Issuu on Google+

FdA Fashion Retail Branding and Visual Merchandising Unit: Visual Retail Planning (WBL) UNIT LEADER:

Lesley Taylor

TEACHING TEAM:

Lesley Taylor and Clare Rose

CREDIT RATING:

20

STAGE:

2

LEVEL:

5

LOCATION IN COURSE:

Year 2, Term 3

WHERE & WHEN:

Please see timetable

Please note: If you arrive late for a class, you must wait for an appropriate break in order not to disturb the session. If you miss a class it is your responsibility to find out what you have missed.

LCF STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO USE ONLY THEIR COLLEGE / UNIVERSITY EMAIL ADDRESS. All correspondence to you will be through that medium

Unit Handbook 2012 – 2013


INTRODUCTION This unit introduces you to a variety of media used in the planning of visual retail activities. You will be encouraged to explore commercial practice that encourages the use of appropriate solutions in the context of commercial space. More advanced techniques are explored and developed through a variety of creative applications. The relationship between design research, design and design development and computer generated contexts is fundamental to this unit and will provide you with a coherent framework for future two to three-dimensional concept development. The unit will also explore commercial constraints on visual retail planning. EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES Upon successful completion of this unit you will be able to demonstrate: 1. translation of development plans and drawings into computer generated visuals; 2. identification and recording of primary and secondary research sources relevant to visual retail planning; 3. an appreciation of the opportunities and constraints associated with product and space management in the context of visual retailing; 4. a reflective and creative approach to 3D enquiry and experimentation; 5. evidence of engagement with the PPD principles outlined in this document and on Blackboard/Moodle. ASSESSMENT MARKING MATRIX The unit is designed to enable you to demonstrate the learning outcomes by completing the assessments. Your work will be assessed through the UAL marking criteria, which have been developed to help tutors give you clear and helpful feedback on your work. Which marking criteria relate to which learning outcomes are shown in the table below. Unit Learning Outcomes UAL Marking Criteria 1. Research 2. Analysis

1 X X

3. Subject knowledge 4. Experimentation 5.Technical competence 6. Communication and Presentation 7. Personal and professional development 8. Collaborative and/or independent professional working

2 X X X

3

4

5

X X

X

X

X X X

X X

X

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA Refer to your course handbook for marking criteria. All assessment will be based on the attainment of the specified marking criteria. 2


ASESSMENT METHODS This unit is assessed holistically (100% of the unit). A portfolio of written and visual work to include: Computer generated models; Sketch books evidencing the design process; A visual and written research journal of primary and secondary information (1500 words); Design development and design outcomes portfolio; Diary of your reflection, observations and practice. Assessment will be against the specified marking criteria. BRIEFING DATE: Tuesday 16 April 2013 ASSESSMENT AND PROJECT BRIEF 'The beginning of your research is the book Chromophobia'. Batchelor, D. Chromophobia, 2000, Reaction books. (There are several copies in the library) It is recommended that you read the whole of the book before selecting a particular chapter from the publication which will be given to you during your initial briefing and which you should analyse over the next few weeks, interpret into a three dimensional Visual Merchandising Experience. Sustainability During this unit you will be introduced to issues of sustainability in a range of areas related to the Fashion Industry. Using all or part of LCF’s Centre for Sustainable Fashion’s Tactics for Change investigate sustainability in relation to the brief you have been given. Tactics for Change is a framework for a sustainable fashion industry developed by the Centre for Sustainable Fashion based at London College of Fashion to enable the industry to thrive into the future. (Available to read in the research section of this uhb.) Tactics for Change 1.Building a transformed fashion system 2. Fostering human well-being 3. Working with nature’s limits discuss your views on what you have learnt in your final rationale. Using the Plans issued to you, you should aim to create an innovative conceptual solution which will need to be transported into an existing retail space of a major retailer. Throughout the project you will have access to both the Visual Merchandising studio, props and design studio to enable you to practice your product handling and skills. During your journey over you will need to identify the following: • Your strategy from initial research enquiry, for example. relevant visits, visual culture and theory • Accurate site measurements for use in scale plans and elevations, perspective views. • Design development, for example inclusions, exclusions i.e. what have you included or excluded as part of the process and why? • How you have applied relevant theory, for example, repetition, colour, trends. This could be evidenced through model making, drawing or inclusion in your sketchbook. • Experimentation, for example testing materials and forms, are they appropriate to the development of your concept? • Presentation. How will you present your work logically and professionally? • Delivery. How will you communicate your concept to enable others to understand your thinking? 3


