity for exterior social enterprise concepts

toilets are in a terrible condition and the council receive emails daily from the public about their condition. The current location does centre itself to service all features of the area but perhaps a change of location would better provide for the area

possible conversion of access road to primary car park, promoting pedestrian activity through the focus group facilities adding activity and life while prioriting pedestrians

large green spaces are typically underutilised, except for the odd community event. The close context to the playground and carpark while allowing exposure to the roadway to advertise the activities could allow for further potential activity development to occur in this space the tourist display is completely disconnected from the facilities of the focus area. It intends to advertise itself to the roadway for visitors but it is not noticeable and hence, not utilised. Increasing signage and relocating to a more central activity area of the focus area would provide further engagement, as many camper vans utilise the car park area the standard shaded seating areas are hardly utilised by the public who instead reside inside the boundaries of the playground, typically parents with children. More interesting seating areas would help promote interest

possible toilet relocation to more suitable area or option to combine toilet facilities with one of the clubs, minimising costs and crossusage

Comments

The primary issues found in the play area in relation to social enterprise is capitalising on the activity of the playground and developing social opportunities around this existing activity. The toilet relocation or development is also an important factor as this forms a necessary component of any social concept, while the green spaces provide the opportunity for larger social event spaces and staging areas for concepts to set up and take place due to their multiple connections to elements such as the roadway, playground and carpark.

89_project process

analysis


physical site analysis rowing sector

The rowing sector of the site contains possibly the best location of the entire focus area. Unfortunately that location is where the current car park is situated. This location currently is able to directly link with the high activity catalyst of the playground, the rowing club opens out into the space, it has a direct connection with the water and jetty while the future GASP walkway will intersect directly through it providing multiple tiers of activity. Other areas include the grassed area outside the rowing club storage typically used for preparing rowing craft but most of the time is left empty, while the rear of the club the grassed large green space continues and wraps around the structure. Interestingly there is a sewage disposal and water station for camper vans on the southern side of the yacht club which would explain the high level of campervan activity within the car park.

most suitable and engaging locations for outdoor social concepts to be staged

sewage disposal and water taps for camper van users attached to south side of yacht club

unused green space fronting access road and rear of yacht club rowing club storage open onto this side via large garage doors

jetty and pontoon features as a prominant bay feature and activity generator carpark is located in possibly the most accessible, high activity and positive location in the focus area


relocation of the carpark to boundary of area and development of community concepts in the site of the old car park would allow thoroughfare benefits

rowing sector

carpark located in most accessible and positive location in focus area. Should be possibly relocated to boundaries to promote thoroughfare activity through focus group facilities strong potential areas to expand out from rowing club storage space. Additional storage could be provided to allow for the addition of social enterprise concepts to be stored and expanded out into the waterfront space

future GASP walkway could provide activity links to social concepts which utilise the outdoor space outside the rowing club storage rooms, while providing a display space for the rowing club

heavy engagement with future GASP walkway rowing club has very insular facades considering it’s location in the main activity node of the area

existing carpark space has the potential to engage with multiple facilities and activities happening within the focus area simultaneously and would be a suitable base location for commercial social enterprise or concepts needing customers

possible connections from this central area to other areas and their facilities such as the playground, school, yacht club and park thoroughfare space jetty features as bay landmark which could be further developed through more attractive or artistic features and promote public use such as fishing thoroughfare and existing carpark on northern side of rowing club provides staging and unloading of water craft but could potentially be condensed to allow for social space to be attached to the northern side of the rowing club to promote and support social enterprise

Comments

The rowing sector is the most centralised location amoungst all the sectors within the focus area. It should be treated as a central connecting node or hub of activity due to all activity and benefit occuring within this area will positively affect the surroundings. Primary focus areas are the car park and outside the rowing club storage areas where connectivity, exposure and conditions are maximised. Social concepts that require customers or exposure to multiple demographics should be based in these areas.

91_project process

analysis


physical site analysis yacht sector

The yacth sector is the most northerly and disconnected location from the primary focus area. The club building is heavily orientated north away from other facilities and groups and the seperation allows the yacht club to esentially claim this entire area as their own. The only other group interaction comes from dragon boat users who utilise a storage shed on the northern side of the club. These dragon boat users are also looking to establish a club somewhere within the focus area which enables the opportunity to club share with the yacht club, enabling further use of the existing building and promoting more participation and activity in the immediate area. If an entirely new club building was to be built then the same issues as the current clubs would most definitely arise. The sector has excellent northern orientation and the future GASP walkway will extend around the water’s edge. This could enable the yacht club to open up it’s northern side to the public through decking or glazing, engaging with the passersby. most suitable and engaging locations for outdoor social concepts to be staged

lockup cage used to store dragon boat equipment. Dragon boat group looking to establish a club in the area

jetty and pontoon used to moor sailing craft

yacht club storage opens to small grassed area and car park, utilised for preparing vessels


potential for northern facade of yacht club to open out onto GASP future walkway and potential social activities and concepts to occur in this sunny area

yacht sector

yacht sector typically isolated from other focus groups storage shed opens out into same space as rowing club, this is the primary interaction between the two

carpark relocation to boundary allowing for increased social activity and concepts to occur on waterfront outside club storage areas

building focussed heavily to the north and disregards the south, which is the direction of activities and focus groups functions and conducts it’s own activities well enough but effort should be made to integrate the club into the overall social scheme of the area

dragon boat storage and clubroom combined into yacht club to promote sharing of facilities and a wider palette of potential activity to engage with community

large northern space in front of the club caters for boat preparation for races but has the potential to allow the yacht club to open out onto the future GASP walkway and open it’s northern facade to engage with the public the eastern side of the yacht club would be ideal for the expansion of social enterprise concepts from utilising the club facilities on the interior but then allowing it to spill out into the public GASP walkway the dragon boat storage could be more heavily integrated with the yacht club and facilities could be shared to establish a critical mass of the club. This joint venture could allow for the funds to open up facades of the club to the public to advertise activity and character existing identity of club should be maintained but also grouped under a larger identity collective of the focus area

primary social concepts and activity generators should be located or interact with the waterfront location to create a band of activity that runs along Montrose Bay

Comments

While the area around the yacht club does seem disconnected from the more central groups of the focus area it has the sufficient facilities and outdoor space to help support social concepts and engage with users, particularly who utilise the future GASP walkway. The two carparks located adjacent to one another really offer an opportunity to combine to form a social plaza that can be adapted from preparing watercraft, to markets, to presentations and school assemblies.

93_project process

analysis


physical site analysis school sector

The most heavily disconnected sector from the primary focus area is the school area. Comprising of a main campus configuration of structures, sports grounds and relevant car parking it faces restrictions on the utilising of it’s facilities and features due to privacy and the issues of public access into school-owned features. That said, the school’s critical mass has the highest potential to fuel and support social enterprises anywhere around the focus area and this should be capitalised on. While the schools internal facilities may be relatively off limits for the majority of social enterprise concepts, the inclusion of the sporting grounds could potentially offer up recreational social enterprise opportunities that the other areas and groups could support through their features. A hot spot within the sector is the overpass crossing the highway which features major activity in the mornings as parents drop their children off for school.

