Page 1

AIR

architectural design studio 3

Julia Koutroulis 350577


CONTENTS Part I. Expression of Interest 1. Case for Innovation 1.1. 1.2. 1.3. 1.4.

Architecture as a Discourse Computing in Architecture Parametric Modelling Case for Innovation Conclusion:

2. Research Project 2.1. 2.2. 2.3. 2.4.

Input/Association/Output Matrix Reverse-Engineered Case-Study Material Effects & Assembly Methods Research Project Conclusion

3. Expression of Interest Conclusion: Competitive Advantage 4. Learning Objectives and Outcomes: Interim Part II. Project Proposal 1.1 Project Interpretation 1.2. Project Delivery 1.3. Project Presentation 1.4. Project Proposal Conclusion Part III. Learning Objectives and Outcomes: Final 1.1. 1.2. 1.3. 1.4.

Personal Background and Learning Objectives Learning Progress Learning Outcomes Future Work

2

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I

1.1. Architecture as a Discourse

SERPENTINE PAVILION,2007 THE SERPENTINE GALLERY PAVILION 2007 ELIASSON & THORSON

The Serpentine Pavilion is key to architectural discourse as it is produced by the leading figures in architectural design each year and is emblematic of the level of development reached at any particular time as the result of modern methods. Elaisson and Thorson’s Serpentine pavilon from 2007 is an amazing timberclad structure which resembles a spinning top and brings a dramatic vertical dimension to the traditional single-level pavilion. It’s unique design involves a wide spiralling ramp that makes two complete turns, allowing visitors to ascend from the Gallery lawn to the highest point for views across Kensington Gardens as well as a bird's eye view of the chamber below.Discourse surrounding building, how it is engaging as visual culture: Olafur Eliasson’s deep-rooted interest in spatial questions, explored in his artistic practice, has resulted in an increasing engagement with architectural projects. This has led to Kjetil Thorsen and Olafur Eliasson collaborating on a number of projects, including the National Opera House, Oslo, and a recently submitted competition proposal for a new Museum of Contemporary Art in Warsaw.

3 •

Julia Koutroulis 350577

SERPENTINE PAVILION Source:http://www.dezeen.com/2007/08/23/serpentine-gallery-pavilion-2007/


I

1.1. Architecture as a Discourse

SERPENTINE PAVILION,2007 THE SERPENTINE GALLERY PAVILION 2007 ELIASSON & THORSON

The Serpentine Pavilion is key to architectural discourse as it is produced by the leading figures in architectural design each year and is emblematic of the level of development reached at any particular time as the result of modern methods. Elaisson and Thorson’s Serpentine pavilon from 2007 is an amazing timberclad structure which resembles a spinning top and brings a dramatic vertical dimension to the traditional single-level pavilion. It’s unique design involves a wide spiralling ramp that makes two complete turns, allowing visitors to ascend from the Gallery lawn to the highest point for views across Kensington Gardens as well as a bird's eye view of the chamber below.Discourse surrounding building, how it is engaging as visual culture: Olafur Eliasson’s deep-rooted interest in spatial questions, explored in his artistic practice, has resulted in an increasing engagement with architectural projects. This has led to Kjetil Thorsen and Olafur Eliasson collaborating on a number of projects, including the National Opera House, Oslo, and a recently submitted competition proposal for a new Museum of Contemporary Art in Warsaw.

4 •

Julia Koutroulis 350577

SERPENTINE PAVILION Source:http://www.dezeen.com/2007/08/23/serpentine-gallery-pavilion-2007/


I

1.1. Architecture as Discourse

SERPENTINE PAVILIONS

SERPENTINE GALLERY 2012 HERZOG & DE MEURON AND AI WEIWE The design team responsible for the Beijing National Stadium, home to the 2008 Olympic Games won the prestigious RIBA Luberkin Prize. They have come together again to create the Serpentine pavilion of 2012. It will be officially opened in June of 2012.

SERPENTINE PAVILION 2007 ZAHA HADID Pritzker prize winning architect Zaha Hadid and Patrik Schumacher designed temporary installation 'Lilas' on the occasion of the Gallery's world-renowned fundraiser The Summer Party. It was remained next to the gallery for a week. SERPENTINE PAVILION 2006 REM KOOLHAS AND CECIL BALMOND Pritzker prize winning architect Rem Koolhas and innovative structural designer Cecil Balmond created the centerpeice of the design spectacular ovoid-shaped inflatable canopy which floated above the gallery’s lawn. SERPENTINE PAVILION 2008 FRANK GEHRY This spectacular structure was designed by Frank Gehry in conjunction with Arup, it featured four massive steel columns anchoring it to the ground and was comprised of large timber planks and a complex network of overlapping glass lanes that created a dramatic, multidimensional space. SERPENTINE PAVILION 2002 TOYO ITO AND CECIL BALMOND WITH ARUP The pavilion of 2002 appeared to be an extremely complex random pattern that proved upon careful examination to derive from an algorithm of a cube that expanded as it rotated.