Assessment Requirements Computer generated models; created using appropriate software showing final specs Sketch books evidencing the design process; A professionally generated sketchbook produced on A3 pages, scanned and manipulated to show design concept research and development, this must be saved as a PDF and handed in on a memory stick or CD A visual and written research journal of primary and secondary information (1500 words); 1500 word journal discussing the sustainable aspects of your design outcomes and reflection on the sustainable aspects on this unit. Design development and design outcomes portfolio; Final designs and specs can be added as a final chapter to your research and development sketchbook Diary of your reflection, observations and practice. To include

1. Personal notes, photographs, films, annotated sketches as evidence of your thinking and reflection on a variety of speaker programme opportunities 2. A variety of Sketches/Illustrations/Visual outcomes in response to your experience of the 'Drawing Factory' as timetabled Summer Term 2013. 3. A 500 word reflective summary of your learning experience during the unit and how it relates to your personal goals and personal professional development

RESEARCH You will be required to do the necessary secondary and primary research from recommended sources in order to complete your assessment task. a) “artefacts can function as a leverage point to unlock complex relationships and a starting point for discussions that may be otherwise difficult to initiate because of their sensitive nature. For example when discussing sustainability or gender it is easy to fall back on traditional labels, to get stuck in polarised camps or to avoid issues that touch ‘too close to home’" Sadowska &Tham b) Using all or part of LCF’s Centre for Sustainable Fashion’s Tactics for Change investigate sustainability in relation to the brief you have been given. Tactics for Change Pages 46-49 of Williams, D., Baldwin, N. and Fletcher, K. (2009) Volume 3.0: Centre for Sustainable Fashion: Tactics for change. London: London College of Fashion (Unpublished) http://ualresearchonline.arts.ac.uk/2751/ 1. Building a transformed fashion system The fashion industry is based on a model of continual economic growth fuelled by ever-increasing consumption of resources. The unsustainability of this model is widely acknowledged. Yet also acknowledged is the important role played by fashion products in our culture. To create a less damaging, more constructive future for the fashion sector, we suggest that as a sector that we: Start a high level debate about the values, rules and goals of the fashion sector The fashion industry is of significant cultural and economic importance to the sustainability of our species yet we must not be afraid of challenging its conventions and business models. At its heart, fashion is radical and thought provoking. The opportunity that this can bring should be celebrated through the visualisation of its positive possibilities. It can rapidly give shape to a new more sustainable paradigm and offer both vision and object that can help in creating a transformed industry. This means reconfiguring the shopping experience beyond the purchase of an unexplained and meaningless object, to a pleasure and attachment maintained through an ongoing relationship with the customer. 4


