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Jessica Rossi-Mastracci j.rossi.mastracci@gmail.com


graduate work Master of Landscape Architecture | University of Pennsylvania | 2010-2012


philly pier potentials spring 2012 | landscape studio | professor Keith Kaseman

flooding working pier algae bloom + harvesting mussel “placing” oyster “placing” + harvesting city events event rentability

ecological events: cycle + schedule


corregation for mussel harvesting

water access

boat access

axon produced using Rhinoceros 4.0 and Adobe Illustrator Rethinking the role of the piers in the context of Philadelphia, the piers become the negotiation between the city and river, re-focusing the city back towards the river, and the armature to embrace fluctuations and seasonal change. As a way to do this, the piers broadcast through lighting, announcing ecological cycles and city activities, and blurring the sharp line of waterfront, merging the city and river through the piers. It also ties the piers back into the city, connecting to the urban grid, infrastructure, and public spaces. The piers become the framework to understand, enjoy, and profit from natural cycles of the river and turn these ecological events into a new type of program and public space for the city. The ecological events, oyster + mussel planting and harvesting, and algae bloom and harvesting for use in biodiesel and water filtration, return the piers and waterfront back into an economic engine for the city. As a large scale strategy, the piers embrace the fluctuations of the river, through wrapping human occupation with ecological events, as a generator/structure for new types of public space, programming, and engagement with the river centered around production, exchange, and gathering. The schedule of events, on the previous page, is used to combine and determine program on a pier-by-pier bases, where each has a combination of programs at different intensities, rather than all at once. The tendency diagrams, on the bottom of the following pages, speak to the distribution and tendencies of the specific programs, and start to influence the formal strategies of each pier. The renderings on the following pages start to speak to the seasonal use of the spaces, from recreational, to economic, to educational.


wood piles for oyster habitat

canoe launch

structure

barriers/ handrails

furniture

axon produced using Rhinoceros 4.0 and Adobe Illustrator

sections


ecological events: cycle + schedule

edge matrix

tendencies + projections produced using Rhinoceros 4.0, V-RAY, Adobe Illustrator + Photoshop


ecological events: cycle + schedule

edge matrix

tendencies + projections produced using Rhinoceros 4.0, V-RAY, Adobe Illustrator + Photoshop


activating industry fall 2011 | landscape studio | professor Christopher Marcinkoski

landform typology study using Rhinoceros 4.0 and V-RAY


system diagram

This proposal focuses on the integration of a public armature within an industrial landscape. A major component is thinking about infrastructure and industry as landform, for public space, highly active industrial space, productive ecologies, and infrastructure to exist simultaneously and adjacently. The landforms are used as a way to “design� the interface between public and infrastructure, RE-ENVISIONING what productive space means in an urban context. The main urban move connects the city to the river and organizes movement through a series of three distinct landings: city, infrastructural ridge, waterfront. Lights call out areas of public, industrial, and infrastructural intensity, playing off of the idea of the spectacle of infrastructure and industry. Through this, infrastructure becomes a way to provide access and guide public movement, rather than becoming a barrier. The massiveness of the move topographically is able stand up to highway and massiveness of the site.


schematic site plan


service infrastructure lighting

Schuylkill River

ecological river edge river walk

infrastructure

wastewater treatment seating

rail bypass

public realm

GATHER ridge: axon, section, plan, views using Rhinoceros 4.0, V-RAY, Adobe Illustrator + Photoshop

cranes

material storage

public armature

wastewater treatment

material sorting

industrial zone


water sports

the Boardwalk

interior road lighting

boating

river access

seating

infiltration

runoff collection + infiltration

river access

runoff collection + infiltration

material collection

water collection

water feature

plaza

plaza

lighting civic programming

recycling collection I-76

CONNECT platform + ridge: axon, section, plan using Rhinoceros 4.0, V-RAY, Adobe Illustrator + Photoshop