5

SERPENTINE PAVILION Source:http://www.serpentinegallery.org/architecture/

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I

1.1. Architecture as Discourse

SEED CATHEDRAL

HEATHERWICK STUDIO

Architects at Heatherwick studio continue to present an exemplar of architectural discourse and computational design. The design process evolved to produce two interlinked and experiential elements: an architecturally iconic Seed Cathedral, and a multi-layered landscape treatment of the 6,000m2 site. The complex nature of the form would be impossible without the help of digital modelling software. These fibre optic filaments are particularly responsive to external light conditions so that the unseen movement of clouds above the Seed Cathedral are experienced internally as a changing luminosity. The studio’s intention is to create an atmosphere of awe around this formidable collection of the world’s botanical resources and to truly create an experience more than just a building. The key reason this specific project is advancing architectural discourse is the perfect marriage of intuitive design and the limitless possibilities of computational design.

6 •

Julia Koutroulis 350577

SEED CATHEDRAL: Source: http://www.archdaily.com/58591/uk-pavilion-for-shanghai-world-expo-2010-heatherwick-studio/


I

1.1. Architecture as Discourse

SEED CATHEDRAL The Seed Cathedral is made from a steel and timber composite structure pierced by 60,000 fibre optic filaments, 20mm square in section, which pass through aluminium sleeves. The holes in the 1 metre thick wood diaphragm structure forming the visitor space inside the Seed Cathedral were drilled with great geometric accuracy to ensure precise placement of the aluminium sleeves through which the optic fibre filaments are inserted. This was achieved using 3D computer modelling data, fed into a computer controlled milling machine. After the Expo just as dandelion seeds are blown away and disperse on the breeze, the Seed Cathedral’s 60,000 optic hairs, each one containing the huge potential of life, will be distributed across China and the UK to hundreds of schools as a special legacy of the UK Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo.

SEED CATHEDRAL: Source: http://www.archdaily.com/58591/uk-pavilion-for-shanghai-world-expo-2010-heatherwick-studio/

7

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I HERRING ISLAND DISCOVERY CENTRE

Architecture asARCHITECTURAL Discourse 1.11.1. ADVANCING DISCOURSE

PERSONAL PROJECT

The Brief: “You are asked to design ‘Unearthing’, a small Discovery Centre for Parks Victoria on Herring Island. The centre will be an opportunity for visitors to ‘unearth’ the natural history of Melbourne and, in particular, the island. Visitors will be taken on a journey through an indigenous landscape, a partially underground exhibition space that will focus on the geological history of the site (and its use as a basalt quarry and silt dump), the history of colonization and the changes to the landscape and river system that took place early last century and the more recent history of its use as a campground for the Scouts association. It will also acknowledge and support its current use as an environmental sculpture park and festival of Melbourne event space. Following the model of contemporary natural history and science museums (local examples include Science works, the children’s section of the Melbourne Museum, and the Ian Potter Foundation Children’s Garden at the Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne) which rely less on static displays and more on an active engagement by visitors, the architecture should be a vehicle for visitors to unearth the history for themselves. Carefully consider sitting, the pathway from the punt landing to the discovery centre, its relationship to the other structures and sculptures on the island, views (distant and intimate), and its material nature”

Using computational techniques I was able to design a discovery centre unlike the norm, it is a centre that is circular in form to reflect the rings of a tree that matures with each ring, it symbolizes growth and knowledge. There is an internal amphitheatre and all roof segments are green roofs with a ramp almost the whole way around the structure. The idea of this discovery centre advances architectural discourse with its new use of materials and space to create an integration of multi-purpose spaces in a new and innovative way not seen before. Although it may not be practical to have an ampitheatre surrounded by external spaces used for other purposes it does allow for discussion on new construction techniques.

8

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I

Architecture asARCHITECTURAL Discourse 1.11.1. ADVANCING DISCOURSE

EXPRESSION OF INTEREST In Kolerevic's article ' Architecture in the Digital age he comments on how the use of digital modeling (threedimensional) and animation (four-dimensional) software has opened new territories of formal exploration in architecture, in which digitally generated forms are not designed in conventional ways. New shapes and forms are created by generative processes based on concepts such as topological space, isomorphic surfaces, dynamic systems, key shape animation, parametric design and genetic algorithms. The process of describing and constructing a design can be now more direct and more complex because the information can be extracted, exchanged, and utilised with far greater facility and speed; in short, with the use of digital technologies, the design information is the construction information. The emphasis shifts from the 'making of form” to the “finding of form” which various digitally based generative techniques seem to bring about intentional Koleric believes that the introduction of digital modelling software into architectural design provided a departure from the Euclidean geometry of discrete volumes represented in Cartesian space and made possible the present use of “topological” “rubber-sheet” geometry of continuous curves and surfaces that feature prominently in contemporary architecture. The highly curvilinear surfaces in the architecture of the digital avant-garde are devised mathematically as NURBS. These three projects relate directly to ideas about the advancement of architectural discourse by exploring innovations and techniques that computational design can accommodate for. This innovation can be taken forward into the Wyndham City Gateway project to explore ideas of shape, materiality and technical innovation. The gateway project asks for as much , if not primarily, for contribution to discourse as it asks for a physical structure. The movement around a space and it's impact on the site can be taken into consideration when working towards the Wyndham council's gateway project, the changing views and qualities of these designs can be taken forward into the design of the gateway.