Recognise the power of design We are all designers of our industry, regardless of our role in the supply chain. To adopt a design mentality is to work collaboratively, challenge convention and find possibility where limits are traditionally placed. Design is a key driver to transform our existing culture. We need investment in positive radical ideas in order to make them scalable, applicable and achievable. Share information Information is the key to innovation. Competitive advantage is not based on being the holder of knowledge in this area, it is shared knowledge that becomes powerful and distinctive when creatively applied. It is also through our education system that we must empower the next generation of fashion professionals to employ creativity to challenge practices and redefine our motivations and aspirations for the fashion industry. 2. Fostering human well-being Fashion makes an important contribution to society. It creates jobs and products that satisfy fundamental human needs. Yet it can also damage individuals and societies more widely through appalling working practices, and the detrimental psychological and ecological effect of consumerist fashion. A fashion piece cannot in itself create sustainability – this is created by the way in which we design, make, wear, discard and reincarnate it. We need to design in a way that means that we engage in fashion in a way that is sustainable. We suggest that we re-connect with fashion as a tool for human flourishing and a source of creative employment and productive work by working in three areas: Critically appraise the role of fashion in our culture As human beings we have a deep need for adornment, discovery and novelty. Fashion can help us meet these needs. By recognising and engaging with fashion’s central role in human culture, we build towards more sustainable solutions that meet needs. Put human well-being at the heart of fashion production and consumption Changing fashion practices to improve well-being of workers, consumers, designers, producers is central to a more sustainable future. Educate in a new way The job of the creative designer is exciting, powerful and joyful. We need a visionary education system with sustainability at its heart, producing designers who can use their creativity as a tool for communication and employ it across the supply chain. 3. Working with nature’s limits The impact of the fashion sector on natural resources and ecosystems is substantial. There is an urgent need to reduce the negative effects of producing and consuming fashion. We suggest that as a sector we: Promote transparency Work towards making the entire supply chain visible and thus promote information about resource use, labour conditions, pollution, and waste. This involves working with suppliers and developing a culture of trust and knowledge sharing. Transparency is a precursor for accountability. Measure, benchmark and improve We need measurable points with rewards where cost, ethics, ecological impact, supply chain transparency and lifecycle analysis are benchmarked and assessed against agreed parameters. This can only be achieved through collaboration, leadership and transparency. Be open to new approaches Look for change towards sustainability in new places, people and collaborations. Design ways in which to engage with emerging technologies so as to bring efficiencies, novel materials and new opportunities. Celebrate traditional skills and knowledge that contain much collective wisdom. Factor in the true cost of production Businesses need to internalise costs that have been traditionally seen as external. When questioned, 90% of businesses surveyed felt that they had a responsibility for both direct and indirect impacts of their businesses on the environment (Volume 1.0: Fashion & Sustainability, A Snapshot Analysis March 2008). However this is yet to be factored into the cost of a product and against the values by which a company stands. 18 Questions on Sustainability by ecouterre.com DESIGN 1. How can you use intelligent design to reduce the social and environmental impact of a product’s lifecycle? 2. Do you consider the environmental effects of the colours and prints you choose for your collection? 3. Can you create a longer-lasting and better-functioning product, thereby reducing the need to replace it? RAW MATERIALS 4. How much water does it take to produce your fabrics? 5


5. Are you aware of the sustainable alternatives to the raw materials you are currently using? 6. When selecting your fabric range, do you think about the end-of-life stage, such as the implications of disposal? PRODUCTION 7. How well do you know your supply chain? 8. What are the social costs of your production process? 9. Have you ever considered using recycled pre-consumer/post-consumer waste in your collection? PACKAGING AND TRANSPORT 10. Are you able to reduce the amount of solid and hazardous waste in your packaging? 11. Have you considered a local supply chain to decrease mileage in the production process? 12. Could you reduce the weight and volume of a product by using fewer or lighter materials to optimize transportation? CONSUMER USE 13. How durable are your products; is it possible to increase their longevity? 14. How can you encourage the customer to form an emotional attachment to your product, thereby discouraging disposal? 15. How does your product need to be cleaned and what impact will this have on the environment? END OF LIFE 16. Can the product have a second life? 17. Could you offer an upgrading and/or a repair service to your customer? 18. Can you reduce the waste impact of disposing your product by making it recyclable or biodegradable READING AND RESOURCE LIST ESSENTIAL READING

Batchelor, D. (2000) Chromophobia, Reaktion books, London Casson, H. (1990) Window Display. Tynron: Thornhill. Dean, C. (2003) The Inspired Retail Space: attract customer’s build branding, increase volume. Gloucester, Mass Rockport Publishers. Moreno, S. et al. (2005) Forefront: the culture of shop window design. Amsterdam: Frame Publishers. Morgan, T. (2008) Visual Merchandising: window and in-store displays for retail. London: Laurence King. San Pietro, S. et al (2007) Window Displays=Vetrine. Milano: Edizioni L’Archivolto. FURTHER READING AND RESOURCES

