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the gazette isle of wight

Historic sites get extra protection NEARLY 140 buildings, structures and gardens of special local historic, architectural or aesthetic interest are to be given extra protection by the IW Council. They are all to be included in a ‘Local List’ drawn up by an independent review panel comprising experts in local history, design and horticulture. Inclusion in the list does not change any designation that already applies but provides a locally held and agreed register of buildings, the historic or architectural significance of which must be considered against any development proposals submitted to the local authority. The list includes war memorials, traditional red telephone boxes, public greens and parks, private gardens and well-known local buildings and structures. Among the Island buildings included are East Cowes Town Hall and Zion Chapel in Ryde, while parks and open spaces include Rylstone Gardens in Shanklin and Church Litten in Newport.

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32-page Lifestyle supplement: centre pullout

Island braced for tourism bonanza Whitecliff Bay’s Charlotte Jones: getting ready for an extremely busy summer season

THE ISLAND is gearing up for a summer bonanza as holidaymakers continue to turn their backs on foreign destinations in favour of value-for-money breaks closer to home. Bookings for static caravans and chalets on the Island reached near-record levels for the Easter weekend, and the indications are that the boom will continue through the year, peaking during the school holidays from midJuly until the end of August. There was hardly a caravan or chalet to be had anywhere on the Island over Easter as mainlanders made the short trip across the Solent rather than queue for hours at airports, only to find the value of the pound against the euro meant a very expensive getaway. Kevin Danvill, sales and marketing manager at Gurnard Pines Holiday Park, said: “It’s fantastic. This site has never seen anything like it before – even when it was the old holiday camp

By Peter White

prior to 2006. “The previous best ever occupancy on average over a year has been 36 per cent, but this year we are already up to 42 per cent. We have been turning people away, and although we have a few vacancies for the summer, my advice is that if people don’t book early they will not get in.” Samantha Towle, in holiday sales at Whitecliff Bay Holiday Park, near Bembridge, summed up the buoyant mood. She said: “We have around 300 units on our site, and we did not have one free over Easter. “In the end we found ourselves turning people away. We could have done with a few more units, although there were a few places available on our camping sites. And so far the response for the summer has been excellent.” Charlotte Jones, holiday sales adviser at Whitecliff Bay, added: “We are much busier than we

‘Wight Sun’ set to launch HOPES of restoring a fully operational ferry service between Yarmouth and Lymington have taken another significant step forward. Ferry company Wightlink have taken delivery of the third vessel they will shortly be using for their regular car ferry service between the Island and the mainland. The new arrival, ‘Wight Sun’, has sailed in after making the long journey from Croatia, where it was built. It will operate in conjunction with ‘Wight Light’ and ‘Wight Sky’, which Wightlink took delivery of late last year. The service has been beset with problems since Wightlink announced their new fleet – much larger than

their predecessors – would be making the 35-minute journey between Yarmouth and Lymington. The company have had to undergo exhaustive trials at sea and in Lymington Harbour amid fears that they could have had a detrimental effect on the estuary and harm the environment. The ferries have also been subjected to speed restrictions. As a result Wightlink were forced to alter their timetable to an hourly service rather than every 45 minutes, to allow more time for loading and unloading. But the arrival of ‘Wight Sun’ should soon result in the service returning to its original schedule in time for the summer influx of holidaymakers.

were last year, and we are getting ready for a very busy time. The phones haven’t stopped ringing.” It was the same story for Island View Holidays, who run Rookley Country Park, Colwell Bay Park, Field Lane, Hill Grove and Bay Close Court in Freshwater Bay. Office manager Liz Jasper said: “In all we have just over 300 units, and they were all full. And the summer bookings so far are as good as they have been for some time. They are already up on last year. “Hopefully people are again realising that they can come to the Island and have a really good value-for-money holiday.” A spokesman for Old Mill Caravan Park in St Helens added: “We have struggled a bit in July, just before the school holidays for the past few years, but this time it is looking far more promising. Bookings are certainly on the increase.” Continued on page 2


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the gazette Contact Details newsdesk: (01983) 409928 Fax: (01983) 404189 email: newsdesk@iwgazette.co.uk address: The Isle of Wight Gazette Unit B18 Spithead Business Centre Newport Road Sandown Isle of Wight PO36 9PH

sales: 01983 402599 Head of Media Sales: Laura Webb James Rolfe Kim Stent Roxy Vaughn James Ward

Published by: The Isle of Wight Gazette Ltd Editor: Martin Potter Reporters: Jamie White, Peter White, Richard Collins, Justin Gladdis News Editor: Paul Rainford Features Editor: Jo Macaulay Distribution: Isle of Wight Distribution Ltd. Design: Colin Clarke, Richard Heaven

Supporting the Earl Mountbatten Hospice through your generous donations when you pick up your free copy. * (Front page) Print runs may vary from issue to issue

Issue 19

April 17 2009

Friday APRIL 17 2009

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Fossils boost for museum A FOSSIL collector from Cowes is handing over more than 1,000 of his prize speciments to the Dinosaur Isle Museum in Sandown. Andy Yule, 61, has been collecting fossils from across the Island since 1970 and has a unique range of finds including fossilised spiders, feathers, crane flies and ants alongside remains of crocodiles and turtles. Parts of the collection will go on permanent display, while some will also be used for educational purposes at the museum, which has its own teaching facilities for visiting school parties. Most the finds have been discovered on the Island’s north-west coastline between Gurnard and Yarmouth. Work is continuing at Dinosaur Isle to individually identify and mark each of the fossils. Mr Yule said: “I am sure many people, especially children during their lessons, will get enjoyment out of the fossils and I look forward to seeing them on display. I could have sold the entire collection for a tidy sum to a mainland museum but that would’ve deprived the Island of many parts of its history.” The collection further reinforces the Island’s reputation as Europe’s most important location for prehistoric finds. IW Council deputy leader George Brown said: “I wish to thank Andy for his generosity in giving the museum his collection.”

Andy Yule: a fossil collector on the Island since 1970

No compromise on beer tax - MP ISLAND MP Andrew Turner has revealed that the Government is poised to go ahead with its plans to increase the tax on beer, even though his Conservative party have asked for a compromise deal. In our last edition, The Gazette highlighted the effect a tax increase could have on Island pubs, clubs and hotels – an issue led by the Island branch of Camra (The Campaign for Real Ale) – and Mr Turner was asked for his support in keeping taxes down. He replied: “The Government appears to be adamant they will

not lower the tax on alcohol. It seems their decision was made using information supplied to them by various parts of the alcohol industry and its own spending priorities. “The Conservative party feel differently to the Government and believes a better solution can be found. The Conservatives propose increasing taxes of alcopops and super strength beers and ciders, while reducing the taxes on low alcohol beers and ciders. “This would mean 90 per cent of alcoholic drinks being unaffected by the tax proposals.”

Continued from front page But it wasn’t just bargain breaks that brought the tourists flocking in. Robert Thompson, owner and award-winning head chef of the Hambrough Hotel in Ventnor, reported: “I have only been here eight months, but I have been told this is the busiest Easter the hotel has ever experienced, by far. “Bookings for the summer are up vastly on this time last year, and I feel the Island is finally pushing past the bucket-and-spade image. People who have not been here for many years are returning. It seems the Island is very much back in fashion.” The eagerly anticipated summer influx of tourists will provide good news for many pubs, restaurants, hotels and other holiday-related businesses that have been battling their way through the deep recession. The adverse weather put a dampener on much of last summer, and although the early part of Easter was damp and murky, it’s now fingers crossed that the sun will shine all summer, and the Island will re-establish itself as one of the country’s top holiday destinations.


