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d8 INTERNATIONAL


Founder and editor-in-chief: Hans Fonk Editor-in-chief: Izabel Fonk Corporate head office: Raadhuislaan 22-B NL-2451 AV Leimuiden - Netherlands t:+31 172 509 843 info@objekt-international.com www.objekt-international.com Honorary editor in chief USA and Canada: Alexander Sasha Josipovicz, Studio Pyramid Inc. 1232 Yonge Street, Toronto, ON, M4V 1E4 sasha@studiopyramid.com Head Office Berlin, Germany Rneé Wilms Unique Company Group Oberwallstraße 14 D-10117 Berlin, Germany OBJEKT International ASIA/CHINA Cora Feng Xi Tang Art Center. No 2. Xi Ba He Road, Chaoyang district, 100028 Beijing, China Contributing writers: Izabel Fonk, Nicole Henriquez, Sasha Josipovicz, Susan Grant Lewin, Milosh Pavlovic, Ruud van der Neut, Lorenza Dalla Pozza, Robyn Prince, Raphaëlle de Stanislas, Dirk Wilms, Rene Wilms, Mercedez Zampoli. Contributing photographers: Federica Carlet,Nicola Cornwell, Andre J. Fanthome, Alaia Fonk, Hans Fonk, Gianni Franchellucci, Avesh Gaur, Jorrit 't Hoen, Hufton & Crow, Evan Joseph ,Kubix Berlin, Adam Letch, Ottilie Maters, Studio Noughts & Crosses, Beppe Raso, Chantal Regnault, Yves Sucksdorff, Tonu Tunnel, Frederik Vercruysse. Graphics: Hans Fonk Studio Art directors: Hans Fonk, Alaïa Fonk Video productions: Alaïa Fonk Illustrations: Eveline Lieuwma-Puijk

photo: Alaïa Fonk

One of the most prominent styles of recent times has undoubtedly been that of Art Deco. It is a style that has had a major influence on many areas of design: from furniture design to architecture, from steam locomotives to airplanes, cars and boats and from the graphic industry to art and fashion. And even today the beauty of Art Deco is recognized and influences the furniture and interior design. It is proof that the beauty of Art Deco is timeless and can be easily mixed with other styles. In the meanwhile, the international design show circus has restarted after a period of Corona related melt downs. The most important of all, Salone del Mobile in Milano was the first to reopen in a slimmed down and special for the event created version. Paris with Maison & Objet and the rest of the designed shows worldwide followed hesitantly. Despite the chanted expectations that a new approach to design would be revealed after the pandemic, it was more evolution than revolution. It is clear that the concept of sustainability has now descended further and can no longer be used exclusively as a marketing instrument. In the following issue, OBJEKT International addresses the evolution of interior design in its own way.

OBJEKT© iNTERNATIONAL Living in Style no. D8 Published by Hans Fonk Publications bv. Distripress member - issn 1574-8812 Copyright ©Hans Fonk

I ZA BE L FON K

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INTERIOR DESIGN ARCHITECTURE ARTS, ANTIQUES GARDENS, YACHTS

Honorary ambassadors OBJEKT International OBJEKT USA-CANADA George Beylerian Eric Booth Martyn Lawrence Bullard Tony Chi Massimo Iosa Ghini Jacopo Etro Marva Griffin Wilshire Ralf Ohletz von Plettenburg Glenn Pushelberg George Yabu Rene Wilms INTERNATIONAL DIGITAL PUBLICATION BY HANS FONK PUBLICATIONS COVER : THE STORY OF ART DECO

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PHOTO : HANS FONK


WHAT’S UP FOREWORD SPLASH OF SONOMA

PINK PALACE BEVERLY HILLS

HANGSGLIDING TO THE EDGE WELL TEMPERED MUD

ROTTERDAM ARTISTIC BALLISTIC

THE SOHO CLIMATE SKIN DEEP IN VOQUE

ARTS DÉCORATIFS ART DECO

UPPER EAST SIDE FRENCH WINERY

DE PIJP

PADOVA IMPACT

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NYMPHENBURG

COLOR OF TRANQUILITY

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NO WOMAN NO CRY

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PHOTO: RETO GUNTLI

UNIQUE EXPERIENCES Selected Retreats for Family & Friends

WWW.UNIQUE-EXPERIENCES.CH


A Sonoma Splash

Photos: Mariko Reed


The project was inspired by the Barcelona Pavilion designed by Mies van der Rohe. The combined pool and guesthouse was designed to connect the pool area to the mid-century modern main residence. It is a creation by Klopf Architecture in the Sonoma valley, just north of San Francisco: a region, like its neighboring Napa Valley, famous for its wines. The new pool house/guest house was one component of an integrated master plan that included renovations to the main house, the new pool, and a new art studio. The aim was to ensure that all structures were carefully aligned to and to create cohesiveness throughout the property. The semi-retired homeowners asked that the structure served multiple purposes, primarily a place to relax and to enjoy the pool while also accommodating overnight guests comfortably. They were looking for an open, modern and warm design that respected the minimalism of their mid-century modern style home, one that was flexible enough to enjoy everyday and allow guests their own privacy. The roof of the building is extended outwards on one side creating deep overhangs that provide cooling from the hot Sonoma sun. Horizontal cedar siding continues those lines and adds a modern touch to the pool house. The same cedar decking material is installed adjacent to the concrete patio slabs creating comfortable pathways surrounding the structure. Sliding glass doors create voids, that opens the space out toward the patio and pool. At night, a double-sided fireplace adds warmth to both the outdoor seating area as well as the living space inside. The interior polished concrete floors keep guests cool during the day and provide a seamless connection to the concrete patio surrounding the structure. The full sized bathroom is bright and airy with floor to ceiling windows that allow natural light to flood the room. A second exterior shower provides a quick rinse after a cooling swim.


ASIAN WOODS 2 photo artworks by

Hans Fonk

photo printed on paper. sales info: izabel@objekt-international.com



The Pi Pace of Berevrl “Wh distinguies The

Beverly Hs Hot from  others is s magic

history. Throu time  has been the destinion of movie

stars and socies, kings and queens. Vivacious and brimming wh life,

there is a particarly strong

cture around the swimming pool and canas.

The canas hold prime

ses to a mesmerizing ow of beaif people wading in

usters, ting in groups as lauter permees the air.

You s surrounded by beay

and lauter, and you

w as the amazing ow

goes on.”

Alexandra Champimaud,


ly Hs


Steeped in Hollywood history, the pool at The Beverly Hills Hotel has always been home to glamorous starlets, movie icons, and the location for many classic films. Having just completed the restoration of its private cabanas by interior design firm Champalimaud Design, the beloved “Pink Palace” provides a new generation of guests with modern day luxuries in a setting reflective of Hollywood’s golden age. The refreshed cabanas convey a residential feel, while paying homage to the hotel’s iconic design elements. Admiring the storied history of the hotel and pool area in particular, each space is imbued with a nostalgic sense of Hollywood glamour. The design studio has created a distinct atmosphere that builds up from the details: basket weave on the chairs, terrazzo on the coffee tables, and bright candy pink throughout the space. Establishing a deeper sense of place, the design studio had sourced peach pink tables from the Los Angeles designer, Bend. A notable design feature in the cabanas is the pink Martinique banana leaf wallpaper made by CW Stockwell. This is the first time the hotel has installed this iconic wallpaper since the original installation in the 1940s. The wallpaper is featured in The Fountain Coffee Room and in all of the hallways of the hotel.


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hang gliding to the edge


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e architecture of South America is highly individual. Famous architects from that region have had a substantial influence on architecture worldwide. e design is down to earth, its feet planted firmly in the Latin American soil, and out door life plays a leading role. A modern example of such architecture is the house, the architect Jairo Marquez of Medellin built just outside the Colombian city. A completely open house, paying homage to the majestic landscape and imposing Cauca river.

Medellin in the Valle de Aburra in northwest Colombia is probably one of the loveliest cities of South America. A city not far from the equator, richly clad in greenery, where tall old fruit trees, soaring bamboos and eucalyptus flourish. It was founded in 1616 by Francisco Herrera y Campuzano, but its tremendous growth only began in the 20th century as a result of far-reaching industrialization. In the nineteen-seventies and eighties Medellin acquired its dubious reputation as drugs capital of the world.


