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Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz A Food Hall of Transition; Bringing the Nature back to the City Unit 22 BENVGA08 Design Realisation


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

CONTENTS Project Introduction Unit 22 Brief and Agenda Project Agenda and Aims Project Brief Building Programme

01 Building Form, Systems and Planning Site Analysis Use and History Site Location Building Form Floor Plans Overall Section Toilets, Water Collectors, Pots and Kitchens

03 Building Performance Material Sourcing User Comfort and Experience Air Pressure and Moisture Control Exhaust Ventilation and Interstitial Condensation External Insulation Wind Energy Rainwater Collector Sun Path and Shading Day Lighting Solar Harvesting Air Quality

Building Systems

04 Building Delivery

Access and Circulation Systems and Services Fire Strategies and Escape Routes

Client, Funding and Users Procurement Route Role of Contractors and Suppliers Role of Consultants Role of Suppliers Construction Sequence

02 Building Construction Overall Strategy Key Structural Systems

Bibliography


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Medellin, Colombia Latitude: +6.29 (6°17’24”N) Longitude: -75.54 (75°32’24”W) Time zone: UTC-5 hours Country: Colombia Continent: Americas Sub-region: South America Altitude: ~2000 m


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Project Brief The River Medellin is very important for its people who are now showing an increasing interest in keeping it clean and making it part oftheir everyday lifes. To promote this idea, the design proposal consists in the creation of several transicional spaces which, being placed in urban areas, will bring nature into the city by linking to bigger green and open areas. Simultaneously, Medellin has social issues between communities, not only economical boundaries divide them, but also deifferent backgrounds. This creates an anti social behaviour and marginalisation of certain areas of the city. This design proposal will be focused in one of the transicion spaces, in this case in the area of Moravia known for its usage as a rubbish dumping site in the past. The project consists in a building divided in for levels in wich vegetation will grow and connect spaces from inside to outside. The inner spaces will be used as an interactive food hall in which the users will be able to cook and sell their products or buy a great variety of meals and enjoy the spaces.

Unit 22 Harbour Brief and Agenda Harbour: several crafts, plenty of decks, efficient provisioning.

The site is strategically placed so the flow of people visiting experiences a transition from private (driving their car to the foodhall) to public (after socialising in the vertical gardens, taking the train).

In terms of typology second and third term will invite students to go beyond averageconstrains of a building to face a more open definition of built environment. Specific activities in the harbor will be defined by each student.

The building shape will be defined by its functions and the navigation through its spaces.

- The crafts. Students will be invited to develop and combine not only their own previous proposal for dwellings and the previous experience on the scale one pavilion but other students’ proposals for both dwelling and pavilion. Design should not only be develop further but gain an ‘operating’ system in the sense Buckminster Fuller was proposing in his book Operating Manual For Spaceship Earth.

Key Project Aims

- The decks. Built environment will incorporate open air facilities, infrastructures, landscape treatment, links and connection between crafts extending the concept of deck, meeting and organizing different environmental levels as in the book The Structure of The Ordinary: Form and Control in the Built Environment from John Habraken. - The provisioning. Architecture requires a lot of supplies as well as environment. Logistics to maintain both natures alive will be incorporate to the students design.

-To create a vegetation network from nearby green areas to the Medellin urban mesh -To create connections from and to public transport -To increase social interaction in the neighbourhood -To provide the neighbours with a space and facilities from which they can make their living by cooking their fresh and natural products -To make the building as self-suficient as possible through energy and water harvesting


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Crime in Medellin War against the Cartel de Medellin

Easing

Homicides per 100,000 habitants

Period of The Violence

Moravia; an issue within its society The project starting point was looking at the impact that the industralisation in Medellin, Colombia, had on its River; from clean, wild and full of life, to a man-made, concrete basin and streight river. Parallel to the denaturalization, an impact on its society occured dividing the city into different areas, or communities, depending on their economical wealth creating an ‘invisible wall’. Medellín was once known as the most violent city in the world, a result of an urban war set off by the drug cartels at the end of the 1980s. As the home of the Medellín Cartel funded by Pablo Escobar, the city was victim of the terror caused by the war between the organization headed by Escobar, and competing organizations such as “El Cartel del Valle”. However, after the death of Escobar, crime rates in the city began to decrease. Throughout the rest of the 1990s crime rates remained relatively high, although gradually declining from the worst years. In October 2002, President Álvaro Uribe ordered the military to carry out “Operation Orion,” whose objective was to disband the urban militias of the FARC and the AUC. Between 2003 and 2006 the demobilization of the remaining urban militias of the AUC was completed, with more than 3,000 armed men giving up their weapons. Nonetheless after the disbanding of the main paramilitary groups, many members of such organizations have been known to have reorganized into criminal bands known commonly as Aguilas Negras. These groups have gained notoriety in Medellín for calling upon curfews for the underage population, and have been known to distribute fliers announcing the social cleansing of prostitutes, drug addicts, and alcoholics.

