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İZGİ UYGUR HARVARD GSD MLA II 2018 JAN

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE ACADEMIC/PROFESSIONAL PORTFOLIO


RESPONSIVE GROUNDS ACADEMIC 2017 FALL

CONJUNCTIVE SKIN ACADEMIC 2016 FALL

MIT OCP STREETSCAPE REPORT INTERNSHIP 2016 SUMMER

MALI - LIMA ART MUSEUM COMPETITION 2016 SUMMER

MIAMI RISE+SINK ACADEMIC 2016 SPRING

CORE STUDIO 3 ACADEMIC 2015 FALL For more information, please visit my website: https://izgiuygur.com/


RESPONSIVE GROUNDS: Dynamic Life of Coastal Infrastructure Phantom Coast: Transforming San Francisco’s Eastern Waterfront GSD Landscape Architecture Option Studio Instructor: James Lord, Roderick Wyllie

This project intends to alter the perception of seawall in Embarcadero by using landscape systems as coastal infrastructure and also as a public space. Coastal cities like San Francisco that are under threat of climate change effects need resilient infrastructure to sustain in the coming decades. Instead of building massive seawalls around the cities that are prone to fail physically, soft coastal edges can help addressing sea level issues. The existing seawall in Embarcadero today is a stable line that does not add value to the public realm. However, other coastal landscapes in SF such as Ocean Beach and Sutro Baths are constantly changing and they accommodate recreation and marine life. Considering this contrast, this study aims to engage a horizontal landscape system into the public realm as an urban infrastructure. This way, the decentralized coastal infrastructure becomes an urban public space and provides multiple uses in different times of the year. It decreases the amount of waves that can be the result of storms or earthquakes, collects the water during tidal fluctuations and creates tidal and swimming pools. It is not always easy to create a new open public space that connects the city to the water, especially in cities with extremely high real estate values. For this reason, the optimal way to construct a public landscape on the Embarcadero coast is to use the sediment from the dredging operations of SF Bay. Every year an average of 3-6 million cubic yards of sediments are dredged from the bay. While a part of the sediment is used for restoring the wetlands, most of it is dumped into the Deep Ocean Disposal Site. Depositing the sand at the Rincon Point and managing it can be an alternative to dumping it to the ocean. The project site, Rincon point is an important part of Embarcadero coastline and inhabits many significant features. Currently, the cafe serves mainly to a specific type of people, who works at the Financial District. Besides its infrastructural character, the site also provides people with affordable cafe and restaurants on the largest pier. It has a deck for ferries at the end of the pier and a deck for fireboats where the bay bridge footing is. The bay bridge also contributes to the light and reflection on the pools and the shadows on the pier in different times of the day, including the night view. Monterey cypress trees (Cupressus macrocarpa), which are native to the Central Coast of California, helps holding the sand and creates a naturalized area. It thrives near the sea, so it has a high wind and aerosol tolerance.

SITE PLAN 1/1500


RESPONSIVE GROUNDS DYNAMIC LIFE OF COASTAL INFRASTRUCTURE

Coastal cities like San Francisco need resilient infrastructure to sustain. Instead of building massive seawalls around the cities that are prone to fail physically, soft coastal edges can help addressing sea level issues. The intent of this study is to engage a horizontal landscape system to the public realm through the infrastructure. This decentralized coastal infrastructure responds to tidal fluctuation and seasonality, thus create new spaces for humans and marine life.


SAND MINING TIMELINE DREDGING OF SF BAY

This diagram shows the dredging stations and deposit sites in SF Bay. Depending on the dredging cycle, the distance to the project site and the amount of the material, 3 stations are the most advantageous and that gives us an estimate time for the design. Depositing the sand creates a new urban edge, with an overall elevation and that prevents the city from flooding. The beach of Barcelona is a good example to constructed urban beaches. Barcelona remained a walled city cut off visually and physically from the water until 1992, but the Olympic games were seen as an opportunity for the city to construct a beach with the artificially placed sand.

The design process started with the idea of depositing the sand to the site. Second phase was creating some linear structures that follow the urban grid and the pattern of finger piers. Thinking about how the sand would change with the waves and currents in time through the structures and breakwaters was the next phase. The breakwaters are vertically positioned in order to reflect a sense of continuation into the water and also enhance the connection between humans and the marine life. Eventually the sand will move and gather where the structures and breakwaters are.