“Buildings prior to the Renaissance, were constructed, not planned”-Kalay This is a state to which many contemporary practitioners of digital architecture wish to return and can be carried through to the Wyndham City Gateway project

9

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I “Architecture

needs to be thought of less as a set of special material products and rather more as range of social and professional practices that sometimes, but by no means always, lead to buildings.” Williams, Richard (2005). ‘Architecture and Visual Culture’, in Exploring Visual Culture: Definitions, Concepts, Contexts, ed. by Matthew Rampley (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press), pp. 102-116, p.!108

10

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I

1.2. Computing in Architecture

GREG LYNN

Parametric can provide for a powerful conception of architectural form by describing a range of possibilities, replacing in the process stable with variable, singularity with multiplicity. In parametric design, it is the parameters of a particular design that are declared, not its shape. By assigning different values to the parameters, different objects or configurations can be created. -Kolarevic “According to Lynn, “While physical form can be defined in terms of static coordinates, the virtual force of the environment in which it is designed contributes to its shape,” thus making the forces present in the given context fundamental to the form making in architecture. Images above show Inverse kinematics is used in the House prototype in Long Island project – Greg Lynn Particle emission is used in the Port Authority Bus terminal, New York – Competition project by Greg Lynn Source: Branko Kolarevic – Architecture in the Digital Age (2003)

11

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I

1.2. Computing in Architecture

EXPERIENCE MUSIC PROJECT

Experience music Project – Frank Gehry seattle 2000 More than 21,000 differently shaped metal shingles for the exterior of the Experience Music Project in Seatle were cut using digitally-driven cutting machines from the geometric information extracted directly from a digital model. The new digitally-enabled processes of production imply that the construct-ability in building design becomes a direct function of computability. This form of design and construction offers “rich opportunities for the tectonic exploration of new geometries – Kolarevic There is also a conventional approach in which the sinuous skin is attached to a conventionally-conceived structural grid, which is carefully applied can produce interesting results. These images from the Kolarevic reading highlight the key elements of the design, the internal ribbing and external metal sheeting all made possible by the use of structural grids produced through digital technology.

Frank Gehry – Experience Music Project Source: Branko Kolarevic – Architecture in the Digital Age (2003)

12

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.2. Computing in Architecture

NORWEIGEN REINDEER CENTRE PARAMETRICS “Parametrics can provide for a powerful conception of architectural form by describing a range of possibilites, replacing in the process stable with variable, singularity and muliplicity” (Architecture in the digital age‐Kolarevic)

NORWEIGEN WILD REINDEER CENTRE PAVILION SNØHETTA OSLO AS Considerable emphasis is put on the quality and durability of the materials to withstand the harsh climate. The rectangular frame is made in raw steel resembling the iron found in the local bedrock. The simple form and use of natural materials reference local building traditions. However, advanced technologies have been utilised both in the design and the fabrication process. Using digital 3Dmodels to drive the milling machines, Norwegian shipbuilders in Hardangerfjord created the organic shape from 10 inch square pine timber beams. The wood was then assembled in a traditional way using only wood pegs as fasteners. The exterior wall has been treated with pine tar while the interior wood has been oiled. The pavilion is a robust yet nuanced building that gives visitors an opportunity to reflect and contemplate this vast and rich landscape.

13 IMAGE SOURCE:http://www.archdaily.com/180932/tverrfjellhytta-snohetta/

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I NORWEIGEN REINDEER CENTRE 1.2. Computing in Architecture

This structure is a key example of how contemporary computational techniques can arrive at innovative solutions and extend create conversations about the digital realm and the physical realm. It is only through processes of digital design and digital production something such as this is made possible. The exact contours of the faรงade would be extremely time consuming and economically unfeasible if it were not for advances in modern computational design. Julia Koutroulis 350577

14

IMAGE SOURCE:http://www.archdaily.com/180932/tverrfjellhytta-snohetta/


I

1.2. Computing in Architecture

2. contemporary computational design

iGuzzini Moored to the ground, it belongs to this place, and to all other places. In reality, there are forms that can only be drawn once, buildings that can only be built once, the second time being a replica. We believe in this opportunity for iGuzzini. Because this form, imperfect, slightly deformed, belongs to the world of iGuzzini. Though it is easy to identify, not everyone can appropriate this profile or this geometry. The structure and it’s skin can not be replicated without the use of contemporary computational design techniques, each panel works with the other perfectly because it was programmed to do so. These architects have created an amazing structure with the help of computational design.

15

Julia Koutroulis 350577

IMAGE SOURCE: http://www.archdaily.com/140897/in-progress-iguzzini-illuminazione-spain-headquarters-mias-arquitectes/


I

1.2. Computing in Architecture

iGuzzini

This innovative structure advances architectural discourse with modern forms of design and construction, creating questions and facilitating discussions on the topic of contemporary computational design and it’s lack of limitations. In the architects words “iGuzzini does not belong to the ground on which it sits. Like a balloon, Leonidov’s aerostat, it will attempt to escape from this world, seeking a new sky. It will describe the conditions of the light, natural and artificial, in its interior, it will refer to its origins, recognizing a geometric order, but above all it will want to speak to us of aspiration” Just like digital design seeks new sky and is always evolving and changing.