Number of homicides per 100000 habitants in Medellin 1990-2009

Year

Homicides

There were 33% more murders in 2008 than 2007, with an increase from 654 to 871 violent deaths. This increased further by over 200% in 2009 to 2,899 violent deaths, or about 110 deaths per 100,000 people, 2.5 times the average homicide rate in Colombia and 20 times the average homicide rate in the United States for that same year. An average of 9 people were killed every day in 2009. There is a significant disparity in crime rates by neighborhoods, with virtually no homicides in El Poblado to areas with open gunfights in the outskirts. Generally, crime rates increase the further the neighborhood is from the center. From 2010 and 2011, homicides have declined as with crime in general, but there remains a high crime rate in the poorest communities. Recently, a turf war has broken out between The Office of Envigado and Los Urabeños cartels. Because of these past problems with crime, the scheme looks to contribute to changing the city in particular the neighbourhood of Moravia, improving the area’s community by increasing the social interaction between its neighbours and the visitors. It will be a space of transition (from private to public and from nature to urban), which will give the opportunity for individuals to socialise with people from different backgrounds.


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Food as a social celebration. The best way to bring people together Medellin, as a Latin American city, is known for the great amount of street food stands that bring life to its streets. The idea of creating a food hall of transition comes from the need of social interaction in the area of Moravia. Food is something evryone enjoys and the act of eating is purely social and and full of joy wehn with people around. This food hall will provide different food for different people divided by areas on the kitchen level (first floor). Traditional Colombian food tends to be deep fried and not so healthy, at the same time, there is a relationship between overweight problems and the socioeconomic status of cities. This project looks to provide traditional food but there must always be an equilibrium between in the choices of food provided everyday to promote a healthier menu for the visitors

Everyday there must be a balance of MEAT CORN VEGETABLES FRUIT AND JUICE

Difference in Overweight Prevalence Growth Rate

didvided by areas


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-MuĂąoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Moravia has a total of 45,15 hectares and a population of 33200 living in 7377 homes, which equals 1296 people per hectare having each person 2.4 sqm of public space.

Car boot Market for fruits and vegetables

Who is it for?

This project will increase the Public space and help rise the area’s economy by giving the neighbours the opportunity to sell their home products to the fast moving sity society. The design is focused towards families in the area so that they are able to profit from this venue by selling their food to the visitors, increasing this way social interaction and decreasing unemployment (manteinance, cleaning and building while the construction process) and providing some extra income to the families going through economical difficulties.

Moveable kitchens to arrange depending on the daily food sold. This means no attached cooking mechanisms in the stands. Solution: Bottled Gas cookers.


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

What to plant in the vertical gardens? Vegetables

Overgines

Onions

Tomatos

Peppers

Carrots

Potatoes

Lettuce

Regional Vegetation

Orchid

Cica

Guadua

Yellow Acacia

Araucaria

Palma Abanico

Red Acacia

Chaquiro

Palma Abanico de China

Choiba

Ceiba

Libro pine

Palma Alejandra

Pandanos

Palma Amarga

Caracoli

The programm looks to grow vegetation within its architecture to both, provide ingredients for the users to cook as well as brnging the original vegetation back to the now urbanized area creating a ‘lung’ for the community.