FIELD CONDITIONS

TRACING OLD PIERS, CAPTURING LANDMARKS, SUN-SHADOW STUDIES

In the site scale, the design is based on the field conditions such as sun and shadow studies, the traces of the historical piers and the vantage points from the elevated highway. The landscape typologies are located according to these analysis. For example, the swimming pools are located where there is constant sunlight during the day in September when the temperatures are highest in SF. The pier like structures are shaped by the historical piers traces and other intersecting lines. The viewpoints are oriented towards the waterfront views, with the farthest view of the water, Treasure Island view and the Bay bridge towers. While the waterfront views has more pools as a continuation of the water, the Bay bridge side is drier including the beach.

Monterey cypress trees (Cupressus macrocarpa), which are native to the Central Coast of California, helps holding the sand and creates a naturalized area. It thrives near the sea, so it has a high wind and aerosol tolerance. The system may spread along the Embarcadero in the future using the spaces in between the existing piers to create a coastal network.


The structures frame the pools like walls and they also serve as mostly narrow trails such as the Sutro Baths edges which creates a tension and a feeling of adventure. Seasonal and daily changes of the weather and light, fog and tidal fluctuations influence the use of space. While the swimming pools or tidal pools can be used for swimming in September, the site can be used for trekking purposes most of the year. And it allows activities related to marine life such as sea lion watching generally in June, September and October.


CONJUNCTIVE SKIN Broadway Shuffle at Madison Square: The Surface is Alive GSD Landscape Architecture Option Studio Instructor: Gary Hilderbrand

This project focuses on making the urban surface a conjunctive skin that prioritize pedestrians and bicycles, by changing the edge conditions. It offers a permeable and activated urban surface and an embrace of the performative and spatial benefits of trees. In time, older public green spaces which has an enclosed and formal character begin not to meet the needs for today’s activities. There are many examples of urban spaces in conflict because of the time they were constructed. For this reason, urban spaces in big cities such as New York undergo some changes very often. Madison Square Park is an example to changing conditions that create a conflict for both pedestrians and vehicles. The changing time requires more flexible urban spaces. That is why temporary plazas emerge in New York City streets. Embracing the change would contribute to the public realm in a better way. These social and physical changes bring out a call for critical conservation. A flexible reading of space is essential for Madison Square Park in this context. A solution can be a pedestrianized street with ambiguous edges that allow various activities within the urban realm. The urban environment is consistently 10 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than the surrounding context. In New York city, this is especially evident with thermal imaging, where the parks and water stand out as cooler surfaces. In terms of global climate change, the rising temperatures, precipitation levels and sea level rise are expected to increase more in coming decades. And the largest effect will be on the urban areas such as NYC, which contributes to this change with the urban heat island effect. One of reasons of urban heat island effect is the dark surfaces that absorb more solar radiation such as concrete and asphalt which are used for pavements and roofs. Another major reason is the lack of evapotranspiration because of the decreased amount of vegetation in the city. Cities also lose shade and cooling effect of trees. Other causes are the tall buildings that have multiple surfaces to reflect and absorb the sunlight and also the blocking of wind, which also inhibits cooling. Both fifth avenue and Broadway have two lanes of traffic. Fifth avenue have a changing schedule. While in rush hours, it is open to vehicle traffic, in less crowded hours and in special events it is open for pedestrians. This makes the plaza and the park a single space and allows flexible pedestrian flow.


Paving plan

New trees

Existing trees


Fifth avenue on Madison Square Park is open for pedestrians: Weekdays: 7 pm - 7 am Weekends: 9 pm - 11 am & Special events


Broadway Shuffle, Madison Square

MEASURES

3’

1’

1’

2’

ARRANGEMENT OF UNITS

2’

2’

1’

UNITS 16 units in total C1 A1

B1

A2

B2

A3

A3

D1

B2

D2

C3

D3

F1 E1 E2 E3

PERMEABILITY POTENTIAL

E3 E2

E1

F2

F3


Human comfort is directly related to urban microclimates which are shaped by the vegetation density and the choice of surface materials. Urban microclimate have a certain effect on how people feel in these spaces, such as Madison sq park. Because of the lack cooling effect of tree canopy in plaza, people prefer sitting in the park in the summer. For this reason, the percentage of tree canopy and permeable areas need to be increased in order to benefit from the shade of trees, to increase the water infiltration and to provide healthy conditions for trees to grow. Vegetation changes, honey locusts in the plaza grow, and when the trees in the park no longer exist, new plane trees will be replaced with them.


