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essica arnhouse portfolio


fall 2012


URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE URBAN MINING: Newtown Creek Gets A Reboot SUNSET SQUARE: Renewing the Industrial Waterfront WATERCOURSE: Redhook Transit Center

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RESIDENTIAL HARBOR RIDGE: The Residences of Pier 1 THE EMPOWERHOUSE: Solar Decathlon 2011 HILLTOP CITY: Housing on the Hillside

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FURNITURE & OBJECTS REST IN THE PARK: Relaxation Station TEARDROP CHAIR: A Contemporary Design for Knoll FINE LINE: Dining Set in Wooden Case

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DRAWING INTERSPACE: An Infrastructural Intersection THE AMAZON: Reimagining the Ground TEXTILE LOGIC: Analog to Digital

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contents


NYC

NEWTOWN CREEK

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PROGRAM: E-Waste Recycling & Processing Plant with Musuem & Recreational Wetlands SITE: Newtown Creek, Brooklyn, New York SCALE: 300,000 sf DATE: 2011-2012 INSTRUCTOR: Jing Liu


URBAN MINING Entrance to Musuem of Technological Obsolescence

Newtown Creek Gets A Reboot


The ubiquity and immediate obsolescence of digital devices

is creating a global problem as these goods, rich in valuable metals but also high in toxixity are carted to landfills at an alarming rate. A mere 10% of this waste stream is currently recycled, of which the majority is sent to China, India and West Africa - places that lack the proper infrastrucure and knowledge to handle this waste stream safely. Rather than shipping off these valuable resources to degrade foreign locales, this project proposes a high-tech recycling facility on Newtown Creek using architecture to enliven a historic industrial zone while simultaneously addressing the years of pollution now embedded with in the creek’s banks. Bio-remediative rhizomes inspire the architecture as the building roots into the creek, eroding the boundaries of industry, water and community toward an integrative model of manufacture.

Existing Edge Conditions

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URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE

Programmatic elements include the Recycling Facilty and support offices, Environmental Biology & Metallurgy Laboratories, Parkland & Wetland Recreation areas complete with a Nature Center with canoe and kayak rental as well as a cafe connected to the Museum of Technological Obsolescence.


View from East Park to Recycling Facility and Laboratories

View to Bridge from Wetland Recreation Area

URBAN MINING: Newtown Creek Gets A Reboot

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URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE


Master Plan Scrap & Material Recovery Waste & Sanitation

High-Tech & Communications Artisan

Green Space & Recreation Barge Routes

Bus Route

Subway Route Bike Route

Superfund Site

Combined Sewer Overflow

INSERT:

The construction of the E-waste Recycling Facilty along with its Musuem of Technological Obsolescence and Reclaimed Wetlands acts as a catalyst to transform the waterfront, allowing community access to hitherto closed industrial processes.

EXPAND:

Other parcels of brownfield along the creek are converted into satelite stations to support the growing needs of recycling New York’s electronic waste, interweaving public, environmental and industrial goals.

PERMEATE:

This integrative model is applied to other industrial and manufacturing process up stream, further eroding the former hard barrier of industry, allowing for both public surveillance and recreation while still promoting New York City’s industrial growth.

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L Subway Train Morgan Avenue

URBAN MINING: Newtown Creek Gets A Reboot

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The architecture straddles the polluted creek edge at its headwater at English Kills, a significantly polluted area of the creek due to the lack of tidal outflow, and cordons it off to create a bio-remediative recreational wetland.