16

Julia Koutroulis 350577

IMAGE SOURCE: http://www.archdaily.com/140897/in-progress-iguzzini-illuminazione-spain-headquarters-mias-arquitectes/


I

1.2. Computing in Architecture

EXPRESSION OF INTEREST The project has asked us to broaden our minds in producing an entrance, welcoming travellers into the Wyndham City area along the city bound Princess Freeway. This instillation must be exciting and eye catching, something that inspires and encourages further reflection on the design after the first glance. When considering our design the elements we considered are the flat wide landscape, high speed traffic movement, sense of pride to local community, aspirational intent to creating a new discourse and enhancing Wyndham City’s place on the cultural map. These examples highlight the ability of computing in Architecture to create something quite amazing, Each example uses quite different materials to produce quite different outcomes. We will carry through ideas of spacial movement past a space through to our design for the Wyndham city gateway. Probably most relevant to our discoveries is Frank Ghery's experience music project, the framing system creates a skeleton for the building that changes with progress past the structure which is the key idea we would like to take into our design for the Gateway project. The process of moving past the structure is key due to the location of the site, traffic runs either side of the Gateway so these qualities will translate better as a dynamic experience through static form rather than the other way around. Through a changing in shape of each piece of structural fabric we see an undulating form that changes shape as the eye moves past it. Wether it is later covered in an external fabric or left bare the idea still remains. The idea of the community and 'seeds of change, also strikes resonance with the construction of an ever changing form.

‌

17

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I

“Any

serious “rethinking” of architecture at the start of this century cannot be undertaken without upsetting the structure and emphases of the traditional profession, of traditional typologies, and of traditional modes of envisaging the architectural subject […].” Vidler, Anthony (2000). ‘Review of Rethinking Architecture and The Anaesthetics of Architecture by Neal Leach’, Harvard Design Magazine, 11, pp. 1-4, p. 3

18

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I

1.2. Computing in Architecture

CONTEMPORARY SCRIPTING CULTURES

Architects are ultimately choreographers of systems, and the benefits of teaching programming in an architectural context are manifold. If architecture wants to survive as a discipline, it needs to engage the culture of innovation and computing. (Mark Collins & Toru Hasegawa, Proxy) Prevalence in exhibited and published experimental work and absense from education programmes

The education system should start teaching procedural Students should then build on these skills and focus them within the context of architecture. (Casey Reas) Tendency to sway to a generic form of design using algorithms or agent systems. Occurring from appropriation of scripts sharing codes can be good and bad, bad because it can produce generic designs or good because it could cause mash ups in the process, which can cause s creative growth. From creative free-flow of design to the cold hard logic of script.. An algorithmic understanding of creativity - that the act is not a flash in the dark, a blessing from heaven but the result of hard rigorous thought which can in many parts be represented algorithmically - that is the important step. Right now, scripting is a very useful paradigm but it is not exclusively so. (Tom Kvan) MOTIVATIONS Authors response: Scripting for Productivity A path to ‘the answer’ Voyage of discovery – global discovery or personal Interviewed designers responses: reaching beyond analogue processes; • capturing material logic and computing performance; • being playful; • exploiting generative processes; seeking deeper access to the imagination; • engaging with complexity; • inducing rapid iteration and variation; • grappling with the performative; • toying with the unexpected and delving into the unknown; • being forced to be explicit; • discovering novelty; • localizing intelligence; • investigating self-organisation principles; • studying phenomena;

19

SOURCE: Burry – Scripting Cultures (2011) Pg. 8-71

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I

1.3. Parametric Modelling

3. contemporary scripting cultures

SOUMAYA MUSEUM FERNANDO ROMERO

The Soumaya museum is located in a former industrial zone dating from the 1940’s. The area today presents high commercial potential. The museum plays a role in transformation of the area as a pre eminent cultural program. It indicates the transformation of the urban perception. It defines a new paradigm in history of Mexican and international architecture with it’s use of interesting morphology and topology through parametric design.

DESIGN PHILOSOPHY

The building was designed to be perceived differently by each visitor, its organic form was intended to reflect the diversity of the collection on the inside. The shell of the building was constructed with 28 steel curved columns of different diameters, each with a different geometry and shape creating a non-linear circulation through the building. Ring beams provide braces around the structure at each level insuring stability.

20

Julia Koutroulis 350577

IMAGE SOURCE:http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/11789/soumaya-museum-by-fernando-romeroarchitects.html


I

1.4.Case for innovation Conclusion

3. contemporary scripting cultures

SOUMAYA MUSEUM

This design expresses benefits of the use of parametric design and contemporary scripting/ programming cultures, as stated my Kolarevic Architecture in the digital age‐Kolarevic) parametric designs can provide for ‘powerful conception of architectural form by describing a range of possibilities, replacing in the process stable with variable, singularity and multiplicity’ This design conceptualizes a form with faces that are variable and not stable producing a result that could not as efficiently be achieved by any other process. If we focus on the top floor we see a suspended roof from a cantilever that allows natural light flow, the building also fulfils function as well as design intent by protecting art from the outside due to lack of openings. In terms of discourse the building was required to create a new identity for the site and have a strong urban presence. The building is sculptural and quite unique which can be credited to its process of design and contemporary programming cultures. Constructed with steel columns of varying diameters, the structure provides a non-linear circulation route taking viewers past the nearly 20,000 square meters of exhibition space. This element along with it’s façade of panels ranging in shape are not possible without the help of contemporary scripting/ programming and computational design.

EXPRESSION OF INTEREST Fernando Romero’s Soumaya Museum is located in Mexico. The design of this building creates much interest, as it seems to have been created from inside out, ‘wrapping’ the outside around form and motion of the interior ramps. Although this is another example of framing for possible consideration of the Wyndham City Gateway Project, it is not the framed inside with outer form that creates most interest in this design. The organic form has been designed from hexagonal plates grouped into 1,000 (one thousand) different families that make up the façade. Twenty eight (28) steel curved columns of different diameters, each with its own geometry and shape also help to make up the complexity of this beautiful form. The use of parametric technologies has allowed the restructuring of this process and uses scripting for productivity it also enables the facade in this project to appear relatively uniform. The apparent complexity perceived by the viewer, within a simple form, makes this project unique and an example of using parametric modelling to create complexity and simplicity simultaneously. It is easy to imagine a simple shape such as the hexagon repeated across this surface, used as a perforation to allow for light. The Wyndham City Council Project brief mentions the forms views day and night. Perforation will allow for play on light which will change the experience though out the day.