VASSAR STREETSCAPE CONDITIONS STUDY MIT Office of Campus Planning Team: Laura Tenny and Todd Robinson

The Vassar Streetscape landscape project is comprised of two sections, east and west, which were built at different times. Vassar East streetscape was designed by Carol & Johnson Associates and completed in 2004, whereas west was completed in 2009. The streetscape incorporates sidewalks, crosswalks, one-way cycle track system on both sides of the street, street lights and furnishings, and street trees for convenient pedestrian and cyclist movement. However, the use and weathering of the materials in time has resulted in some damage to both hardscape, such as paving and furnishings, and softscape, such as trees and shrubs along the street. The aim of this study is to evaluate the overall site material conditions and horticultural health on Vassar Street conditions are documented in this report that includes photographs, diagrams, maps and explanations of analysis that has been done through the summer of 2016. According to the results of the analyses, at the end of the report, a recommendations section was prepared that describes further inspection and also for management of both the site materials and the street trees for the east and west sides of Vassar Street.


TREE HEALTH ASSESSMENT

UMASS SOIL ANALYSIS

An assessment of overall tree health; classify as low, normal or high. Tree is weak, growing slowly, and/or under stress. 0

Vigor Low

#1142

High

121 8

NUTRIENTS

Ca Mg K

7

2

None (dead)

Foliage size and color are normal for the species in the area. Yellowish-green to yellow.

10

21

Very Low

P

Low

100

160

K

1000

1500

Ca

1000

50

120

Mg

50

30

50

80

100

4

0

4 53

0 2

7

10

30

50

NUTRIENTS

5% 3.1%

#SAMPLE #1187

Low 2.5

18 196 15

Mg

NUTRIENTS

7

10

100

160

K

1000

1500

Ca

50

120

Mg

30

50

80

11

4

100

85

0

4 4.3 34 362 30

160

1000

1500

50

120 100

Ca Mg K

0 2

7

10

30

50

80

12

4

100

84

0

5%

ORGANIC MATTER

3.5%

14

100

0.0 / 2.1

5%

ORGANIC MATTER

Low

0

EXCH. ACIDITY / CATION EXCH. CAP. BASE SATURATION

Very Low

P

14

100

0 2

14

7 7.2

4

0.0 / 1.1 Ca Mg K

0

pH

0

EXCH. ACIDITY / CATION EXCH. CAP. BASE SATURATION

14 7.2

Very Low

100

SOIL ANALYSIS

7

P

90

0

#1167

Any known failure problems with the species in the branches, K Ca trunk, or roots.

80

ORGANIC MATTER

0

120

8

2

neutral, pH 0-7 indicates that the soil is acidic and pH 7-14 indicates that the soil is alkaline. One of the most important value for the soil analysis is pH values. New England soils are generally acidic and needs to be limed to maintain the desired neutral values.

NUTRIENTS

1500

1109 59

100

SOIL ANALYSIS

Dead foliage in part of or the entire crown. pH

160

0.0 / 6.2 Ca Mg K

5% 1.3%

14

8.2

100

0

EXCH. ACIDITY / CATION EXCH. CAP. BASE SATURATION

14

7.0

14

2.1 / 2.9

A tree that has dropped its leaves because it ORGANIC is dead. MATTER

Necrotic

43

0

4

100

0 2

Foliage

Chlorotic

Low 1.9

0

EXCH. ACIDITY / CATION EXCH. CAP.

Normal

Very Low

pH The soil pH is a measure of acidity or alkalinity of. While pH 7.0 is

SOIL ANALYSIS TREE 7 NUMBER

pH

6.7

Tree has average vigor for its species and theNUTRIENTS site conditions. P Tree is growing well and appears to be free of significant KCahealth stress factors. Mg BASE SATURATION

14

7

pH

Normal

#1181

SOIL ANALYSIS

1.7%

Macronutrients: Phosphorus(P) Water runoff causes losses of phosphorus. Plants require fairly large quantities of phosphorus. Potassium(K) Crops take up a relatively large proportion of plantavailable potassium each growing season. Plants deficient in potassium are unable to utilize nitrogen and water efficiently and more susceptible to disease. Calcium(Ca) Calcium is essential for propoer functioning of plant cell walls and membranes. Sufficient calcium must also be present in actively growing plant parts. Magnesium(Mg) Magnesium is a vital substance for photosynthesis and is ordinarily supplied through liming. Sulfur(S) Sulfur deficiencies are rare in New England and an optimum range for Modified Morgan extractable sulfure has never been identified. Micronutrients: Micronutrients are elements essential to plants that are required in very small amounts. Five of these (iron, manganese, zinc, copper, and boron) are tested routinely. Micronutrient deficiencies are most likely to occur in sandy, low organic matter soils. High soil pH may also bring about micronutrient deficiencies, especially in sandy soils. Aluminium(Al) Aluminium is not a plant nutrient and at elevated levels it can be extremely toxic to plant roots and limit the ability of plants to take up phosphorus by reducing phosphorus solubility. ` Lead(Pb) Lead is naturally present in most New England soils at low concentrations. However high levels are a concern for people and plants.