A. Museum of Technological Obsolescence & Cafe B. Administrative Offices C. Nature Center and Boat Rental D. Finished Product Delivery & Storage with Resale & Artisan Booths E. Outdoor Ecology Laboratories & Greenhouse F. Engineering & Facility Support G. Research Facilities H. Receiving & Storage I. Processing & Data Destruction J. Smelting & Ingot Production with Overhead Pedestrian Bridge K. Recreational Bioremediative Wetlands L. Public Park M. Parking

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Level 04: Research Library & Studies

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Level 03:

Metallurgy Laboratories

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Level 02: Museum of Technological Obsolescence & Environmental Biology Laboratories

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Wetland plants

have the ability to process heavy metals and other pollutants through the microbial environments created in their root zones. Using an analogy to these root systems and thier ability to decompose as well as build and anchor structure and convey nutrients, the “cell� of the architecture emerges as a pentahedron that in combination becomes a morphing space frame structure that assembles together in various ways depending upon its location in the site and its technical and programmatic requirements. A nexus of nodes serves as the underlying logic of these cells as

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URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE

they morph to act as air filters or shading, soil retention structures, or as fissures in the creek edge to promote wetland reclamation.

In some locations the cells grow to allow for openings into the recycling facility for public access. Such circulatory paths are interwoven throughout the project to allow public accessibility into the often-closed industrial processes, including from directly above the smelting operations.


Performaive functions of the morphing cell as it adapts to different programmatic and site conditions: Fissure, Retention, & Filter/Shading

Studies combining morphing cells to produce landscape and structure

Moving section following the path of a visitor through the recyling complex

URBAN MINING: Newtown Creek Gets A Reboot

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PROGRAM: Vocational High School & Community Center SITE: Sunset Park, Brooklyn, New York SCALE: 200,000 sf DATE: Fall 2010 INSTRUCTORs: Johnathan Marvel, Rob Rogers & Guido Hartray


SUNSET SQUARE Renewing the Industrial Waterfront


multi-purpose facilities and community gardens. The architecture serves to weave together students and community, folding through pushes and pulls into a form that responds to the industrial context of traffic, noise and pollution while demarcating social, educational and natural spaces. The upper levels form an enclosure from which a garden spills, protected by the building from the intense noises of the interstate to the west and irrigated through rooftop rainfall collection. From the garden a large atrium pierces through the center of the building connecting to the entryway and providing light to a generous lobby dedicated to public art and other community programs. A careful division of programmatic elements allows for the security of the students while still maintaining an open campus. Rather than distinct hallways, the atrium serves as a filter through which students and visitors navigate, always with a visual connection to the is like many rest of the building. post-industrial communities; it is home to the crumbling artifacts of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The full glazing at the north facade industrial past, embedded with the activates the street corner, revealing a toxins of outmoded industries, and has media center, laboratories and public a growing residential community in galleries. Slips in the rain screen need of work and the necessary skills allow glimpses of foliage spilling out to succeed. In response to this fabric from the gardens above, inviting of interstates, industrial buildings, and passerby to round the corner and people, Sunset Square addresses the enter this interior square. Once inside, need of educating the workforce for light filters through the atrium inviting future industrial technologies while visitors up the monumental staircase providing valuable social services. to the gardens. Skylights from the This is a school where the doors donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t gardens filter light into the gymnasium close when its young pupils leave, but and welding areas, while frosted glass beckon in all residents with health, allows visitors a translucent view from career and fitness programs through its the lobby.

Sunset Park

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URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE


Mein Entrance, Southeast Facade

Southwest Facade

Northwest Facade

Northeast Facade

SUNSET SQUARE: Renewing the Industrial Waterfront

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Receiving  Storage

Storage

Lockers

Storage

Men’s Lockers

Office

Office

Office

Drafting

Classroom

Office

Women’s Lockers

Classroom

Classroom

Exercise  Studio

Exercise  Studio

Exercise  Studio

Exercise  Office Studio

Custodial 

Machine Shop 

Welding Shop 

Sheet Metal  Shop

Band &  Chorus

Gymnasium

Career  Center

Lounge

Health  Center

Classroom

Classroom

Gallery

Administration

Art Studio

Guidance

Lobby, Cafe & Gallery

Dining

Media Center

Media Center

Storage

Dining

Storeroom &   Telecom/Network Devices

Kitchen

Security

Science Lab

Science Lab Science Lab

Science Lab Classroom

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Science Lab

Science Lab

Classroom Science Lab

Classroom

Entry

Science Lab Science Lab

Science Lab

Media  Room

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom Classroom

URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE

Classroom Classroom

Classroom Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom Classroom

Special Educ. Classroom

Classroom Classroom

Classroom Classroom

Classroom Classroom

Special Educ. Classroom Classroom

Media  Room Special Educ. Classroom

Special Educ. Classroom

Special Educ. Special Educ. Classroom Classroom

Special Educ. Classroom

Media  Special Educ. Room Classroom

Media  Room


Level 01

Level 03

CIRCULATION

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Level 02

Level 04

Public Private Garden Water

SUNSET SQUARE: Renewing the Industrial Waterfront

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SPRING/FALL

WINTER

SUMMER Environmental Sections overlaid with Sun penetration studies.

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URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE


Early models exploried the site context and varying means to repsond to the industrial context of traffic, noise and pollution, from which emerged a structure that enlivens the street corner with 4 story glazing that directs visitors toward the entrance and upward through the atrium.

Division of the square into 2, 3, 4, & 12 grids from which the form is built in response to noise, traffic and pollution.

Programmatic Models exploring the demarcation of social, educational and natural spaces through circulation.

SUNSET SQUARE: Renewing the Industrial Waterfront

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NYC 22

REDHOOK

PROGRAM: Water Taxi Hub & Marine Ecology Station SITE: Redhook, Brooklyn, New York SCALE: 9,000 sf DATE: Fall 2009 INSTRUCTOR: Andrew Bernheimer


WATERCOURSE Redhook Transit Center


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The harbor

at Redhook presents an opportunity to expand the New York City ferry service while providing more public transport options for this currently underserved community. This proposed station celebrates water both as a means of transport and in its architecture. The station acts as a collector of passengers as well as a collector of water. The roof is contoured based on waterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rippling effect and channels water to screens on the facade that contain charcoal filters. Rain transforms the screens into waterfalls, filtering the water on its way to the collection tanks at the basement level. These tanks are visible from the street and demonstrate the treatment process. A facade of rippling glass columns, mimicking waterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s refractive properties, allows light to enter in into the building as if submerged . The station includes ample bicycle parking with a service shop, a cafe on the upper terrace, and a small marine ecology outpost to educate the public on water conservation.

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URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE


PLANS

Level 02

Level 01

Level 00

WATERCOURSE: Redhook Transit Center

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Water taxi entrance by day and night

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URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE


Water Collection System Roof Collection

Water Treatment

WATERCOURSE: Redhook Transit Center

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PROGRAM: Luxury Residences & Hotel with Olympic Velodrome SITE: Brooklyn Heights, Brooklyn, New York SCALE: 375,000 sf DATE: Fall 2011 INSTRUCTOR: Henry Smith-Miller


HARBOR RIDGE

The Residences of Pier 1


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This site is sandwiched

between the Brooklyn Bridge Park on the west, while the walled edge of Furman Street and the Brooklyn - Queens Expressway face it from the east. To mediate between this walled edge and lawn, the building grows up from and opens out on to the park to the west while presenting an undulating facade boasting circulation “piers” that recall the nautical origins of the site to the east.

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As Brooklyn Heights currently lacks acess to the Brooklyn Bridge Park, I sought to create a connection from the Brooklyn Heights Promenade, via Squibb Park, by creating a walkable rooftop landscape that merges the lower park with the one above. The velodrome sinks into this landscape while the hotel and residential programs push upward toward the Brooklyn Bridge, creating a lookout vista on the roof of the building and opening up views from each unit to lower Manhattan, the Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridges, and even the Statue of Liberty.

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RESIDENTIAL


The design takes cues from boatbuilding in the structure, form and wooden facade. Just as the building peels upward from the landscape, the wood planks of the facade peel away to reveal windows with views to the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges, Lower Manhattan and the Statue of Liberty.