Palma Areca

Majagua


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Family brings

t he

The idea for the Menu is to be open for each individual. Families will bring the products they are used to cook with at home, and prepare them in the same way for the visitors. At the same time Medellin - and Colombia in general - is known for its heavy and high in calories food, this is why there would now be an opportunity to also sell healthier food lightly influenced by more international food for those more adventurous people. The floor will be divided in areas depending in the kind of food being served on the day creating different ‘food paths’ to follow, making the visitor’s experience different every day and this way making them keep coming as a regulars.

g

ds to the b oo

n ldi ui

g

Aj ia

Goods are lifted to the Kitchen area

jo

Arepas

Once upstairs, the goods are prepared and the cooking starts


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

01 Building Form, Systems and Planning Site Analysis Use and History Site Location Building Form Floor Plans Overall Section Toilets, Water Collectors, Pots and Kitchens Building Systems Access and Circulation Systems and Services Fire Strategies and Escape Routes


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

01 Building Form, Systems, Planning and Context

History of River Medellin For everyone in Medellin now a day, the image of the Christmas lights in the city brings to the memory great moments with family, friends and holidays. Only looking at the river provokes in people’s minds the memory of flavours and smells and whish to make those times come soon again, by the markets, music and colourful lights by the Medellin River. Although, what many remember and not so many from the new generations know is that these activities would have been impossible to happen not that long ago. There was a time when the River was clean, was not canalised, it had its own life, less people abused of it and more people loved it, as told by the older generations. Before the Spanish arrived to Medellin, the river was the main attribute of the Aburra Valley, its murmur abounded the environment like a proclamation of freedom and peace. Aborigines would come to its shore and look at themselves as if it was a mirror flirting as well with the magic reflection of the stars on the water surface at nights. The river would give a great economical use as very important sediments for agriculture formed it. All sorts of crops grew and animals would live around the river providing either feed of company. Up until the XX century the river was pure, even women would come down to clean the swine tripe’s before cooking it. It was also a way of transport for wood coming from up in Envigado down to the city centre, used then for construction and furniture. The City then started to grow more and more and the river started creating problems by damaging crops and flooding areas, for this reason it was decided to completely change its course from being natural and curvilinear to a straight manmade path by creating in the start wooden walls filled with stone known as ‘trinchas’ by 1941. These ‘trinchas’ became concrete structures and later it was added the canalisation of the river, which for many, became the coffin for the river. Years passed by and more people arrived to the city. The river was then completely transformed. Now everything started to be built around and along the river, happening at the same time the development and industrialisation of Medellin. After then, people started to care less and less about the river, making it dirty, factories polluting it with their waste, throwing into the river garbage and residues. This made the river Medellin a highly polluted river, completely changing the look of the Medellin to a more sad and neglected city. In the past years, there has been an increased interest in cleaning the river and giving it the protagonisme and love that it once had. Water purification plants were installed (eg: San Fernando) cleaning an 80% of the water by filtering the sand big solids (such as bottles, plastic bags etc) from the public drainage, then a biological process in which microorganisms ‘eat’ the dirt in the water creating a mud heavier than the water which drops to the bottom of the tanks separating from the water above. 1300L/sec go through the plant, taking 8 hours from the start of the process to the end. Now that some of the areas of the river are cleaner, new public spaces can be created and used by the ravines. Not only it is for ecological reasons, but also for economical as some families live of the river digging sand out of it as an example. Everyone is responsible for the river and everyone has to look after it.


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz. Unit 22. Harbour Project

River

in

Medell

Moravia is a neighborhood located at the very urban core of Medellin. It is a settlement of approximately 104 acres, inhabited by around 40 000 people and according to report, the current public space index is of 0.37 sqm/person. This “barrio” grew in an area that was designated as the city’s dumpster and that is the reason why it was chosen as the site area for the design project. The settlement grew as an enclave, completely separate from its surroundings, yet encircled by large gestures of public space and transportation nodes. Located near by are the Botanical Garden, The Planetarium, Music Center, Parque de los Deseos, Parque Norte, a few metro stations, the University of Antioquia and the more recently constructed science museum: Parque Explora.

Although it may seem contradictory, more people began to settle in the area since having a dumpster also meant employment; recycling, garbage recollection, etc. As such, the settlement continued to grow and the proximity to the railroad made it one of the first areas newcomers would seek. This proximity to the main transportation system also meant that Moravia also became home to a large black market and “pirate” activities. Colombia’s recent history is interesting to look at as it is tied to an internal war with Guerrilla, Paramilitary groups, and Drug Cartels. Paralleling the country, Moravia’s history is also tied to the violence and manipulation incited by these groups. Pablo Escobar, the famous leader of the Medellin Drug Cartel, used this settlement (as well as others) to legitimize his actions and political campaign, “Medellin without slums” (Medellin sin tugurios). He constructed Moravia’s soccer (futbol) field and even constructed the equivalent of a small town in order to relocate families in great need, or in the case of Moravia, families who had lost their home after a fire.