EXCHANGE ACIDITY / CATION EXCHANGE CAPACITY (meq/100g)

VIGOR #1175

#1188

SOIL ANALYSIS 0 Very Low

P

4

13

Ca

FOLIAGE 0

13

NUTRIENTS

14

1000

1500

Ca

50

120

Mg 100

Ca Mg K

0 2

7 3

10

30

50

80

9

0

ORGANIC MATTER

BRANCHES

88

100

5%

4 4.3

42 647 42

14

100

160

1000

1500

50

120 100

0.0 / 3.7 Ca Mg K

0 2

7 3

10

30

50

Any element with a positive charge is called a cation. The amount of these cations a soil can hold is described as a Cation Exchange Capacity. The large this number, the more cations the soil can hold. A clay soil will have a larger CEC than a sandy soil because clay attracts cations. The acidity is the amount of the total CEC occupied by the acidic cations (H+1, Al+3).

BASE SATURATION (%)

80

88

9

0

ORGANIC MATTER

2%

Low

KEY PLAN

0

EXCH. ACIDITY / CATION EXCH. CAP. BASE SATURATION

Very Low

P

160

0.0 / 1.2

14

7 7.1

K

100 205

Mg

BASE SATURATION

Low 2.4

0

pH

7.1

6.1

K

EXCH. ACIDITY / CATION EXCH. CAP.

14

7

pH NUTRIENTS

SOIL ANALYSIS

100

5% 4.0%

Base saturation is the portion (expressed as a percentage) of the soil’s cation exchange capacity occupied by calcium (Ca+2), magnesium (Mg+2) and potassium (K+1).

ORGANIC MATTER Soil organic matter (SOM) is composed of materials containing carbon. Native SOM content of most cultivated or developed areas of New England is typically in the 2 to 4% range. 2.5% SOM in a loamy sandy soil might be considered ideal while 2.5 % could be considered marginal in a silt loam soil where 3 to 5% is more common. “Interpreting Your Soil Test Results”, UMass Extension

TRUNK

GOOD - HIGH NORMAL - MEDIUM POOR - LOW DEAD SPECIES FAILURE PROFILE The “Basic Tree Health Assessment Form” section of International Society of Arboriculture is used to assess tree health conditions on Vassar Street. This assessment includes vigor, foliage and species failure profile. The detailed definitions of these terms are given above. The assessment was done by visual inspection of the trees. Vigor levels of the trees were determined by comparing the overall health of the same species trees with the healthiest ones that are located on the street. Another indication is foliage, of which the size and color are essential signs of tree health. Since the inspection was done in summer, both the deciduous and evergreen trees with no leaves are considered as dead. Other signs of tree stress include yellow leaves (chlorotic) or dead foliage in part of or the entire crown (necrotic). The conditions of the tree parts such as branches and trunk, that form the structure of the tree, are also a significant part of the examination. On this section, the trunks and branches were compared to other trees for their thicknesses and their shapes as indicators of tree health. Additionally, all the trees were photographed for record and tree numbers are assigned according to the MIT Campus Tree Inventory completed in 2008.

A soil analysis of the tree pits on Vassar Street was necessary to understand and evaluate the issues that cause trees to die such as Ginkgo trees on the East half of Vassar Street, or to have poor health conditions like some Elm and Sweetgum trees on the west half of the street. For this reason, 23 of four different species with both good and poor conditions along the Vassar Street were identified for testing, and soil samples were collected from those tree pits. One of the most important steps of soil analysis is collecting the soil samples. If the samples are not taken correctly, it leads to inaccurate results and potential incorrect treatment. After choosing the site for sampling, the soil needs to be collected to a depth of six to eight inches by using a clean shovel. The features of the soil such as texture, color, drainage and consistent soil management should be alike throughout the sampling area. Subsamples from random spots of the area need to be mixed. It is also critical to collect the samples when it is not too wet or for a period of six to eight weeks after a lime or fertilizer application. The collecting phase was done according to these instructions and dried for 3 days on paper plates in front of a window that gets sunlight. All the stones, root parts and other debris were removed. After drying for three days, approximately one cup of sample from each tree pit was put inside each zip-lock bag and was tagged according to tree number. The soil samples were collected on 19th and 20th of July and they were let dry until 22nd of July. The box that contains the soil samples and the submission form including Sample ID, approximate area represented by sample, Crop Code and the choices of analysis types were sent to UMass Extension, Soil and Plant Nutrient Testing Laboratory on 27th of July. While 23 trees were tested according to routine soil analysis and organic matter analysis, 6 of them were also tested for soluble salts. The report detailing the results of the soil test was received from UMass on 3rd of August, 2016.