HARBOR RIDGE: The Residences of Pier 1

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RESIDENTIAL


The process of creating the form was very intuitive

and drew from the landscape surrounding the site. A series of models were carved from layered cardboard, mahogany and white oak investigating ship-like forms and various means of connection between the Brooklyn - Queens Expressway, the Promenade, Squibb Park and Brooklyn Bridge Park.

HARBOR RIDGE: The Residences of Pier 1

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WASHINGTON D.C. 36

POTOMAC PARK & DEANWOOD

PROGRAM: Affordable , Net Zero , Single Family Housing SITE: Potomac Park & Deanwood, Washington, D.C. SCALE: 850sf in Competition, 3200sf Fully Built DATE: Spring 2011 INSTRUCTORS: David Lewis & Laura Briggs COLLABORATORS: 100+ student & faculty team from Parsons the New School for Design, Milano the New School for Management & Policy, & Stevens Institute of Technology.


EMPOWERHOUSE

Solar Decathlon 2011


Empowerhouse is a community-

based approach to building affordable, net-zero housing that addresses all aspects of domestic life. The Empowerhouse team brings together students from Parsons The New School for Design, Milano School of International Affairs, Management and Urban Policy at The New School and Stevens Institute of Technology to design and construct a solar-powered house that was exhibited on the National Mall as part of the U.S. Department of Energy 2011 Solar Decathlon.

LIGHT-LOFT REMOVED

Bringing the Empowerhouse beyond the National Mall, the team worked with community partners, including Habitat for Humanity Washington D.C. and the D.C. Department of Housing and Community Development, to construct a second house in the D.C. neighborhood of Deanwood. After the Solar Decathlon, the two houses were joined together to create a two-family home, as a model for affordable, net-zero housing that can be replicated around the globe.

GARDEN TERRACE 2ND FLOOR ADDED CREATING 3BR UNITS

HOUSE MIRRORED ADDING 2ND HOME

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RESIDENTIAL


I: SOLAR DECATHLON The single-family, solar-powered home competes at the 2011 Solar Decathlon at Potomac Park in Washington, D.C.

II: TRANSFER After the competition, the house is moved to the Deanwood neighborhood of Washington, D.C.

III: DEANWOOD Habitat for Humanity adds a second floor with terrace to make the house into three bedroom homes for two families.

EMPOWERHOUSE: Solar Decathlon 2011

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RESIDENTIAL


EMPOWERHOUSE: Solar Decathlon 2011

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Environmental Performance Mechanical Performance

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RESIDENTIAL


Bioretention Swales capture and filter street runoff.

Raingardens capture storm eater runoff

GAULT PLACE

PUBLIC ALLEY

RESIDENTIAL

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NYC

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS

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PROGRAM: 65 Multi-unit, Mixed Income Apartments SITE: Highbridge Park, New York, New York SCALE: 65 Units DATE: Spring 2010 INSTRUCTOR: Henry Smith-Miller


HILLTOP CITY Housing on the Hillside


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RESIDENTIAL


Hilltop City negotiates the sloping terrain

of Highbridge Park in anticipation of reopening High Bridge to pedestrian traffic, creating a path up the steep slope to Washington Heights. The units range from studios to three bedrooms and

ammenities include a gym and day care center. The convex forms ensure each apartment has an expanding entry view out onto the park as the units stack and nestle into the curves of the hillside.

2 Bedroom

1 Bedroom

Studio 3 Bedroom

HILLTOP CITY: Housing on the Hillside

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Studies

of potential exterior treatments were conducted in physical and digital models, ultimately leading to the choice of self-supporting brick masonry structure. The bricks mimic the stacking units, undulating across the facade to visually and structurally unite the apartments into a comprehensive whole.

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RESIDENTIAL


HILLTOP CITY: Housing on the Hillside

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The masonry structure relates to the existing architecture of the park and further emphasizes the undualting stacking of the units. The windows act as vertical ribbons cascading down the building creating floor and skylights.