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Food group’s funding axed THE FUTURE of Taste of the Wight, the organisation that champions local food producers on the Island, looks in doubt as a substantial chunk of its funding has been cut by the IW Council. According to a council spokesman, the IW Council spent over £135,000 supporting Taste of the Wight projects and the associated Green Island Awards last year, which was nearly double the original budgets set aside for both initiatives. The council claims that it had expected Taste of the Wight to have attracted sufficient funding from the private sector by now to survive without public money, but that this had not proved to be the case. Cllr George Brown, IW Council cabinet member for economy, leisure, planning and property, said: “We will investigate whether any

individual elements could continue without direct council support and we would be happy to explore any such possibilities with interested parties.” Taste of the Wight is probably best known for its quarterly magazine, a lavishly produced publication which carried little advertising. Its editor, Alix Robinson, said: “It is true the council have cut their funding but the Taste team are working hard to find alternative solutions to maintain Taste of the Wight’s key projects, including the magazine.”

Appley celebration planned for Armed Forces Day PREPARATIONS are being made for the Island’s contribution to Armed Forces Day, a new national day of celebration that has been introduced by the Ministry of Defence this year to honour Britain’s armed forces of the past, present and future. The celebrations will take place in Appley Park, Ryde on Saturday June 27. The day will not only include the traditional Veteran’s Parade but also an afternoon of musical entertainment, military displays and activities for all the family. The day will conclude with evening proms in the park with the Trident Concert Band followed by a fireworks display. Armed Forces Day is intended to honour not only those who have served their country in the past but also those who are currently doing so and those who plan to do so in the

future. The Cadet Services will be heavily involved in the day, taking part in displays and sporting competitions. There will also be an opportunity for young people to find out about careers in the armed forces, with representatives from all the services present on the day. Chairman of the Veterans Committee, which is organising the event, Cllr Roger Mazillius, said: “We hope people will come together to show their appreciation and support of our armed forces and enjoy the full day of events we have planned. “It is hoped the day will not only honour servicemen and women but will also inspire a new generation and raise awareness of the wide range of career opportunities the armed forces can offer.” The event is being led by the Royal British Legion Isle

Eight hurt in road crash POLICE are appealing for witnesses after a road accident in Apse Heath left eight people needing hospital treatment. The accident happened on Newport Road near to the entrance of Sandown Airport, and involved a red Citröen C3, a blue Ford Fiesta and a silver Peugeot 206. A 50-year-old woman from Sandown had to be cut free from the wreckage of the Peugeot by firefighters, and was treated for a suspected neck injury. The passenger in the Peugeot, an 18-year-old woman from Sandown, received whiplash and bruising. Both were released from hospital after treatment. The driver of the red Citröen C3, a 71-year-old man from West Sussex, received chest and whiplash injuries. One of the passengers, a 60-year-old woman from West Sussex, was believed to have suffered a broken sternum. Other passengers including a 36-year-old woman from Wales, and two girls, aged eight and 11, all received minor whiplash injuries. The driver of the blue Ford

Fiesta, a 52-year-old woman from Wiltshire, also received whiplash injuries. All three emergency services were called to the scene and the road remained closed for two

Armed Forces Day: the schedule 10am: Military vehicle display opens (North Walk)

12.30pm: Cowes Royal British Legion Band (Appley Park Stage) 2pm: Parade commences (North Walk)

3pm: Start of Cadet competition (Appley Beach) 3.30pm: Wight Diamonds Marching Band (Appley Park Stage)

4pm: 165 Regiment Territorial Army beach landings of Wight County and Ryde Branch with the support of the IW Council and various sponsors, including Ryde Town Council and Wightlink. Local businesses are also contribut-

Sea rescue display by Ryde Inshore Rescue (timing tbc) 4.30pm: Vectis Corps of Drums (Appley Park Stage) 7.30pm: Proms in the Park with the Trident Concert Band (Appley Park stage)

10pm: Fireworks finale (approximate time) Flypasts by various RAF formations will take place throughout the day.

ing to the event in a variety of ways. It is requested that all armed forces personnel attending the event wear full uniform and medals.

Men charged after hotel thefts

DETECTIVES working as part of Hampshire Constabulary’s Operation hours while the area was cleared. Nemesis have charged two men after non-related burglaries at hotels in Anyone who witnessed the Sandown and Ryde. collision is asked to phone Mark Anthony Cording, 30, of FairShanklin Roads Policing Unit on 101 or 0845 045 4545, or call field Gardens, Sandown, was charged Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111. with one count of burglary, plus two counts of theft from a motor vehicle, and one count of vehicle interference. The first charge follows an inves-

The crash scene at Apse Heath. Picture by Jamie White

(timing tbc)

tigation by the IW Priority Crime Unit (PCU) into a burglary at The Friends Hotel, Hill Street, Sandown in February. Detectives have also charged James Robert Haigh, 29, of George Street, Ryde, with one count of burglary. The charge follows an investigation into a burglary at the Royal York Hotel, George Street, Ryde, in March.


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Apollo theatre rocks for local charities

THE APOLLO Theatre in Newport is staging a charity music showcase on Saturday (April 18) featuring some the Island’s top young acts. The Major Tones, a four-piece who reached the finals of the Livewired rock competition will be doing a set, while new band The Golden Strands will be performing a combination of their own material and some Beatles covers. On the solo side, expect a special guest appearance from Laura Groves, a winner of Rock Idol, who will be accompanied by piano and percussion, playing songs from the likes of Mariah Carey and Norah Jones. Tickets cost £3, with all proceeds going to the two nominated charities, the Earl Mountbatten Hospice and Cardiac Risk in the Young.

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Here come the girls

IT’S already being heralded as ‘Girls’ Night Out’ after a host of top female names were revealed as Big Top performers on the Friday of this year’s IW Festival. Eighties girl group Bananarama will be joined by the likes of Ladyhawke, Alesha Dixon, The Noisettes, Beverley Knight, Eddi Reader and Pixie Lott, aimed at getting everyone into the festival spirit! Although there have been changes from the original line-up over time, Bananarama’s name has been synonymous with great pop music for around 25 years, and have enjoyed ten top ten UK singles and a US number one. New Zealand’s finest, Ladyhawke, RENOWNED stamp dealers Stanley Gibbons will will bring her mix of modern electro be holding a buying roadshow on the Island later pop and vintage disco elements to the this month. Big Top, and Strictly Come Dancing The London-based company’s specialist team winner Alesha Dixon will bring a will be at the Best Western New Holmwood Hotel, different spin to the evening’s affair Queens Road, Egypt Point, Cowes on April 28 from as she skips her way through ballads, 9am to 1.30pm. frenetic dance tracks, party numbers They will examine anything philatelic, includand hummable hits. ing postal history and old correspondences and are With The Noisettes, it’s always best particularly interested in buying better items of the to expect the unexpected, so festivalBritish Commonwealth and Britain. goers are being told to get ready for Appointment times can be booked by calling 0800 a mix of ragged, energetic, indie rock 731 8052 and asking for the buying and processing and soulful blues. department. Beverley Knight has become widely admired as a vocalist and songwriter with four gold-selling albums and 12 top 40 hits. Beverley will be taking to the Big Top stage to perform a variety of her classic hits and showcase some of her new ones. Scottish singer-songwriter Eddi Reader is also set to light up the Big Top stage as she continues to fly the flag for folk and traditional music. The former lead singer of Fairground Attraction scored a surprise hit with her album ‘Eddi Reader Sings The Songs of Robert Burns’, which beau-