Noble, I & Bestley, R. (2005) Visual Research, London: Ava. Barreneche R. A. (2005) New Retail, London: Phaidon. Bell, J. (2005) Silent Selling, Best Practices and Effective Strategies in Visual Merchandising, NewYork: Fairchild. Pegler, M. (2006) Store Windows No. 15 New York; Visual Reference Publications. Portas, M. (2007) How to Shop, London: BBC Books. Dean, C (2003) The Inspired Retail Space, Mass: Rockport Publishers Inc.

6


Allwood, J., Laursen, S., de Rodriguez, C. and Bocken, N. (2006) Well Dressed? The present and future sustainability of clothing and textiles in the UK, Cambridge: University of Cambridge Institute for Manufacturing http://fashioninganethicalindustry.org/resources/reports/welldressed/ Black, S. (ed) (2012) The sustainable fashion handbook London: Thames and Hudson Fletcher, K. and Grose, L. (2011) Fashion and sustainablity: Design for Change London: Laurence King Publishing WEBSITES

Free online news resource for the retail industry: www.theretailbulletin.com Worth Global Style Network: www.wgsn-edu.com www.vmsd.com www.proportion-london.com www.designcouncil.org.uk www.retailstorewindows.com Amelia's Magazine http://www.ameliasmagazine.com/ Centre for Sustainable Fashion http://www.sustainable-fashion.com/ Ecouterre http://www.ecouterre.com/ Ethical Fashion Forum http://www.ethicalfashionforum.com/ Inhabitat http://inhabitat.com/?page_id=2 NICE http://www.nicefashion.org/en/

TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS This will include studio-based and site visit activity introduced through a series of lectures, studio and computer workshop skills supported by tutor discussion. Lectures, design tutorials and computer workshops underpin the theoretical elements with group discussion, peer evaluation and critiques. SUPPORT If you are having problems with your studies which you think might be due to a specific learning difficulty (such as dyslexia or dyspraxia), disability or ongoing health condition please contact the Dyslexia Coordinator or College Disability Representative, on ext. 7404 to discuss possible support for your needs.

7


SCHEME OF WORK Week/ Date Tuesday 16th April 6.30

Lecture Topic

Learning Activity

Self Directed Study Activities

Sustainable Briefing Introduction to Tactics for Change and fashion and sustainability

Sustainability in the fashion industry

1. What does sustainable fashion mean to you? Make notes in any way you like, for example, a list of words, a definition, a list of brands or organisations or images. There is no right or wrong answer, so simply note down your thoughts without aiming for a perfect answer. The key thing is to observe your personal impressions so avoid any indepth research. Ask five people what sustainable fashion means to them, include people working in the fashion industry where possible. Explain to them why you are carrying out the research for this course and what you will do with the results. Make a note of their name, their age, their occupation, any other relevant demographic factors and their response. 2. Read: Pages 46-49 of Williams, D., Baldwin, N. and Fletcher, K. (2009) Volume 3.0: Centre for Sustainable Fashion: Tactics for change. London: London College of Fashion (Unpublished) http://ualresearchonline.arts.ac.u k/2751/ 3. Read: pages 7 to 14 of Allwood, J., Laursen, S., de Rodriguez, C. and Bocken, N. (2006) Well Dressed? The present and future sustainability of clothing and textiles in the UK, Cambridge: University of Cambridge Institute for Manufacturing http://fashioninganethicalindustr y.org/resources/reports/welldres sed/

Saturday 20th April 9.30 -2.30 (Tutors LT & CR)

Introduction LT & Clare Project Briefing Lecture: History of retailer (partner tbc

Lecture, Seminar, Workshop, Film Viewing with task.