Montrose Bay High main campus

football oval two basketball/netball courts

overpass provides one of only two highway crossing locations (other is at the DEC) soccer field


utilisation of the sporting grounds can allow for social concepts to engage with recreation and engage with the other focus groups post-game

school sector

diverse array of sporting grounds available could present the opportunity for a disadvantaged sporting league, with before and after games catered by one of the other focus groups parents dropping their children off at the overpass in the morning and then trying to merge back into 80km/h traffic is a problem that will need to be addressed by a relative authority. Perhaps social enterprise can either help the situation be engaging with this activity node in the morning, or allowing an easier method of dropping children off

potential engagement with the large amount of parents dropping children off from school through a potential coffee drive thru or other transportable enterprise

GASP future walkway will move along border of school campus, allowing potential exposure to outside circulation activity and a better connection to both the focus area and the wider context

future GASP walkway to run along school campus border allowing easier connection between school and other focus groups in order to fuel concepts through critical mass

social speculation should explore a number of concepts that directly engage and utilise the critical mass of the school to fuel them, but that can also function when school is not in term school sector should primarily be utilised to support social concepts through use of sporting grounds, potential event extension from focus area onto sporting grounds and utilising the critical mass to fuel enterprise speculations the sector should be used to support others, not to be developed on

Comments

While the school does seem disconnected from other focus groups, it actually has the greatest power to fuel the social concepts and re-engage the activity in the primary area. While development should not typically occur within the school sector, various methods of incorporating the school children and pedagogy into social speculatons within other focus groups should be a high priority. Collaborative relationships between all focus groups will be the most effective solutions.

95_project process

analysis


social site analysis Investigations into the social aspects of the focus area such as differing user groups and their movement, and popular locations of social interaction which will inform speculation


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SPE CUL ATE GASP!_GLENORCHY_HOBART


circulation social site analysis

Current circulation is predominantly student, moving across the site especially later in the day. Students move from the school and cut between sporting ovals and through open space, saving time by not engaging along pathway. Or they leave school and use the overpass to cross the highway on the way to the Glenorchy Centre. Adults utilise the central car parking and as they are central result in minimal circulation except for when using the designated walkway, mainly for walking animals

adult circulation

students cut across open, but on bicycle they are forced to utilise pathways

student circulation future GASP walkway starting points

current central carparking minimises circulation

boundary parking will promote circulation + thoroughfare activity

Comments

Boundary carparking will help to add experince to the site by promoting pedestrian activity, rather than users park their car, walk 3m, complete activity, get into car and leave. In order to draw students to main paths and focus groups there must be visible activity occuring in the area. Youth are drawn to activity, if social concepts were being employed over near the pathway, the youth would utilise them.


99_project process

staying spaces social site analysis

Other than the school there are three primary areas in which users tend to spend time within the focus area. Research showed that the jetty was popular for activities such as fishing and sitting and talking. The playground was a major staying space which included children on the play equipment and parents talking to one another on the play equipment seating. The third area was on the grass behind sheltered seating areas and trees where people would sit on the grass with a certain amount of privacy from the track but while also feeling connected

“loose appropriation allows a multitude of appropriation types� - Stevens, 2008 staying spaces

X Comments

Successful staying spaces within the area are not the sheltered seating areas, but loose elements such as the playground which allows multiple appropriation methods, the jetty which allows inpromptu seating and experience and the grassed area behind trees which offers privacy and no set seating spot.Social concepts should engage with these loose types of spaces but not dictating specific methods of use but allowing for multiple types of appropriation. Jetty and playground could provide experience and activity to concepts


interactions social site analysis

Currently there are limited everyday interactions within the focus group. This analysis disregarded the occasional rowing and sailig club activities and focussed more on what occurs everyday of the year on the site. A major interaction driver was of course the playground and school but what was interesting to note was that the carparks acted as an interaction point at the beginning and conclusion of activities such as dog walking or jogging. The bend in the walking track also prompted interaction as users often surprised each other coming around the bend and they could not avoid by deviating

interactions fishing sitting + talking children play, parent conversation dog walking jogging

Comments It was interesting to see the carparks acting as activity nodes. This same concept could be applied if the carparks were moved, as long as a main centre (such as a plaza) was present which could become the new start and end point for activities. Also the bend in the track proved interesting and the green space to the north of it could become a good area to stage outdoor social concepts, it is essentially a meeting node along the walkway


social site analysis

A few interesting activities took place within the focus area during the analysis study. The most prominant was the presence of campervans. As previous analysis has shown, there is a sewage disposal and drinking water system on the southern side of the yacht club but even then there was at least 2 campervans present whenever analysis was conducted. Primarily in the carpark and further north at the boat ramp. Interesting yoga/ stretching locations were utilised by users, while school drop off turning circle outside yacht club was moderately used in the mornings

stretching/yoga campervans student drop-off

bend in walkway location was used for a single yoga user, perhaps due to view of opposite mountain

Comments The constant presence of campervans can perhaps add a further user group that will need to be considered for future development of social concepts within the area. While the spots utilised by yoga/people stretching were the jetty, playground and walking track bend. These were most likely chosen due to their outlooks and proximity to the exercise starting point but could inform of positions to situate fitness related social concepts

101_project process

interesting activities


social usage analysis Analyse the usage of the site by different focus groups in order to determine the most heavily utilised areas and which groups are most active and could potentially support proposed concepts. The following analysis describes the social activity that occurs on the site involving the focus groups throughout particular times of the year.


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SPE CUL ATE GASP!_GLENORCHY_HOBART


monday

social usage analysis

Playground Training

School training

Health + Wellbeing program (cooking, fishing, kayaking)

Montrose Bay High School

Classes 7

9

8

10

11

12

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Glenorchy Rowing Club

Rowing season

Montrose Bay Yacht Club Term 1 Public

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

Term 2 May Jun

Jul

Aug

Term 3 Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec


social usage analysis

Playground Training

School training

Montrose Bay High School

Classes 7

9

8

10

11

12

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Glenorchy Rowing Club

Rowing season

Montrose Bay Yacht Club Term 1 Public

105_project process

tuesday

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

Term 2 May Jun

Jul

Aug

Term 3 Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec


wednesday social usage analysis

Playground Training

School training

Health + Wellbeing program (cooking, fishing, kayaking)

Montrose Bay High School

Classes 7

9

8

10

11

12

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Glenorchy Rowing Club

Rowing season

Montrose Bay Yacht Club Term 1 Public

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

Term 2 May Jun

Jul

Aug

Term 3 Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec


107_project process

thursday

Playground

social usage analysis Montrose Bay High School

Classes 7

9

8

10

11

12

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Glenorchy Rowing Club

Montrose Bay Yacht Club Term 1 Public

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

Term 2 May Jun

Jul

Aug

Term 3 Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec


friday

Playground

social usage analysis

Health + Wellbeing program (cooking, fishing, kayaking)

Montrose Bay High School

Classes 7

9

8

10

11

12

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Glenorchy Rowing Club

Montrose Bay Yacht Club Term 1 Public

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

Term 2 May Jun

Jul

Aug

Term 3 Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec


social usage analysis

109_project process

saturday

Training Playground training

Montrose Bay High School

competition Sport

7

9

8

10

11

12

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Glenorchy Rowing Club Rowing season Montrose Bay Yacht Club