Date for philatelists

By Peter White tifully re-worked Burns’ traditional classics such as ‘Auld Lang Syne’. Essex newcomer Pixie Lott will kick the Girls’ Night Out off in style as she performs her soulful pop and R&B. At only 18, this soul diva is already being tipped for great things. ITV2 has been named at the exclusive TV broadcaster for this year’s Festival, and Look magazine will also be a partner, setting up their Look Pamper Parlour in Strawberry Fields. The artists so far confirmed are: • Thursday for Campers, Big Top: The Human League, King meets Queen, The Complete Stone Roses. • Friday, Main Stage: The Prodigy, Basement Jaxx, Pendulum, The Ting Tings. • Friday Big Top: Bananarama, Ladyhawke, Alesha Dixon, The Noisettes, Beverley Knight, Eddi Reader, Pixie Lott. • Saturday, Main Stage: Stereophonics, Razorlight, Maximo Park, White Lies, The View, The Rifles, The Zombies, Paolo Nutini. • Saturday, Big Top: The Australian Pink Floyd Show, Ultravox, Jessie Evans, The Arcadian Kicks, Deborah Hodgson. • Sunday, Main Stage: Neil Young, Pixies, Simple Minds, The Pigeon Detectives, The Script, Goldie Lookin’ Chain, Judy Collins, Arno Carstens. • Sunday, Big Top: The Charlatans, TBC. The Festival takes place from June 12 to 14 at Seaclose Park, Newport. Tickets are still on sale and for more information check out www.isleofwightfestival.com.

Beverley Knight (above) and Ladyhawke: heading for the festival’s Big Top

From Brading to Oman Cyclists sought

for charity ride

By Jamie White THE WEATHER may have warmed up on the Island over the past couple of weeks but you can be sure it’s still positively Arctic-like compared to where Jan Dixcey will soon be heading. Mrs Dixcey, from Brading, is celebrating after winning a dream holiday to Oman, on the south-east coast of the Arabian Peninsula. She entered an online competition organised by Oman Air to win the luxurious four-day trip and was understandably delighted when she heard she had won. “I was just surfing the Internet and saw the competition and thought I would give it go. Obviously I never thought that I’d win. “I have entered a few competitions before but never really won anything. Money has been really tight and we had to postpone the holiday that we were due to go on at the end of last year,” said Mrs Dixcey. The lottery-style draw gives away three package holidays a month over the period of six months, and Mrs Dixcey has been told that she will be accommodated in either a 5- or 6-star hotel in the capital, Muscat. “The hotels are supposed to be amazing. We fly from Heathrow to Muscat with Oman Air. I haven’t

Jan Dixcey: dream holiday

flown with them before, and that is something I am looking forward to as well. The food is supposed to be excellent – and they serve alcohol on board, which is always handy!” added Mrs Dixcey. Oman boasts beautiful beaches, atmospheric markets, fabulous shopping centres and various historical sights. ‘I just can’t wait to get there now,” said Mrs Dixcey.

FOLLOWING Team GB’s recent successes at the World Track Championships, Breast Cancer Campaign is calling on all Island cycling fans to follow in our champions’ tyre tracks by signing up to its London to Paris bike ride. Running from 21–24 August 2009, the challenge covers nearly 200 miles in just three days, ending in a celebratory welcome underneath the Eiffel Tower. Sarah England, Breast Cancer Campaign’s events executive, said: “The London to Paris bike ride is perfect for anyone looking for a new physical challenge and is a great way to meet new friends while exploring the French countryside. Plus the money raised will help the charity beat breast cancer by funding innovative world-class research.” Participants are requested to register by May 2009. If you would like more information about the London to Paris bike ride or any other of Campaign’s challenge events contact the events team on 020 7749 3700, email treks@breastcancercampaign.org or visit their website www.breastcancercampaign.org

Bowling with Elvis THE WIGHT Elvis will be in the building on Saturday (April 18) doing his stuff to raise money for the InterIsland Bowls Tournament 2009.

The concert takes place at the IW Community Club, Park Road, Cowes starting at 8pm. Tickets are available from Alec Soars on 280252


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Yachts guru at UKSA WORLD-RENOWNED yacht designer Ron Holland is to help raise money for Cowes-based sailing charity UKSA with a talk there to mark the 35th anniversary of his company, Ron Holland Design. Mr Holland has donated his time to visit UKSA to talk about the world of yacht design and the inspiration that led to the creation of his latest custom yacht, the 190ft performance ketch, Ethereal. This event, on May 14 at 6pm, is open to every one with an interest in yacht design. Entry to the event is £10, with all proceeds from this event supporting UKSA’s work with young people, inspiring self-confidence and self reliance through sailing and other watersports. Ron Holland Design is known for its innovation in yacht design – from ocean racing yachts to superyachts and state-offoundation stone on the new site. He the-art megayachts – as was presented with a silver trowel well as its eco-friendly and mallet to mark the occasion. design expertise. Owing to the rain the company then To learn more about rapidly retired to the marquee where UKSA’s work with the Bishop gave his address. young people, visit After the Second World War St www.uksa.org/changMark’s was closed for 23 years, being inglives finally reopened and rededicated at To book a place at this Easter 1970. In December 1984 St event call UKSA on Mark’s was finally consecrated. 203034 or register at For further details of the centenary www.uksa.org/ronholweekend contact Carolyn Bennison land. on 882783.

St Mark’s centenary plans WOOTTON’S ‘new church’, St Mark’s, is to celebrate its centenary with two separate weekend celebrations. On April 25-26 a patronal weekend marks the centenary of the laying of the foundation stone, with an evening social event on the Saturday and a special St Mark’s Day service on the Sunday conducted by Rev Canon Howard Barker. The August Bank Holiday weekend sees the centenary of the dedication of the church, with the church

hosting an exhibition looking at the history and future of St Mark’s on the Saturday and Monday, and a centenary service on the Sunday hosted by the Very Rev David Brindley, Dean of Portsmouth. Of the two church buildings in Wootton, the Norman church of St Edmund is perhaps the better known. But the Edwardian, brick-built church of St Mark’s in Station Road has been recognised as a fine building in its own right by architectural experts – Pevsner’s Guide

to the buildings of the Isle of Wight describes the interior as ‘striking’ and ‘remarkably original’. The church was built in 1909 to serve those residents for whom the distance to Arreton, then the mother church, was too great. The project was initiated by a group of wealthy and influential residents with the support of the Bishop of Southampton. Following a period of fundraising, on April 29 1909, in heavy rain, the Bishop of Southampton laid the

Know your Wight Island curiosities explained

No. 5: The Yarborough Monument By Paul Rainford

AH, THOSE were the days. In the nineteenth century, there were no worries about namby-pamby issues such as planning; if people with power and influence wanted to erect a bloomin’ great obelisk on one of the higher points of the Island they would jolly well go ahead and do it. And that’s just what happened on Bembridge Down, on the eastern tip of the Island. Lord Yarborough was a naval man and a very prominent personage indeed around these parts. He liked to spend his summers on the Island, but not in some cosy self-catering cottage – Appledurcombe House was his holiday pad. By all accounts, Lord Yarborough was a bit of a disciplinarian – the crew on his ships had to sign an agreement to

be flogged as and when necessary. His most famous ship was the ‘Falcon’, which was launched in 1826. A year earlier he had been appointed Commodore of the Royal Yacht Squadron at Cowes and during his reign the yachting scene on the Island went from strength to strength. When he died, in 1846 on board the ‘Kestrel’ off the coast of Spain, the Royal Yacht Squadron Committee put up £200 towards the cost of erecting a nautical monument to his memory somewhere appropriate on the Island. And so, in 1849, the Yarborough Monument, all 75 feet of it, came into being. Inscriptions on two sides of the monument, which can be seen from miles around, detail the many and varied qualities of the man – though unfortunately what looks suspiciously like a spelling

mistake appears in one line. (‘He was eminent in fostering and encouraging by his example and liberality all that was calculated to improve the science of naval architecture and to advance the maritime intrests of his country.’) In 1867 another Lord, Lord Palmerston, was busy fortifying the Island against the threat of Napoleonic invasion, and he got the monument moved a few hundred yards further east to its present position close to the Culver Haven pub so that he could build the moated Bembridge Fort. The base of the monument provides a great place to sit with a cup of tea and a sandwich from the nearby café, particularly if you’ve struggled up the hill on foot from Bembridge or Yaverland. It’s what Lord Yarborough would have wanted.