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RESIDENTIAL


HILLTOP CITY: Housing on the Hillside

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NYC

UNION SQUARE

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PROGRAM: Furniture Installation for peaceful contemplation and public relaxation SITE: Union Square North Lawn, New York, New York SCALE: 130 sf DATE: Fall 2009 INSTRUCTOR: Andrew Berheimer COLLABORATORS: Melissa Baird


REST IN THE PARK Relaxation Station


Inspired by the trees that shade the north lawn of Union Square, the Relaxation Station encircles the trunk of a tree in a folding steel form. These folds are carefully calibrated to human proportions and seating preferences to accommodate many users and types of rest, for groups or a single a user. The incised pattern mimics the shading of the trees above, changing density depending on the orientation and function of the plane.

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FURNITURE & OBJECTS


REST IN THE PARK: Relaxation Station

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Incised pattern as it changes density across the unfolded structure based on orientation & function.

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FURNITURE & OBJECTS


REST IN THE PARK: Relaxation Station

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NYC

KNOLL SHOWROOM

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PROGRAM: Contemporary Lounge Chair for the Knoll Studio Collection SITE: Library, Sitting Room, or Lounge DIMENSIONS: Lounge Chair 114 x 75.5 x 110 cm, Footrest 65 x 75.5 x 40.5 cm DATE: Fall 2011 INSTRUCTOR: Andrea Ruggiero


TEARDROP CHAIR Designing for Knoll


Aspiring

toward the classic moden aesthtic of the Knoll Studio, the Teardrop Chair uses gesture to exploit the soft vs. hard aesthetic in play within Knollâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s furniture while creating an enveloping seat perfect for lounging. The project was process driven, beginning with sketches and iterations of models, to a full scale mock-up and ergonomic studies to carefully develop the form for the human body. 61.0

65.5

19.0 1.0 75.5

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FURNITURE & OBJECTS

75.5


110.0

65.0

2.0

40.5 32.0

26.0 3.5

114.0

65.0

TEARDROP CHAIR: Designing for Knoll

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Actual Size

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PROGRAM: Contemporary Flatware SITE: Dining Table DIMENSIONS: 3.25 x 12 in DATE: Spring 2012 INSTRUCTOR: Rolando Negoita


Contrary to the traditional table setting, the knife and

and fork of this set sit together on the left side of the plate with the knife blade facing in. This is to accommodate contemporary eating habits, minimizing the amount of tableware on the table and grouping the primary elements of most Western meals, the knife and the fork, together. The sharp chisel blade allows for a variety of foods to be cut and eaten with ease, from steak to tomatoes. The slender reciprocal shapes of each instrument bring an elegant refinement to the meal, reducing table clutter and enhancing the eating experience.

FINE LINE Dining Set in Wooden Case


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PROGRAM: Investigation of Infrastructural Interplay of the Roosevelt Island Tram & the Queensboro Bridge SITE: Roosevelt Island, New York, New York DATE: Fall 2009 INSTRUCTOR: Andrew Berheimer


INTERSPACE

An Infrastructural Intersection


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DRAWINGS


This study

focuses on the spatial intersection between New York City’s Queensboro Bridge and the Roosevelt Island Airtram to investigate what it means to measure, tackling the concept of measurement using footsteps, light, color, the passage of time, and relative distances. The resulting “measures” informed a series of collages, flip books, and models that transform the “between space” of the intersection through an exploration of void, interiority, structure, movement and time.

INTERSPACE: An Infrastructural Intersection

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S. AMERICA AMAZON RIVER

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PROGRAM: Investigate the “ground” and act of mapping through drawing SITE: Amazon River, South America DATE: Spring 2010 INSTRUCTOR: Dilip Da Cuhna COLLABORATORS: Lorna Carrasquillo, David Lawrence, & Orlando Velez


Recognizing the inherent bias in the act of mapping, this drawing

reimagines how the Amazon could be re-presented. A key feature of this river lies in how its inhabitants either float on or anchor into its banks. This became the shifting ground from which to draw it. Social and geographical features are mapped conceptually in this re-drawing and conceptualization of the Amazon river.