Snyder Docks

lighting

public armature

cranes

subsurface wetlands

eco-walk

Snyder Docks

constructed riparian habitat

eco-walk

lighting

public realm

ecological + industrial educational center

rail infrastructure

material collection + sorting

industrial zone

ecological

FILTER platform + ridge: axon, section, plan using Rhinoceros 4.0, V-RAY, Adobe Illustrator + Photoshop


edges + event spring 2011 | landscape studio | professor Karen M’Closkey

gradient study using Adobe Illustrator


inital pattern and 3D studies


This project creates edges or boundaries through a series of cuts and wedges as organizational strategies. Starting with the initial gradient pattern and model studies, I looked at possibilities within these overlapping lines and shapes as surface operations, and took ideas about when they cross, if they become cuts, folds, shifts, or are removed. The cuts, the main topographic move, serve as a water collection and filtration infrastructure, moving water from the urban fabric and park towards the Delaware River. They loosely define the site into many programmatic zones. The wedges begin to delineate multiple scaled spaces through vegetation (forest, gridded trees, meadow) and ground materials (lawn, gravel, concrete).

analysis of existing site lines, surfaces, and materials


phase one: establish community conenction and main path


site plan


market space

large gathering

open gathering

event space

small group gathering

large + small group gathering

performance space

large gathering


reclaiming infrastructure fall 2010 | landscape studio | professor Dilip da Cunha


plan (left) and sequential sections, graphite on Arches


This project reclaims unused/unusable spaces between lines of infrastructure: active catenary power lines, railroad tracks, a major elevated highway, and the Schuylkill River. These spaces have been dramatically altered during construction of these infrastructures, leading to an overgrowth of invasive plants and a large amount of remnant material debris, but inevitably discarded as unusable spaces. By engaging these lines through a series of constructed paths, walls, vegetative strips, and water collection channels, it creates physical connections to reclaim these spaces as usable and desirable to inhabit. ground + threshold: photography study


From both a logistical and environmental viewpoints, large amounts of material debris, such as concrete, railroad ties, and stone, are repurposed into the constructed elements through use of gabian structures. This method of repurposing materials, reclaiming spaces, and collecting runoff water can become a way to engage infrastructure on a larger regional scale.

material collection + infrastructure: photography study


dry studio | Aridlands Institute summer 2011 | teaching, research, and fieldwork | Hadley + Peter Arnold

Part teaching, part research + studio work, part travel. Teaching Assistant for Dry Studio, an upper level studio for undergraduate architecture students at Woodbury University in Burbank, California. As an individual project, I researched water management issues in the West and Southwest, including indigenous and contemporary water infrastructures, policy, and land management practices. Midway through the summer, we took a road trip from Burbank to study water scarcity + usage, landscape, and traditional dry farming methods, ending in Dixon, New Mexico. For two weeks, we worked with a farming community, who still uses a traditional acequia system of irrigation, to develop policy and management strategies, and to document two acequias using GPS, GIS, and photography. We returned at end of summer to present our work through a community meeting and drawing gallery.


studio (group) drawing, using data collected on two acequias


nested dig

unit network

capture slow

distribute spread network

slow

collects water for distribution

allows for groudwater recharge

collects water for distribution

allows for groudwater recharge

nested imprint

slow

capture capture capture capture filter distribute capture spread distribute filter capture spread filter filter filter filter filter capture

capture capture spread spread

distribute distribute

berms

slow

slows flow of water

slow

land tiles

slow

contour swales

distribute

encorages sediment deposition

slow

creates habitat for pioneer species

slow

Lancaster, Brad. Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond. Tucson, AZ: Rainsource, 2008.

slow

filtration

waste biomass return biomass

effluent waste biomass reverse osmosis or nanofiltration

concentrated brine effluent

waste biomass

revegetation

slow

slows flow of water

slow

dig

field network field unit network network

slow slow slow slow slow slow slow slow

spread capture filter filter filter filter

capture capture

nested

slows flow of water

slow

improves water retention and infiltration

non-porous

Lancaster, Brad. Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond. Tucson, AZ: Rainsource, 2008.

slow

drop structures

slow

slows flow of water

slow

reduces soil loss improves soil quality

slow

reduces soil loss due to erosion

slow

encorages sediment deposition

distribute

improves water retention and infiltration

capture

cut/pile

line imprint

Margolis, Liat. Living Systems: Innovative materials and Technologies for Landcape Architecture, Birkhäuser Architecture; 2007.