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At the end of the 20th century Medellin was in the throes of a major modernization. e city has undergone a complete face-li, with the present mayor energetically leading the way - he did not hesitate to go and live in a neighborhood that still had to be renovated, thus enhancing its appeal. Medellin is also Fernando Botero town: for example, Plaza de Botero is graced by numerous impressive works by the artist. He donated many sculptures and paintings to the Museo de Antioquia, which dates from 1881. ‘San Pedro de Majagna’ the country house Jairo Marquez designed is situated some 80 km outside the city near Santa Fe de Antioquia, a town with a cultural history that has been declared a national monument. e area is a popular location for weekend and holiday homes. It sits high above the Cauca river, which meanders in a majestic sweep down below. It is a spectacular piece of architecture, in which all the rooms are open, literally. At the start of the estate are the stables. Wooden decking leads to the guest rooms and the 'open house'. e living area is situated beneath vast canopies and has only floor-to-ceiling white curtains to screen it. It contains a suite of sofas around a square table of braided natural materials. e dining area and kitchen follow on from there also completely open. At the other side of the living area, a vast swimming pool reaches seamlessly to the edge of the steep hillside. A battery of loungers stands at the ready, at the other end of the pool. In a specially planted palm grove white hammocks have been hung. Part of the complex is a large pavilion housing the master bedroom with a large open-air bathroom, and the sitting room. e pavilion's circular structure has no walls. e high roof, made from dried leaves, rests on poles and an ingenious palisade of joists held together with white rope.


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santa fe de antioquia e small town of Santa Fe de Anqioguia looks as though it had emerged from a story by Gabriel Garcia Márquez. e houses, colors and large square have an aura of religious tranquility, bathing in the shade of the everpresent cathedral from 1799. It was founded in 1541 by Jorge Robledo and in 1547 received urban rights from King Philip II of Spain. Its specialty was once gold mining: today tourist bring in the new gold. e town was declared a national monument in 1960. e photos show the bars around the main square in the shade of the cathedral, and the striking, historical Hotel Caserón Plaza.

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W-Tempered Mud LICENCES TO GRAZE LIVESTOCK ON THE LAND IN SOUTH AFRICA DATE BACK TO THE MID-1700S, BUT IT WAS FARMED BEFORE THE 1800S. THE ORIGINAL CIRCULAR FARM WAS DIVIDED INTO SMALLER PARTS OVER THE YEARS.

THE MAIN HOUSE OF THE FARM DATES BACK TO 1852. THE DATE AND INITIALS IWDV, ISAK WILHELM VAN DER VYVER, ARE INSCRIBED ABOVE THE DOOR. THE VAN DER VYVER FAMILY WAS ASSOCIATED WITH BUFFESLDRIFT AS FAR BACK AS 1768, WHEN THEY FIRST LEASED THE FARM.

THE ENSEMBLE OF HERITAGE BUILDINGS INCLUSING THE HOUSE, BARNS AND WINE STORIAGE ON BUFFELSDRIFT, WEST OF LADISMITH IN THE ARID KLEIN KAROO REGION OF THE WESTERN CAPE WAS RECENTLY RESTORED BY ITS NEW OWNER SAOTA DIRECTOR GREG TRUEN AND JACO BOOYENS ARCHITECT, A SPECIALIST IN CLAY BUILDINGS.



Previous pages: the wine store of a restored farmhouse complex in South Africa. It was painted pink partly in reference to the historical practice in the karoo of mixing lime to make a light red or pink color, and partly in an exploration of some of the historical connections between Cape and Mexican architecture. This page: the farmhouse dating back to 1852 and recently restored by Greg Truen, complex owner and director of Soata architects. He was assisted by Jaco Booyens, a specialist in clay buildings. 26 OBJEKT

Original photos: Adam Letch


The restoration involved a cluster of Cape buildings in a valley beneath the Swartberg mountain range, consisting of a main house and two barns, plus a store. A short way off is a flat-roofed building, typical of the Ladismith style, which was originally used as a wine store. Other structures on the property include a contemporary shed, a cottage further up a hill and a graveyard. Greg Truen, who acquired the farm in 2016: “While minor additions and modern alterations had been made to the buildings, the original house, was in ‘good condition, considering’ and the barns were ‘fundamentally untouched’. In the main house evidence of earlier refurbishments in the 1970s, were stripped out, while modern kitchen and bathrooms were inserted in an adaptive approach to conservation. A new pump house was added near the dam wall on the property. Its design and construction were an experiment in contemporary architecture using the same materials and techniques as the heritage buildings, including poured or.” The house and barns had been constructed according to the usual technique used by Dutch settlers in the Cape, with walls of poured on clay, cast layer by layer about 700mm wide. “This method of construction, ubiquitously used by Dutch settlers, trekboers and later Voortrekkers, requires a source of clayey ground into which is added ‘a good proportion’ of sand and grit, possibly straw or dung, combined in a pit, all trod through by oxen-hooves in span,” wrote Fisher (quoting William John Burchell’s Travels In The Interior Of Southern Africa). He continued: “This must be ‘well-tempered’, sufficiently stiffened to be able to stand alone up to 300mm in height without slump. This was prepared at the same time as the foundations were being laid, and would leaven for about seven days, deemed ready when a ball made from it, when thrown to the ground, retained its shape. The cob was delivered to the builder on pitchforks, who then piled it in courses of about 300mm, all built over a good stone or slate foundation. Each layer was allowed to set and then paired to an even surface with a flat paddle, much as that used as a pizza oven shovel. The corners were laced through diagonally by saplings or braided cord at each layer to prevent the separating and bursting of the structure at this weakest point where the direction of the stresses of thrust changed. These stresses were consequent to the additional weight of the gable on the end wall, thereby creating shear while on the other was the thrust of the weight of the thatched roof.” Once the walls were complete, they would have been finished with lime and sand plaster. Over the years this had been replaced with cement. Booyens notes that one of the biggest tasks of the restoration involved removing the cement plaster and re-finishing the walls with traditional lime plaster, which recaptured the undulating surface of Cape homes known to soften the bright karoo light. Where there was termite damage, the walls were filled in again with clay.


These pages: in the main house, evidence of earlier refurbishments in the 1970s, were stripped out, while modern kitchen and bathrooms were inserted in an adaptive approach to conservation. Truen and Booyens opted to use a thin lime plaster on the interior walls between the central living room and the bedrooms on either side, not only expressing the original texture of the mud wall, but also, as Truen puts it, leaving “a little of that construction history visible, so you can get a bit of a story of how these building were put together”. Interior design is by Arrcc.

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For the restoration Truen and Booyens opted to use a thin lime plaster on the interior walls between the central living room and the bedrooms on either side, not only expressing the original texture of the wall, but also, as Truen puts it, leaving “a little of that construction history visible, so you can get a bit of a story of how these building were put together”. In the living space, the original yellowwood beams and ceiling were intact and could be restored. The timber floors, however, had rotted and were replaced with poplar planks, consistent with the originals, kiln dried in Oudtshoorn. The screed floors of the T-section, which was converted into a combined kitchen and dining area, bathroom and front stoep were all refinished using ‘stone pavers taken out of the veld’, as was the kitchen courtyard and front stoep. The roof of the lean-to section had rotted away and a raw concrete slab was cast over it. It was converted into two bathrooms. Narrow slats for skylights flood the bathrooms and passage with natural light. A custommade poplar vanity and shutters were added for privacy. Poplar shutters were made for all the windows, which enhances the remarkable thermal qualities of the building. “Even on a very hot day, when temperatures can rise into the upper 30s and early 40s, the internal temperature is in the mid to low 20s and is very pleasant,” said Truen. “Where modern materials were introduced, they were carefully selected. The shower for example, has been clad in terrazzo slabs, and in the kitchen, a contemporary island has been inserted, also clad in terrazzo. We looked for a contemporary material that spoke to the original materials. The concrete and Terrazzo resonated with the stone and cement paving: a connection between the old and the new.” The landscaping of the sloped site was another significant undertaking, involving a contemporary approach to terracing at various heights, executed using traditional Cape building elements and materials. Truen and landscaping designer Fritz Coetzee created a raised platform at the back of the building, so one can now come down a driveway and park at the back of the building and walk down the site towards the house and the wine store. The exterior of the wine store has been painted pink partly in reference to the historical practice in the karoo of mixing lime to make a light red or pink color, and partly in an exploration of some of the historical connections between Cape and Mexican architecture. Truen visited various traditional Mexican buildings, as well as some famous examples of Mexican modernist architecture such as Luis Barragan’s famous Cuadra san Cristobal. “A lot of the historical buildings in both countries are made in quite similar ways, using and stone and materials that were immediately available to them. And, actually, they have quite similar landscapes,” according to the Saota director.