Sailing season Term 1

Public

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

Term 2 May Jun

Jul

Aug

Term 3 Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec


sunday

social usage analysis

Playground

Montrose Bay High School

training 7

competition 9

8

10

11

12

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Glenorchy Rowing Club

Montrose Bay Yacht Club Sailing season Public

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec


social usage analysis

Montrose Bay High School - cross country carnival along foreshore, foreshore restoration program, use of other clubs facilities Glenorchy Rowing Club - 3 Adult Ed courses a year, monthly commitee meetings, November regatta, depends on member numbers

Montrose Bay Yacht Club - racing typically contained within the bay except for annual long distance, hosts championships at Christmas

Public - community events such as market and extensions of programs such as ‘The Works’ art program, youth sporting events on oval

111_project process

occasional


weekly use overview social usage analysis

public - weekends

public - weekdays

school - classes

school - sport

rowing club yacht club Mon

Tue

Wed

Thur

Fri

Sat

Sun

Comments Through usage analysis the potential of each group to fuel social enterprise concepts can be seen. While the school and the public heavy use of the focus area highlight the need to incorporate these groups into as many social concepts as possible there must be careful thought into what occurs when school is not in term. The rowing club provides more activity on the site than the yacht club, due to its scale of activity craft. Examining concepts that involve more than simply the activity of rowing or sailing but still relate to their respective club’s identities will allow an increased presence and possibility of engagement, rather than just two days a week during the sporting seasons.


113_project process

When the facilities of some focus groups are not in use the public appropriate and utilise them how they see fit. These gentlemen are threading fishing lines on the pontoon used by the rowing club to launch their craft. It is this sort of ‘loose appropriation’ (Stevens 1998) that should be encouraged in the social enterprise concepts. Encouraging continuous use by multiple demographics, and not just being able to be utilised by one group for a specific purpose will be most successful.


character development Utilising a set of characters derived from the analysis conducted which allows for objective based testing of social enterprise and community concepts


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SPE CUL ATE GASP!_GLENORCHY_HOBART


character development A set of characters were developed from the research enquiry in order to allow objective based testing of the social enterprise concepts that were to be proposed. The characters were based on research and analysis previously conducted and the desires of particular groups that arose. The characters can be used as informants to particular elements of a proposition, allowing the wider positives and negatives to be seen that were not so obvious at first glance

Rowing Club Member Wants the rowing club to become more involved in area activities and gain new members so they’ll be more funds to improve the club and allow more rowing activities and events

Artist Wants more creative programs where she can engage in artistic creation, teach art or experience new creative activities and events


117_project process

Disadvantaged Youth Wants opportunities that can help him in his future other than direct schooling. Schooling alternatives that give him an education in what he’s interested in

Unemployed Man Wants opportunities to gain education or training that will help him secure employment while taking part in activities that will allow him to meet other people

Student Wants student support and features that cater to students including further education methods and concepts and providing a social outlet

Yacht Club Member Wants more rowing activities and potential for the club to engage with more people in order to increase it’s presence amoungst the community and further the sport participation


speculations, recommendations + conclusions Speculative ideas are concluded from analysis while social enterprise and community concepts are recommended and explored through diagrams, montages and supporting by critical research discoveries


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SPE CUL ATE GASP!_GLENORCHY_HOBART


Boat Building

Creative outlet furthering opportunities

Engagement, social and economical development, responding to the need The potential for water activity and the focus around this particular lifestyle within the focus area is particularly high. The combination of both yacht and rowing club in such close proximity provides the opportunity for a conjoined social enterprise development of a boat building installation, most likely a supporting feature structure that is jointly used by both clubs, supports GASP creative directions, links with the cycling track + is fueled primarily by the nearby school education classes and adult education

potential location due to supporting adjoinment to clubs, water jetty connections, solar preservation and visual bay prominance as well as feeding off circulation interactions


121_proposition


The boat building social concept engages with multiple demographics and groups from both within the focus area and the wider context. Through the temporary utilisation of space outside the clubs the concept allows a certain form of loose appropriation that can expand from the storage areas of the clubs and temporarily engage both with the users of the concept and passersby along the future GASP walkway. The concept allows a collaborative relationship between all groups and allows for activity generation, creativity and recreational fun events “finally a learn by making program that promotes creativity” “boat building as a subject is way better than regular MDT class”

“this will help increase the activity in the bay and the yacht club”

“undertaking this wil help me with my apprenticeship applications”

1

relocation of percentage of yacht and rowing club carparking to western boundary of focus area

2

utilisation of parts of the yacht and rowing storage areas for boat building outdoor workstations and features

3

use of previous club carparking as outdoor boat building and display area engaging with GASP walkway and the waterfront

4

eventual addition of storage facilities of clubs to contain more boat building equipment or an entirely new feature building to house the enterprise

“I can get my adult ed training in marine craft down in Montrose Bay”

“the joint relationship between the yacht and rowing club is fantastic”

the flexibility of outdoor workstations coming out of club storage areas will maintain the previous uses of the space for boat launching, while adding new opportunities


123_proposition

Hobart

need to add visual activity to the bay to promote activity to help draw in users

professional qualifications available from distant Franklin, this could provide closer alternative

potential future building location establish life boat displays act as a portable feature to Elwick Bay and manufacturing could be in collaboration with the industrial sector across the highway and the school

“First life, then spaces, then buildings – the other way around never works” Jan Gehl 1987

Allowing looseness within the space will allow for transformation and multiple functions

Establishing life of program through the joint use of yacht and rowing club facilities, in particular rowing club garage doors and ability to ‘spill out’ into public space will showcase and allow passersby to see activity. Car park relocated to along road to allow for temporary, flexible working space which will eventually lead to a built form on the water high

primary

special

Prominant schools surrounding which could help fuel boat building concept figure 14 Versaille Pavillion, Creative Architects

figure 15 Lower Mill Estate, Sutherland Hussey Architects


Cycling Support

Sustainable program that engages with multiple demographics Assistance, participation, creativity, sustainability, infastructure, connections Due to the focus areas integration with the cycling track and future GASP walkway there is the potential to introduce a social enterprise concept that supports this sustainable transport and provides benefits back to the community and creates a more community engaging space in Elwick Bay. Through the recycling and restoration of bicyles they can be provided to underprivileged members of the community free of charge while students experience bike building and business experience. Benefits for the clubs include the extra activity generated especially if a bike one-way rental feature is employed by the enterprise. The clubs could incorporate their boat building enterprises with this bike building concept to form a creative hub

cycle repair/rental/programs should be located to directly engage with GASP cycleway while advertising it’s presence to the major arterial road to the South. Enterprise should not consist of a structure at first but rather establish its existence and life through temporary installations, utilising storage from the clubs if possible. Over time a pavillion structure could possibly be developed but the temporality of the enterprise could be beneficial for seasonal activity shifts


125_proposition


The cycling community concept allows direct connection to the strong GASP walkway while providing opportunities and connections for the young and older demographics in the community. The focus on the recyling and restoration of old bikes and providing them to the disadvantaged members of the community would be a prime focus for the concept, this would also engage the younger members of the community through the school and other groups to help restore bikes while also providing a bike rental service to the nearby ferry centers would help produce an income “artistic sculptures using recycled bicycle components? Sounds interesting” “I can ride my bike along the track and donate my old one to the community”

“the amount of activity and people riding past the yacht club has skyrocketed”

“I can get experience running the bike rental and repairing bikes”