slow

improves soil porosity and water retention

filter

creates an ephemeral wetland, absorb phosphorus

river

Lancaster, Brad. Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond. Tucson, AZ: Rainsource, 2008.

capture

nested

Margolis, Liat. Living Systems: Innovative materials and Technologies for Landcape Architecture, Birkhäuser Architecture; 2007.

slow

terracing

filter

imprinting

slow

water harvesting

slow

earthen dikes

slow

network

slows flow of water

field

nested

creates habitat for pioneer species

point

Out of Water Project, http://www.oowproject.com/mapping/land-imprinting

network

slows flow of water

network

slows flow of water

network

allows for upslope infiltration

network

directs arroyo runoff to be used downstream

unit

encourages sediment deposition, increases soil depths

porous

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

water harvesting

induced meandering

field

vane weir point bar baffle

network

encorages sediment deposition

dig

field

creates habitat for pioneer species

diversion canals

earth and rock dikes

dig

network

temporary rock + brush dams

cut/pile

field

slows flow of water

imprint

point

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

slows flow of water

nested

network

Leopold, Luna B. A View of the River. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1994

slows flow of water

collection and distribution of seasonal stream flow

collection and distribution of seasonal stream flow

nested

network

directs arroyo runoff to be distributed downstream

weir

revegetation

dig

point

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

reservoirs

check dam

gabian structure

induced meandering

distribute

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

slows flow of water

weir

dig

field

spread

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

vane

baffle

point bar

cut/pile

point

nested

collection of seasonal stream flow

reduces channel incision and erosion

creates a new ecological regime

slows flow of water

encourages sediment deposition

slows flow of water

encourages sediment deposition

slows flow of water

reduces runoff and bank erosion

slows flow of water

encorages sediment deposition

creates habitat for pioneer species

slows flow of water

non-porous

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

Lancaster, Brad. Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond. Tucson, AZ: Rainsource, 2008.

Zeedyk, William D., and Van Clothier. Let the Water Do the Work: Induced Meandering, an Evolving Method for Restoring Incised Channels. Santa Fe, NM: Quivira Coalition, 2009.

influent

qanat

effluent

distributes groundwater through a series of underground canals and wells

aeration

contour swales

berms

land tiles

revegetation

drop structures

imprinting

induced meandering

non-porous

Zeedyk, William D., and Van Clothier. Let the Water Do the Work: Induced Meandering, an Evolving Method for Restoring Incised Channels. Santa Fe, NM: Quivira Coalition, 2009.

Zeedyk, William D., and Van Clothier. Let the Water Do the Work: Induced Meandering, an Evolving Method for Restoring Incised Channels. Santa Fe, NM: Quivira Coalition, 2009.

Leopold, Luna B. A View of the River. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1994

vane baffle

water harvesting

porous

Ruggles, D. Fairchild. Islamic Gardens and Landscapes. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 2008

slows flow of water

effluent

encorages sediment deposition

creates habitat for pioneer species

weir point bar

layer

point

spread

slows flow of water

improves water retention and infiltration

diversion canals

earth and rock dikes

temporary rock + brush dams

container

line

nested

Lancaster, Brad. Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond. Tucson, AZ: Rainsource, 2008.

improves water retention and infiltration

reduces soil loss due to erosion

improves soil quality

reduces soil loss

slows flow of water

encorages sediment deposition

creates an ephemeral wetland, absorb phosphorus

improves soil porosity and water retention

creates habitat for pioneer species

slows flow of water

encorages sediment deposition

creates habitat for pioneer species

slows flow of water

non-porous

Lancaster, Brad. Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond. Tucson, AZ: Rainsource, 2008.

Margolis, Liat. Living Systems: Innovative materials and Technologies for Landcape Architecture, Birkhäuser Architecture; 2007.

Lancaster, Brad. Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond. Tucson, AZ: Rainsource, 2008.