Right: the interior of the pump house, a new building constructed in response to the need for an irrigation building. Truen: “It was an opportunity to experiment and test some ideas we had building contemporary architecture using traditional techniques.” The building forms a connection between the landscape and the dam wall. Its earth-colored walls take their cue from the mud walls of the heritage buildings.


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These pages: one of the bedrooms and bathroom on the mezzanine above. The rotted upper floor was replaced with SA pine. The roof was finished with poplar beams and a rietdak ceiling.

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M A D R C C I E I T T T S T S I I O T L R R L A A B


Industrial design at the Haka building in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, with part of an lift door and the refelection of one of the four stained glass windows by L. Visser, installed in the narrow vertical windows of the stairwell. The building was the venue for the design manifestation Object Rotterdam, july 2021. The Haka building is a commercial building that was built in 1931-1932 for 'De Handelskamer' (Chamber of Commerce) at the Vierhavensstraat in Rotterdam. Designed by the architects Hermann Friedrich Mertens and Jacobus (Ko) Koeman, it was built in the style of the ‘Nieuwe Zakelijkheid’. The Haka building consisted of a coffee roasting facility, a tea mixing facility and a packaging department, as well as offices, a warehouse and a grain silo. The building is recognized as industrial heritage and has had the status of a Dutch national monument since 2002. The Cooperative Wholesale Association 'De Handelskamer' was founded in 1914 with the aim of supplying workers with good quality food for a reasonable price. Shop cooperatives could join regardless of their political or religious affiliation. All images by Hans Fonk


Location seemed to be the key at the avalanche of design and art fairs held in July 2021 in the Dutch city of Rotterdam: the Rotterdam International Art Fair at the monumental Van Nelle building, the design fair Object in the industrial Haka building and the manifestation van ‘De Huidenclub’ in historical Diepeveen building. The design fair Object was launched in 2002 by Anne Van der Zwaag to Inspire and to discover young talent and to create the possibility to buy unique design pieces.

“Designers have used the corona lock down period to fully focus on new work and are to reconnecting with fans and followers again. More than a hundred designers showed their new furniture, interior products, lighting designs, jewelry, textile design and architectural installations.”

“It is more important than ever to put designers in the spotlight. Our houses and our interiors have become increasingly decisive in recent times. Extra attention is paid to the use and design of our personal living environment. For makers of furniture and other interior objects, this offers an opportunity that they seize with both hands. Our show provides a stage where supply and demand come together again, and that is sorely needed after the past Covid dictated period,” according to Van Der Zwaag.

Above: creation by Diederik Schneeman/Rademakers Gallery. Right: “Safe me” by Bas Kosters is an artist reflection on the connection to the city of Amsterdam. The project revolves around the iconic traffic cone portrayed in different ways. The glass series reveals the soul and individuality of a worldwide iconic shape. Mouth blown at the Glass museum Leerdam.


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Left: a work by Noah Arends. She describes her work as a fusion of fashion, design and visual arts.Above:’To be or the be Square’ by Studio Fleur Peters and Iris Lucia Megens.

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Above: creations by Jule Cats and Laura Schurink. Right: works by Tomas Schats.


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rotating rotterdam reality On the edge of historical Delfshaven in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, is the national monument Diepeveen located. It is a former warehouse built for the ironware trading company W.B. Diepeveen & Co. The building with the striking tower was designed by architect Willem Kromhout and built in 1929-1930. This was the location where the first manifestion of ‘De Huidenclub (The Skin Club) took place: a workshop for artists, designers and activists, the club offers a platform for diverse visions and perspectives on urgent social issues. The club’s name derived from its predecessor, the tannery De Coöperatieve Vereniging Rotterdamsche Huidenclub.


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De Huidenclub (Skin Club) is located in an industrial building from 1914, in the Diepenveen building. It derives its name from its predecessor, the tannery De Coöperatieve Vereniging Rotterdamsche Huidenclub. As a workshop for artists, designers and activists, the club offers a platform for diverse visions and perspectives on urgent social issues. The launch of this platform, with Self-Assembleas its first biannual theme, took place in June 2021. The starting question was: how can a 'bottom-up non-institute' organize itself? Two exhibitions on this theme were held in two cubes specially built for this purpose. The exhibition 'Shaking the Habitual' examined how art, within its own discipline, can have political and social meaning. Participating artists were: Pauline Boudry + Renate Lorenz, Pauline Curnier Jardin, Andrea Eva Gyori, Patricia Kaersenhout, Janis Rafa, Evelyn Taochang Wang, Jennifer Tee and Kubilay Mert Ural. The design exhibition 'The Design Deviants' presented some of the best of the current design field in Rotterdam with works by Laurids Gallé, Sabine Marcelis, Tim Mastik and Phil Procter. The presentation was created in collaboration with Victor Hunt.

Outside the designated exhibition spaces, works by Jonas Lutz and Johan Viladrich, Anna Aagaard and Pim Top were on display. They presented their custom-made furniture for the future workspaces in the Huidenclub. The Huidenclub was an initiative by Chantal Schoenmakers en Liv Vaisberg. From autumn 2021, the Huidenclub created a number of studio spaces and workshops available to artists, designers, makers and anyone who has an affinity with its objective.


Left: part of the Huidenclub manifestation, Rotterdam, July 2021 with works by Jonas Lutz and Johan Viladrich. This page: ‘Barricade - Paux de Dames’ by Pauline Curnier Jardin.


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This page: Janis Rafa’s Eaten by non Humans. Right: object from the ‘Summer Collection’ by Jonas Lutz.


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Archi-Tectonics with principal in charge architect Winka Dubbeldam and partner in charge Justin Korhammer, converted a long and narrow industrial structure in SoHo, New York City, into a spacious and flexible 8-story family home. The size of the space was doubled by adding a 4-story structure to the original townhouse, and by unifying the two volumes with a 3d envelope: the Climate Skin. The townhouse is inscribed within the Climate Skin, a spacious lattice envelope made of lightweight steel and folding panels clad with Trespa™ slats.

When closed, they appear as one smooth surface, but when opened, they fold out like feathers of a birdwing. Like an intricate lacework dress, the sheathing changes character and appearance at different times of the day and view angles, and serves as both filter and amplifier between the privacy of the house and the public streetscape. The Climate skin does not stop at the f acade, it wraps up and over the multi-level roofs, creating a private outdoor ‘room’ with green roofs and outdoor dining. Principal in charge: Winka Dubbeldam, Assoc. AIA Partner in charge: Justin Korhammer Archi-Tectonics Team: Hanxing Zu, Sarah Laulan, Filomena Nigro, Avra Tomara, Royd Zhang, Zhe Wen, Kristina Kroell, Elena Sarigelinoglu, Hsiang Wei Chen, Adin Rimland, Boden Davies, Nariman Kiazand, Robin Zhang, Thiebaud Nell Main contractor: Galcon Construction Consultants structural engineers: WSP GROUP Mechanical engineers: 2LS Consulting Engineering Photos: Evan Joseph, Federica Carlet

Extensive prototyping assisted in optimizing the movement of the trellis panels. This way, the façade can fold and slide open depending on the residents’ changing needs, as well as simultaneously connect to and enclose from the outdoors. This facade also poses interesting solutions for sustainability. By making the Climate



Skin operable, residents can adjust ventilation, light, shade, and temperature so that the building naturally adapts to environmental conditions. In warmer months, the Climate Skin reduces interior radiation and lowers the need for airconditioning. In colder months, opening the Climate Skin increases interior radiation and reduces the need for heating.

Inside, the project pays respect to the building’s history by restoring the existing brick and up-cycling materials. The black original building steel wass used throughout the house, such as in the staircase, that runs through all eight stories of the house lit from above by a glass roof. At the top the stairs turn 90 degrees and move up to the bulkhead where we find a perfect meditation spot, with its window box penetrating the Climate Skin, overlooking SoHo. To enhance the building’s small floor plates spatially, each floor contains a program connected through double-height voids, such as between the kitchen and dining area, and between the study and master bedroom. These allow for spatial interlacing and long views.