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A new beat for Dave EAST Cowes has a new bobby on the beat. PC Dave Cooper has joined the East Cowes safer neighbourhoods team as beat officer to work alongside Sergeant Ged Armitage, PCSO Steve Anker and PCSO Derek Howard. PC Cooper was born on the Island and has six years’ experience as a police officer, including spells in CID and the priority crime unit. He replaces PC Andy McDonald, who has been promoted to temporary sergeant for one of the Island’s targeted patrol teams, which respond to 999 calls and emergencies.

PC Cooper said: “I’ve lived on the Island all my life and I’m keen to maintain it as one of the safest places to live in the country. My role as beat officer for East Cowes is to help make sure policing responds to the needs and concerns of local residents. I’m in contact with the community through regular patrols, beat surgeries, plus parish and town council meetings. Residents have consistent opportunities to influence the action we take to tackle their priorities.” The East Cowes safer neighbourhoods team has completed a comprehensive ‘street mapping’ exercise in the town

‘Non-urgent’ incidents system is launched

A NEW appointments system has been established on the Island for residents wanting to see a police officer on a non-urgent matter. The appointments system has been introduced by Hampshire Constabulary to provide an improved service to victims of crime and to make better use of available resources. Appointments can be made at a time that is convenient for the victim and which allows the officer more time for investigating. This, it is claimed, should ensure a better service as well as improving the opportunity to resolve crimes. It will also free up officers to attend urgent 999 calls. The new processes are initially aimed at victims and witnesses of non-urgent incidents that do not require immediate attendance but need to be investigated. During a six-week pilot in Southampton and Basingstoke, more than 500 appointments were given to people who had become a victim of burglary, theft, threats, assaults or anti-social behaviour. If the reported incident is suitable to be dealt with through a scheduled appointment, the call taker at the force enquiry centre will book the appointment with a local police officer at a time convenient to the caller and, if possible, within 48 hours. Appointments are mainly held at police stations but officers will make home visits if required. Although the availability of appointments may vary, every police station will offer day and evening appointments throughout the week and on weekends. There will be dedicated officers attending these appointments to minimise the risk of them being called to a major incident or life threatening situation and avoid cancelling appointments. Assistant Chief Constable John Campbell said: “The scheduled appointments have proved to be immensely effective and popular in the pilot areas, and feedback from the public has shown that they really appreciate this flexible approach.”

recently. Officers carried out surveys of residents in specific streets and roads to gather more detailed information about the issues affecting their lives. The top three priorities for East Cowes are reducing traffic congestion around the Red Funnel ferry terminal, addressing a lack of available car parking spaces and creating more facilities in the town for all age groups. The police are working with the IW Council, East Cowes Town Council, Whippingham Parish Council, the South-East England Development Agency (SEEDA), and ferry company Red Funnel to tackle these issues.



Sergeant Ged Armitage added: “Anti-social behaviour, which includes youth nuisance and underage drinking, has been reduced to the fourth community priority from number one last year. This shows the progress made in making East Cowes a safer place to live and work. This type of nuisance behaviour is my team’s main concern, and we will continue our efforts in the coming year to reduce the fear of crime this type of behaviour brings.” The East Cowes Safer Neighbourhoods Team can be contacted by phoning 101 or 0845 045 45 45.

PC Dave Cooper: responding to local needs

us your Lottery lets rangers Tellnews! come out to play A NEW ‘play ranger’ scheme for children and young people is to be made available thanks to lottery funding secured by the IW Council. A team of play rangers will be offering a range of free after-school and holiday activities in the Island’s parks and open spaces. The sessions operate on an ‘open access’ policy, so no booking is required. Children simply need to turn up at the sessions, which will be advertised locally through schools and community groups. The activities organised by the play rangers are designed to get children and young people active through innovative team games and everyone taking part will be actively encouraged to create new activities for everyone to share. The sessions will also encourage creativity through arts and crafts, sport and general active games. The work carried out by the play rangers, who are fully funded by the Big Lottery Fund, will contribute towards the objectives of Every Child Matters, a Government initiative to improve the health and wellbeing of young people across Britain. Play rangers aim to encourage children and young people to make greater use of the open spaces in their communities. The play ranger team will also be part of the Play Partner-

ship, a group responsible for using the £1.1 million Play Building grant secured earlier this year to develop at least 22 new or refurbished play areas on the Island. Alongside these projects, the council has also secured funding for an ‘I Play’ facility which will take the form of a brightly coloured mobile bus. It will contain mobile ITC equipment and a variety of toys and will travel around the Island encouraging children and young people to play, with a particular focus on promoting fully accessible opportunities for all. The scheme is being co-ordinated by the council’s play development officer and Fraser McDermott from the Riverside Centre in Newport and will be fully operational this summer. Carly Kennen, IW Council play development officer, who is leading the team of Play Rangers, said: “I am currently visiting schools and youth organisations to find out what sorts of activities young people would like to get involved in. I am beginning to hold taster sessions at schools across the Island before starting the after school sessions in the summer. Soon we will be looking to recruit the additional play rangers, which will allow us to get started in the Island’s open spaces.”

Crews unite in charity car wash THE CREWS at Shanklin Community Fire Station and Sandown & Shanklin Inshore Lifeboat raised almost £900 by clubbing together in a charity car wash. It is the first time the two crews have joined forces to raise money for both services, as well as Shanklin Youth football club and the IW Air Ambulance. SSIL coxswain Mark

Birch was delighted with the amount raised. “It was fantastic getting both emergency services working together. We do a lot of fundraising, but this was by far the most fun that we have had doing it! Everyone really enjoyed themselves. It was great working with the fire crew and hopefully we will be able to do it again sometime in the near future.”

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the gazette  

Friday APRIL 17 2009

Send your news to newsdesk@iwgazette.co.uk or tel. (01983) 409928

Shanklin hit the high note

SHANKLIN Town Youth Brass Band has swept the board at a competition on the mainland, returning victorious having won all the prizes in their section.

Fundraising efforts earlier in the year had enabled the band to travel to Hove for the Southern Counties Amateur Band Association’s Annual Spring Contest. And despite stiff competition from Hangleton Youth Band, the youngsters won the March Prize with a rousing rendition of ‘Barnard Castle’ and completed their victory by winning the section with a great performance of the Four Cities Symphony. Further success followed with solo cornet player Ashley Wicks receiving the Best Instrumentalist award. Musical director Malcolm Lewis, who also scooped the Conductor’s Prize, said: “I am so proud of them all. Their hard work in raising the money to attend the concert and their dedication in regularly attending rehearsals has really paid off.” The success of the Youth Band complemented the achievements of the Senior Band who have recently gained promotion within SCABA and now play in the Second Section. The Senior Band came fifth overall on the day. With contesting over until the autumn, both bands are about to begin a busy summer season at their home at Rylstone Gardens, Shanklin and across the Island. Performance dates for both Youth and Senior Bands are available on the website www.shanklintownbrassband.org.