Students should continue unravelling text from chosen chapter and begin the visualise this. Work on PPD journal

Mind maps (in pairs), mood 8


– LT & Clare to discuss) Activity: Unravelling text from Chromophobia Pleasantville Film Viewing Briefing Tuesday 23rd April 6.30

boards

JPS Sustainability Lecture focusing on ‘fostering human well-being’.

1.Read the following and answer the questions: a. People Tree case-study in Parker, E. (2011) Steps towards Sustainability in Fashion: Snapshot Bangladesh, edited by Hammond, L., Higginson, H. and Williams, D., London College of Fashion and Fashioning an Ethical Industry http://fashioninganethicalindustr y.org/snapshotbangladesh/ b. Pachacuti’s Fair Trade & Sustainability Report 2009-10 https://www.panamas.co.uk/dow nloads/Pachacuti_FT_report_20 09_2010.pdf c. In what ways are People Tree and Pachacuti ‘fostering human well-being’? 2. Carry out an audit of your own wardrobe and answer the following questions: How many items of clothing are there? Categorise them (e.g. trousers, skirts, shoes)? How many of these are stretch items? Are they functional or fashionable (or neither?) What has NOT been worn for the last 12 months? What is the oldest item? Newest? What do you wear most often? What doesn’t fit you? What makes you feel good when you wear it? What holds a special emotional connection for you?

Saturday 27th A series of April workshops and

You will have one workshop with Liz Parker then sign up

Reflect on the workshops and consider the information your will 9


9.30 – 2.30 Tuesday 30th April 6.30 Saturday 4th May 9.30 – 2.30 (Tutor LT)

lectures relating to sustainable issues and initiatives IT Portfolio / Graphics

for 3 one hour sessions across the day.

Prototyping & model making as design methods

Lecture, Workshop – model making & intuitive prototyping as design inspiration

JPS

Tuesday 7th May

Sustainability Lecture focusing on ‘Working with nature’s limits’.

use and develop further for your final submission.

Take sketchbook to work on in session Students should continue unravelling text from chosen chapter and begin the visualise this. Work on PPD journal. For next week – bring a selection of found materials and tools (papers, boards, wood, stone, string, fabric etc – anything not purchased especially) 1. Read the following: a. Draper, S., Murray, V. and Weissbrod, I. (2007) Fashioning Sustainability: A Review of the Sustainability Impacts of the Garment Industry, Forum for the Future (14p) . b. The chapter 'Material Diversity?' from page 3 to 38 from Kate Fletcher (2007) Sustainable Fashion and Textiles Design Journeys, Earthscan. 2. Find an actual lycra vest (i.e. in your wardrobe, in a friend’s wardrobe etc). In a medium of your choosing (e.g. mind map, writing, drawing), explore the environmental costs of that lycra vest. Some questions to consider: What materials have been used? What chemicals are used in the process? Which brand or retailer was it made for? Where was it made? What kind of factory? What is the distance it travelled? How was it transported? How was it packaged? Where was it sold? Who wears it and why? How long is it owned for? How will it be laundered? What is likely to happen to the vest once the wearer has finished with them?

Saturday

Drawing Factory at 10


11th May 9.30 – 2.30 Tuesday 14th May 6.30 Saturday 18th May 9.30 – 2.30 Tuesday 21st May 6.30

Mare street Portfolio Graphics (JPS) Cultural & Historical studies HH Sustainability Lecture focusing on ‘Building a transformed fashion system’

Cultural & Historical studies

1. Read Braungart, W. and McDonough, M. (2002) Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things, USA: North Point Press Chapter 6: Putting ecoeffectiveness into practice pp157-186 2. Company strategies i.Identify at least 5 different strategies that the brand or retailer you are working for (or a brand or retailer of your choice) has adopted or promotes to address the social and environmental impact of their sourcing practices. ii. Order these strategies in terms of those that you think will make the biggest change in the way sourcing for fashion operates down to those that you think will have the least impact. Give your reasons. Lecture, Seminar activity – working with found materials as part of creative process. Creating colour palettes.