MATCH LINE (SEE L0.3)

MATCH LINE (SEE L0.1)

R=21.38

# 286

Westga

te "F"

M.I.T. # 284 Westga te "

G"

METROPOLITAN STORAGE WAREHOUSE

W-45

M.I.T. BLDG W-59 WEST

BLDG. No.42A

PARKING GARAGE

BLDG. No.42B EXTENSION BLDG. No.44

BLDG. No.42

BLDG. No.45 BUILDING 48

MASS

M.I.T. BLDG W-59 # 219

BLDG. No.42B

BLDG. No.41 BLDG. No.41A

W89

BLDG. No.43

E

S AV

SETT ACHU

"F"

M.I.T. "D"

# 292 Westgate

BLDG.

No.35

BLDG 37

M.I.T.

# 286

Westgate # 290 Westgate

# 284 Westgate

BASKETBALL

"G" BUILDING

"E"

W34

ATHLETICS

GYM

BLDG W33

& 39

BLDG 36

BLDG 38 BLDG

W31

BLDG 34

CENTER

PAR

BLD KIN G G 70 GAR AGE

JOHNSON

MIT FACILITIES Department of

77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139

VASSAR STREETSCAPE PHASE 2 - WEST

MIT PROJECT NO. 02191; MIT CONTRACT NO. 861

RECORD DESIGN DOCUMENTS

TREE HEALTH

EXISTING CONDITIONS

L0.2


LUZ + PIEDRA / LIGHT + STONE MALI Competition The Lima Art Museum New Contemporary Art Wing Competition Team: Ignacio Cardona - DDes Student, Harvard GSD Rodrigo Guerra - MAUD 2017, Claudia Tomateo - MAUD 2017, Izgi Uygur - MLA II 2017, Yuting Zhang - MAUD 2017

“I walk barefoot on the stone, feeling the cold surface contrasting with Lima’s warm weather. Looking up to the french pavilion at Parque La Exposición, suddenly I feel water in my feet, while I notice some kids running around. On the right side a beautiful cubic white stone that projects a delicate light, and just a few steps behind a vertical garden that borrows the park textures and brings it into the building. I decide to take the ramp, but as I approach I notice a deep void -another white stone of light, this time underground- that attracts me to look down. Something reflects into my eye. It is a sculpture and people are reading books around it. As I look up again I find myself in the foggy sky of Lima.” Light+Stone is a project that seeks to aknowledge and respect the context where it is inserted. On the city scale the project understand the dryness of Lima and the importance of the few existing green spaces in the metropolis, it also acknowledges the Parque de la Exposición as part of a bigger organism of green urban spaces, thus rethinking the project as a stone that can help to motorize future projects. The design proposed for the park incorporates the existing pedestrian routes and the importance not only of the MALI but also of the pavilions within the park. In addition, it includes landscape strategies that solve noise issues and degrees of privacy. Under a great public space platform, most of the new MALI expansion for contemporary art is located, liberating the west facade of the historic building completely. The main idea is to produce two white light stones: the box/pavilion that emerges from the platform and replicates the pavilions within the park, and the void/patio that replicates the courtyard of the MALI. Both pieces articulate the different programs. At the level of design, the structural clarity seeks to emphasize the central nave that links the two light stones and allows different organizational options and subdivisions. Finally, the materiality evokes Peruvian memory where the hard soil gives a stereotomic character to the proposal, intensifying the sensorial experience as you walk through. Light+Stone aims to rethink the urban condition of an arising metropolis and the role that public space and buildings plays into the configuration of the city. A city full of culture and memory.