Llanitos Moravia Morro

Centro Cultural Moravia

Playa

Milan

Bosque

Health Centre

Parque Norte

Universidad de Antioquia

Parq ue Ex plora

Moravia began as a linear settlement bordering Medellin’s railroad, being next to the North Station in the early 1900s (a big reason for this was the solidity of the soil next the railroad, which contrasted to the humidity and instability of the surrounding ground). As the settlement grew, especially in the 1950s due to the political war and violence that was taking place in the country’s rural areas, so did some of the industries and institutions around it. Because of the lack of waste management in the city, Moravia slowly, informally became the wasteland for its surrounding area, and in the late 1970s, the city declared it as the official city’s dumpster.

Fidel Castro

Parqu e los de de seos

There are various sectors in the settlement of Moravia, each one consisted of its own identity and origin; El Bosque, Moravia Centro, Llanitos, Milan, la Playa, el Oasis and el Morro (the last 2 mentioned are sectors located on large mounds of garbage).

Moravia grew through auto-construction but remained disconnected to the surrounding city’s infrastructure (water, sewage, electricity, streets, etc) and even city society. There were many environmental problems, as well as unemployment. As the city’s dumpster, the area had bad smell problems (still smells), polluting the air with toxic gazes. These factors would not stop plants and grass from growing in the garbage mountains even some of the residents would grow crops not realizing the levels of toxicity at stake. In 1983- the city closed the dumpster and a land rehabilitation process slowly began to take place. In the 1990s, the violence in the settlement grew as local bands, and militia groups linked to Guerrilla, began to form and fight for power. These internal battles made Moravia, according to homicide and other violence statistics, “one of the most dangerous barrios in the World”.

Metro

Botanical Garden

Quebrad

a El Moli no


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Moravia; a neighbourhood highlighted by History

Poor brick constructions, no planning, isolation, pollution in the canals, An effort is being made by the government to integrate the area and improve its services eg.: Healthe centre (Arch. Rogelio Salmona) opening.


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Renaturalization of the canal Quebrada el Molino (or ‘La Chorrera’) In order, main areas: Concrete/ Urbanized Area Green Area Water


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

The site is located in a strategic location, just in front of ‘Park North’ on the other side of the tributary ‘El Molino’ which joins the main river ‘Medellin’ just a few metres away. It is situated at the beginning of the commune of Moravia, right in a transitional space where public transport, as oposed to pivate, starts being used. The city’s new central bus station, universities, hospitals, new leisure parks; its ground rent potential is high and inhabitants constantly feel the pressure of being relocated. Polluted soil and damaged public spaces describe the area at present, for this reason it became of interest to explore the ways in which the space could change the area and the way its percieved by the rest of the city. Site Plan 1:500


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

A

B

Site long Elevation 1:200

Site short elevation 1:200


in d

Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

W

Summer 18:19 Winter 17:53

SITE

Summer 5:49 Winter 6:20


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

-

http://www.colombiainfo.org/en-us/cities/medellin/medellinclimate.aspx


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Earthquakes in Medellin Although most of the earthquakes in Colombia do not occur in Medellin but in cities like Bogota or towns closer to Ecuador, special attention to earth movements is needed when designing a building in Medellin as it is a high risk area for earthquakes. There are two options, making the building very flexible (either thanks to mechanisms at the base or building with flexible materials), or extremely robust so that when an earth movement occurs the building completely absorves the vibrations avoiding dabage on the upper levels. When building a robust and stable structure, a gap needs to be allowed between the new structure and the neighbour building as there is a high chance that the other building will shift in case ove earth movement and posibly damage itself against the new building if directly in contact.

Medellin

Heavy rain in Medellin Medellin is known for its very rainy climate which sometimes can cause problems such as flooding, lanslides or poor quality building colapse. In order to design a good proposal, the building needs to take advantage from the rain (by collecting it for instance) as well as take into consideration its potential damage.