Shanklin Town Youth Brass Band with their musical director Malcolm Lewis

Musical Maggie up for award Above: Maggie Carberry leads one of her Caterpillar Music groups. Below: two Caterpillar regulars having fun while learning with the help of puppets, drums and mums

A ST HELENS woman who offers music and movement classes for preschool children on the Island has been nominated for a national award. Maggie Carberry runs Caterpillar Music, a series of children’s groups that offer under-fives the chance to learn through the use of puppets, percussion instruments and singing in nurseries and other pre-school venues. Now a number of parents and grandparents who bring children to the groups have nominated her for Most Outstanding Activity or Class Leader at the whatson4littleones. co.uk website. The judging is already in progress, with shortlisted nominees being notified next month and the awards ceremony taking place in Harrogate in June. “For me it’s so nice because I feel like the parents are saying thank you,” said Maggie. “They are really recognising the benefits from coming along to the weekly sessions.” Maggie started the business in 2006, when she moved down to the Island from London. Three years on, it is very much a full time job. “I started out with about four or five classes but over the years it’s just grown and grown. Nurseries see the huge advantages of me coming in, because what I do is not just sitting in a circle singing, there’s a lot of movement involved as well.” Maggie did not have a background in teaching but believes rapport with the children is more important than academic qualifications. “I’ve always had a genuine love of children and

By Paul Rainford I think that’s really important when you do something like this. It’s not just jumping about and being loud, you’ve got to have a real affinity with children.” Maggie currently holds classes in Cowes, Newport, Sandown and Bembridge, and is planning to open another soon in Nettlestone. The classes give children a chance to develop vital social skills, as well as have fun, believes Maggie. “Some children are straight in there, but with some of them it takes them a week or two, so they’re learning lots of confidence and social skills as well – and they’re learning to share.” The parents also benefit from the sessions, says Maggie, as they get a chance to extend their social network. “I have lots of mums come along who have just moved from the mainland and don’t know anybody. The benefits for them are just endless.” Aran Testa, who takes two of her children to the Caterpillar classes, said: “What impresses me most about Maggie is her natural ability to interact and encourage the children. Her never ending energy and enthusiasm keeps the children’s attention throughout the class, meaning all participate, even my seven-month-old.” Jenny Hulse, who takes her grandson Leo Jeffery along to the group, added: “During our two years at Caterpillar Music, I have seen a shy toddler grow into a self-confident little boy. He has an impressive repertoire of songs too!”


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9

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gazette news

Recognition for drink campaign

Work starts on the cover-building roof of Newport Roman Villa, which will help protect the historic mosaics and baths

THE ‘Know Your Limits’ campaign run by the IW Council in partnership with the NHS is being featured on a national website commissioned by the Department of Health and Alcohol Concern. ‘Know Your Limits’ was run across the Island during the Christmas/New Year period with the aim of promoting knowledge on alcohol units, awareness of alcohol-related problems and a ‘sensible drinking’ message. The campaign spanned seven weeks and a different theme was chosen each week. The campaign is being featured on the website of the Hub of Commissioned Alcohol Projects and Policies (HubCAPP). The organisation is an online resource of local alcohol initiatives throughout England. The Hub has a particular focus on capturing the policies, decisions and strategic history that enabled projects to come into existence. There may be further recognition later in the year, as the campaign has been entered for the ‘Campaign of the Quarter’ Award, which is run through the NHS. The project on the Island will compete against other campaigns from across the country. Dawn Cousins, IW Council Cabinet member for health, housing and community wellbeing, said: “The Know Your Limits campaign was informative and was heavily advertised across the Island to a wide range of people. To me, it is no surprise the scheme has received national recognition.”

New roof secures Your letters future of mosaics

WORK has begun to help safeguard the future of one of the Island’s great hidden historic attractions, Newport Roman Villa. The cover-building roof of the 1,700-year-old villa, in Cypress Road, will be replaced over the next month as part of a major project joint-funded by IW Council and English Heritage, which has grantaided over £40,000 towards the essential works to protect it from further weathering. The roof has been designed to improve environmental conditions, reducing moisture levels which have contributed to the build-up of algae on the mosaics below. During the construction of the roof, the villa’s historic mosaics and baths will be protected. IW Council deputy leader George Brown said: “The Island has a rich heritage and it is very important we preserve our historic sites and tourism attractions. Newport Roman Villa regularly has over 5,000 visitors each year and more than 1,400 school

By Peter White children take part in educational visits. These works will ensure that residents and visitors are able to enjoy this fascinating window into past for many years to come.” Dr Andy Brown, English Heritage regional director for the South East, said: “We are delighted to be able to help the council to safeguard this important Roman site so that it can be enjoyed by and can inspire thousands more visitors in the years to come.” Newport Roman Villa is a scheduled ancient monument, which gives it protected status. The remains of the Roman farmhouse built in 280 AD were discovered in 1926 when workmen uncovered Roman tiles while digging foundations for a garage as part of a new housing development. The site was excavated and the ground plan of the villa house uncovered. Thanks to public interest and the generosity of the developer, the site was preserved and protected by a cover

building. House-building continued round it, and it lies in a residential part of Newport. The villa house itself was probably built in the late 270s. The bases of the villa walls were built of local stone including flint, chalk, limestone and greensand and can be seen almost at their original height. The building was roofed with heavy slabs of Bembridge limestone which needed massive roof timbers to support them. Many of these roof slabs, with their distinctive shape, and pierced with a single hole to take a nail, were found on the site. The discovery of fragments of window glass on the site shows that the building has some glazed windows, and remains of painted wall plaster recovered during excavation show that at least some of the rooms had brightly coloured interior walls. The furnace for heating the bath suite was outside the back wall of the villa at the end of the bath wing, and a servant would have been responsible

for feeding it with fuel. The hot air from the furnace passed through an arch at the base of the villa’s back wall and circulated under the raised floors of three rooms. No-one seems to know how and when life at Newport Villa ended. Excavators found the skull of a women in her early thirties in a corner of one of the rooms. It has been suggested that she met her death at the hands of raiders in an abandoned building. This is just speculation, of course, and the decline and abandonment of Island villas by the middle of the fourth century may have been due to economic hardship rather than the threat of attacks by the Anglo-Saxon raiders. The villa will be closed until May 14 while the roof repairs are undertaken. When reopened, Newport Roman Villa will be fully back in business, with its education room and lots of hands-on activities, as well as a Roman-style garden and a display exhibiting some of the Roman finds found on the Island.

It is hoped that the villa will be back in business by May 14, offering hands-on activities in its education room

Send your letters to newsdesk@iwgazette.co.uk or B18 Spithead Business Centre, Newport Road, Sandown, Isle of Wight, PO36 9PH

A word of thanks Dear Sirs Good news! Courteous and honourable people do exist in abundance on the Isle of Wight. Because one Wednesday last month I found myself on my back and out of my wheelchair, having gone over the kerb and into the road opposite the Shanklin sports shop, and was immediately surrounded by people offering help and comforting words. But I would particularly like to thank the four or five people who stayed with me until the ambulance arrived – one lady in particular even took her coat off to cover my shivering body and I joked at the time, saying “I always knew I would fall for an older woman” and we all had a laugh. So once again a big thankyou to you all for your warmth and friendly help and comforting words, including the ambulance crew. John Nicholls, Portland Lodge Residential Home, Landguard Manor Road, Shanklin

Building better homes Dear Sirs I read with interest your story ‘Dream home up for an award’ in the April 3 issue. What a fantastic property: thoroughly contemporary and blending in so well with its surroundings. It made me think, however: why can’t more Island new-builds show flair like this? Everywhere you look, perfectly good buildings are being pulled down by developers and being replaced with bog-standard apartment blocks in that dreary buff-coloured brick. The Broadway in Sandown is a good example: fine Edwardian houses swept aside to be replaced by unimaginative monstrosities. I’m pleased to see the council seems to be taking a firmer line with developers at last, but in many ways the damage is already done. All we can hope is that from now on developers will start to put a bit more thought into their projects. Gary Forrester, Staplers Road, Newport


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the gazette  

gazette news

Friday APRIL 17 2009

Send your news to newsdesk@iwgazette.co.uk or tel. (01983) 409928

Want to know how to flirt? Head for Shanklin TAKE a stroll down the high street of any of our main towns on a Saturday night and you might conclude that the age of romance on the Island is well and truly dead. Couples may be walking with their arms round each other, but only to keep from falling into the gutter. But it seems that there is another side to the story.