1

establishment of small bike rental, repair and social riding group/school groups based in the playground carpark location utilising the storage of clubs

2

temporary structures and stalls utilised to shelter concept and features and establish a more permanent appropriation of the carpark

3

increase of yacht or rowing club storage to cater for more bikes and equipment

4

construction of a small pavillion which serves as a permanent facility for bike rental, repair and cycling related community concept but that can also be also utilised for other enterprises

“I received a free bike from the Montrose Bay place to help me get around”

“the rowing club is seeing increased membership due to the activity increase around the bikes”

small pavillion or temporary appropriation in the playground carpark will allow for maximum engagement with both thoroughfare along future GASP walkway, links to club storage and users, playground users and would act as a catalyst of activity and sustainable transport while engaging and supporting demographics of the community


- free bicycles - help underprivileged - recycling - workshops - youth run - sustainable transport - repair and creation

“bike share” “rental”

possible cycling rental links to ferry destinations along the foreshore figure 17

Strong intercity cycleway could be connected to the site across the highway

DEC highway crossing would need attention from relevant authorities

possible public transport node, people park or catch bus to focus area, then ride to MONA, Wilkinson’s Point or further context links figure 18

Strong public transport use in Glenorchy Support ‘Gehl report’ aspirations for Hobart and greater context Emphasis on the cycling link between the focus area, Wilkinson’s Point + MONA

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Bristol Bike Project


Portable Entertainment

Collaborative creation of catalytic points of expression

Engagement, drawcard for site, activity catalysts, building vibrancy potential Due to the heavy involvement of creative processes throughout the site and its context there is the possibility to establish a number of catalytic expression points that both support GASP project aims but offer a more community scale option for displaying and engaging talent. Developing portable entertainment features such as portable or floating stages through social enterprise procedures will provide this catalytic interaction point that the community could utilise to engage more heavily with Elwick Bay. These catalytic platforms would host informal local performances, provide shelter for lunch eaters, engage with the play of children and allow the school to showcase it’s design and building talents

features should be ideally portable, catering to seasonal changes in activity (festivals, events etc) but after life is established due to other social enterprise concepts these locations would be the most suitable and provide the most effective solutions in promoting a journey along the GASP walkway and acting as catalysts for expression and activity for the community and focus groups


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The utilising of portable performance spaces both engages with multiple focus groups and the community but also strengthens GASP project drivers relating to creativity and participation. The artistic pieces both allow multiple appropriation methods by differing demographics and act as catalysts of activity and increase the staying time of users within the space. During the Works Festival and other Glenorchy events held within the focus area the stages can be moved around to either provide seating, shade or performance space “I can become involved and create my own artistic portable stage” “I’m finally building something major in MDT clss”

“we can utilise the portable stages for our post-race presentations and functions”

“I can play with my band on the stages during big events!”

1

commencement of design of temporary performance spaces by the school integrated into design and contruction based subjects such as MTD

2

educational and council funding to construct the student designed temporary catalysts in conjunction with the manufacturing capability of the industrial area across the highway

3

student built within the focus area with special emphasis on sustainability and portability

4

temporary entertainment stages are complete and can be relocated throughout the focus area by the council to cater for events. School repeats process in class each year

“I can earn a bit of money by helping the manufacture of the stages”

“finally people are using the area to eat lunch and play on the stages where they can see us row”

small pavillion or temporary appropriation in the playground carpark will allow for maximum engagement with both thoroughfare along future GASP walkway, links to club storage and users, playground users and would act as a catalyst of activity and sustainable transport while engaging and supporting demographics of the community


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UTAS students designing, building and installing bus stops to act as interest catalysts

Artistic stage at Bellerive in Hobart functions as a stage for performances and as a lunch eating area during less busy hours

Context Analysis

The site is surrounded by various type of nodes, ranging from natural, art, commercial, sport and historic attractions. The site is potential to become nodes (catalyst) of all other scattered attractions, for example, hub for Creative Stuff, water Sports, eco-tourism etc. The existing features on site ease the site to establish its identity. Mona

GASP! - Rowing + Yacht Club - Groove Reserve - Sculpture Park

dowSIng PoInT deRwenT enTeRTa RT InMenT RTa CenTeR eLw L ICk RaCeLw COURSE gLenoRChy oLy L MPIC PooL Ly - Intercity cycle way - Glenorchy Aquatic Centre

T SManIan TRanSPoRT Ta MuSeuM

ROYAL SHOWgRound

noRThgaT hga e ShoPPIng hgaT CoMPLex Moonah aRTS CenTeR

offers less formal engagement for creative community than MONA or DEC. Outlet for Moonah Arts Centre and Works Festival expansion along GASP

Catalytic small injections of life, participation and artistic engagement to bring life before the eventual development of a larger social development

DEC’s appearance during event at night.

The social aspect behind the portable entertainment platforms is that they engage with the community from design through to utilisation. They are multi functioning and can be appropriated by the group inhabiting them for all manners of participation. They act as catalytic injections throughout the currently underutilised site

manufacturing relationship possibilities with industrial sector across the highway, then constructed by school as a project figure 19 Portable Eco-Stage, EFGH

figure 20 Foldable Stage, Yanko Design


Catering Solutions

Educational training that promotes collaborative relationships Collaboration, education + skill development, place making, opportunity The current need for catering support programs for Montrose Bay High can be further developed by incorporating them into the social enterprise concepts for the focus area. The yacht and rowing club are rarely utilised for multi-programming and appear to be vacant for most of the time. This presents an opportunity to utilise the catering education student mass to revitalise the underused club facilities, allow the possibility of further context connections and through the utilisation of the club spaces as becoming ‘loose’, allow multiple types of encounters and engagements

catering programs should respond to relating and incorporating primarily the yacht club clubhouse which can currently be hired out to third parties. The redevelopment of existing features or adjacent location of service will allow the possibility of utilising the club rooms as a dining room for larger events, fully catered to by students and able to move outside of the kitchen and engage at a wider context


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The need for culinary educational support for the school could be developed further through the collaboration with other focus groups. Rather than developing a new kitchen for the school which would remain as privately owned and would require primarily school funding, the opportunity arises to utilise the existing kitchen features of the focus area groups. Through an eventual upgrade, the club facilities could be used to educate students, conduct adult education classes and cater for club events such as the use of the large yacht club function room “this could be a perfect place to eat after the exhibition event in the park” “I love how now we have cooking classes and I can interact with the public”

“the culinary class offers an affordable catering solution for our functions”

“I can use this to get a chef apprenticeship through getting a certificate”

1

small scale use of existing user group kitchen facilities to determine viability of class numbers and facilities

2

upgrade of kitchen facilities within club to allow for more students and the ability to cater for yacht club function room events

3

deployment of a small cart or portable concept that allows culinary class products to be sold to the public around the focus area during events

4

if demand and support increases, the eventual construction of a small scale culinary classroom pavillion or school on the western side the rowing club catering for entire program of site events

“I can recieve my culinary adult education certificate”

“our facilities are being more heavily used now and the promotion of our club is great”

staged life-space-building process will need to be employed to judge success of the concept. Starting with utilising existing kitchen facilities, then upgrading, then developing a portable cart allowing sale of good, before finally determining if a built solution could be viable