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Aburra Valley

Social and Functional segregation of the territory

Socioeconomic cluster Water flow system

River

High socioeconomic level

Plain

Low socioeconomic level

Hill

Occurrence of disasters

Fragmentation and Disarticulation of the river flow

Fragmentation, disarticulation and deficit in natural ecosystems and urban green public spaces

Native forest intervened Regional roads

Forest in regeneration process Green spaces associated to the river

Existing public space Expectant soils Strategic projects

Public spaces in conflict with movility


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

BRING NATURE BACK TO THE CITY. Neotropical plants that attract birds

Fruit-trees

Birds that frequent Nectar-trees and insect-trees

Birds that frequent Nectar-trees

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Tabebuia chrysantha

35 m

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Guayacán

Fruiting Period

Birds that frequent seed trees and fruit trees

Trepatroncos

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(Piranga olivacea)

Seed Trees

Flowering Period

Fruiting Period abr

(amazilia saucerottei)

Piranga

mar

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Colibrí

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Guacamayo

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Birds that frequent Nectar-trees

Semillero

(Oryzoborus angolensis) Croton magdalenensis 22 m

Flowering Period

Fruiting Period

Birds that frequent Isect-trees

Mosquerito

feb

Flowering Period

Mielero

Fruiting Period

(todirostrum cinereum)

ene

Flowering Period

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15 m

Talipariti tiliaceum

Fruiting Period oct

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Majagua

Bauhinia picta

Flowering Period

ene

Casco de vaca

ene

Acacia

Calliandra pittieri Flowering Period

Birds that frequent Isect-trees and fruit-trees

Birds that frequent Isect-trees and fruit-trees

Azulejo

Caesalpinia peltophoroides16 m

Gallinacito

(Sayornis nigricans)

Birds that frequent fruit-trees

(Thraupis episcopus)

Nectar-trees

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Birds that frequent Birds that frequent Nectar-trees and fruit-trees fruit-trees

Sirirí rayado

3 - 15 m

Fruiting Period

Fruiting Period (Myiodynastes maculatus)

12 m

Flowering Period

Flowering Period

Fruiting Period oct

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Carbonero

Anacardium occidentale

feb

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Marañón

ene

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Flowering Period

Chumbimbo

feb

10 m

Atrapamoscas

(melanerpes rubricapillus) (Myiophobus fasciatus) Sapindus saponaria 25 m

Psidium guajava

ene

15 m

oct

Guayabo

Ficus americana

35 m

Carpintero

Caucho sabanero

Erythrina poeppigiana

nov

Cámbulo

Insect-trees

Birds that frequent seed trees and fruit -

Semillero Pechinegro

(Sporophila nigricollis)

INFORMATION TAKEN FROM: Franco Molina, Diego. (SAO). Vida, Color y Canto. Plantas neotropicales que atraen aves. MESA Editores. 2009.


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Kitchen Pavilion Medellin for MAMM

Water Down (in)

Foodhall in Moravia

Solar Chimneys Water Collention Kitchen Inspiration Smoke up (out)

Unit 22 Bartlett students together with UPB students in Medellin designed a pavilion founded by MAMM. The Kitchen unit inspired this new design in several ways; The idea of kitchens and cooking as a starting point followed by the air ventilation, solar chimney driving the smoke upwards and water collection bringing the water down. All these components put together and the adition of site related factors result in the new design.


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

The Doubble Lace System; Communication of Nature and Journeys PU IC BL AN

TR

From countryside and Tributaries O SP

to the Urban mesh and the River

RT IN

From Private Transport

TR AN SP OR TO UT ANSITIO TR

N

IN

PR

N

IVA T E TR AN S OR TI N

G VE

IO AT T E

N

C

Meting all at this environment of social transition that will rejuvenate the area

TR IBU T AR YI

PU BL I

Parki n

g

to Public transport


Project Typology

ue

o wo r k ey t n r jou

by

Pu

ic bl

Tr

City Centre, end of journey in and start of journey back Transition ce of a p S

Coo k, Se ll a nd

E ls Mea of ind lk al at

Breakfast, co nt ter f in A

an sp or t

Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Someone will take your car to a secure parking for the day

5:30am; Drive from home to the foodhall


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

1. Solar Chimneys 2. Water Collectors 3. Steel Latice 4. Steel ‘Tree’ Structure 5. Staff Staircase from garage Market 6. Dining ‘Pots”