Double-height windows, a skylight, and a dramatic south-facing continuous window slot bring ample light into what could otherwise be a dark and narrow living space. Altogether, these highlight the sensation of extreme verticality and transform mundane everyday tasks into a dynamic spatial experience.

This Urban townhouse represents an innovative approach to densification in a city challenged by housing shortages and skyrocketing prices. The conversion not only provided residents with a diversity of elegant living, working spaces and generous outdoor areas, but also respects the existing characteristics of the city and poses a potential future for urban living.

The Climate Skin’s adaptability to environmental conditions represents a rethinking of the residence’s footprint on the environment, and reduces energy costs. It anticipates future, more sustainable design approaches to urban living. 52 OBJEKT


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Deep in Vogue

Celebrating Ballroom Culture

In close collaboration with Amber Vineyard, Mother of the House of Vineyard, the first ballroom house in the Netherlands, Kunsthal Rotterdam presents ‘Deep in Vogue’ in autumn 2021. It celebrates the ballroom culture and provides the context for a subculture that is shaped by and for black and brown queer and trans people. The exhibition was designed by themultidisciplinary fashion house Maison the Faux. The origins of ballroom culture can be traced back to the New York underground scene of the 1970s. It was first brought to the attention of the general public with the launch of Madonna’s music video ‘Vogue’ in 1990, the same year in which the documentary ‘Paris Is Burning’ premiered.


Previous pages Connie Girl Fleming, backstage of the grandest grand march ever during aids benefit Palladium, NYC, June 1990. Photo © Chantal Regnault. These pages. Right: Princess Gaby Vineyard, Mother Amber Vineyard, Typhoon Angels chanting and cheering at a ‘Voguer’ contestant at the Emerald City Ball, hosted by the House of Vineyard, Milkshake Festival, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2017. Film still Documentary O.T.A (Open To All) by Ottilie Maters. Beside that Aitana Miyake Mugler categorie: FF Sex Siren, ‘We are The Night Ball’, organized by House of Vineyard. Film still Documentaire O.T.A (Open To All) by Ottilie Maters. Bottom right: legendary voguers Luis, Danny, Jose and David-Ian Xtravaganza NYC, May 1989 Photo: Chantal Regnault.

Over the past years, ballroom has returned to mainstream attention and ballroom events at major festivals around the world. Through photography, video installations, and a number of fashion items, the exhibition Deep in Vogue. Celebrating Ballroom Culture, The Rotterdam Kunsthal visualized the community, codes, and expressive power of ballroom. The exhibition focused on the roots and the continuing need to celebrate each other in a society that so often fails to do so.

Ballroom culture originated in Harlem, New York around the 1970s. Black and brown homosexual men and transgender women were often subjected to exclusion and discrimination, both from outside and within the LGBTQIA+ community. They started creating their own, chosen families, the so-called houses. These houses came together during balls. It were safe spaces where different ideals applied than in the outside world with its white and heterosexual standards. Dressed in extravagant robes, ball gowns and uniforms, they were able to take center stage in search of fame and status within the community, with queens imitating the poses of fashion models in an attempt to outperform each other on the dance floor. Posing evolved into a stylized form of dancing, known as Voguing, with influences from Asian martial arts, Egyptian hieroglyphics, and fashion.

The vogue performance categories soon became some of the most popular during the balls. Although the Aidsepidemic claimed the lives of many ballroom pioneers in the 1980s and early 1990s, it certainly did not mean the end of the community and their legacies are carried on to this day. The culture has since spread around the globe, and by now there is also a thriving community in the Netherlands. The exhibition focuses on the most important aspects of ballroom culture, from the 1980s up until now. Thirty black-and-white photographs by the French-Haitian documentary photographer Chantal Regnault tell the story of the social structures and mutual affection within the chosen families. Between 1989 and 1992, Regnault frequently portrayed members of the New York houses. The exhibition includes portraits of legendary mothers and fathers and members of the queer community at balls engaged in different categories like fashion, realness, body, and vogue performance. Images of people like Willi Ninja (1961-2006), the Godfather of Voguing, in provocative poses emphasize the expressive power of vogue. The documentary maker Ottilie Maters captured each of the five elements of vogue performance on camera: duckwalk, catwalk, hands, floor performance, and spins & dips. Also included in the exhibition are video images by Maters showing the contemporary European scene.


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These pages: legendary voguer Willi Ninja wearing Thierry Mugler body pieces NYC, June 1989. Photo: Chantal Renault. Next pages: Aitana ‘Gilda Hair’ at home, preparing to go out in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, September 2020 Film still Documentary O.T.A (Open To All) by Ottilie Maters


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This pages: Monkey with human skull (inspired by Darwin's theories), German, signed Frz. Spenger, unicum made in wood, 1930s, height 22.5 cm. text : Ruud van der Neut photos : Hans Fonk


Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes

THE LIFE SPAN OF THE ART DECO STYLE OF THE 1920S AND '30S, IS REMARKABLE, TO PUT IT MILDLY. EVEN TODAY, ARCHITECTS, DESIGNERS AND ARTISTS DERIVE INSPIRATION FROM THIS STYLE THAT IN ITS DAY WAS INNOVATIVE. OBJEKT INTERNATIONAL EXAMINED SCULPTURES FROM THE ART DECO PERIOD, HIGHLIGHTING A DISTINCTIVE FORMAL IDIOM THAT HAS FOUND AN ABIDING PLACE IN ART HISTORY.


Paris, April 1925. At the opening of the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes organized by the French Ministry of Trade and Industry, no-one could imagine it would lend its name to a specific style and period: Art Deco. At the time, it was intended to provide an overview of the various aspects of the art of modern-day living. Today Art Deco is often associated with the Roaring Twenties and everything that in those days was new and stylistically outré. Although the Paris exhibition was an international event, with participants from countries throughout the world, it was primarily meant to recapture an important position for France in the design world. The products at the Paris exhibition presented not only historically derived elements, but influences of exotic cultures and of modern art as well. The African colonies were also an important source of inspiration for French Art Deco. Yet it had no founder, manifesto or philosophy. The movement was primarily a means of expression for designers, artists and artisans in post-First World War Paris generated by the demands of a society in reconstruction. But the term Art Deco extended to more. Since the nineteen-sixties it has been used to cover the style of the twenties and thirties - in particular the French version. A style in which architecture, the visual arts and design - in all branches of the applied arts - were influenced by new, functional design. With geometric patterns and stylized motifs reflecting 'back to basics'. Everything, from flowers to people or animals, was rendered in an angular, or more or less abstract way, with forms sharply outlined and more simple than those of their actual counterparts. Speed was considered to be one of the greatest miracles and achievements of the 20th century. The designers of cars, trains, steamers and airplanes were guided by the streamlining dictated by aerodynamics - as, in fact, were designers and artists who worked on a smaller scale. Objects, be they in series, mass-produced, or unique pieces, designed in the distinctive modern-looking Art Deco style, became fashionable with a wide, international audience. A characteristic feature of the French Art Deco is its luxurious cachet; it invariably used expensive materials like marble, ivory, semi-precious stones and exotic woods. Furniture and art objects of the twenties and thirties even included such materials as sharkskin, snakeskin and vellum. Also chromium-plated or bronzed metal, early plastics like Bakelite and other synthetics supplanted natural materials in many a piece of jewelry, furniture, clock or sculpture. On the one hand, the design was unvaryingly traditional and harked back to the 18th and 19th centuries, on the other hand, it widely applied the Cubist syntax and vivid colors. Consequently, in this Interbellum, an entirely unique, distinctive style emerged. Other countries followed in France's footsteps. For instance, Belgian Art Deco largely followed the formal idiom of the French style. Yet German and Austrian Art Deco were inspired primarily by baroque forms and Chinoiserie. While in the Scandinavian countries, they were especially influenced by stylistic elements of Neo-Classicism in producing their own interpretation of Art Deco. The need for a style that was in keeping with the modern day was particularly strong in America, where specific stylistic features from the past never had a wide following. One American critic wrote: “The only reason why America was not represented at the 1925 exhibition of decorative industrial art in Paris was that we felt we had no decorative art”. Although the Netherlands did participate, the exhibit could hardly be termed trail-blazing. The participating Dutch designers and artists were overly influenced by Art Nouveau, the style which prevailed at the turn of the century. The Netherlands referred to the 'Amsterdam School' for their interpretation of the new, functional style. Be it as it may, it is hard to demarcate the scope of Art Deco, as it covered such a wide design field and the Dutch version borrowed freely from more serious design trends like De Stijl and Bauhaus. 66 OBJEKT