FLAMINGO PARK MIAMI RISE + SINK

Option Studio 2015 Spring, Instructor: Rosetta Elkin

The flow of water and its transition through various mediums is expected in the climate system since the water is unstable; it is moisture in the air, water in the ocean, rain water coming from clouds. In addition, in subtropical climates such as Florida’s, there is either too much water or not enough water. It is a place of extremes, as well as a region confronting changing climatic conditions and highly stochastic weather patterns. In conversation of sea level rise, different water types are ill defined. This project helps to define them and aims to balance the freshwater availability seasonally, focusing on the peak and low precipitation in the Miami Beach. By studying a small scale rain water collection system, it is possible to address the freshwater shortage. This helps not only to save energy and water by decreasing the stress on desalination facilities, but also supports the governmental plans of increasing green spaces. Trees are seen as urban catalysts today and they will become playmakers for the changing cities in the near future. This is especially important for an urban space that is experiencing sea level rise such as Miami Beach. Flamingo Park, the only public green space in the city is under threat of drastic changes in hydrologic conditions and is also away from being an ecological and adaptive system. One of the prime challenges is the lack of water supply to irrigate the park. City is using a large amount of energy and money to desalinate the water that is pumped from the aquifers. Furthermore, because of the low level of the park, vegetation is under stress of saltwater which reaches to ground level with the rise of groundwater table. So, trees are important urban elements since they absorb the water with both their leaves and roots. This project focuses on Flamingo Park, which has the capacity to serve as a public green space in the future if it becomes a self-sustaining and adaptive system. It argues that the park concept needs to be modified in order to sustain the vegetation. The project suggests to elevate the park partly in order to raise it up to the elevation of roads and eliminate flooding in the park. This language of modification of the height of the land both through natural and artificial means was already a part of the history of the Miami Beach. Hammocks (tree islands) are the natural typologies and they are important for land forming by reshaping the relation between land and water. The indigenous people also created mounds and piles of various mediums. In addition to the changing topography in the park, some archetypes that are hybrids of water towers and cisterns provide freshwater for irrigation, by capturing the rain water and releasing it periodically. These elevated islands in the park would be visible in the city in a modest manner, in contrast to condo hotels. The locations of the tanks follow a pattern of the flooded areas and the openings. Without changing the whole park, and by keeping the existing canopy, flooded areas are turned into islands in order to prevent flooding in the whole park and and the capacity of water absorption is increased. In addition, this system in the park can integrate the other green spaces in the city by occasionally providing water for the adjacent private gardens from the water tanks.


TYPOLOGIES WATER TOWERS

Bernd and Hilla Becher, Water Towers

Some of the alternatives for freshwater collection are water towers and cisterns.

The project is seeking a new type of rain water collecting system that can be developed by combining these systems. These new structures have the potential to create a new type of decentralized park system. Such as the follies in Tschumi’s Parc de la Villette proposal, they can be differentiated with some minor interventions. They can be located not only in Flamingo Park, but also they will be distributed in the city. The choice of location of these structures is determined by the water need. Larger green spaces as Flamingo Park, parking lots which are almost only open lots in the city and condo hotels with excessive water usage are the spots this project is interested in. By collecting the rain water in the wet season and using this for irrigation loads in the adjacent green spaces, these tanks would allow the city to use water wisely.


There are various sizes of tanks that could be used for different irrigation types in the park. In addition, during the wet season, overflow can provide experiences of atmospheric conditions. While small or medium tanks offer a place to chill out, large tanks can serve as parking garage or cultural center. And they all have a range of irrigation. Sometimes it is park trees, sometimes alley trees, or sports fields. Using a seasonal approach to fresh water, Flamingo Park can be imagined as a model for collection and distribution, without modifying its existing character as a critical open and public space.


Workshop 1-2 with Hannah Gaengler GSD Landscape Architecture Core Studio 3 Instructor: Assoc. Prof. Bradley Cantrell

The objective of this first workshop in Landscape Architecture Core Studio III, was to understand the behaviour of water in various landforms and to project its processes through some actions such as holding, infiltrating and distributing within the landform. In this studio work, we focused on the estuarine typologies. Choosing a natural pattern and by changing it in various dimensions, we tried to comprehend how these actions vary with topography and the material of the soil. Besides the physical formation, social intervantions and temporal conditions also added as layers to this landforms as shaping mediums.


Workshop 3-4 with Sophie Geller GSD Landscape Architecture Core Studio 3 Instructor: Fionn Byrne

Education

Athletics

It is critical to engage landform and urban form in order to develop new terrains for landscape architecture. This workshop aimed to investigate the density and uses in the urban form with a focus on Buenos Aires. After analyzing the density of the Buenos Aires city, the objective was to learn FAR and covareges by changing and creating imaginary populations, in order to understand the urban density.