THE AMAZON Reimagining the Ground


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PROGRAM: Drawing Performance Textiles in analog to digital DIMENSIONS: Analog Tool: appx. 12 x 12 in; 3D Printed Objects range from 1 to 5 inches DATE: Spring 2010 INSTRUCTORS: Nicole Robertson & Alexander Terzich


An analysis of the properties

of high-performance textiles led to the invention of a new tool for â&#x20AC;&#x153;drawingâ&#x20AC;? materials based on measures of strength, density, and modulus. The logic of the analog tool then informed a generative digital model from which an infinite series of objects can be three-dimensionally printed. These objects record a particular combination of fabrication means and fiber properties.

TEXTILE LOGIC Analog to Digital


EDUCATION

JESSICA BARNHOUSE 100 Lefferts Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 11225

502.494.2759

jessicabarnhouse@yahoo.com

PARSONS SCHOOL OF DESIGN New York, New York Master of Architecture May 2012 Alpha Rho Chi Bronze Medal Recipient Student Council President of Parsons School of Constructed Environments Vice President of AIAS Parsons REED COLLEGE Bachelor of Arts, Fine Art

SKILLS & INTERESTS

EXPERIENCE

Portland, Oregon May 2004 Commendations for Excellence 2003 & 2004 Adobe Creative Suite AutoCAD Ecotect Furniture & Product Design

Grasshopper/Python Hand Drawing/Rendering Metal Craft & Woodworking Microsoft Office

Model Making Revit Rhinoceros Sketch-up

MATTER PRACTICE Fabricator

Brooklyn, New York Fall 2012 • Constructed & installed “Peace & Quiet,” a 200 square foot dialogue station in Times Square fostering apolitical conversations between civilians and veterans. WATER WALLS New York, New York Research Assistant Spring 2012 • Assessed New School University buildings for the feasibility of refitting for water collection and reuse, culminating in comparative cost analyses and design recommendation scenarios. THE EMPOWERHOUSE New York, New York & Washington, D.C. Design/Builder 2011 • Researched & wrote variances to zoning codes for eco-friendly land use practices. • Participated in conferences with Washington D.C. agencies (DCRA, DDoE, DDOT, BZA) to develop site water management strategies in compliance with local codes. • Collaborated in Stakeholder meetings with local elected officials and the Washington, D.C. Habitat for Humanity to realize a home design based on real community needs. • Produced Construction Documents for the Architecture Set as well as the Civil Set for each phase of the project. • Presented design options and building code research during weekly meetings. • Authored blog on MetropolisMag.com; “Beyond the Mall”, September 16, 2011. E-ON U.S. Louisville, Kentucky Asset Information Technician 2007 - 2009 • Managed and maintained the quality of Kentucky Utilities mapping database. • Coordinated work assignments across departments • Performed field checks to ensure compliance of database with service area. MACY’S FEDERATED, INC. Louisville, Kentucky Sales Associate 2006 - 2007 • Recognized frequently for Outstanding Customer Service. GERALDINE ONDRIZEK, ARTIST Portland, Oregon Artist Assistant & Fabricator 2004 - 2006 • Fabricated models and full-scale sculptures from artist sketches and renderings. • Designed & built wood, steel, and Plexiglas displays. • Provided detailed, illustrated instructions for gallery installations. • Produced announcements, posters, and text panels for gallery shows.

OTHER EXPERIENCE

PARSONS SCHOOL OF DESIGN New York, New York Guest Critic Summer 2012 • Reviewed the final jury of the Summer Studies in Architecture Program. PROJECT WARM Louisville, Kentucky Volunteer Winter 2008 • Winterized homes of low-income seniors and disabled persons. ST. JAMES COURT ART SHOW Louisville, Kentucky Juror Fall 2008 • Determined the artists to be included in this nationally recognized art and craft show. REED COLLEGE CO-OP Portland, Oregon Cofounder 2000 - 2002 • Established the first cooperative housing program at Reed College, creating alliances with administrative personnel to develop policies promoting a spirit of consensus and autonomy as an alternative to the traditional dormitory.


Portfolio