Right: stylized pelican made as a bookend, probably French, unsigned, bronze, 1930s. Height: 13 cm. OBJEKT 67


Above: sparrow hawk, signed by the Dutch sculptor Jan Trapman (18791943), unicum made in rosewood, late 1920s, height 22 cm. In the background, a painting portraying flamingos in Artis, the Amsterdam Zoo, by the Dutch artist Sam van Beek (1878-1957). Date: c. 1925. 68 OBJEKT


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The French sculptor Antoine Louis Barye (1795-1875) was one of the first artists to take animals as worthy subjects, and no longer a lesser part of a composition with one or more human figures. He studied his subjects in the Jardin des Plantes, the original royal zoo in Paris. The small bronze sculptures, which Barye submitted at the annual Salons were popular with the public, who saw them as attractive collectors' items. Barye was emulated by sculptors like Pierre-Jules Mêne, Rosa and Isidore Bonheur and, later on, François Pompon and Max Le Verrier, whose Art Deco animal figures had a distinctive design and stylization. In the twenties and thirties animal sculptures became extremely popular. The art of the ‘animaliers’, as the sculptors who specialized in animal figures were called, is essentially realistic, with great attention to action and abstract detail. Fast, exotic animals like the panther, lynx, puma, gazelle, springbok and eagle, were frequent subjects. The aesthetics of streamlining were to give new impetus to the production of graceful figures for the contemporary interior. Animal sculptures were sold in great numbers, in ceramics, metal alloys or synthetic materials, in order to meet enormous demand. They were produced after designs by well-known artists or designed by anonymous workers in pottery factories, foundries and small-scale studios. In particular, production in potteries of monochrome pieces flourished: white (in all its variations, like ivory, cream or off-white) was especially prevalent. Large runs and the relatively simple production process meant these animal sculptures could be sold very cheaply. The sums paid for animal sculptures made by individual artists and cast in bronze or skillfully carved in attractively grained wood were quite a different matter. They were made in limited editions or as 'unica'. In those days, they could be bought in galleries, in leading interior shops selling contemporary design, or from the artist direct. In the animal sculpture evolution, not only bronze, but also ceramics have long played a leading role. There are, for instance, ancient examples from Japan and China in which the - anonymous - artist sought to capture in ceramic the 'spirit' of a particular animal. Numerous life-size animal pieces in porcelain date from the 18th century, made in Meissen and designed by Johann J. Kaendler and Johann G. Kirchner. In the course of the 19th century ceramic animal sculpture developed further. For example, the German manufacturers Nymphenburg, the Danish Royal Copenhagen and the French Sèvres started producing them in series. In the early decades of the 20th century, many artists, following in the footsteps of the French sculptor Antoine Louis Barye, visited the zoo to study the animals and sketched them 'on the spot'. After that, a painting or sculpture would be made in the studio based on the spontaneous drawings made on location. Clearly the design varied from one designer to another or one studio to another. More-over, renderings could be either realistic or contemporary. Many Art Deco sculptures were Cubist in style; even their pedestals have been known to contain streamlined portrayals of grass, plant motifs or rocks. The surface of hand-formed pieces (in pottery) was generally rough and irregular, whereas Art Deco figures produced in series were smooth, making a soft impression and increasing the decorative effect. In the Netherlands, artists who were considered to excel as animal sculptors include J.C. Altorf (1876 - 1955), J. Mendes da Costa (1863 - 1939), A. Remiëns (1890 - 1972), J. Trapman (1879 - 1943), B. Jordens (1888 - 1972), J. Kaas (1898 - 1972) and H.J. Jansen van Galen (1871 - 1949). Favorite animals included the (polar) bear, cat, sea lion, parrot, various birds of prey, apes, marabou, crane and heron, elephant, penguin and pelican. Pieces that were made in limited editions in cast bronze, or as 'unica' in wood, pottery, bone or ivory are now considered to be the artistic highlight of the period in which modernism entered the interior. Meanwhile museums and private collectors world wide are making up for lost time in adding authentic Art Deco sculptures for their collections. And today those style icons command record prices at special art auctions and fairs. 70 OBJEKT


Right: young crow, unsigned, probably German, unicum wood, 1930s, height 16 cm. OBJEKT 71


Left: Ibex, signed by the Dutch sculptor Joh. Bosma (1879-1960), bronze, c. 1930, height 13.5 cm. Right: deer by the Dutch sculptor Adrianus Remiëns (1890-1972) bronze, c.1926, height 8.5 cm. 72 OBJEKT


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A R

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THE HOUSE IS LOCATED IN THE FOREST HILL AREA OF THE CANADIAN CITY OF TORONTO. IT HAS THE TRADITIONAL GEORGIAN ARCHITECTURE USUALLY SEEN IN THE NEW ENGLAND AREA. IT WAS AUTHENTICALLY RESTORED BY RENOWNED ARCHITECT JACK WINSTON. BUT IT IT THE INSIDE THAT COUNTS HERE. THE PROPERTY WAS BOUGHT IN 2006 BY JEFFREY WYNN WHO GAVE THE INTERIORS ITS GREAT AND GENUINE ART DECO TOUCH.

“THE HOUSE WAS BUILT IN 1906 BY THE GOODERHAM AND WORTS DISTILLERY EMPIRE AND RESTORED TO ORIGINAL STATUS ON THE EXTERIOR. BUT ENTERING THE HOUSE, YOU ARE STRUCK BY THE POWER OF THE 1930'S ART DECO ATMOSPHERE.” OBJEKT

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“I am not American, even though, most my family hails from there, but most of the Art Deco pieces were purchased in the United States. I prefer American Art Deco, which is streamlined, not heavy and much more sought after. It follows the art of the locomotive/ automobile movement and the chrome design. For me Art Deco exuded optimism in the future. I bought my first Art Deco piece, which was a Grandmother clock from the long defunct antique market on Toronto Harbour front in the early 80's. Since then I have searched the world as well as my own backyard for significant pieces.” “Fortunately with the advent of the internet, I was able to locate the period Art Deco pieces I specifically knew were important in design and meaning for the 30's,” according to Jeffrey Wynn

He continued: “A great majority of my pieces were through Decollect on 1st Dibs, located in Port Hope, Ontario. They acted as my broker and sourced globally. In my hunt for the finest Art Deco pieces I travelled to a palatial Art Deco manor house in Manchester a few years ago to purchase all the fixtures, wall mounted cigarette lighters, wall paneling, doors and floors before it was demolished. I purchased the Amelia Earhart huge etched glass panel in Los Angeles from a house in the Hollywood hills that too was sadly being demolished.” “It was purchased first by Leonardo Dicaprio, who cancelled at the last minute whereas I grabbed it immediately. The etching was commissioned by Earhart's boyfriend at the time and

presented and shown to Amelia. I even have photos from the 30's showing the house with the glass fireplace etching in all its art deco glory.” “Other items are the baby grand pianos from the great trans-Atlantic cruise liners, clocks from the 1939 New York world fair, Maurice Adams Mayfair art deco from London used famously in the Poirot and the Crown series. My bullet bar , is on display at the Victoria and Albert museum.” For him Art Deco is all about dynamics. Initially born out of the French Art Nouveau period Art Deco came up during the time of the roaring Gatsby twenties, the pinnacle decade of Hollywood glamour and lifestyle, the rise of skyscrapers as the Chrysler building and the Empire State building: the first bridge to modernism and a celebration of exuberance represented by the likes of Wallis Simpson, Martinis and other Hollywood stars. It was the period of the mechanization of trains, planes and automobiles into geometric and streamlined shapes. That all pushed the design for movement, speed and modernity which during the 30's its best exemplified by a world coping to extradite from the Great Depression. The last stage of the Art Deco era was ushered in by the emigration of progressive refugee Jewish architects from Nazi Germany, designing the simplified streamlined steam liners and introducing Bauhaus design. World War 2 stopped the style period but Art Deco pieces are some of the most highly collectables these days.