11

7. Kitchens 8. Screens 9. Main Entrance Staircase

10

1

10. Ramps from and towards the Canal 11. Ramps from and towards the Park

2

4 7 6

3

8

9

5

Main Entrance Lift

10


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Corrales and Molezun Brussels Paviliont

The Tote by Serie Architects

Giancarlo Mazzanati Sports Centre

Andres Perea

Prefabricated swimmingpools


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation Water collection system. Opening mechanism Impermeable Fabric

Structural strategy

Lightest materials

Steel latice grid system. Tension and compression Holding the water collectors

Steel structure holding roof structure Tree-shaped structure in compression

Storage deck Linking ‘tree’ structures reducing movement and strengthening stability

Dinning area. Floor between kitchen area and roof. Free wood structure in compresion tied by cables in compression

Dining area connecotrs ‘paso’ style

Heaviest Materials

Solar chimneys Extracting smoke and smell from Kitchens and toilets.

Lift Biodigester toilets Covered in vegetation Kitchens level ‘Table’ Structure Concrete base structure Heavy and stable. Main entrance. Steps are individual. Standing on a ‘tripod’ structure Ground level. Goods are delivered from cars and vans in this level


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Models for inspiration.

Do or op en sw

he n

sta

nd ing

he r

e

‘Pots’. Intrigate microsystems, self supported and moveable Water collector. Stretch fabric and unfolding structure Sequence of frames creating a tunnel like experience as going up the stairs Wood framed white metal sheet screens

spiral

Enter here Tunnel of wo nders

HOY El m ejor Ajiajo Colombiano

Ricas Mazorcas de Ricarda

AREPAS Gloria las mas buenas!

Bandeja Paisa que alim enta!

pper s the u toward

world

starts

now


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Pile foundations

Concrete Waffle

The foundations used will be ‘Pile Foundations’ due to the softness of the upper soil. The foundations will extend 8 metres below ground in order to reach the hard soil.

Waffled concrete will be used for the first floor slab to reduce its weight.

Pile

Soft soil provides little or no support

Rock


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Structural engineer sketches After consulting the structural engineer, the design structure was addapted to spread the loads in a more coherent way. Dimensions, such as the water collectors, changed and a more solid base was proposed. The continuity of the structure was corrected to follow a vertical allignment. It was decided to slightly change the water collectors design by creating a roof structure consisting in a latice grid in which a secondary structure of foor arms linked with impermeablestretch fabric rests to spread the load along the roof structure instead of individual vertical elements.

AREPAS Gloria las mas buenas!

Ricas Mazorcas de Ricarda

The foundations were changed to be deeper and more stable by replacing them for pile foundation system The individual step structure (for the entrance staircase) changed to be ‘tripods’ instead of single poles, to ncrease stability. The tree-structure changed to be taller and adapt its branches to reach higher or lower levels of the latice roof grid. Wider structure was designed for the dining ‘bird cages’

HOY El m ejor Ajiajo Colombiano

Ricas Mazorcas de Ricarda

AREPAS Gloria las mas buenas!

Bandeja Paisa que alim enta!


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Building load diagram

HOY El m ejor Ajiajo Colombiano

Ricas Mazorcas de Ricarda

AREPAS Gloria las mas buenas!

Bandeja Paisa que alim enta!


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Building sequence

First of all the ground need to be prepared and the foundations installed.

The pre-fabricated tree-like steel structures are now installed onsite

The first built structure will be the the concrete base, defining the first floor

The biodigester toilet cabines are built on-site from prefabricated units constructed off-site and placed resting on the wholes made on the concrete slabs

The next step will be to place the concrete slabs in place

The main dining area wooden ‘bird cage’ structures and build onsite from prefabricated units builf off-site

Then, the service staircase will be built in order to ease the workers circulation.

The rest of the ‘bird cage’ structures are built over the biodigester toilets

Pre-fabricated ramps from and towards the park and canal are installed on-site

The individual steps for the main staircase are placed on-site

Connection staircases in the building are constructed on-site with fire proof materials

Staircase to and from the park is built on-site


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

The storage deck is installed linking the steel ‘tree’ structures to increase stability of the structure for heavier load above

The prefabricated latice grid roof is lifted to its position with the help of a crane to precisely link it to the ‘tree’ branches.