135_proposition figure 21 Culinary Cafe, Mina Hanna

Culinary Cafe in Seattle operates out of a transportabe shipping container and contains kitchen facilities in one container for educational purposes, and another container that serves the public

utilising or renovation of existing club kitchen facilities

school support

Potential engagement with wide demographic with students and adult education of community being enabled, while users have chance to engage with real customers through the participation of the enterprise in supporting events in and around the focus area

Utilising intial small scale culinary kitchen facilities such as reestablishing the existing club kitchen facilities or depending on class size, the installation of a temporary pop up education facility will allow students to be educated and experience business ethics through customer relations and further pop up business concepts, before a built solution could be investigated

establishing a pop-up catering coffee store in playground vicinity

eventual construction of a catering facility on western side of rowing club, catering for yacht club function room events

Culinary School Form Concept, Mina Hanna


Pop-Up Enterprises

Educational training that promotes collaborative relationships Collaboration, education + skill development, place making, opportunity Developing an extension of the culinary education concept is the notion of a pop-up enterprise. These are portable and small stalls that can be moved around the site to cater for specific events and seasonal variations in activity. They don’t need to be necessarily food or coffee stalls but these would be the most relatable to the general public. The stalls would be run by the students and food and goods would be made by groups within the site or from the community. For example, a coffee stall could move around the site to cater for events or an artistic stall could be utilised during art events spanning across the focus area. The pop-up enterprises could be used as business training tools or cater for events

pop up business concepts should be portable enough to go where the action is needed depending on seasonal variations and event shifting activity. Potential hot spots include the overpass on the highway before school hours when countless parents drop children off to school (coffee in car friendly cup potential), off side of highway next to playground, and next to the rowing club engaging the clubs, jetties, playground and GASP walkway.


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The pop-up enteprises have the potential to engage heavily with school children and the disadavantaged members of the community. During weekdays the pop-ups could be run by the school and the students, but on the weekends it allows the opportunity for the disadvantaged to experience working at the stalls. This could provide educational benefits as well as social and possible short financial gain for the users. The flexibility of location of the enterprises will assist in returning profit as they can be moved to the hubs of activity around the site “I’d love to be involved in making an artistic painted version of those stalls” “I can get some work experience through the school by working at the stalls”

“finally somewhere to buy food and drinks after the sailing race”

“I can work at the stalls on the weekends for a little bit of extra cash”

1 2 3 4

engagement with key groups and facilities that can provide produce or goods for the stalls such as the club room kitchen facilities or community groups within the area construction of a pop-up enterprise transportable cart or adaption of one of the schools shipping containers to act as a pop-up facility by school students as part of an integrated school project engagement of events that take place around the site by locating pop-up enterprise in activity areas construction of further pop-up enterprises with artistic qualities acting both as enterprises and artistic features within the area

“I could be educated in the business side of the stalls”

“the stall near the entrance means more members are using the club as there’s drinks available”

the benefit of the transportable pop-up enterprise is that it can minimise financial loss due to not operating at particular occasions and that it has no leasing costs. This makes it ideal to be heavily fueld by student and youth participation and has the potential to become a catalyst of activity in supporting community events within the focus area


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figure 24

Pop Up Bar, Melbourne

figure 25

Stoneleigh Monument Pop Up Cafe, Sydney

Flexibility during seasonal activity variation is key

Must be careful to not simply relocate to activity areas and disregard focus area, locations should still provide benefits for other focus groups (yacht, rowing club etc)

figure 26

Portable coffee stand, Kickstand Enterprises

figure 27

Portable coffee + food stand, STREAT


Studio Space

Outlet for creativity, participation and artistic community Creativity, participation, education, identity, national drawcard due to multi-function potential, located north of playground in prominant support of all focus groups

1 2 3 4

establishment of potential programs and artist workshops that would engage with potential community adult education and nearby schools

The establishment of a studio space in the focus area would help to support artistic and creative GASP project drivers but also allow the opportunity for a collaboration between the existing focus groups. The possibility of multi-function arises to such a workshop space that allows a sense of loose appropriation within. An open plan studio could be utilised by the school for education purposes, by GASP for internal gallery openings and by the clubs for functional events. It would act as an activity catalyst within the focus area and could act as a social enterprise base location. Allowing for education of the community and other beneficial and engaging programs to be located from within and surrounding this feature Art Workshop, A31 Architecture

trial run some test programs in existing club facilities to determine number of artists, students and community members who would be participating in the programs construction of studio pavillion space that acts as a drawcard and character building for the area and which connects and supports GASP events utilisation of the building for multiple types of needs including art education, large functions, boat building and support structure for other social enterprise concepts

figure 27 figure 27

art workshop that frames views to environment and walking track multi-function possibilites, potential for boat building, display, workshops and creative education classes


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Gym + Training Facility Training facility that engages with people and place Social sustainability, interactions, participation, engagement rowing club periphery based with activities that extend out to high fitness activity zones

1

determine potential numbers of participants in morning fitness classes that take place around the bay

2

explore potential collaborative relationship with rowing club to utilise some of their excercise equipment outdoors and purchase some more for them

3

engage both the schools in the area and the community providing an open air gym that takes advantage of outlook of focus area, providing classes once a few days

4

seek more permanent appropriation in the focus area through new small pavillion building or extension to one of the club buildings and then focus on social engagement concepts listed to the right

Through the need of clubs to increase their training facilities a concept was explored that instead of simply extending their own training facilities, a collaboration was formed and the extension was jointly undertaken by other groups. The training facilities of the rowing club now act as a catalyst for social and community interaction. Extending elements of the training outdoors while still utilising some parts of the interior of the rowing club will allow a gradual increase in activity and engagement before a potential new structure could be developed. The focus on social sustainability should be high and positive connection to both the elderly and disconnected should be addressed through social events and interlaced programs

Open Gym, London

focusses on using the outdoors of a location and engaging with place provides occasional free sessions outdoors at the site for anyone to come along

Good Gym, London

social sustainable gym that partners members with an elderly community member each month gym members go on runs from the gym to the elderly’s house, helping them with a task


Tech Engagement

Promoting the participation and making of place through tech Participation, technology, interaction, appropriation, looseness, identity located as catalysts along GASP walkway and around staying spaces

1 2

It was seen through the research conducted that the focus area is utilised heavily as a thoroughfare for students on weekdays but on weekends the demographics present are more younger children and parents utilising the playground. In order to increase the engagement of the site with this teen and older demographic the use of technology as a drawcard and participation catalyst should be utilised. Through the installation of free wi-fi around the focus area it opens up options for social enterprises to engage with internet related media, displays and social enterprises. Through using temporary theater installations to screen video streaming concepts it will help to add activity and label the focus area as an exciting place

establishment of free wif-fi within focus area to both attract users and to enable specific forms of artistic GASP installations put forward a competition amoungst the community to make a video about Elwick Bay or within Elwick Bay. It could be funny, or a serious video but it must then be loaded onto youtube figure 28

3 4

utilise the school in the construction of temporary theater pop-ups which could be installed and located around the focus area for events utilise the pop-up theaters for a screening night of the competition videos. The theaters could be spread along the waterfront GASP walkway promoting the journey between the different enterprises

Temporary Theatre, Aaron Jones

artist designed in a kit of parts that takes only 30 minutes to erect two can be joined together to create a makeshift childs skate ramp acts also as a lighting feature amoungst the park, which draws users from the exterior areas