By Paul Rainford The Grange, a hotel in Shanklin’s Old Village, is this month playing Cupid by running a weekend ‘workshop’ on how to flirt. The course is aimed at all those who need guidance when it comes to sending out the right love signals. ‘Flirtshop’, which runs from April 24-26,

Prue Leith: a night at the Lakeside Park Hotel

Prue in Wootton

PRUE LEITH, the high priestess of great British cooking, is to visit the Island to sample the local fare and talk about her career. Miss Leith, who is perhaps best known for establishing Leith’s School of Food and Wine in London, is a TV regular, appearing on such programmes as The

Great British Menu. In recent years she has taken to writing novels and her third, The Choral Society, was published in February. ‘Taste – an evening with Prue Leith’ is being organised by Taste of the Wight, the body that promotes local food on the Island, and takes place at the

Lakeside Park Hotel in Wootton on April 20. The evening kicks off at 7pm with a six-course seasonal tasting menu devised by Lakeside head chef Luke Holder, which will include Bembridge crab, Island asparagus and new season lamb. Miss Leith will deliver her talk after dinner.

is being led by Alison Goldie, a writer and performer. “The idea is to instil confidence into people so that they want to talk to strangers. I give them the tools to get over their fears,” said Alison. The workshop consists of games, exercises, role-play, coaching and discussion help people make the first move and keep the confidence flowing. Subjects covered included eye contact, body language, opening gambits, knowing what you want, and how men and women differ in approach and response. For more details visit The Grange’s website www.thegrangebythesea.com. The speed-dating walk, which seeks to introduce single walkers to each other in an unpressured and ‘natural’ environment, runs for the fourth time as part of the IW Walking Festival on May 10. More men are currently being sought to join the walk. See the Walking Festival website for details.

Alison Goldie: installing confidence

Film buffs in the spotlight FILM enthusiasts from around Island have been brushing up their film editing skills on a weekend course held at the Carnival Learning Centre in Westridge, near Ryde. Their tutor was Andrew Wilks, who was editor of the acclaimed BBC TV programme Walking

With Dinosaurs. He took the group through the basics of film editing to ‘green screen’ special effects. The course organiser, StratCat Productions’ Mark Dicker, said: “Many people from all around the Island have been asking me to put on a series of courses like

this one for people who have a real passion for TV and film, but do not have the necessary skills. And now, through our association with the Carnival Learning Centre, we can expand these classes, covering anything from scriptwriting to directing.”

Left to right back row: Barry Hooper, Mark Collins, Ken Knapman, Claire Kay, Sharon Holloway, Laura Schalker. Left to right front row: Mark Dicker, Andrew Wilkes, Nigel Montague, Paul Hewson


Friday APRIL 17 2009   

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Get on your boots! IT’S THAT time of the year again… the world famous Isle of Wight Walking Festival kicks off on May 9, with its centrepiece, Walk the Wight, taking place on May 17. (And remember: if are planning to Walk the Wight this year, you need to register by May 1.) As ever, there are scores of walks on offer, many of them exploring hidden corners of the Island many of us never knew existed. To whet your appetite for this year’s festival – and to inspire you to dig out those walking boots from under the stairs – The Gazette has picked out 16 particularly enticing walks, one for each day of the festival. For full details of all the walks on offer visit the official website, isleofwightwalkingfestival.co.uk May 9 Dinosaur Walk

Location: Brighstone or Brook Booking essential A trip to local beaches in search of dinosaur footprints and fossilised forests, guided by an expert. Contact: Martin Simpson Tel: (01983) 740844

May 10 The Joey Attrill Walk

Location: Bembridge Lifeboat Station, Lane End Booking advised See below for details Contact: Rod Bowman Tel: (01983) 875200

May 11 The Wildlife and Geology of Freshwater

Booking not essential A leisurely stroll looking at cliff plants, rock pools and more. Includes some steep wooden steps. Contact: The National Trust Tel: (01983) 741020

May 12 The River Medina:

From Bricks to Blades

Location: Newport Booking advised A reasonably flat, circular walk along the western bank of the Medina. Exploring the importance of the river, past and present, to the economy of the Island. Contact: Carol Flux or Chris Brammall Tel: (01983) 535836

May 13 Darwin Celebration – Insectivorous Plants at Bohemia

Location: Rookley Booking essential Celebrate Darwin’s bicentenary. See the amazing insectivorous plants of Bohemia Bog and learn about Darwin’s work in this subject. Contact: Ian Boyd, Island 2000 Tel: (01983) 298098

May 14 Evening Beach and Woodland Walk at Osborne

Location: Osborne House

Booking essential A leisurely walk with Gazette columnist and Osborne House head gardener Toby Beasley through the picturesque woodlands to enjoy the private beach at Osborne. Contact: Toby Beasley Tel: (01983) 200022

May 15 Jimi Hendrix Garden Tour, Jimi’s Garden, Dimbola Lodge

Location: Freshwater Bay Booking advised A circular route from the Hendrix Memorial Garden at Dimbola Lodge to view the site of the 1970 Isle of Wight Festival at Afton, followed by a visit to the Isle of Wight Festival Exhibition in Dimbola Lodge. Contact: Steve Brook Tel: (01983) 291122

May 16 Meditation Walk

Location: Carisbrooke Booking not essential Learn to walk ‘mindfully’ along a route, taking in

some of the best views across the island. Tel: (01983) 537338

May 17

Walk The Wight

Booking essential It’s the big one! A sponsored walk for the Earl Mountbatten Hospice, which last year over 10,500 people walked, raising over £340,00 for the care of terminally-ill patients on the Island. Tel: (01983) 528989

May 18 Bonchurch Books & Beer

Booking not essential A look at Bonchurch’s literary history and heritage and a chance to have a pint in the characterful Bonchurch Inn. Tel: (01983) 203884

May 19 The History of Mottistone Common

Booking not essential. Join this walk to discover how people have shaped the

landscape over the centuries. Contact: The National Trust Tel: (01983) 741020

May 20 Gotten, Hoy’s Monument and Pepper Pot

Location: Chale/Blackgang Booking not essential A circular walk with the Ramblers with good views, looking at the history and rights of way network in the Chale/Blackgang area. Contact: John GurneyChampion Tel: (01983) 522665

May 21 Ventnor Lizard Walk

Booking not essential Starting at the Botanic Gardens, passing through Ventnor Park down to the coast, this varied and undulating walk around Ventnor looks at some great wall lizards-spotting spots. Contact: Sam Buck Tel: (01983) 200074

May 22 A Secret Flora

Location: Havenstreet Village Booking essential A circular walk to discover one of east Wight’s best kept secrets – a meadow with a wonderful diversity of plants. Contact: Richard Grogan Tel: (01983) 533180

May 23 Lymington – Hurst Castle Circular

Booking essential A walk on the mainland coastline, from Lymington to Hurst Castle and the Shingle Spit. Contact: David White Tel: (01983) 854263

May 24 The Wroxall Horseshow – Spring Farming for Wildlife Booking not essential Finalist in the RSPB’s Britain’s Favourite Farmer competition in 2008, Wight conservation’s Wroxall Manor Farm is renowned for wildlife diversity. Contact: John Paton Tel: (01983) 760773