21

Julia Koutroulis 350577

IMAGE SOURCE:http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/11789/soumaya-museum-by-fernando-romeroarchitects.html


I

2.1. Input/Association/Output Matrix

CUT DEFINITION MATRIX

Eventually by altering slider values the rotate technique produced a scattering of random points which may not be useful in future physical designs but could be tied together as a basic framework for some type of skin.

By increasing the sliders I was able to create densities of circles in specific regions of the surface according to an attractor point which could be useful in future designs for the gateway project

22

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I

2.1. Input/Association/Output Matrix

4. cut

CUT DEFINITION MATRIX

The combination of the surface normals and extrusion techniques produced an interesting piece of geometry, this could be incorporated into the design for the gateway project.

The rotate technique also produces quite interesting sets of geometry with the points flying off the surface in different arrays.

23

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I

2.1. Input/Association/Output Matrix

CUT DEFINITION MATRIX

Further experimentation with given cut definitions, testing extrusion of circles using attractor points and also using image samplers to create undulating forms. This could be helpful in designing the gateway project as it would be quite appealing to the eye travelling past it in a car.

24

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I

2.1. Input/Association/Output Matrix

4. cut

EXPRESSION OF INTEREST From these precedents we have developed a few elements which we explored further, such as the use of a simple shape, creating movement or morphing of a shape, framing, contours and perforations. The Matrix we have provided explores these concepts drawn on in our precedents. Using Rhino and Grasshopper computational programs surface norms have been used to create movement in shape, exploring the ways in which the surface can change along the the z axis as well as the x and y axis. After the surface was divided perforations have been added and adjusted in accordance to an attractor point. Many other components were tried and tested in conjunction with the major precedents.

IMAGE SOURCE: group matrix elements

25

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I

2.2. Reverse-Engineered Case-Study

SPANISH PAVILION I experimented with the use of a hexagonal pattern and the random tool in conjunction with the CMYX colour tool to produce a similar pattern to that of the Spanish Pavilion in the Cut Case studies section.

IMAGE SOURCE: STACKED/TILED Spanish Pavilion, 2005 Booklet Accessed from LMS

26

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I

5. reverse engineered case study

2.2. Reverse-Engineered Case-Study

SPANISH PAVILION Although the shapes are not perfectly symmetrical hexagons they produce a pattern that is possible through mathematics and advanced computational software. I have attempted to reverse engineer this building by making a netting of hexagons using grasshopper and rhino

.

27 IMAGE SOURCE: STACKED/TILED Spanish Pavilion, 2005 Booklet Accessed from LMS

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I

2.3. Material Effects & Assembly Methods

BANQ RESTAURANT The one precedent not trialed within the matrix was contouring. To extrapolate on how a previous contour design had worked the BanQ Restaurant in Boston, U.S. by Architects Office dA was studied and reverse engineered. The design space has been conceptualized around the z axis rather then the normal thinking of floor wall and roof as separate elements. The reason for this was that the floor space needs to be flexible to allow for changing number and sizes of tables, and in relation the lighting, sprinkler system and acoustic systems and other mechanical equipment need to also be flexible enough to cover most areas. This woodslatted, contoured design conforms to each of these services while also smoothing the transition of the surrounds to create a virtual landscape for diners to experience. Incorporating the columns with the ceiling design enables them to appear suspended from the ceiling, and along with the various ‘dips’ and ‘drops’ the enhances the aspect of a rolling landscape. This Project was then perforated on each surface and produced as a CUT model as we wanted to see how the contours could create dynamism between itself and a moving car. This was established as favored element due to the appearance of movement that can be achieved by differing the position of the panels. This gave the impression that the shape was changing as the viewer passes by when in reality it is a static object. The perforations create an element of shadow which constantly changes throughout the day with the angle of the sun. In this way our model achieves and creates movement through the use of shadows. The layering of panels creates an impression of a singular form from certain angles, while from others it separates, in this way changing and moving as well.

IMAGE SOURCE: http://yatzer.com/BANQ-restaurant-by-Office-dA

28

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I

2.3. Material Effects & Assembly Methods

BANQ RESTAURANT As a group we took our reverse engineered case study of the BanQ restaurant to the next level by creating a physical model making reverence to the provided CUT definitions. We materialized what our group believed to be the most interesting explorations as a detailed model we explored light and materiality processes through our design by observing changes in light and how the shadows are altered with light filtering through perforations and a shift in perspective. The shifting and bending of forms can be seen through the use of contouring creating an undulating form that would be quite dynamic when traveling past at high speed in an area such as that chosen for the Wyndham city gateway project.