Saturday 25th May 9.30 – 2.30 (Tutor: LT

Lecture: Concept to Completion with integrated seminar. Lecture followed by progress tutorials Lecture: Materials and materiality in design

Tuesday 28th May 6.30

IT Portfolio Graphics

Saturday 1st June Saturday 8th June 9.30 – 2.30 (Tutor: LT)

Self-Directed study

Self-Directed study

Lecture: Lighting the store environment Lecture: Colour in commercial environments, Concepts, Application Seminar Activities

Lecture, Seminar, Workshop – identify lighting types. Colour in interiors – workshop – creating a palette from the mood board

Students should complete mood boards based on selected chapter with design development. Work on PPD journal. For next week – bring mood boards and water colour block paint/brushes and cartridge or water colour paper. Students should continue working on Design Development. Work on PPD journal

Students should continue working on Design Development. Work on PPD journal

JPS 11


Saturday Final Presentations Final Presentations and 15th June Submission of Portfolio in 9.30 – 2.30 PDF on Memory stick or CD (Tutors: LT &CR) From time to time alterations may be made to the scheme of work to take account of students’ progress and unforeseen events or opportunities. If so, you will be informed in advance where possible, but check Blackboard daily. The scheme of work is intended only as an outline of topics to be covered and is not a definitive list of what will be included in individual sessions.

12


ASSESSMENT DEADLINE HAND-IN DETAILS DATE:

15 June 2013

TIME:

09:30

PLACE: VM Suite JPS 6th Floor Do not hand your work in anywhere else or at any other time. Work handed in after a deadline (even if just a minute late) will be counted as a non-submission. You should not hand in work prior to the hand in time unless your Course Leader has previously agreed this. You should hand in your work personally if at all possible in order to be secure that it has been delivered on time and to the right location. Ensure your work clearly states your name and degree , the title of the unit and the name of the tutor Ensure you obtain a receipt upon submission and that you keep this receipt

RETURN OF ASSESSED WORK / FEEDBACK DATE:

13 October, 2013 (and via On-line assessment 19 July 2013)

TIME:

09:30 AM

PLACE: VM Suite JPS 6th Floor

UNCOLLECTED WORK Uncollected work will be held for 1 term only and then discarded. If you have Extenuating Circumstances (EC’s) and are unable to collect your work at the specified time please contact Jonathan Baker (j.baker@fashion.arts.ac.uk)

13


ASSESSMENT DEADLINE HAND-IN DETAILS FOR STUDENTS WITH A DYSLEXIA PASSPORT and/or INDIVIDUAL STUDENT AGREEMENT / DISABILITY PASSPORT. DATE:

22 June 2013

TIME:

10AM

PLACE: VM Suite JPS 6th Floor Do not hand your work in anywhere else. Ensure your work clearly states your name and degree , the title of the unit and the name of the tutor Ensure you obtain a receipt upon submission and that you keep this receipt

RETURN OF ASSESSED WORK / FEEDBACK DATE:

13 October, 2013 (and via On-line assessment 19 July 2013)

TIME:

09:30 AM

PLACE:

VM Suite JPS 6th Floor

UNCOLLECTED WORK Uncollected work will be held for 1 term only and then discarded. If you have Extenuating Circumstances (EC’s) and are unable to collect your work at the specified time please contact Jonathan Baker (j.baker@fashion.arts.ac.uk)

14


PLEASE NOTE: 1. You should keep an electronic copy of all written and digital work. 2.

Holders of Dyslexia Passports and/or Individual Student Agreements/Disability Passports Additional time is not granted automatically. If you have a Passport or Individual Student Agreement, you are required to discuss arrangements for handing in the work with your tutor during class time two weeks before the deadline. A copy of the Passport/Individual Student Agreement should be attached to the work when submitted. Students with Disability Passports/Individual Student Agreements who need to review their hand-in dates should contact Diana Aronstam at d.aronstam@fashion.arts.ac.uk no later than one week before the deadline.