FAR: -2 COV: 30%

FAR: -2 COV: 60%

FAR: -2 COV: 90%

FAR: -1 COV: 30%

FAR: -1 COV: 60%

FAR: -1 COV: 90%

FAR: +/-0 COV: 30%

FAR: +/-0 COV: 60%

FAR: +/-0 COV: 90%

4 ha

Legend

Residential all floors

FAR: +1 COV: 30%

FAR: +1 COV: 60%

Residential first two floors commercial

FAR: +2 COV: 60%

Public open space

Hospitality

Parking lot

Commercial/office

Private open space

FAR: +1 COV: 90%

Residential first floor commercial

FAR: +2 COV: 30%

Educational/institutional

FAR: +2 COV: 90%

Sidewalk


ALLSTON with Andrea Soto Morfin LAND-SCAPE LAND-FORM URBAN-FORM GSD Landscape Architecture Core Studio 3 Instructor: Assoc. Prof. Chris Reed, Assoc. Prof. Bradley Cantrell

Instead of considering the site as tabula rasa, our proposal engages the site with existing patterns of use in the surrounding neighborhoods. Being the missing node in Olmsted’s green network of Charles river banks, the site has a critical potential. It also brings the hydrological landscape features from the past and links these with a canal to the future. Referring to the spatial and physical qualities of the site, one of the most important tasks in our project, was to create a strong relationship with the Charles River, bringing and extending the river into the site. We also decided to create an urban strategy of districting the site into a mixed program of Residential, Institutional, Research and Cultural uses. The ground level of the buildings serve as social spaces that engage the public use. The buildings also work as bridges that connects both sides and create interstitial spaces between them to determine gathering spaces for the users. Allston Landscape

The proposal is programming social activities that are shaped by the change on time depending on seasonal and environmental changes such as tidal fluctuation that occur in the river, and storm water level during the raining season. Through a revision of historical maps from 1848 to 1965 we were able to understand the changes the place has suffered in the last years and it became important for us to relate this area to the network of parks that Charles Elliot and Olmsted planned as public reservations upon the banks of Charles River.

Diagrams and site plan

outer green areas

residential

permeable soil

buffer zone

research

berm

marshes

bioswales

canal

industrial

institutional

Our proposal somehow resembles the condition of the land that we observed in the historical maps, creating marshland areas. We believe that the idea of parks as “pastoral landscapes” can be adapted in a different manner when the place is located in a complex city area. We wanted to explore the possibility of creating an urban park where landscape, architecture and the urban fabric are part of the same system interacting with each other, as a contemporary way to understand landscape as urbanism.

compacted soil

berms

cultural

river berm

soil types

vegetation system

districts

hydrological system

+5.00

Low tide Inundation level

+8.00

Medium tide Inundation level

+1.00

High tide Inundation level rm

t tree

Cam

se +6.00 den ear ar

et A

Stre

rian

est

Ped e

Buff

+8.00

nse

nse

+4.00

tion

eta

veg

Concrete beach

+1.25

.50

+2.00

Wetlands +1.00

Institutional District

n

atio

et veg

Research District

Buffe

+1.00

Berm

0.00

+0.50

e

anc

Entr

- de

a r are

Buff

- de

rea

er a

eS

Residential District

+4

+4.00

g brid

Research District

Be

et B

Stre

River

Canal

tion

eta

veg

Industrial District

Pedestrian Bridge

+4.50

+3.50 Berm

Highway 90

Buffer area

- dense veg

etation

Plaza

tunel

Train Sta

tion

Platform

s

Railway

+4.50

Institutional District

Cultural District +10.00 Buffe

r area-

dense

Highw

ay 90

vegetat

ion

tunel

Berm

+2.00

So

ldie

Hig

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hw

Ra

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90

Fie

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Pa

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“Landscape as a living system�. Working with the natural cycles became one of the most important aspects of our project.The Charles River has been polluted by water runoff. Therefore we created a series of strategies that address the issue of water run off cleaning process that also works as an efficient drainage system for the site. The proposal includes to extend a series of bioswales that connect to the neighborhoods and the streets in the North area because of the natural condition of the topography, the water moves downstream. These bioswales collect rain water and direct it to the marshland area which we propose with a new topography with lush perennial vegetation that becomes part of the cleaning processes of water in order to return this clean water back into the river. In this area there is a strong relationship between buildings and topography where social activities happen, interrelating the cultural and the natural systems. On the south area, the landform has a different character, being a hardscape, where the platforms that hold square and plazas have a steeper topography in relation to water level.