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Cross-Cultural Cafe

Establishment of cultural engagement and participation Culture, engagement, place making, cross-programming, utilisation utilises club facilities and caters to major activity areas

1

establishment of cross-usage of existing club facilities, in particularly the rowing club and yacht club functions rooms

2

engaging members of the public from different cultural backgrounds living in Glenorchy and undertaking utilisation of the kitchen features or allowing for minimal upgrading to allow cooking

3 4

installation of temporary furniture both inside one of the club rooms and the immediate exterior and seeking the permission of clubs to operate as part of a collaborative allowing the cafe to operate to cater for specific events occuring on the site or for the clubs, allow cultural cooking education and the option to cater off-site

Due to the large cross-cultural inhabitants of Glenorchy a social enterprise that not only engages with the focus area, but provides a social connection and way of meeting others for someone who is new to the city or culture of Glenorchy would be extremely beneficial. Each person carries with them a cultural background which is unique and which could be utilised in a crosscultural cafe enterprise. The concept is unique in that it brings different cultural backgrounds together into one location, both acting as social support for one another who may not know anyone in the city, and to also provide a unique cafe that employs these people and serves unique dishes to the public

Temporary Theatre, Aaron Jones

figure 29

Cross Culture Cafe, Jaffa

Cross culture cafe in Jaffa allows new members of the community from foreign locations a social outlet to plug into cafe provides weekly meetings for cultural members


Plant + Craft Market

Catalyst of looseness and community participation

Participation, identity, looseness, creativity, engagement, place making located within existing carpark areas in order to engage with clubs and provide maximum connections

1 2 3 4

Perhaps the loosest space is the typolgoy of the market. The market can adapt and change, essentially fitting into any space. The integration of a plant and craft market would allow for the community to directly appropriate elements of the focus area and form a strong sense of participation. Even visitors to the market will see the community-run stalls and view the identity of the space as a public, community friendly and engageable. Plants and craft are utilised as they offer something different from the showgrounds market and focus on both creativity and the unique environment of Montrose Bay. The concept engages multiple groups through school stall potential, exposure and displays by the clubs and the ability for artists and community members to sell their goods

determining suitable times to allow market appropriation to coincide with other programs occuring to allow for major exposure and activity on the site allowing market appropriation by the community and existing groups around the area and treating the market as a major activity catalyst that can advertise other uses on the site such as rowing and sailing installation of market shelters which can be used by yacht and rowing club members when markets are not in session the integration of multiple types of activities and events that occur while the market is running to create one large activity hub within Montrose Bay which draws multiple demographics together and works in relation to other social enterprise concepts

figure 30

Toronto Plant Market, Canada

plant market appropriates existing facilities and allows community to bring craft and plants to sell promotes interaction and engagement with the older demographics, while at the same time sporting events occur around the context


Allows participation for the disadvantaged + social benefits Participation, activity, fitness, identity, friendship, social, community utilise sporting ovals on weekends and postgame facilities at yacht club

1

determination of when school oval can be utilised by social program and if the yacht club facilities could be used after the game

2

engagement of the public to offer a more affordable social sporting league to the disadvantaged members of the community including people who might not be able to afford sporting costs and the disabled

3

formation of a league that runs once a fortnight with the emphasis on participation, engagement, fun and social interaction

4

utilising the yacht club facilities after each game for food and beverages in which the yacht club can operate to make profit and community culture is strengthened

Sporting leagues offer the opportunities to make life-long friends and promote good health. There is no reason that everyone should not be able to engage in this. Developing a social sporting initiative within the focus area would allow for large amount of exposure, activity and community engagement to be obtained by the focus area and GASP. By providing the disadvantaged members of the community with a sporting league which also functions as a social support network it reactivates community pride and identity. The postgame activities can engage with focus groups such as the yacht club where the function hall could be utilised for drinks and food as well as for league events

figure 31

Economically Disadvantaged Soccer Leagues, London

affordable sporting leagues for the economically disadvantaged offers social outlet and opportunity to meet other people promotes a community culture and the leagues form their own identity and grouping, often travelling to other disadvantaged league home grounds for social games and interaction the emphasis is on interaction and creating a support network for these members of the community

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Sporting Initiative


Artist Accomodation

Creation of Montrose Bay as an artistic hub supporting GASP Creativity, identity, activity

located as to not detract from waterfront identity, will need to be smallscale as to not remove existing identity

artist accomodation would engage with artists and support GASP drivers while providing an increased amount of activity and use it would need to be combined with other social enterprise concepts in a collaboration to make it viable as a social enterprise as it only typically engages one group could function well in a hybrid structure with the studio enterprise concept, but would need to remain at a small scale to maintain identity of the bay and not minimise the potential for community engagement and participation in the programs

Rowing Museum

Catalyst of water activity and focus group interactions

Participation, focus heritage, interaction, engagement, feature, place make adds needed functional options for clubs and school, drawcard for wider context and promote participation + interactivity

would engage with rowing club and act as an attraction but it should be partnered with further social concepts if developed. Figure 20 shows a rowing museum with multi-programming possibilities, any rowing museum development should utilise the same strategies

The River and Rowing Museum, Henley, UK


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rowing museum could potentially be a small addition onto the existing club rooms with further funding focussed on social enterprise concepts that engage it’s surroundings and feed of the user activity generated from it


Creative Production

Enabling of creative and participatory activities for benefit Participation, creativity, education, engagement, beneficial, community small scale operation results in the use of current on-site facilities such as the rowing club function room

allowing artistic workshops that engage all demographics to make their own wears and market them Biddy Bags allows the elderly to knit, while the younger generation turn shirts into laptop bags

‘Shirts to Bags’, NY

Biddy Bags, UK Biddy Bags, UK

Water Support Hub

Interactive base for community participation + involvement

Participation, links, support, activity, context engagment, portable drawcards located as feature structure in the bay, if structure was not required, increase of storage for the clubs will be required

providing a general hub for water activity would benefit the entire focus area this hub would need to work in conjuntion with other social enterprise concepts to be eligible for consideration. For example, it would need to supply facilities for boat building and a workshop in order to engage with the community while the ability for groups to use the hub would be beneficial, it must also contain programs that support social enterprises. It could potentially act as the base for the dragon boat group if the existing clubs weren’t convinced of facility sharing with them


149_proposition figure 32

water support hub could provide a central location for the dragon boat group. ‘Dragons Abreast’, which comprises of breast cancer survivors, could strengthen their community enterprises from this base location. This could function in unison with other social concepts which would be located around the focus area while providing the clubs with a link to the Derwent Regatta and other major water events.


Existing Facilities

Direct additions that will influence the focus area

catalytic potential, currently insular, potential to engage + promote interactions

?

Currently the yacht club is completely closed down on all facades exceot to the north, where it features small windows. It doesn’t engage with it’s surroundings and currently provides no connection or provision for exterior activity

?