The legend of Joey Attrill By Peter White

AMID the scores of different events for rambling enthusiasts at this year’s IW Walking Festival, there is a poignant reminder of one of the Island’s true heroes. On Sunday, May 10 at around 9am a group of walkers will set out from outside the Bembridge lifeboat station to retrace the steps that coxswain Joey Attrill took more than 120 years ago. Joey’s name was etched in Island history when in 1888 he walked the 17 miles from Bembridge to Brook – in oilskins and boots – for a

mission beyond the call of duty. The Brook and Brighstone lifeboats had been called out in horrendous conditions to rescue the crew of Sirenia, a three-master, full-rigged ship of 1,588 tons which had been driven on to rocks at Atherfield. The Brook lifeboat reached Sirenia, after sailing through six miles of “a veritable hell of waters”. When it was only yards away from Sirenia a wave knocked the ship. Three of the crew, Second Coxswain Reuben Cooper and two brothers, were knocked out of the boat. The brothers were soon rescued, but despite a long search, aided by flares from Sirenia, no trace was found of Cooper. The lifeboat attempted to return to Sirenia, yet by this time the lifeboat had suffered heavy damage, and almost all of its oars had been lost. The crew, after an epic

15-hour struggle, had no choice but to return to Brook. When news of the tragedy filtered across the Island to Bembridge, Coxswain Attrill set out on his historic journey. When he finally reached Brook he volunteered to replace the man who had been killed. Soon afterwards the lifeboat was re-launched and helped in the rescue of the Sirenia’s crew. The inquiry held by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) into the Sirenia disaster awarded four silver medals for bravery to the crews of the lifeboats, and gave £300 to create a fund for the families of the deceased. A further £1,200 was raised on the Island, and work on a new station to watch Atherfield Ledge began. It was opened only three and a half years later. The gravestones of those who died were also provided by the RNLI, and can be seen in St Mary’s Church, Brighstone.


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Friday APRIL 17 2009

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Main pictures by Jamie White

gazette feature

the gazette  

THE GAZETTE continues its look at the Island’s leading attractions gearing up for the new season, and discovers there will be plenty of activity around Brading Roman Villa this summer THE SECOND phase of a five-year ‘Big Dig’ programme at Brading Roman Villa later this year is expected to unearth further revelations of what life was once like on the centuriesold site. During the initial phase last year finds included a bracelet, several rings, a fibula brooch and a second century coin of Faustina II, wife of Marcus Aurelius, who ruled the Roman Empire between 161 and 180 AD. Now it is hoped many more treasures will be

By Peter White discovered. And as well as the Big Dig, which will take place over a three-week period from August 2, an area of ungrazed meadow at the rear of the visitor centre is being developed into a public area for entertainment, education and research. The site, known as Medusa Meadow, is now up and running after Brading Roman Villa was awarded £10,000 from the Big Lottery Fund’s Breathing Places grants programme, which aims to help community groups across the country develop and maintain nature friendly breathing places in their local area. Developed in partnership with the BBC, the meadow trail project is a scheme designed to attract locals and visitors, and allow them the chance to get up close and personal with nature and at the same time find out more about the amazing wildlife in the area. Chris Piggott, chief executive at Brading Roman Villa, said: “It was an area that we just let grow, and we discovered that it attracted a variety of butterflies, bees and birds, as well as other small wildlife. “We are looking especially for young children to enjoy the site, and go out with microscopes and cameras and record what they find. It is already proving very popular.” So much so in fact, that subject

to obtaining a further grant, Brading Roman Villa hopes to expand the site, and hold an open weekend later in the year. Island based environmental artists Eccleston George and community green landscape organisation Green Gym have worked together to produce what they claim will be a ‘truly captivating wildlife trail for public use’. Sculpture artist Nigel George, of Eccleston George, said: “By using our innovative sculpting techniques and recycled materials, our aim was to help create a totally novel kind of nature trail. We can incorporate integral habitats for many species including field voles, shrews, wood mice, slow worms and numerous invertebrates within the sculptured seating and interpretation panels themselves.” Brading Roman Villa’s grant is part of £5million set aside by the Big Lottery Fund for the Breathing Places grants programme to help develop existing breathing places or create new ones. Meanwhile, the second phase of the Big Dig at Brading Roman Villa is being carefully planned. As with the initial stage last year, which focused on the buried north range of buildings, Phase Two will be led by Professor Sir Barry Cunliffe, currently interim chair of English Heritage, who will again assemble a team of volunteers to carry out the dig. It will involve a full excavation of the south range, about which

Shovels and


Friday APRIL 17 2009   

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gazette feature

Above: Sculptor Nigel George takes a well earned rest on one of his creations in the Medusa Meadow, which has added a new dimension to Brading Roman Villa. Right: former Island High Sheriff Alan Titchmarsh opened the gardens earlier this month

very little has been recorded. “We need to work out what went on there,” explained Sir Barry. “There seems to have been a bath building, found in the 1880s, but it was not very well recorded.” The public will be encouraged to witness the work in progress, with guided tours, as the villa’s guardians seek to ‘spread the word’ on the Island site’s potential to enhance understanding of Roman life in Britain. Since discovery of the villa’s remains in 1879, and the original excavations that followed, the archaeological importance of the site has been recognised, thanks to the extraordinary mosaics – comparable to any in

Europe – found in the west range. The mosaics are now the centrepiece of a major heritage attraction within a state-of-the-art exhibition and visitor centre in the care of the Oglander Roman Trust. The phased Big Dig will help to clarify how the other buildings, some only partly excavated by the Victorians and all re-buried, fit into the overall story of the site. Parts of the main villa will also be re-examined to help pinpoint the full social and economic context of the Roman establishment. One thing is clear: there’s still a lot more of a story to tell at Brading Roman Villa.

centurions


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gazette feature

the gazette  

Friday APRIL 17 2009

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A right royal re-planting SOMETHING Edwardian is stirring in the grounds of Carisbrooke Castle. The Gazette went to have a look THINK of Carisbrooke Castle and you think medieval: archers, men in tights, that kind of thing. But it also has associations with more recent times – the Edwardian age to be precise, when Queen Victoria’s daughter, Princess Beatrice, stayed at the castle in her role as Governor of the Island. Princess Beatrice held this position from 1896 until her death in 1944. And in June a new Edwardianinspired garden, which will include period plants, fruit trees and a fountain, is to open at the castle to celebrate the connection. The garden is a collaboration between English Heritage, who look after Carisbrooke Castle on behalf of the nation, and award-winning garden designer and BBC Gardener’s World presenter, Chris Beardshaw. The new garden will contain just about every element of a fashionable Edwardian garden and will change a fairly unused green space with minimal planting into an exciting and colourful oasis. It will complement the Victorian garden at English Heritage’s other notable property on the Island, Osborne House. While the garden at Osborne House reflects the formality of the Victorian era, Carisbrooke Castle’s garden will reflect the Edwardian trend for softer planting. Not only will the garden be a joy to look at from the ground but those with a head for heights will be able to look down on the garden from the castle’s medieval ramparts. Gardens are not generally associated with castles but this is one of two new castle gardens to be unveiled by English Heritage in 2009, the other being at Kenilworth Castle in the Warwickshire. The design is based on the Edwardian layout of the Princess’s original private garden at Carisbrooke Castle, with inspiration drawn from her blue, red and gold heraldic crest as well as from architectural detail on the adjoining chapel in the grounds of the castle. Following a geometric pattern, the garden is divided into four quarters with the fountain, forming the centrepiece. Herba-

ceous plants will feature in colourful borders, while the chapel’s stained glass windows will be reflected in ribbon planting in ‘window borders’. There will also be clipped hedges, a stone viewing platform and benches so that visitors can sit and enjoy this sheltered paradise. Garden designer Chris Beardshaw said: “It has been a great opportunity to design a garden in such a historic environment. Inspiration can be found wherever you look and hopefully the keen-eyed visitors will be able to spot where some of my ideas for the garden came from. Gardens bring places to life, they interest people and I’m positive this will add an extra dimension to Carisbrooke Castle.” Tracey Wahdan, English Heritage visitor operations director for the South East, said: “We are very excited about this fabulous new garden and we are certain it will prove a great attraction for visitors to the castle. “We are grateful to the late Mrs Dorothy Frazer whose generous bequest and devotion to the Island has enabled this garden to be created and enjoyed by future generations.” Little is known of the garden’s layout or its uses during medieval and Tudor times up until the 19th century. It was then a kitchen garden, before becoming Princess Beatrice’s Privy Garden. Because archaeological excavation has revealed ancient walls beneath the garden, Chris Beardshaw has had the added challenge of having to make sure that roots do not cause any damage. The trees, for example, will be in containers. The Princess Beatrice garden will add another dimension to the Island’s popular medieval castle which is also the home of the Carisbrooke donkeys. Recent improvements include new and exciting interpretation facilities, a new visitor reception and a shop, which opened last summer.