Now the solar chimneys can be inslalled attached on to the newly placed latice roof

Lastly, thewater collectors are fitted into the laticed grid roof and the storage tanks fixed along the tree branches


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Circulation

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Ground floor;

First floor;

Access to first floor from the street level throught staircase or lift

Access from and towards the Canal/Park

Access from the road by car through the ground floor to provide goods and leave or park and sell the goods

Access towards the upper levels via two staircases

Access from ‘garage’ for the staff up to the firs floor


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

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Second floor;

Third floor;

From the lift or staircases (at both ends) navigate through the dining ‘pots’

Storage level, only for service. Access from the service staircase or the lift Access to roof via ladders for mantainance from this level


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Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

M + E and sanitation systems The Foodhall will be naturally ventilated throughout, beign an open structure, the wind will find its way through the design components allowing for sufficient ventilation. Solar chimneys will capture the smoke provoked by the kitchen and extract it out of the building vertically. Being Medellin such a rainy city there is a rainwater collection and purification system integrated in the design to supply the water needed. The water is collected up in the roof level and through the pipes towards a storage tank the water is forced by gravity through several purifying filters. It then can be used for cooking, drinking and irrigation. Electrical services are housed vertically in a raiser at the centre of the project enclosed in a waterproofed material with sufficient access to the box and trip switches. The sanitation services -covered in vegetation- are only on the first floor where the kitchens are located. The toilets are biodigesters so there will be no need for pipes traveling into them but just output pipes which will travel horizontally and towards the park to be disposed. Water collection and purification

Solar chimneys Raiser Electrical wire path Grey water -black pipe connected to local sewer system

Bandeja Paisa que alim enta!

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Purified water

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AREPAS Gloria las mas buenas!

STU TTG ART

Ricas Mazorcas de Ricarda

EH C S

HOY El m ejor Ajiajo Colombiano


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation Water Collection and Purification

max 1 m3 of water -1000 Lautomatic closure if limit exceeded

Filters: Textile filter (100 microns diametre) Poliester filter (15 microns diametre) Iodine impregnated beads (99.3% of bacteria killed)

Filter Refference; Water for Life Straw

Screw on water collector bottles

Granulated active carbon fibre (eliminates flavour and smell)

Elevation of four collectors

03 Building Performance

Plan of four collectors


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

How much Food is needed? How much Storage is needed?

2000 people a day

Meat

Vegetables

250 g per person

500 kg a day

± 1.35 m3

100 g per person

200 kg a day

± 1.8 m3 Soil 3 inches Straw 12 inches Straw filled air vent

Drainage trench

Potatoes

Flower

100 g per person

200 kg a day

± 2 m3

35 g per person

70 kg a day

± 0.1 m3

Straw layer Mixed root crops


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Waste Inlet Biogas Outlet to Gas Tank for usage MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

Toilets in the building to be biodigestors encapsulated by a wooden frame on which vegetation grows. Its not a toilet, its a garden!

Liquid Waste Outlet

Towards the park, integrated underneath the connecting ramps Heavy Waste Outlet

BIOGAS

BIOGAS


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

2000

Boards for stand name

1500

Folding Bar

2900 Hob area for cooking

Gas tank

900

able and self sufficient, having a gas supply inclosed, to be able to be distributed along the first floor depending on what is being cooked on it each day.

500

Kitchens in the design to be move-

Cuobuards for storage Wheels

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Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Fire escape B1 Means of warning and escape The building should be designed and constructed so that there are appropiate provisions for the early warning of fire and appropiate means of escape in case of fire from the building capable of being usedsafely and effectivelyused at all times For shops, leisure centres or public enclosures where the visitors are not familiar with the building, the distance for horizontal escape is 30m end no more than 18m in one direction A minimum of 2 escape routes is required for 60-600 people per floor, the proposal for the Foodhall shows three staircases (beggining of journey, end and service staircase) in the second level and a lift. In the first floor there are three staircases (from the street, from the garaga -service-, and towards the park) and ramps towards the park All internal and external escape stairs are constructed with fire resistnt materials All escape routes are clearly signed and approopiately iluminated with protected power circuits. Therefor in the event of a fire the sadety signs and signals will continue to function. Cables are sufficiently robust with non combustible support enclosure

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Ground floor escape routes Plan 1:200 R P O

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First floor escape routes Plan 1:200

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Fire curtains will enclose the kitchen area in case of fire, as it it will probably be its origin


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Acoustics an Smell

Roof mechanism

It is very important the acoustic quality in the foodhall, as it is a social space, the idea is to magnify the sound vibrations from the street as well as the cooking to make it a buisy and celebrational space in which smell and noise are the main theme.