Rowing club shares a number of the issues that the yacht club posesses. It is closed down on facades from the public, especially to the north. The storage doors open onto a grassed area with perfect orientation but it is not taken advantage of

recommendations (minimal)

open facade and potential decking to north to engage with future GASP walkway

extension to storage

recommendations (minimal)

extension to storage

open facade and potential decking threshold to surrounding activity zones

encourage public appropriation along path through seating


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Detroit Collaborative Design Centre Improvement of the club facilities should follow the typical improvement drivers of the Detroit Design Centre. Additions should be focussed on connecting and opening the structures to the circulation of the GASP future pathway. This will help to add life and integrate the buildings and clubs into the identity of the focus area, while still positively retaining their own

Renew Newcastle + Pop-Up Paramatta Another method for improving the current club’s level of engagement is to allow temporary uses and artistic displays of the buildings. This will allow for quick generation of life around the structures, integrating them back into the community through use and activity. Artists could be asked to submit their ideas about how to temporarily appropriate the buildings which could be utilised as unique temporary artistic displays in Glenorchy


Toilet Relocation

Interactive base for community participation + involvement Support, activity, environmental engagment, features The toilets should have a number of design drivers to determine their location. The toilets should be in a visually prominant location so they are easy to find and safe to use, act as an important form in the landscape, support existing circulation paths and activity areas while promoting the environment around them

Toilets located south of playground allows exposure to highway if feature building, frames bay from road, good visual location, supports primary activity areas and promotes activity generation around it

Toilets, Noosa River. Bark Design

frames view to the river and sits within its environment includes service storage and not read as a typical toilet block

Toilets, Centennial Park, Sydney. Lahz Nimmo. frames views of the landscape and includes storage uses exterior basin as an interaction point and acts as a landmark in the landscape

most beneficial

Toilets located east of carpark maximum visual location, allows bay framing views, supports GASP walkway, acts as meeting point, feature in landscape, supports all major activity areas, potential for iconic characteristics Toilets located conjoined to rowing club rear minimises financial costs, promotes cross usage of facilities, limited visual presence, supports main activity areas but would be hard to located when north of the rowing club, disconnected from GASP


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rather than viewed as a negative typology and situated in the worst areas of the site, the toilets could act as a feature point of the area as they require appropriation by users. The potential to frame views and utilising an exterior basin system could potentially provide a catalyst for interaction


Carparking Relocation

Freeing positive space from cars and giving it back to people engagement, identity

Potential relocation areas for the carpark were investigated in the diagrams below. It is recommended that the carpark be relocated to somewhere on the boundary of the focus area as to promote pedestrian thoroughfare and exposure to the existing and future activities that occur on the site which they cannot experience from their cars. Careful consideration needs to be applied to still allow access for vehicles to boat launching areas on the waterfront for the clubs.

western border

corner block

provides thoroughfare past activity of clubs, users will take multiple routes over oval, converts entire side of site into a strip of carparking

large block dominates corner of site, close proximity to activity spaces, removes open green space that could be potentiall utilised

southern border maximum thoroughfare for clubs which could become annoying for regular users, blocks view of bay and park from the highway, close proximity to the playground

most beneficial

western block close for club members, thoroughfare for other users, located in currently unused space, supports event areas, buildings block view of carpark


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current carpark is located in the best location within the focus area. This location is connected to all focus group and is central to all existing activities. It is recommended that the carpark is relocated and this spac is converted to be used for event support and as a central plaza. It is recommended that the space remain loose, being able to be used for multiple activities is crucial. Such activities could be market space, social enterprise locations, large gatherings for events and outdoor school assemblies or as a potential GASP outdoor exhibition and performance space.


conclusion - question Injecting life into an underutilised site is an issue that architects are continuously attempting to grappel with. The use of iconic structures as an attempt to draw users to an area is a standard response for many designers, essentially using the odd or exciting to generate activity. For this study the research and analysis focussed on a smaller scale, a human scale, and addressing the architectural question of how an undeveloped site can be utilised as an activity catalyst, well, the solution really had little to do with architecture.

How can an underdeveloped site be utilised as a catalyst for interaction, social enterprise and identity, while creating connections to the wider community?

In an investigation such as this where life was attempting to be added to the site it required focussing more away from the built form. Utilising a life-space-building approach it was found that like buildings, life has to be built from the ground up. A simple building constructed would not engage with the existing community around the focus area and the methodology we developed established that. The methodology allowed us to go step by step and analyse everything about the area and it’s surroundings. Discovering this was key as determining the social strengths of the focus area is what allows the research question to be answered successfully. Through the research process features of the site were dfiscovered that allowed potential social ‘plug-ins’ that could positively affect the area. This was not always an architectural solution and through focussing on the lifespace-building methodology smaller and more discrete solutions were proposed such as something as simple as opening up a facade or allowing people to use a space. These more human scale interventions were a step back from typical top-down masterplanning work. This process was working from the bottom-up. To develop interactions in the site the specific user groups of the area must be examined and how they function and circulate around the space. Masterplannning strategies


The research methodology at each step allowed us to beter understand the site, what people liked about it, how they used it and what nobody used. This was the existing life of the site, and this would be a major building block in generating new life. Once the site’s life had been fully understood, only then could speculations be generated. These speculations used elements from the research analysis to attempt to link specific components of the site and it’s context together to create inter-relational nodes. For example, the boat building concept was located in the activity node of the space outside the rowing club, which could be fueled by the critical mass from the school, the yacht club would partake in the exercise, the community could gain education, it linked directly to the GASP walkway circulation etc. No architectural form solution was needed, simply the understanding of different tiers of site life and activity and implementing a common insertion that provides benefits with minimal effort, which is why social enterprise concepts are so important in successfully answering the question. The social enterprise concepts are extremely important in that they provided the opportunity to act as lifecatalysts within the site which provided more links to activities and groups within the focus area and the context. Social enterprise concepts allowed the activities and user groups of an architectural solution, but with little cost and with much more human scale appreciation and engagement with both the environment people. An architectural solution from the beginning would not allow this type of human scale social engagement. Social enterprises allows for a concept to grow and be accepted in the existing community fabric, rather than simply

impose as a building does. The enterprises act as mini catalysts, and when they link to other social concepts and activity around the site, that’s when the site becomes a catalyst for interaction, social enterprise and identity. As the life-space-building process was extremely beneficial and successful, especially within a site with financial limits, looseness was a necessary component in allowing spaces to function with multiple activities or functions, but without losing their original identity. The clubs wanted to retain their original identites but wished to be grouped under the GASP identity also. Through facility sharing of areas such as the exterior grassed areas outside their clubs which could be transformed into a temporary market, before becoming a boat launching area once again alllows a dynamic relationship between all groups that is both engaging, exciting and creates a unique identity to the space as groups are united where each group has a claim to the space and look after it. In answering the question of how an underdeveloped site can be utilised as a catalyst for interaction, social enterprise and identity, while creating connections to the wider community, the anser is simple; life. The life processes and activities of the underdeveloped site need to be fully explored and analysed, it is from here that the needs of users and the holes in the life of the space can be addressed through social enterprise and community concepts, these concepts allow identity to be formed through increased appropriation of the site and through increased appropriation allows the possibility of connecting with the wider community. The answer doesn’t lie in tradtional built architecture, but in the construction of social architecture which eventually allows the built.

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would not succeed as they are disconnected from the real people that inhabit the space. To generate life, you must really know the existing life.


conclusion - GASP Speculate + propose the potential use, design + development of collaborative relationships and social enterprise + community concepts within the focus area at Montrose Bay which support existing programs + intentions of GASP and of broader elements such as the Glenorchy City Council Plan.