3. Extenuating Circumstances Procedures for completion of ECs can be found in your Course Handbook and on Blackboard. Formal documentary evidence to support your claim should be submitted with your form to Registry in John Princes Street. All extenuating circumstances will be treated confidentially. The Extenuating Circumstances Panel will make a recommendation to the Examination Board, where your profile will be discussed and any dates for resubmitting your work will be set. 4. Late hand-in of work will result in fail. Late hand-in of work will result in a non-submission being recorded (NS). If late submission is due to illness or other serious problems you are advised to complete an extenuating circumstances form. 5. All grades are provisional until ratified by the End-of-Year Examination Board. RESULTS Progression Sub- Board: 04 July 2013 Publication of results on Blackboard: 22 July 2013 Please note: the outcomes of Boards are published on Blackboard on your course blackboard site. Your student ID number, with the first 3 letters removed, will be used to make this information available. It is your responsibility to ensure that you find out whether you have passed the unit or whether you have been referred and are required to complete additional work. The following abbreviations are used to record the outcomes of the examination boards: R-NS (referred due to non-submission) Any new referral work submitted will be capped by the examination board at D- for the unit R-RSB (referred, not all assessment criteria have been met) Any referral work submitted at the second attempt will be capped by the examination board at D- for the unit D (deferral, for example when extenuating circumstances have been accepted). Any deferral work submitted will be uncapped, and you can receive the full range of marks REFERRAL / RE-SUBMISSION Should you fail to attain the required standard for a unit, you will be required to submit a new or amended piece of work. Under these circumstances you must check your course Blackboard site for details of referral deadline dates and details of the new or amended piece of work set. Please note that it is your responsibility to take up the offer of any referral / deferral tutorial. You should contact your Course Leader/Programme Director if you are unsure of what you are required to complete, in order to pass the unit.

15


UNIVERSITY OF THE ARTS LONDON ATTENDANCE POLICY The University is required to monitor your attendance and report, as appropriate, to the UK Borders Agency, the Local Education Authorities and the Student Loans Company. As such you must inform us of any changes to your contact details and /or immigration status (if relevant). As a student at the University of the Arts London you are expected to attend all timetabled sessions, including lectures, seminars, group and individual tutorials, learning support sessions, workshops, inductions and demonstrations. Regular attendance means that you can take full advantage of the learning and teaching opportunities available to you and gain the greatest benefit from the course. Poor attendance not only affects you but also affects others who rely on you in group projects and for peer learning: where group work and peer learning is central to the subject, poor attendance can lead to failure of assessment. If you regularly miss sessions you will be contacted by your Course Director or Personal Tutor and offered the opportunity to discuss any difficulties that might be affecting your attendance and ways in which the University might help you attend more regularly. If your attendance continues to be poor you will receive a warning letter, your visa or student loan could be revoked and, eventually, you will be withdrawn from the course. The University recognises that you may need to undertake part time employment to support your studies and may have other commitments such as childcare or family or religious events. However the University does expect you, wherever possible, to fit these commitments around timetabled sessions in order to take part in the course fully. If you are aware of an event (for example, an offer of work experience or a religious holiday) that is going to disrupt your attendance at taught sessions you must discuss this with your personal tutor or Course Director. This helps to ensure that you do not miss important sessions that could affect your performance at assessment and also allows the University to make sure that the requirements of the Student Loans Company and UK Borders Agency continue to be met. Remember, if you are studying with us on a student visa, the University has a legal obligation to inform the UK Borders Agency if you: 路 do not enrol for your course by the latest agreed start date; 路 withdraw, or are withdrawn, from your course, take time out from your course, or exceed the number of permitted unauthorised absences; 路 change or transfer to a course of a shorter length; 路 break the conditions of your permission to stay in the UK.

LONDON COLLEGE OF FASHION When you start your course you will be given a course timetable. You will be expected to attend classes in accordance with this timetable. The reason for any absence should be reported to the course tutor / course director and, in the case of sickness absence of five days or longer, must be supported by a medical certificate. If you withdraw from the course you must provide written notification to your Course Tutor / Course Director without delay. You must see your Course Handbook for full information regarding attendance regulations. There are key contact points for each course, for every year, when your attendance will be monitored. These include(*): Enrolment at the start of the year 3 Tutorials throughout the year 3 Register checks during the year 3 Assessment points during the year If you are an international student you will have further contact points due to the requirements of the UK Borders Agency. If you have any concerns regarding your contact points please contact Student Services: Student.Advisers@arts.ac.uk (*) Please note that contact points may be subject to change.