29

Julia Koutroulis 350577


I

3. Expression of Interest Conclusion: Competitive Advantage

EOI CONCLUSION Initial investigation into the subject of architectural discourse helped us to understand what we is expected of us when aiming towards the goal of creating a Gateway for Wyndham city. Precedents such as the Frank Gehry experience music project and Seed Cathedral helped to inform decisions about what direction to head in with our design. Computational processes that are relevant in the seed cathedral may not be relevant in our design but the overall design processes are relevant. Through initial planning and a key idea the architects at Heatherwick studio materialized what was once only a concept. The advanced technological framework of this design can be used with respect to the gateway project in a way that promotes an ever-changing view of structure and a dynamic observation from static form. As clouds move over the seed cathedral there are changes in light allowances producing interesting effects that could be reinterpreted into the gateway project with the movement of cars traveling past the structure. The Experience music project can also be integrated into our discussion of the gateway project with the incorporation of a framing system and a cladding or skin, through designing a frame that changes in form throughout its entirety we also create dynamic movement through static shape, as cars travel past the skeletal framing system different views emerge. Through experimentation of digital design techniques and cut definitions as a group we were able to discover what parametric design is capable of. Through experiments with different definitions we were able to produce a matrix of geometries which can help to inform the future design for the Wydnham City Gateway Project. After our interim presentation we will be taking comments into consideration and altering our approach slightly to take advantage of the use of computational design. Through the use of contemporary computational design the possibilities are almost endless and our initial design can be altered and changed according to what we believe is the right direction to put the Wyndham City Gateway on the map.

30

Julia Koutroulis 350577


II

1.1. Project Interpretation

PRELIMINARY PROPOSAL To begin we started with the letter W as we believed that although it was quite simple it can stand for many things, such as Wyndham, Werribee, Welcome etc. We then decided to take that W and repeat it so that we could create some dynamism as commuters drive past the structure. Each W was altered to create different shapes as though the form morphed and changed with time.

Next, we lofted our surfaces together to create a smooth texture which we believed would look visually quite pleasing and also morph and change as the car moves past it. This was the shape our numerous lofted W's resulted in.

31

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.1

II

Project Interpretation

FURTHER ANALYSIS The project has asked us to broaden our minds in producing an entrance, welcoming travellers into the Wyndham City area along the city bound Princess Freeway. This instillation must be exciting and eye catching, something that inspires and encourages further reflection of the design after the first glance. When considering our design, the elements we considered are the flat wide landscape, high-speed traffic movement, sense of pride to local community, aspiration intent to creating a new discourse that inspires and enriches the municipality. Our proposal for the Wyndham Gateway is that of a bold iconic shape that will stand out and resonate with the viewers. It represents a changing, developing and expanding community of Wyndham. It is adaptable to different times of day and has the potential to appear different each time it is viewed. The boldness of the form marks the entrance to a community that is making its mark on Melbourne, and thus is placing Wyndham on the cultural map. Our first concept was both a literal and abstract interpretation of Wyndam, taking the W from it's name and morphing it into another dynamic shape with the intent of instilling a sense of pride in the Wyndham City People. The form began simply and then morphs into something more dynamic. After gaining feedback from the initial crit we went back to the drawing board and began to re-design.

32

Julia Koutroulis 350577


II

3. Expression of Interest Conclusion: Competitive Advantage

VITRA HOUSE

While researching this idea of clichÊ uses of well known shapes and iconic forms we came across the concept of the 'vitrahaus' by Herzog and de Meuron: this concept conncects the key concept of stacked volumes. Vitrahouse is a five sorey structure which is comprised of 12 houses – five houses are set at the base and severn are stacked upon one another. Each of the structural volumes appear to be extruded and then cantilevered above one another. As a group we decided that we would follow on with this idea of shape extrusions and cantilevered masses to produced our own sign post for Wyndham. The vitra house cantilevers up to 15 metres in some places. the floor slabs intersect the underlying gables, resulting in a three-dimensional assemblage or 'pile of houses'.

33

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.1

II

Project Interpretation

VITRA HOUSE

The building on the lowest level appears to be the same form as the other but squashed, almost as if the weight of the other buildings is bearing down on it, this is a nice little surprise to the repition of forms in this building, we may like to incorporate something like this into our design, or possibly a tapering in of form, change of size with extrusion, this can be done using a boolean and attractor points.

34

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.1

II

Project Interpretation

SYMBOLS Our further design process began by taking inspiration from the attractions of Wyndham and using icons as a visual Sign Post for the city. This piece of architecture should be reflective of the style of Melbourne freeway art that exists and also represent Wyndham in a new and dynamic way. We identified some of the main attractions of the area, such as the Werribee Open Range Zoo, the Point Cook Wetlands, the Werribee mansion and also the Chiryu sister city in Japan. After researching the symbols associated with these attractions we picked out what we believed to be the most recognizable icons to design with. We experimented with many different shapes and the end result was a giraffe to represent the Werribee open range zoo, a boat to represent the regions association with water, as represented in the symbol for Wyndham, reeds to represent the Cheetham wet lands, the silhouette of the Werribee mansion, and also a symbol for the Japanese sister city. The instillation enhances the physical environment through the introduction of a visual arts component. It will have longevity in its appeal as it highlights icons that continue to exist within Wyndham and encourages against the Western Interchange by encouraging further reflection after first glance. We have taken advantage of the key view lines into the site and considered scale with regards to the space. The installation is just under 60 meters long, providing a significant amount of ground coverage without being excessive in size. The service Centre and existing structures don’t inflict on our structure.