Margolis, Liat. Living Systems: Innovative materials and Technologies for Landcape Architecture, Birkhäuser Architecture; 2007.

slows flow of water

revegetation

weir

check dam

gabian structure

induced meandering

qanat

tanque

reservoir

porous

Out of Water Project, http://www.oowproject.com/mapping/land-imprinting

Leopold, Luna B. A View of the River. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1994

slows flow of water collection and distribution of seasonal stream flow

directs arroyo runoff to be distributed downstream

cistern

biotope

ridged field

dig

spread

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

swale

catchment trench

cut/pile

network

distribute

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

reservoirs

berms

earthen embankment

layer

point

nested

collection and distribution of seasonal stream flow

collection and distribution of seasonal stream flow slows flow of water

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

weir

vane

baffle

point bar

rain garden

french drain

non-porous

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

reduces channel incision and erosion

creates a new ecological regime

slows flow of water

encourages sediment deposition

slows flow of water

encourages sediment deposition

slows flow of water

reduces runoff and bank erosion

slows flow of water

encorages sediment deposition

creates habitat for pioneer species

distributes groundwater through a series of underground canals and wells

Lancaster, Brad. Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond. Tucson, AZ: Rainsource, 2008.

Zeedyk, William D., and Van Clothier. Let the Water Do the Work: Induced Meandering, an Evolving Method for Restoring Incised Channels. Santa Fe, NM: Quivira Coalition, 2009.

Zeedyk, William D., and Van Clothier. Let the Water Do the Work: Induced Meandering, an Evolving Method for Restoring Incised Channels. Santa Fe, NM: Quivira Coalition, 2009.

Zeedyk, William D., and Van Clothier. Let the Water Do the Work: Induced Meandering, an Evolving Method for Restoring Incised Channels. Santa Fe, NM: Quivira Coalition, 2009.

Leopold, Luna B. A View of the River. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1994

Ruggles, D. Fairchild. Islamic Gardens and Landscapes. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 2008

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

reduced dependence on outside water sources

water retention and infiltration

collecting water for reuse

reduced dependence on outside water sources

collecting water for reuse

reduced dependence on outside water sources

water retention and infiltration

distribution

improves water retention and infiltration

creates habitat for pioneer species

retains wastewater on-site for filtration

increase soil depths

slows flow of water

reduces soil loss and erosion

catch and retain runoff water for agriculture use

slows flow of water

improves water retention and infiltration

spread

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

Margolis, Liat. Living Systems: Innovative materials and Technologies for Landcape Architecture, Birkhäuser Architecture; 2007.

Lancaster, Brad. Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond. Tucson, AZ: Rainsource, 2008.

Lancaster, Brad. Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond. Tucson, AZ: Rainsource, 2008.

Lancaster, Brad. Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond. Tucson, AZ: Rainsource, 2008.

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

improves water retention and infiltration reduced dependence on outside water sources

network

Lancaster, Brad. Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond. Tucson, AZ: Rainsource, 2008.

brush water spreaders

waffle garden

nested

Lancaster, Brad. Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond. Tucson, AZ: Rainsource, 2008.

slows flow of water

spread

reduced dependence on outside water sources

capture

Lancaster, Brad. Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond. Tucson, AZ: Rainsource, 2008.

spreads water across a field

slow

water retention and infiltration

slow

water retention and infiltration

slow

creates habitat for pioneer species

imprinting

revegetation

slow

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

reduces soil loss and erosion

improves water retention and infiltration field non-porous

groundwater

point field field

slow slow slow slow slow

capture spread capture

rain garden

dig improves water retention and infiltration improves soil quality

field

porous rain_runoff

waffle garden

distribute capture

slight [5-20%]

brush water spreaders

slow

point

non-porous river

revegetation

slow

porous groundwater

gravel mulching

slow nested Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

little/no [-5%]

imprinting

network

imprint rain_falling

check dam

field check dam

rain_runoff

gabian structure

point gravel mulching

non-porous

nduced meandering

network creates/improves conditions for vegetation

spread

slow

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

distribute

gabian structure

slow

slows flow of water

capture

slows flow of water

distribute capture

reduces runoff and bank erosion

slow

encourages sediment deposition

slow

creates habitat for pioneer species

slow

nested

improves water retention and infiltration

filter

network

Out of Water Project, http://www.oowproject.com/mapping/land-imprinting

filter

Zeedyk, William D., and Van Clothier. Let the Water Do the Work: Induced Meandering, an Evolving Method for Restoring Incised Channels. Santa Fe, NM: Quivira Coalition, 2009.