canal

wooden deck platform

OPEN SPACE / WATER

TYPOLOGIES OF OPEN SPACES AND RELATION WITH WATER

INSTITUTIONAL DISTRICT

RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT circulation

street level

BUILDING / LANDSCAPE street level

auditorium

plaza

canal small plaza

wooden deck platform

path

OPEN SPACE / WATER

canal

TYPOLOGIES OF OPEN SPACES AND RELATION WITH WATER

RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT

RESEARCH DISTRICT

INSTITUTIONAL DISTRICT

circulation

street level

BUILDING / LANDSCAPE

street level street level

canal

auditorium

wooden deck platform

path

plaza small plaza

path

OPEN SPACE / WATER research pools

canal

TYPOLOGIES OF OPEN SPACES AND RELATION WITH WATER

INSTITUTIONAL DISTRICT

RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT

CULTURAL DISTRICT

RESEARCH DISTRICT museum

circulation

street level

BUILDING / LANDSCAPE street level

street level

auditorium

canal

plaza small plaza

wooden deck platform

connection to Cambridge path

path

OPEN SPACE / WATER research pools

facilities for water sports canal

INSTITUTIONAL DISTRICT

RESEARCH DISTRICT

CULTURAL DISTRICT museum

street level street level

auditorium

plaza

path

connection to Cambridge


control

Pedestrian Tunnel

Axonometric Views

Research District

Institutional Building

Institutional District

Institutional Building Charles River water

Terraces Water cleaning process

Marshlands Recreation activities Recreational Island

Cultural District

Research Building

Charles River water

Institutional District

Squares open public spaces

Topography introducing water into the land

Vertical Circulation

Districting Cambridge Street

Institutional Research Residential Cultural Train Station

Theatre Cultural events

Summer conditions

Opening Sun light

Humidity Low tidal fluctuation Summer field trips Summer cultural events outdoors Recreation in marshes and plazas Water activities

Cafeteria and Restaurants outdoors Vegetation Trees grid: ยบ Tilia ยบ Liquidambar

Circulation Vehicle circulation Railway

Vegetation berm Highway noise control

Highway I 90

Pedestrian Tunnel

Railway

Institutional Building

Retention ponds

Bioswales water runoff downstream

Institutional Building

Pedestrian Bridges

Terraces Water cleaning process

Marshlands Recreation activities Field trips Education Island

Pedestrian Bridges

Research Building

Building footprint Cultural program Institutional and research square

Hardscape Institutional square

Vertical Circulation

Vertical Circulation

Landscape Hydrological systems Softscape: Perennial gardens and marshlands Hardscape: Squares and plazas

Excavated Cultural Auditorium

Auditorium Lectures

Pedestrian circulation

Fall conditions

Opening Sun light

Carved plaza Gathering spaces

Compost leaves Fall festivities Museum Exhibitions Kayaking Learning ecologies Students events

Harvard University and Boston University Learning ecologies outdoors

Building footprint Cultural program Vegetation berm Highway noise control

Vegetation berm Highway noise control

Train Platform

Institutional Building Institutional Building

Terraces Water cleaning process

Pedestrian Tunnel

Institutional Building Institutional Building

Marshlands Recreation activities

Snow recreational activities

Winter activities Ice skating

Research Island

Recreational Island Research Building

Research Building

Hardscape Institutional square

Institutional and research square

Vertical Circulation

Reception Events

Auditorium Seminars

Spring conditions

Opening Sun light

Rain water - snow melting Tidal fluctuation Field trips Cultural events outdoors Open House events Learning ecologies Research outdoors

Harvard University and Boston University Vegetation Trees grid: ยบ Tilia ยบ Liquidambar Vegetation berm Highway noise control

Institutional Building

Terraces Water cleaning process

Marshlands Recreation activities

Winter conditions

Opening Sun light

Snow Freezing ponds Winter sports Research seminars Winter fairs Cultural events

Cafeteria and Restaurants indoors Snow fights with friends

Vegetation berm Highway noise control

Pedestrian Tunnel

Institutional Building

Auditorium Lectures Opera house

Shelter platform for winter Pedestrian Tunnel


Residential Buildings

Institutional Buildings Harvard and Boston University

Residential Buildings

Residential District

Network of bioswales Water runoff

Institutional Buildings Harvard and Boston University

Institutional District Harvard University

Cambridge Street

Research Buildings

Research Buildings

Network of bioswales Water runoff

Research District

Soldiers Field Park Boulevard

Street Level +0.18

+0.18

+2.5 m

High Tide

+1.5 m

Medium Tide

Water level 0.00

Clay loam

Exposed stone

Structural Concrete wall

Compacted Soils Building Foundation

Planting Soils

Permeable Soils gravels

Low Tide

Hardscape Plazas and Squares

Recreational Activities

Softscape Perennial gardens

Marshland

Ground Level Cultural program

Clay loam

Cultural Spaces

Ground Level Cultural program

Retention ponds

Exposed stone

Structural Concrete wall

Compacted Soils Building Foundation

Planting Soils

Permeable Soils gravels

Structural Concrete wall

Exposed stone

Marshland

Clay loam

Izgi Uygur Harvard GSD 2017 Landscape Architecture Portfolio  
Izgi Uygur Harvard GSD 2017 Landscape Architecture Portfolio  
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