Photos: Alaïa & Hans Fonk

Right: the study annex music chamber. In the foreground left an American chrome and Bakelite Airplane clock by Sessions stands on an English piano by Priestley & Sons of Birmingham. The American chrome and Vinyl stool is by the Troy Sunshade Co. Behind this a chrome ‘Guardsman’ lamp by John Dickerson for the Faries Lamp Co. on an East Indian Laurelwood and glass desk by Gilbert Rohde for the Herman Miller Co which is paired with a Royalchrome ‘Z’ chair also by Rohde A white Bakelite English rotary telephone also sits on the desk beneath an American chrome ‘Odeon’ wall mirror. To the rear a Lorenzl peach mirror clock together with a selection of American and English photo frames sit atop the French fireplace and screen assembly. An American triple-cone torchière stands next to a French leather and Macassar Ebony couch and chair beneath one of a pair of two oil painted decorative panels from an American Jazz club of the 40’s. A Black Oceans Airplane Globe stands on a blonde wood, black lacquer, glass and chrome yacht coffee table and takes center on an original Irish Art Deco geometric patterned carpet.


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The living in the Toronto Art Deco house has a fireplace and overmantel mirror from the home of Emilia Earhart. It is flanked by a pair of copper and chrome lamps by the Markel corporation. The pair of black leather, triple chrome band armchairs are by K.E.M. Weber for Lloyd Manufacturing Co. The English blonde wood and black lacquered round table is by Maurice Adams and is flanked by a pair of English cream leather ‘Tank’ chairs around a large American Hollywood Regency ottoman. Standing next to the fireplace is a Coronet coffee set by Walter von Nessen for Chase that stands on a circular French Christofle cocktail trolley. The dining table and chairs are part of a twenty-piece suite that was purchased in Paris in 1933 by the original owners.

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Left: the antechamber in the Toronto Art Deco house. In the background an English three-piece lounge set with matching ‘Rocket Ship’ bar all by Maurice Adams. This page: The the kitchen with on table stands an American ‘Bomb’ toolbox by Blackhawk. The set of four American counter stools is attributed to the Troy Sunshade Co. In the background an English oak Grandmother clock circa 1935. The bedroom has an American Skyscraper king-size bed and bedside tables by David Robertson Smith for Dynamique Creations circa 1929. At the back of the room to the left is a polychrome veneer French bi-fold screen while in the center stand a book-matched pair of American dressers by Gilbert Rohde for Herman Miller. On the right stands an English circular vanity and stool attributed to Betty Joel. The bathroom is reflected in the many ground mirrors.


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Left: the living room of the Toronto Art Deco house at the garden side of the house with a contemporary ottoman and couch, mixed with a black leather, triple chrome band couch and chair by K.E.M. Weber for Lloyd Manufacturing Co. On the wall is an original oil painted triple-panel screen by Floreal depicting Josephine Baker dancing in the Revue Negre. From the ceiling is a large American ‘Saturn’ chandelier hanging and on the floor is a large original Irish Art Deco carpet.

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upper east side in the light


These pages: the entrance hall to the Upper East Side, Manhattan apartment, recently redesigned by David Scott Interiors. Lighting design is by Orsman Design. The brass pendant fixture with circular Murano glass drum form shad is from John Salibello, circa 1960.The textured glass diamond Sconces and the vintage Rosewood console are also from John Salibello. Photos: Gianni Franchellucci Styling: Colin King


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The building is located in Midtown East, Manhattan, New York City on walking distance to Central Park and the East River. The block-long site offers views of Central Park, the East River and iconic city views. The building was designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Architects under the creative direction of partner Roger Duffy. One of the apartments was recently redesigned by David Scott Interiors with lighting designer Orsman Design. The brief was very specific: New York glamor all the way. The apartment had to be suitable for entertainment and large holiday family gatherings.

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This project is the primary residence of clients who moved to the city from a large estate in New Jersey where they maintain their medical practices. An unusual reverse commute. The place consists of living and dining spaces, glorious hallways, 4 bedrooms and4.5 bath rooms over an area of 4,600 sq. All rooms offer a double or triple exposure with panoramic views of Manhattan's most important landmarks. Most remarkable things are the iconic furniture pieces and the artworks that are literally scattered all over the spaces.


Previous pages The central living area with a Vladimir Kagan custom Sloane sofa from Ralph Pucci, a Jean Claude Dresse coffee table from Artys Gallery, a Sheaf of Wheat table by Edward Wormley for Dunbar circa 1950 from Karl Kemp Antiques. The brass and glass bowed sideboard is from Cosulich, 1990 and the Scavo Glass bulb form Vase is by Cenedese from John Salibello. On the table is a ‘Petite Crumpled Sculptureal Vessel’ in Silver and Turquoise by Jeff Zimmerman, USA, 2017. The hand-blown Crystal Vessel in Purple is also by Jeff Zimmerman, USA, 2017. Purchased from: R & Company. The artwork Sudden Feral over the piano is by Larry Poons, 2017. Medium: Acrylic on Canvas, purchased from Yares Art. Over the fire place Untitled, 2015 by Nancy Lorenz, purchased from Morgan Lehman Gallery. Medium: Yellow Gold, Charcoal, Pigment and Gilt Glass on In the niche left of fireplace Figure by John Hovannes,1932. Purchased from: Conner Rosenkranz.

These pages Bottom left: the kitchen with an artwork by Ilhwa Kim, Seed Universe 38, 2016. The Karl Springer dining table, circa 1970, is from Cain and the custom fireplace mantle is from Chesneys. The brass and fur armchair is by Erwan Boulloud, France, 2016. Beside that: the master badroom with a Como King Bed from Dmitriy, vintage circular flush mount ceiling fixtures from John Salibello and a cylinder Drum Table from John Lyle. The Roberta Rida Table Lamps are from Bernd Goeckler. The artwork over the bench, Pulse (2), is by Luisa Rabbia, 2016. Medium: acrylic paint, colored pencil, and fingerprint on canvas, purchased from Peter Blum Gallery. Next pages The library with a Tiger Caramel Area Rug from Joseph Carini, a Branche table from Holly Hunt and a Cesare Lacca, Milano Sculptured Wood Chair, circa 1950, is from 1st Dibs. The Sunflowers (Large 2) artwork is by Toni R. Toivonen, 2018. The Art Deco vases are by Charles Catteau, circa 1920s from Rago Arts. The Rorstrand Vases are by Gunnar Nylund, circa, 1930s from End of History.

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UNE SI JOLIE PETITE CAVE

Left: the new winery of the Les Davids Estate in the south of France designed by he French architect Marc Barani.


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THE FRENCH ARCHITECT MARC BARANI HAS DESIGNED THE NEW WINERY FOR THE LES DAVIDS ESTATE . LOCATED ON THE EDGE OF THE LUBERON, IN PROVENCEALPES-CÔTE D’AZUR AND SURROUNDED BY ORCHARDS AND GARDENS, THE ESTATE HAS TWENTY HECTARES OF VINEYARDS AND CURRENTLY PRODUCES ELEVEN ORGANIC QUALITY WINES.

MARC BARANI CREATED A WINERY THAT RESPECTED THE ENTIRE GRAVITATIONAL PROCESS OF WINE MAKING WITH A FORM OF ARCHITECTURE THAT IS INTEGRATED INTO THE LANSCAPE AS E A NATURAL ELEMENT. THE WHOLE STRUCTURE IS BUILT OF SOLID CONCRETE IN AN OCHRE COLOR THAT REFLECTS THE ROCKY EARTH THAT SLIDES DOWN TO THE VALLEY.

ALTHOUGH THE BUILDING IS VERY LARGE (2130 M2), IT IS SURPRISINGLY ELEGANT, AS IF IT EMERGES FROM THE EARTH LIKE A MASTABA FROM ANCIENT TIMES. IMPORTANT DETAIL IS THE GLASS NOTCH, THAT REVEALS THE MONUMENTAL ARRANGEMENT OF CONCRETE TULIP BARRELS, PLACING THE EXTERIOR VINES IN VISUAL COMMUNICATION WITH THE WINE BARRELS ON THE INSIDE.

THE TERRACE, WHICH IS COVERED BY A LARGE, CANTILEVERED ROOF, OVERLOOKS Original photos: Frederik Vercruysse

THE ESTATE AND OFFERS AN IMMENSE VIEW OF THE SURROUNDING MOUNTAINS. IN THE CORRIDOR IS A HUGE CERAMIC FRESCO BY THE BELGIAN ARTIST YVES ZURSTRASSEN. THE CORRIDOR LEADS TO THE TASTING AND SALES COUNTER .