35

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.1

II

Project Interpretation

SYMBOLS The City of Wyndham and the City of Chiryu in Japan signed a formal Sister City agreement in 2000 to promote cultural and educational exchange and explore business opportunities between the two cities so we found that this would also be a key icon to represent. The Werribee Open Range Zoo is located just a short 30 minute drive west of Melbourne’s city centre, on the Princes Freeway and is a key attraction to the city of Wydnham. (A) The Werribee Mansion is located 30 minutes west of Melbourne at Werribee Park, ‘the mansion’ is described as a living, breathing postcard of the 19th century and a must see attraction for visitors. (B) The Cheetham wetlands lie on the western shores of Port Phillip Bay, close to the expanding City of Wyndham. The artificial lagoons and natural lagoon, which makes up the wetlands are Ramsar listed and support internationally significant populations of seven species of shorebirds. (C) The boat symbol refers to the munincipailitiy's close proximity to the coast as seen on the map (D)

` IMAGE SOURCE: Google Maps

36

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.1

II

Project Interpretation

EXPERIMENTING WITH FORM

Experimentation of form lead us to researching some key symbols of the municipality, the existing logo was taken in this dessign and extruded upwards and made to sit flat on the landscape as a form that can only be seen as true form from the sky. We agreed that although the form looked quite nice, it did not portray the message we wanted to get at to those who were traveling past it in a vehicle.

37

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.1

II

Project Interpretation

SKETCH MODEL

I created a small sketch model just to see how the model could be viewed by passers by and in doing this I was able to see that although the form is quite striking, it has no relevance to the breif and does not highlight Wyndham as a municipaility.

38

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.1

II

Project Interpretation

MATERIALITY & LIGHT We experimented creating linear stacked planes with chipboard to see how the structure would look carved from wood similar to the earlier precedence we used of the Norweigen reindeer centre and the BanQ Resteraunt. This also gave us opportunity to experiment with light contrasts and digital photography. We had some practise creating a stage for the model to sit on and using lighting as seen in photographs.

39

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.1

II

Project Interpretation

MATERIALITY & LIGHT

40

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.1

II

Project Interpretation

MATERIALITY & LIGHT

Using a small hand held torch helped shine light on the model and emphasise the materials used as well as highlighting the curving form and adding some depth to the photograph..

41

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.1

II

Project Interpretation

EXPERIMENTING WITH FORM

In keeping with our main objective of creating a signpost for Wyndham one of our early design was the word Wyndham pointing off in different dirrections. This was created very simply using Rhino by lofting surfaces and stacking them one on top of the other. We experimented with what It would look like driving past and decided that it is not bold and iconic enough to be our final design.

42

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.1

II

Project Interpretation

EXPERIMENTING WITH FORM The amazing thing about the use of new technology is that in just a few seconds you can create a design and alter it in any way you like through digital manipulation, this makes the process much easier. With the use Rhino we were able to create our shapes and then extrude them using grasshopper with reference to attractor points, we could also produce a boolean and cut off the shapes in reference to a line drawn.

43

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.1

II

Project Interpretation

EXPERIMENTING WITH FORM

44

Julia Koutroulis 350577


II

1.2. Project Delivery

FINAL PROPOSAL To follow on the path of this idea we began by lofting and extruding our shapes with reference to attractor points. By stacking them like blocks using parametric designing techniques we were able to adjust the rotation around a central axis and define the lengths of extrusion with a Boolean grasshopper definition.

45

Julia Koutroulis 350577


II

1.2. Project Delivery

FINAL PROPOSAL

46

Julia Koutroulis 350577


II

1.2. Project Delivery

FINAL PROPOSAL

47

Julia Koutroulis 350577


II

1.2. Project Delivery

FABRICATION

Attempting to produce our model by hand made us gain a whole new level of appreation for contemporary digital possibilities in fabrication software and printing services. The amount of time spent in creating a model by hand when compared to our later model which took much less time and produced a far superior result. We ended up with a clean and crisp model that exactly replicated our digital model.

48

Julia Koutroulis 350577


II

1.2. Project Delivery

FABRICATION

Even though the hand made model was not of great quality we were still able to produce some great photos of it that captured the esence of our design.

49

Julia Koutroulis 350577


II

1.2. Project Delivery

FABRICATION Hand made model with different lighting experimentation. Image bellow shows the process of preparing templates from which to construct our physical model.

50

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.3

II

Project Presentation

FINAL PROPOSAL With the use of contemporary fabrication technology we were able to 3D print our model with great accuracy and in a minimal amount of time. The model is an exact representation of what we hoped to achieve for the Stendhal City Gateway project, it is an iconic form which strikes resonance with the residence of this area, passers by and also people who are traveling to visit the area. It is a dynamic shape which changes views and shapes as you move past in your vehicle. Although the structure is stationary, it appears dynamic when the eye travels past it.

51

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.3

II

Project Presentation

FINAL PROPOSAL

52

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.3

II

Project Presentation

53

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.3

II

Project Presentation

PHYSICAL CONSTRUCTION The red highlighted segment of the model highlights the section that I have chosen to take as an example for how the actual structure could be constructed.

54

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.3

II

Project Presentation

PHYSICAL CONSTRUCTION

The construction process for this physical structure on site would have to be frame and cladding as it would be way too large to be made from solid metal and there would be too much frame work involved to to use in-situ concrete. Precast concrete panels may also be too heavy and cost too much to deliver to site.

Using frame and cladding construction here are images of part of the structure being contoured. This takes the model and cuts it at pre-determined intervals, we have chose 2 meters. Digital software allows us to slice up the model and determine how many framing elements are needed, what heights they are, how wide they are etc.