An importand detail of the building is its roof and the ability to open and close its components to allow for sun light to go through / shading, or to protect from rainfall and collect water. The components are placed in two diferent heights to allow for ventilation even when they are fully open to cover the floors below.

The sound bounces through the thin 80mm screens at a wide angle on the first floor and through the multifaceted walls of the dinning area. The smell will be produced by the cooking at the first level, a mixture dishes will be cooked and their smell will inundate the space. Both smell and noise will expand outside the building to attract visitors and alert them of a celebration taking place.

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Wood/Metal Screens for sound amplification on the first floor HOY El m ejor Ajiajo Colombiano

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AREPAS Gloria las mas buenas!

Ricas Mazorcas de Ricarda

HOY El m ejor Ajiajo Colombiano

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Ricas Mazorcas de Ricarda

AREPAS Gloria las mas buenas!

Bandeja Paisa que alim enta!

Bandeja Paisa que alim enta!


Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

Disabled access

Health and Safety

The building follows section M of the Building Regulations as well as the Accessability and Mobility Standards on the BSL.

Construction, Design and Management (CDM) highlights the importance of the designer’s responsability for health and safety during the construction process and building manteinance.

People with reduced movility will enter the Foodhall either through the ramps linking the park to the building or from the lift integrated in the building, which connects ground floor to first floor second floor and service deck between the second floor and the roof

-Goal: to eliminate hazards and reduce risks during design and provide information about other risks.

M1 Access to and se of buildings- Reasonable provision shall be made for people to (a) gain access to; and (b) use the building and its facilities Accesible stairs with Approved Document Part M: There are no single steps The raise of a flight between landing contains no more than 12 risersfor a going less than 350mm and no more than 18 risers for a going of 350mm or greater The projection of a step nosing over the tread below is not more than 25mm The rise and going of each step is consistent throughout a flight The rise of each step is between 150mm and 170mm. the going of each step is between 280mm and 425mm. Access to all areas of the building is step-free All corridors are wider than 900mm Wheelchair WC are available in the first floor All staircases are a minimum of 1200mm wide and have a handrail of 1100mm

Wide stepped entrance with integrated wedge on steps for easing the movement of perambulators or other wheeled systems

Potential risks during construction have been taken into account in order to be reduced. Most of the components (such as the steel ‘tree’ structures, the bamboo ‘birdcage’ structure, the latice grids and the toilet ‘pots’) in the proposal have been designed to be manufactured off-site to reduce this way on-site risks. It is responsability of the contractor to ensure the apropiate safety equipment is worn at all time by workers when on site. A n office will be installed on-site during the construction process to control all exits, entries and route across the site, labeled and sign posted. Also during construction, a provisional roof will be installed to protect workers from the heavy rain. Below, the minimum equipment required per worker: -

Safety caps (brightly coloured to enable visibility on-site) Knee pads, Gloves, Hi-vis jacket, Hi vis waterproof trausers, Safety glasses, pocket toolbelt

In order to mantain the proposed builting, there will be access to the water collectors integrated in the steel framed roof through ladders from the upper storage deck in case of any damage to the impermeable fabric or any other component. The steel and wood structures will be finished with a protective coat extending their mantainance span. Free-standing individual steps supported by a ‘tripod’ structure

Wedge

As a designer, it is important to check that the client is aware of their duties and that a CDM co-ordinator is appointed


At morning time the cooks in the area will arive to the foodhall at 06:00 am to get the food ready for 06:30 on time for the first clients to grab their breakfast on their way to work.

07:30 pm

06 am

Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Mu単oz - Unit 22 - A Food Hall of transition - BENVGA08 Design Realisation

The Foodhall

06:30 am On the way to work

07 pm Dinner time

With a population of 33200 people,and a very high level of unemployment, the space will provide an economic help for the area, allowing neighbors to sell their planted products or their prepared meals to the buisy citizens in the morning. Around an estimate of 800 people will beserved a meal within an hour and an average of 2000 people are expected to visit the building per day.

01 pm Lunch time


DR Draft Jose Ignacio Ortiz  

DR Draft Hand-in

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