filter

small boulder bench terraces

distribute

induced meandering

network

weir

vane

unit

baffle

network

point bar

field

slows flow of water

point

slows flow of water

dig

network

spreads water across a field

nested

point

encorages sediment deposition

dig

line

creates habitat for pioneer species

nested

network

increases soil depth and sediment deposition

acequia

permeable paving

exposed collection gutter

concrete asphalt

Zeedyk, William D., and Van Clothier. Let the Water Do the Work: Induced Meandering, an Evolving Method for Restoring Incised Channels. Santa Fe, NM: Quivira Coalition, 2009.

collects runoff water

porous

Leopold, Luna B. A View of the River. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1994

reduces runoff and bank erosion improves water retention and infiltration

capture

improves water retention and infiltration

check dam

revegetation

layer

network

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

creates a new ecological regime distributes water through a series of open ditches

gabian structure

ground materials

Lancaster, Brad. Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond. Tucson, AZ: Rainsource, 2008.

Lancaster, Brad. Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond. Tucson, AZ: Rainsource, 2008.

slows flow of water

creates a new ecological regime

non-porous

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

slows flow of water

encourages sediment deposition

reed bed

induced meandering

dig

structure nested

reduces channel incision and erosion

weir

vane

baffle

point bar

river

small boulder bench terraces

Zeedyk, William D., and Van Clothier. Let the Water Do the Work: Induced Meandering, an Evolving Method for Restoring Incised Channels. Santa Fe, NM: Quivira Coalition, 2009.

Doolittle, William E. Cultivated Landscapes of Native North America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.

slows flow of water

encorages sediment deposition

reduces runoff and bank erosion

slope

exposed collection gutter

permeable paving

filters water for reuse

creates a new ecological regime

creates habitat for pioneer species

retains wastewater on-site for filtration

swale

canal restorer

method of intervention dig

Zeedyk, William D., and Van Clothier. Let the Water Do the Work: Induced Meandering, an Evolving Method for Restoring Incised Channels. Santa Fe, NM: Quivira Coalition, 2009.

Leopold, Luna B. A View of the River. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1994

Kadlec, Robert H., and Scott D. Wallace. Treatment Wetlands. Boca Raton, FL: CRC, 2009.

filtration

captures stormwater

aeration

creates a new ecological regime

aeration

improves water retention and infiltration

non-porous

retains and filters waste and stormwater onsite

non-porous

Mau, Bruce. Massive Change, Phaidon Press, October 1, 2004.

advanced treatment

soil permeability

creates habitat for pioneer species

treatment wetlands

wastewater

retains wastewater on-site for filtration

return biomass

removal of total dissolved solids and/or trace consituents as required for water reuse applications

tertiary treatment

groundwater

acequia

nested secondary treatment

qanat

water type

Kadlec, Robert H., and Scott D. Wallace. Treatment Wetlands. Boca Raton, FL: CRC, 2009.

influent

Kadlec, Robert H., and Scott D. Wallace. Treatment Wetlands. Boca Raton, FL: CRC, 2009.

waste biomass

revegetation

return biomass

disinfection

slope water type soil permeability method structure function: slow function: capture function: filter function: spread function: distribute section diagrams

additional nutrient removal

influent

removal of residual suspended solids by filtration and membranes

influent

Kadlec, Robert H., and Scott D. Wallace. Treatment Wetlands. Boca Raton, FL: CRC, 2009.

primary treatment

components

removal of biodegradable organic matter, suspended solids, nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus)

function

Kadlec, Robert H., and Scott D. Wallace. Treatment Wetlands. Boca Raton, FL: CRC, 2009.

distributes groundwater through a series of underground canals and wells

references removal of wastewater constituents such as rags, sticks, floatables, grit and grease, and suspended solids and organic matter

potential benefits

Kadlec, Robert H., and Scott D. Wallace. Treatment Wetlands. Boca Raton, FL: CRC, 2009.