THE WINERY IS PART OF TH HAMEAUX DES DAVIDS ESTATE TUCKED AWAY BETWEEN OAK FORESTS, LAVENDER FIELDS, OLIVE TREES AND VINEYARDS.



DANGEROUSLY COOL

Etablissement De Pijp (the Pipe) is the oldest restaurant in the Dutch city of Rotterdam. Established in 1898, it is a remarkable place shaped by time. A place frequented by prime ministers, artist, entrepreneurs and other people; all welcomed as equal. During the bombing of the city at the beginning of World War II, the restaurant moved to its present location and since that time the basic interior has not changed. During the war it became the secret gathering place for the Rotterdam Students Corps, so it had to be hard core party-proof: until today indestructible, basic cool.


Started in 1898 as the beer trading company ‘De Pijp’, it soon became one of the beacons in the social life of the city of Rotterdam, a famous world harbor. At the beginning of World War II, the heart of the city was devastated by German bombings. Also the original location of De Pijp was demolished and the etablissement found a new homeport at the current location. It was the period that the Rotterdam student Corps was looking for a hiding place. That laid the foundation for what still exists: a gathering place for people of all kind. Over all those years, basically nothing has changed in the interior. Even after a renovation in the 90th, it still looked the same: basic party proof, an open kitchen in the middle and

long tables for the guests on the sides. It was and is as sturdy as simple and trend free. The interior has an atmosphere created by its legendary owners and its visitors, many of whom come back regularly to this place where so many good memories were created. On the walls numbered ‘Pijp’ ties belonging to people who have contributed to the fun. 98 OBJEKT

To visit De Pijp is a unique event: here time stands still doused by alcohol. It is the ideal place for new creative ideas and multicultural friendships: An Institute for Social Traffic. It is simple: you enter and you like it or not, but the most of the people that like it have travelled the world and they know what they are talking about.


Previous pages: them entrance and bar section of ‘De Pijp’ the oldest restaurant in the Dutch city of Rotterdam. The interior has been created by its legendary owners and regular visitors alike: basic and party proof. These pages: the interior of ‘De Pijp’ with its numbered ‘Pijp’ ties on the walls belonging to people who have contributed to this Institute of Social Traffic.

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It is better to create than to learn! Creating is the essence of life. Julius Caesar

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padova impact

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e interior design for this private home, located in the heart of Padua with a panoramic view of the entire city, emphasises the existing spaces and highlights the historical character of the Art Nouveau architecture of the building. e project was designed by Studio Marco Piva. e résident wanted a refined and elegant home environment, contemporary and at the same time, complementing the monumental features of the building with the pre-existing works of art and furnishings. e design included three floors and the panoramic rooop terrace with swimming pool and outdoor kitchen with barbecue. Studio Marco Piva designed the new living room, dining room, show kitchen and working kitchen, studio, music room, laundry, four bedrooms with private bathroom and one guest bathroom. According to the designer, the house reveals its elegant beauty right from the entrance, with a ‘setting that encompasses comfort, style and hospitality, embellished by a luxury that is expressed through the details of the materials and finishes.’ Large backlit metal framed Honey Onyx panels, marble floors with metal joints pace and custom designed cladding and finishes form the basics of the luxurious and monumental character of the interior spaces. In line with the building's architectural features, some emblematic elements have been reproduced, such as the imposing doors, which have been enhanced with large glass panels, and double height, to create an osmotic dialogue with the outside and give the house a, perfectly integrated into its surroundings.


Previous pages The panoramic rooftop terrace of a house in de center of the city of Padova, Italy, recently redesigned by Studio Marco Piva. These pages The interior reveals the quest for elegant beauty with large backlit metal framed Honey Onyx panels, elegant fabrics refined marbles, and fluted wood. Cladding and finishes have been completely custom designed. The collaboration with Lualdi, an historic Italian design company, resulted in the tailor-made doors and boiserie throughout the property, special colors and refined details. Next pages The living area, located on the upper floor, features double height ceilings, is decorated with historical pieces chosen by the client, integrating in a natural and balanced way with the contemporary elements selected by Studio Marco Piva and the existing furnishings. Originals photos: Beppe Raso

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oh la la

Nymphenburg

The intimate domicile is an over 200-year-old cavalier's house in the historic Nymphenburg Schlossrondell near the German town of München. With its fairy-tale charm of an 18th-century private palace, this is the guesthouse of Porzellan Manufaktur Nymphenburg. The architects and interior designers Thomas Mang and Stefan Mauritz, who have been working with the porcelain manufacturer, were commissioned to transform the property into the Langham Nymphenburg Residence.


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The property now serves not only as luxurious accommodation for twelve persons at the crossroad of city and country, but also as a showcase for the many possible interior design using bespoke objects made of porcelain manufacturer. "The overarching design concept involved not only the ubiquity of porcelain in ever new, artistic forms, but also a color scheme that took account of the unique location of Nymphenburg on the outskirts of a vibrant city of München. The key colors are black, white, and shades of green, broken up by colorful accents. The themes of the individual rooms likewise repeatedly make reference to special location of the palace and cavalier's house." explained Thomas Mang. Mang & Mauritz generally followed a key principle when selecting the tradespeople and partner companies for this special project:

"We only engaged artisanal, owner-managed companies and manufacturers with whom we have been working for years to give the rooms an unmistakable, unique authenticity marked by clear craftsmanship.” According to the designers the greatest challenge was to write a new story for the cavalier house: a story that authentically incorporated the house's history and specific location. At the same time they wanted to create an impression of modernity by harmoniously integrating building, communications, and wellness technologies in such a way that they met the strict monument protection requirements and the standards of a five-star hotel at the same time. They left the historical ceilings and stucco, and installed a concealed air-conditioning system and up-to-date technologies for the meeting room under the roof. They also developed an innovative lighting concept for which the ceilings were partially suspended, in collaboration with the renowned Zurich-based lighting company Lichtkompetenz. The designers retained the spacious historical layout with its very high ceilings in order to preserve the building's fundamental grandeur. In total, they i ntegrated four bedrooms, three lounges, a kitchen, and seven bathrooms into the spatial structure.


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THE COLOR OF

TRANQUILITY


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Perched atop a nearly 150-year-old check dam, that forms a perennial rainwater lake, Raas Chhatrasagar is a hospitality property located near the town of Nimaj, in theRajasthan’s Pali district, India. Chhatrasagar is an artificial lake that was formed in the late nineteenth century. A local Rajput noble, Thakur Chhatra Singh built a dam across a tributary to the rain-fed Luni with the intent to provide farmers continuous water supply for irrigation. Replenished by monsoon showers, the reservoir soon transformed the nearby scrubland into a lush arable tract.

Over the years, the property mushroomed into a vast stretch of forest, attracting wildlife and native avifauna, including migratory species. Most farming activities were suspended nearly a couple of decades ago when the owners decided to re-wild the landscape, reserving a small parcel of land for organic farming. The original tourist camp at Chhatrasagar, run by the noble’s grandsons, comprised of an eleven-key tented accommodation, operational from October to March. It was dismantled during the harsh summer months, only to be re-assembled again at the onset of autumn.

Previous pages Tranquility is queen at Raas Chhatrasagar near Nimaj, Rajasthan, India. The hopitality project consist of 16 sixteen tented units and the Baradari restaurant, all designed by Lotus Studio. These pages The interiors of the tented units have a typical local atmosphere with its colorful details, wall papers and textiles. The project was built on a dam in the Chhatrasagar artificial lake, formed in the late nineteenth century. Original photos: Studio Noughts & Crosses, Andre J. Fanthome and Avesh Gaur


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The canvas tents were charming in their simplicity but offered dismal insulation and lacked visual and acoustic privacy. This combination made for a tough business model to sustain. Raas, a local boutique hotel company with a history of turning around difficult projects, was brought on board to chalk out a comprehensive blueprint that would improve and enhance the guest experience, while retaining the essence of what the guests loved about the property. The design team of Studio Lotus, consisting of Ambrish Arora, Ayesha Hussain, Deepesh Harbola and Pranvi Jain was commissioned to reinvent the earlier property providing guests with a year-round opportunity to observe the region’s abundant biodiversity amidst 800 acres of pristine forestland. The design brief called for developing a perennial property resilient to the harsh summers and cold winters of the region. The existing capacity had to be extended to sixteen tented units and public spaces had to be upgraded. The design team created a system of low-impact foundations and lightweight superstructures. They built almost entirely without cement, employing a dry construction methodology and using lime as a binder wherever minimal wet work was required. The site plan lays out the sixteen 'pods' as an arrangement of conjoined suites raised on stilts to preserve the embankment's structural integrity and allowing rainwater to drain freely into the lake.