The proposed architectural research project may result in the development of a brief that may be used for an open design competition leading to the development of the open spaces + potential design + construction of a new community based facility.

Investigations will also examine existing infastructure such as carparking and toilets within the focus area to determine if relocation or alteration could potentially add positive attributes to the site and GASP.

The speculations will be based directly from the analysis conducted into the focus area and will provide seed ideas and discussion points for further speculation. The analysis and findings presented will provide the general framework for groups to implement more specific architectural and social solutions. This method allows adaptability to everchanging variables, as opposed to a fixed masterplan.

Through the analysis of all life within the focus area and the context, social speculations were made in order to form as many collaborative relationships as possible and to bring the community into the focus area and help it engage with the wider context. Through the analysis it was seen that limited social concepts could engage fully with all focus groups, particularly due to the yacht and rowing clubs primary focus on water activities. This allowed a number of primary options such as boat building, catering education, portable entertainment, pop-up enterprises and more to be established. These directly engaged and formed a relationship between all focus groups and resulted in the direct interaction between them. Secondary concepts were developed that still engaged focus groups but some with limited capacitiy, for example, the gym concept stationed around the proximity of the rowing club. The yacht club was not directly involved in this but would still benefit from the increased activity and potential exposure. The speculations were developed as stand-alone concepts with the intention that they could be potentially combined, sharing facilities and increasing the potential engagement with multiple demographics. For example the artist studio could work in conjunction with the boat building workshop. They are able to be mixed and matched to whatever configuration fits a potential opportunity that arises. Through the analysis it was ensured that all speculations matched both GASP’s values of creativity and participation alongside the Glenorchy City Council’s community values. The speculations and montages can be used as talking points to produce further ideas from focus groups in the future. This report is a collection of thoughts intended to jump-start the thoughts of others to produce even more possible concepts.


The utilisation of the school’s critical mass is essential and the integration of some concepts within the school’s subjects are highly recommended. When school term is out there needs to be a focus switch for some enterprises, this typically resulted in the transition between school education and adult education but would prove more difficult with concepts such as portable entertainment platforms, which require school children to build. The rowing club was found to have a higher potential to engage with the community than the yacht club due to it’s more approachable and rookie-friendly rowing activity. Wherever possible it would be recommended to integrate the rowing club into concepts due to the potential use of their club room, facilities and the general central location of their club building. They are already engaged with the school for multiple activities and examining ways to strengthen these relationships would be beneficial for the area, and to draw potential external users into the focus area and along the GASP walkway. The yacht club functions more inwardly, with it’s activities typically limited to Sundays, an insular building facade and a less-rookie friendly water sport. The clubs large function room, liquor licence and excellent space to the north however allow it the potential to engage with social concepts that require function spaces and larger events that can be supported by other community concepts occuring on the site. The carpark and toilets were also recommended to move location. The carpark moving to the boundary, particular

to the western side of the rowing club allowed decent activity thoroughfare past clubs but was not located at a too greater distance to result in annoyance. The existing carpark locations which are the most desirable on the site can then be utilised as large plaza spaces that can handle large GASP supporting events on the water’s edge, market social concepts and performances. Loose design will need to be employed to still allow elements of boat loading to occur. It is recommended that the first possible step in the focus area would be the new location of an entirely new toilet block. A toilet block that acts as an attractive feature to the site, rathern than simply producting another unattracive structure would be beneficial to the area. While a seperated block was seen to be the most beneficial, if budget restrictions and further facility sharing were major priorities than the option of extending one of the clubs toilets into the public realm was an explored option. From the research and amount of speculation produced it can be seen that there is an enormous amount of potential within this focus area and combining this with the exciting and creative concepts of GASP, there is a real opportunity to create a wonderful space that engages and connects with the community in a way that could really change the dynamics of the entire city. As intended, this document proposes a number of concepts relating to collaborative relationships, social enterprise and community concepts and presents an analysis and research framework that can lead to further group speculation, seed idea generators or the development of a specific architectural brief. The future of Elwick Bay is one of creativity, participation, engagement and it being the go-to place for any activity that involves recreation, relaxing or just to feel connected to people. It will be a place where art meets park meets people.

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Through the analysis and speculations it was found that enterprises with either an educational benefit (catering, boat building) or that allowed for some sort of commercial benefit (pop-up enterprises, plant market) would be the easiest to maintain and produce the highest probability of generating a return.


references Gehl, Jan 1987, Life Between Buildings, Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, New York Gehl Architects 2011, Hobart Public Spaces + Public Life Recommendations, Hobart City Council, accessed 1st March 2011, <http://www.hobartcity.com.au> Glenorchy City Council + Inspiring Place, Elwick Bay Masterplan Document, accessed 28th February, <http://www.gcc.tas.gov.au> Glenorchy City Council, GASP Project Document 2011, accessed 28th February, <http://www.gasp.gcc.tas.gov.au> Glenorchy City Council, Glenorchy City Community Plan, accessed 28th February, <http://www.gcc.tas.gov.au> Jencks, CH 1985, Modern Movements in Architecture, Penguin Books, London Krupa, Fredirique 2010, The Privatisation of Public Space, Translucency, viewed 25th March 2011, <http://www.translucency.com/frede> Newman, O 1972, Defensible Space: Crime Prevention through Urban Design, Macmillan, London Ran, Dr Ami 2008, Space Appropriation: The Private Aspect of Public Space, AIQ, viewed 28th March 2011, <http://www.aiq.co.il> Spatial Agency 2011, Detroit Collaborative Design Centre, viewed 30th March 2011, <http://www.spatialagency.net.database/detroit.collaborative.design.center> Sommer, R 1974, Tight Spaces: Hard Architecture and how to Humanise it, Englewood Cliffs, NJ Stevens, Quentin & Franck, Karen 2008, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Tying Down Loose Spaceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in Political Activity in Public Spaces: Awakening, Stagnation or Fall, Routledge, London


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http://www.gasp.gcc.tas.gov.au/DraftVision.aspx http://www.gasp.gcc.tas.gov.au/DraftVision.aspx http://www.gasp.gcc.tas.gov.au/TheFuturePark.aspx ibid ibid http://www.treehugger.com/files/2010/05/collapsible-coffee-kart-kickstand.php http://architecture.udmercy.edu/ http://renewnewcastle.org/projects/about/project/the-roost-creative/ http://www.iamdanho.com/food/5-things-i-miss-about-new-york-city/ http://www.petertlang.net/urban-culture/anothology-edited-by-karen-a-franck-and-quentin-stevens/ www.montrosebayhigh.tas.edu.au http://thebesttraveldestinations.com/europa-park/ www.gcc.tas.gov.au/ http://urbanplacesandspaces.blogspot.com/2009/03/jan-gehl-writes-people-first.html http://designshifter.blogspot.com/2010/03/loose-space-encounters.html http://www.superherodesigns.com/journal/archives/001789.html www.unistage.co.uk ibid http://www.eprints.utas.edu.au/3581/ www.viewlondon.co.uk ibid ibid ibid www.streat.com.au/ www.popuptheatre.org.uk www.weblocal.ca/king-flowers-plant-market-toronto-on.html ibid www.proambeachsoccer.net/.../79498-giving-disadvantage-youth-chance-to-play www.dragonsabreast.com.au/

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Gasp speculate report 2011lr