water infrastructure

Ruggles, D. Fairchild. Islamic Gardens and Landscapes. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 2008

intervention

check dam

intervention conditions

gabian structure

nduced meandering

ground conditions ground conditions

steep [20%+]

rain_runoff

compacted soil clay porous

existing conditions

research work on water infrastructures nested

network


undergraduate work Bachelor of Arts in Architecture | Washington University in St. Louis | 2001-2005


creating urban landscapes fall 2008 | urban design studio | DIS Copenhagen | professor Dominic Balmforth This urban strategy connects a mixed use residential area to central København and existing infrastructure, and integrates landscape within urban environment. The landscape network serves as the main organizational spine, where waste and water runoff is collected through central greenspaces and reused, creating a closed-loop system. The public spaces shift in scale and levels of openness, from private to public. Pockets, such as the common courtyard shared by four residences, or public squares, are large enough to invite activity, yet intimate enough to fit the human scale.


spreadable

hand tools how to manipulate

power tools

LASER

digital fabrication

outside fabrication

liquid

unit of material

module

sheet/roll

slab

interior

application

exterior

rooÂżng

material resource center

structural

summer + fall 2009 | material research, label design + library development sustainably certiÂżed

non-toxic

recyclable and/or contains recycled materials

sustainability CO2

BIODEGRADABLE

The College of Architecture’s Materials Resource Center at Washington University in St. Louis is developing a database of sustainable materials. The digital database and physical resource center emphasize qualitative material characteristics and provide evaluation of materials for sustainability, allowing users to compare materials based on transparent and nonproprietary information. For the physical resource center, I designed display labels for specific material samples, including developing graphical icons that describe sustainable and quantitative information, environmental certifications, recycled and recyclable content, and carbon footprint. This categorizes materials in a general way, where more specific information regarding performance is available on the digital database.

zero carbon footprint

biodegradable

reclaimed

metal

This project was selected for the ASCA Call For Action: Innovation in Design and Research.

ceramic or glass

category

cementious, masonry or stone

organic (carbon based)

plastics or resins

hybrid (combination of 2 or more)


structural spine, concrete skin spring 2008 | material studies in concrete | group project | professor Liane Hancock Through an elective class on materials, we focused on using concrete in a small-scale application. We looked at different precedent studies to see how concrete could be used in innovative ways, and took these ideas into our bench design project. My study of Felix Candela influenced the use of cantilevering and folding planes. We developed a modular system, using the same triangular slab to make up each folded component and complementary angles to simplify the manufacturing process.

24.0 “

27.5 “

120º

27.7 “ 29.0 “

24.0 “

60º

24.0 “ 33.9 “

2.0 “

2.0 “

24.0 “ 25.0 “

24.0 “ 27.5 “


The two parts, the structural steel spine and the concrete skin, utilize the inherent structural qualities of each in an innovative way. While the concrete form is complex, it is held together simply through the steel frame, creating a design that can be both simple and complex at the same time. This duality is juxtaposed in its materiality and how each is used, fluid and fixed, compression and tension, skin and spine.


blurring boundaries fall 2007 | architecture studio | professor Gia Daskalakis The project folds the landscape and building together, blurring the line between the built and natural. A continuous folding plane creates the floor, wall, and roof, ending into the landscape, creating a new topography for the park. Pathways cut into the hillside, sinking the visitor below ground and engaging them with the landscape. Along a path, there are certain key moments where the visitor emerges from the ground and has a framed view of the park. These pathways connect two distinct areas in the park, one with recreational activities and another with a naturally hilly landscape, and encourage interaction between them.


unfolding space fall 2006 | architecture studio | professor Liane Hancock


Unfolding Space incorporates the idea of unfolding, distorting, and reflecting the space surrounding Dan Graham’s “Triangular Bridge Over Water.” Walking around the site, the reflection of the sculpture on its glass panel changes, distorting the inhabitable space inside. It is not a static work; you have a new understanding of the sculpture and consequently, space, as you experience it. This analysis began an investigation into incorporating the ideas of viewing, reflecting, and distorting in the viewing space and small gallery.


The small gallery space is a formal gesture further developing ideas about reflection and distortion. Inspired by the undulating hills and the natural setting, the architecture frames the visitor’s view of nature. It is a small-scale intervention, similar to the sculptures that reside in the park, encouraging the interaction between art, architecture, and landscape on a pedestrian scale.


j.rossi.mastracci@gmail.com | (+1) 281.733.9104

portfolio  

as of spring 2012

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