These pages Designed using a lightweight metal frame, dry mounted with hand-dressed stone infills, the Baradari restaurant is a contemporary expression of the Rajputana twelve-pillared pavilion. It is a reminder of the Art Deco sensibilities of the bygone era of the British Raj. Next pages: One of the tents and the Baradari restaurant.

Designed using a lightweight metal frame, dry mounted with hand-dressed stone in-fills, the Baradari restaurant is a contemporary expression of the Rajputana twelvepillared pavilion. It creates a seamless connection between the two key experiences of the site, the panoramic views of the lake,and the serenity of the forest belt. It does so with its naturally ventilated wraparound verandah extending up to the embankment walls on one side and stepping down onto the deck lining the private, all-season infinity pool on the other. It quietly nods to the Art Deco sensibilities of the bygone era of the British Raj when nobles entertained Western dignitaries with sumptuous feasts and hunting expeditions in tented lodges.


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Designed for living within the elements through the configuration of its layers, Anna Stay is a dynamic wooden home in the shape of an open platform, enabling adjustments to its wooden exterior and glass interior to adapt to any occasion, mood, or weather condition. It was designed by Dutch designer Caspar Schols. Schols: “The idea of Anna Stay is derived from a desire to live with nature's elements, rather than shielding them off. It’s primarily about being outside, and about creating a dynamic interaction between yourself: a cabin as your home and nature.” “Anna's ability to adapt and to change, enables its inhabitants to follow their senses. She gives the freedom to live among an abundance of life, and cultivates a sense of belonging. You become part of everything around you, and I believe that everyone recognizes that feeling deeply from within.” Without any architectural education, Schols began this project in 2016 after his mother asked him to design a garden house. He was looking for a concept to create a dynamic connection between man, nature and home. He envisioned a flexible space where she could read or paint, organize family dinners, and where her grandchildren could visit and put on theatre performances. The original design has been further developed in Anna Stay, aimed at short- or long-term occupancy. The project was awarded the Architizer A+Award

Previous and these pages Anna Stay, a dynamic wooden home designed by Dutch designer Caspar Schols. photos: Tonu Tunnel Jorrit 't Hoen .


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 oard SEATTLE-BASED OLSON KUNDIG ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN STUDIO CREATED A SEVEN-METER TALL WOODEN CONSTRUCTION, A FULL 28 METERS IN DIAMETER. THE CIRCULAR STRUCTURE IS INSPIRED BY THE MORE THAN 4000 YEAR OLD MESOPOTAMIAN STORY OF THE ARK AND ALSO RESEMBLES A SPACESHIP. IT HAS BEEN CONSTRUCTED INSIDE A FORMER WHOLESALE FLOWER MARKET, ACROSS THE STREET FROM THE MAIN MUSEUM BUILDING.

At the center point of the Anoha Children’s World at the Jewish Museum Berlin. are an enormous wooden Ark and 150 different animal sculptures. Original images: Yves Sucksdorff, Kubix Berlin, Hufton & Crow.

ANOHA TAKES THE TORAH STORY OF NOAH’S ARK AS THE POINT OF DEPARTURE FOR A JOURNEY INTO THE FUTURE. AT THE CENTER POINT OF THE CHILDREN’S WORLD ARE AN ENORMOUS WOODEN ARK AND 150 DIFFERENT ANIMAL SCULPTURES.



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INSPIRED BY THE PIONEERING VISION OF NOAH’S ARK AT THE SKIRBALL CULTURAL CENTER IN LOS ANGELES, WHICH UNDERSCORES THE IMPORTANCE OF DIVERSITY, COMMUNITY, AND SECOND CHANCES, ANOHA, THE CHILDREN’S WORLD OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM BERLIN, WILL GIVE THE MUSEUM’S YOUNGEST GUESTS A SENSE OF HOPE AND POSSIBILITY THROUGH A WORLD OF IMAGINATION AND PLAY.

ANOHA IS DEEPLY ROOTED IN ‘TIKKUN OLAM’, OR ‘WORLD REPAIR’, IN JEWISH TEACHING, THAT HIGHLIGHTS STEWARDSHIP OF THE NATURAL WORLD AND EACH OTHER AS AN INHERENT HUMAN RESPONSIBILITY.

Images from the playful Children’s World of Anoha, as part of the The Children’s World of the Jewish Museum Berlin. It was designed by Olson Kundig architecture and design from Seattle and constructed inside a former wholesale flower market in Berlin. At the center point is an enormous wooden Ark with 150 different animal sculptures.

INTERACTIVE EXHIBITS PLACED ALONG AN INTUITIVE VISITOR PATHWAY INVITE CHILDREN TO CARE FOR THE ANIMALS, ENCOURAGING THEM TO WORK INDEPENDENTLY AND AS A GROUP. BY EXPLORING AND EXPERIENCING A VARIETY OF ANIMAL HABITATS, CHILDREN ARE FURTHER LED TO CONSIDER DIVERSE PERSPECTIVES. “WE INVITE CHILDREN TO TRANSLATE THE STORY OF NOAH’S ARK IT INTO THEIR OWN

LIVES AND TAKE IT A STEP FURTHER. THEY ARE THE LEAD ACTORS AND ACTIVELY SHAPE WHAT HAPPENS,” SAYS DR. ANE KLEINE-ENGEL, HEAD OF THE ANOHA CHILDREN’S WORLD AT THE JEWISH MUSEUM BERLIN. HETTY BERG, THE DIRECTOR OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM BERLIN ADDED: “THE CHILDREN’S WORLD IS ENVISIONED AS A PLACE OF ENCOUNTER BETWEEN GENERATIONS, RELIGIONS, AND CULTURES, FOR PEOPLE FROM KREUZBERG, BERLIN, AND BEYOND. ANOHA IS A BUILDING FOR A STORY: THE STORY OF NOAH’S ARK.”


“We designed Anoah through the lens of a child’s experience,

allowing them to engage

with important cultural issues in creative,

age-appropriate ways.” Alan Maskin, Design Principal, Olson Kundig

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The project in Port Elizabeth, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines was named for the nautical-inspired tensile roofs, which are a contextual response to the Grenadines' sailing culture and environmental building systems: The Sail House. It consists of a dappled array of structures, consisting of a primary residence and several guesthouses. It was designed by international award-winning sustainable architect, David Hertz, of Los Angeles, CA.


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David Hertz: "The main inspiration for the Sail House was a wooden boat with its masts and sails, the expressed stainless steel rigging and hardware, which is referenced in the home." Since construction in the Caribbean can be difficult with its limited resources, the buildings were prefabricated and flat-packed and send to the island in 15 shipping containers. The goal of the shipping process was to maximize density and efficiency with zero waste. The prefabricated structure was set upon a concrete box that acts as a cistern for water collection and anchors the residence to the ground. It allows the aluminum beams to be cantilevered off the base, providing minimal impact on the jungle.

David Hertz: "Sustainability was one of the main goals of the Sail House project. The non-corrosive and termite-resistant aluminum structural system was wrapped in reclaimed ironwood planks recycled from an abandoned pier in Borneo, as were the plank floors, decks, and the vertical louvers that control low sun and prevailing breezes." Other interior/exterior finishes were panels made of woven palm, coconut shell fragments, and many other natural, highly crafted surfaces created by Javanese and Balinese craftsmen.

Architect: David Hertz, David Hertz Architects, Studio of Environmental Architecture House Fabrication: TomaHouse Principal Consulting on Design: David Hertz FAIA Project Architect: Eric Lindeman Project Designers: Stephan Schilli / TomaHouse Structural, MEP & Envelope Engineering: TomaHouse Landscape Architect: By owner Lighting Designer: TomaHouse Climate Consultant: David Hertz Architects,inc. Photos: Nicola Cornwell


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