16


TIMEKEEPING If you are absent due illness or other related circumstances, it is your responsibility to find out what you missed. Please note: due to the complex and structured delivery of taught sessions, it is not possible to redeliver or repeat sessions. However, you will find project information and session details on Blackboard and in this Unit Handbook.

PUNCTUALITY It is important that you arrive to your taught sessions on time and that you bring the appropriate equipment, materials and relevant course work required for the activity planned for each session. Late attendance is not acceptable on this programme of study except with prior consent from your course tutor. Lateness to timetabled sessions disrupts the pre-planned structure and delivery to your class as well as has a direct impact on the progress of your fellow classmates.

HEALTH AND SAFETY OR RISK MANAGEMENT At times you will be required to write risk assessments for your college work. This is an important part of planning your work as well as being a requirement for insurance policies, health and safety legislation, and the University of the Arts London health and safety policy. Examples of situations when you should write a risk assessment are: when working with new solvents or substances that we do not already use in college, or when organising a photography shoot on location as opposed to in the studios, an off site exhibition or show. These are just some examples, and there are many other occasions when your tutors or technicians may ask you to write a risk assessment before your work can proceed. All student risk assessments must be signed off by your Course Tutor before you undertake any work. The University’s general risk assessment form and guidance is available to download from the London College of Fashion Health & Safety Blackboard page (Health & Safety @ LCF). All students and staff have access to this page.

17


University of the Arts London Undergraduate Assessment Feedback Sheet

Student Name

Date of Assessment

Student ID

Course Unit Title / Code

Type of Assessment

Visual Retail Planning

□ Staff Assessment □ Self Assessment □ Peer Assessment

Course Unit Level

5 Type of Assessment

Course and College

Assignment / Project Title

SUMMATIVE

FdA Fashion Retail Branding and Visual Merchandising London College of Fashion

See Assessment Methods

Marking Criteria

Level of Achievement

Fail 1 Research Systematic identification and investigation of a range of academic and cultural sources

2 Analysis Examination and interpretation of resources

3 Subject Knowledge Understanding and application of subject knowledge and underlying principles

4 Experimentation Problem solving, risk taking, experimentation and testing of ideas and materials in the realisation of concepts 5 Technical Competence Skills to enable the execution of ideas appropriate to the medium

Criteria Specific Comments (optional) Where criteria do not apply, write n/a in the comments box

Pass

• • • • • • F

E

D

C

B

A

• • • • • • F

E

D

C

B

A

• • • • • • F

E

D

C

B

A

• • • • • • F

E

D

C

B

A

• • • • • • F

E

D

C

B

A

6 Communication and Presentation Clarity of purpose; skills in the selected media; awareness and adoption of appropriate conventions; sensitivity to the needs of diverse audiences

• • • • • •

7 Personal and Professional Development Management of learning through reflection, planning, self direction, subject engagement and commitment

• • • • • •

8 Collaborative and / or Independent Professional Working Demonstrates suitable behaviour for working in a professional context alone or with others in diverse teams

• • • • • •

The feedback you are given should be informed by the criteria and should help you plan and execute work in the future as well as understand how your grade was arrived at. Grades are arrived at through markers’ holistic judgement informed by the criteria

□ Formative X Summative

F

F

F

E

E

E

D

D

D

C

C

C

B

B

B

A

A

A

General comments and advice on how to improve your work in the future

Marker(s)

Signature(s)

Date

Grade

This is an indicative grade which is subject to moderation and ratification by the Board of Examiners. Internal verification complete / pending / not required (delete text as applicable)

UALv8 2011

18


FdA FRBVM Visual Retail Planning