Here is an example of the paneling that could be used on one segment of the structure. Each panel is a different size as the structure goes from large triangle to small triangle.

55

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.3

II

Project Presentation

PHYSICAL CONSTRUCTION The Model will sit on the site at the position shown bellow as we believe that is the best possible place for the structure to be viewed when traveling in a vehicle towards the municipality. The large faces can be viewed on first glimpse of the structure when traveling in the direction coming from the city. As you pass by each element is extruded to a form less than half the size of the original. This positioning helps to highlight the idea of a stationary object creating a dynamic experience.

N

56

Julia Koutroulis 350577


1.4

II

Project Proposal Conclusion

Our design is an abstraction of a ‘signpost to Wyndham’ using stylized symbols of some of Wyndham's key attractions. The symbols point in the general direction of the attraction and create a dynamic effect when you move past. It provides an entry statement and arrival experience by becoming a new identifier for the municipality. It creates a focal point of an iconic scale and will generate much discourse.

57

Julia Koutroulis 350577


III LEARNING OBJECTIVES AND OUTCOMES: FINAL 1.1. Personal Background and Learning Objectives

Following the Subject Handbook, Studio Air aims to develop students’ competencies in: “interrogating a brief” by considering the process of brief formation in the age of optioneering enabled by digital technologies; When interrogating the brief we were given it gave us opportunity to understand what exactly the client is asking for and make sure that we understand some key words such as “bold” and “iconic” and what they might mean to the people of the municipality Hence, we were able to produce our interpretation of a bold and iconic design that will welcome commuters into the Wyndham area. developing “an ability to generate a variety of design possibilities for a given situation” by introducing parametric modeling with its intrinsic capacities for versioning; The use of parametric modeling has given us this ability to alter designs and generate many possibilities instantly, this can be seen through our production of a Matrix with numerous different designs being produced through grasshopper definitions. developing “skills in various three-dimensional media” and specifically in dynamic 3D modeling, digital fabrication, dynamic diagramming and so on; developing “an understanding of relationships between architecture and air” through interrogation of design proposal as physical models; This course has really been an eye opener into the three-dimensional digital world, we have learnt the basic skills needed to create parametric models and learnt when parametric modeling is very useful and when it is redundant. developing “the ability to make a case for proposals” by engaging students in the controversies and contradiction of contemporary architectural discourse on digital architectural design. This can be seen throughout my groups conclusion to the E.O.I and how we have adapted our designs to better suit the client, also visible through section II of my journal with the different proposal outcomes, moving from a solid horizontal shape to cantilevered masses.

58

Julia Koutroulis 350577


III LEARNING OBJECTIVES AND OUTCOMES: FINAL 1.2. Learning Progress

My process for this subject went as follows. -Understanding Architectural discourse -Researching precedence -Discovering key aspects of Wyndham -Finding out the capabilities of digital modeling -Learning the difficulties of fabrication without digital processes -Resolving form to be produced using contemporary digital process -Understanding digital fabrication processes(3D printing) Each step is explained throughout the journal in further detail. 1.3. Learning Outcomes

I feel that the fundamental learning objectives behind this course were great however an understanding of what is actually expected could be better communicated. I believe that this course has pushed me to learn more about computational design and has taught me a lot, I came into the subject never having used Rhino or grasshopper and I now have some basic skills to take away with me. Although it was tough learning a new program and keeping up with coursework I believe it will be beneficial to my possible future in the design industry. These skills have enabled me to build and develop a personal repertoire of computational techniques substantiated by the understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of applications. I now am aware of when parametric modeling is helpful and when it just adds extra unwanted difficulties. I have developed a foundational understanding of computational principles behind digital geometry, data structures and programming and developed capabilities for conceptual, technical and design analysis which has the possibility to position my work in comparison with others who have not done this subject. 1.4. Future Work In the future I would like to work in the field of heritage and conservation and I believe that this subject has provided me with some useful information as to how the digital era and digital design more particularly can benefit Architects as we keep moving forward in technological developments. Technology is advancing at a rapid pace and I believe the integration of the old and the new is quite an amazing thing when done right. This subject has given me some new skills to take with me into any future design career path.

59

Julia Koutroulis 350577


RESOURCES ●

http://www.dezeen.com/2007/08/23/serpentine-gallerypavilion-2007/ http://www.archdaily.com/58591/uk-pavilion-for-shanghai-worldexpo-2010-heatherwick-studio/ http://www.archdaily.com/180932/tverrfjellhytta-snohetta/ http://www.archdaily.com/140897/in-progress-iguzziniilluminazione-spain-headquarters-mias-arquitectes/ http://www.archdaily.com/33925/soumaya-museum-lar-fernandoromero/ http://www.snoarc.no/#/projects/239/true/all/image/1280 http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/11789/soumaya -museum-by-fernando-romero-architects.html http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/13930/soumaya -museum-now-open-fernando-romero-interview.html

http://www.kvadrat.dk/textiles/kvadrat_art_projects/serpentine_g allery_pavilion_olafur_eliasson_kjetil_thorsen/

http://yatzer.com/BANQ-restaurant-by-Office-dA

Branko Kolarevic – Architecture in the Digital Age (2003)

Burry – Scripting Cultures (2011) Pg. 8-71

60

Julia Koutroulis 350577

Ads3 final journal  

Final Journal, ADS3