Gazette

Lifestyle Shanklin special

Blood hound

17 April 2009

Island bounty

How Bella the dog was saved by a canine blood transfusion


2

the gazette lifestyle  

  Friday April 17 2009

lifestyle comment

David Holmes

David is your typical ‘Grumpy Old Man’. In his late 40’s David has been involved in several businesses and was also a local Councillor for a short while. He regularly appears with Alex (Grumpy 2) on wightFM.

mark. To be fair, funeral directing is a bit theatrical. Our task is to put on that final performance, to bring the curtain down; costumes, polished coffins and limousines, poetry, music and timing. Whatever we do, I’m certain the corpse should always be centre stage. Barry is a showman, the best undertakers usually are. He has installed gold plaster lions and a chiming bell at his Rotherhithe funeral home. Jade was escorted from the chapel of rest behind Barry as the little bell chimed, mournfully setting the scene as the crowd of strangers gawped. From then on at every opportunity he seemed to be waving his top hat and cane around and aloft like Douglas Fairbanks or a circus ringmaster. He paused en route, in the old market, making a mercifully short speech as he released a dove in ‘her’ memory. Presumably up until then this poor thing had been concealed in its own box on board the hearse? How ironic. He then headed to Jade’s former council flat home, scene of her parents’ drug abuse, for yet another pause, this time placing a flower. He walked much of the way from funeral parlour to church. Riding in the flower laden Rolls hearse is the norm. He even appeared to have a lookalike police motorcyclist clearing a path, or perhaps just tipping him off when he saw the next crowd, giving Barry yet another chance to hop out and do some more cane and hat waving. Sadly Gordon Brown didn’t make the funeral. He was saving the world (again) with Barack, formerly Barry Obama. Two Barry’s changing their names, odd coincidence eh? Had dour Gordon been in London no doubt he too would’ve walked behind the hearse. He does always look suitably miserable. Thankfully local MP Simon Hughes was available to step in and deputise. Hughes you may recall wanted to lead the Lib-Dems after Ming (Surely Ming-ing Ed?) Campbell stepped down; until it was revealed he preferred the company of boys to girls. At the funeral, MP Simon got a bit carried away saying ‘Jade should have a lasting memorial and perhaps a fund to support training young people to raise awareness of healthy lifestyles.’ Hopefully common sense will prevail. Neither Mother’s Day nor Heathrow will be re-named in her honour, as some have suggested. All funerals are sad. Like Parky I found this one particularly depressing.

SHE couldn’t sing or dance, she wasn’t academic or sporty. We were all shocked at her sudden premature death, most of us liked her. We felt for her boys. ‘She’ of course, wasn’t Jade; she was Diana, Princess of Wales. Almost twelve years have passed since the Saturday funeral of Lady Di, and we’ve seen nothing like it since, until the funeral of Jade Goody. Jade reminded us that these days anyone can be famous, even if they are comically naïve, dense and gobby.

When not scribbling for the Gazette I am a funeral director. I have conducted thousands of funerals. When they’re over I always ask myself; Was it a good one? How was the Minister, the service, the bearers, cars, flowers and music? Was the weather right, did the family seem satisfied? I’ve conducted some high profile funerals, dealt with major and minor tragedies, unwanted media attention and famous mourners. Michael Parkinson has spoken out about the Jade effect. I left him outside a chapel once; I couldn’t fit him in because he was late arriving. Jade had three hearses to carry her flowers; my record is five plus a couple of vans. Through it all I was up front and in charge, but always discreet. Jade’s funeral was carried out by Barry (Albin) Dyer. Barry Dyer is a reality TV undertaker. He was an employee who took over the old established Albin firm in Bermondsey. For business reasons he even changed his name to Albin-Dyer. He’s done well. How apt that he should look after Jade. The funerals Barry conducts can at times appear to be more about him than the deceased. He makes his

Contents Comment

Jo Macaulay

WELL this issue brings a first for me – I never thought I’d interview a dog. Quite a talkative dog in that funny way dogs talk to us I might add, but I couldn’t quite understand her lingo. Luckily her family were on hand to interpret.

It’s funny how attached we become to our dogs. We acquired an adorable Jack Russell with the alluring name of Tallulah from the RSPCA at the end of August last year. She’s got wonderfully large ears and quite a lot of

June Elford

REMEMBER the song, “My Grandfather’s clock was too tall for the wall so it stood for ninety years on the floor”?

Leslie Brand told me this story. In 1919, when he was eightyears-old, he travelled to London with his friend, Eric, to visit Gamages. In the store he found a grandfather clock priced six guineas (£6.30). The manager spotted the boys looking at the clock. “What are you lads doing,” he demanded. “I like the clock,” said Leslie and was amazed when the man told him to buy it. Between them the boys scraped up the six-

Jo Macaulay is Features Editor of the Lifestyle Gazette and lives in Ventnor with her husband and three children. Her hobbies are art, reading and collecting.

spots. “She’ll lose them as she gets her winter coat,” I pronounced sagely. Of course she got more and more spotty as the winter progressed. Tallulah likes to jump – if you have something she wants she’ll leap several feet into the air and she makes a dancing spectacle on the beach leaping for pieces of seaweed. Apparently she could be a smooth fox terrier, according to one old lady who saw her out walking one day. How on earth can you tell the difference? True to form Tallulah hates postmen – and probably postwomen too. Every morning as the post hits the mat she’s in full defence mode, running to the front door and barking the house down. Unfortunately she will also mistake any man in black trousers for a postman too, which has led to a few embarrassing moments with waiters and the occasional passer-by. Amazingly she’ll even bark when she passes the sorting office – now that’s just weird. The cats were not amused and made their feelings clear – we have two of them, also from the

RSPCA. This took the form of a dirty protest I’m afraid and it’s certainly wearing me down – litter trays after seven years of using the garden is no joke. I was once told that you shouldn’t get a pet until you could look after a houseplant. The leopard lily on my kitchen windowsill is on its last leaves – what should I do now? On a lighter note I do believe I’ve lost some weight since I went to visit Den Clare – I don’t actually weigh myself so I can’t tell you how much but my clothes seem to hang more loosely. I’ve got the summer togs out of the wardrobe and I can get them on without straining the buttons or zips – something of a first. Now I must start getting into shape – I’ve been meaning to Walk the Wight ever since I moved back to the Island in 2000 and this could be the year. If you’re planning to do the same then make sure you get your applications in soon – the closing date is May 1, and the walk is on May 17. jo@iwgazette.co.uk

June Elford is a book & feature writer who lives ‘below the castle’ in Carisbrooke with her cat. She enjoys gardening and Scottish dancing. Her column is from the point of view of the older generation. shilling deposit, it was agreed that the rest was to be paid over 12 months. But when the clock arrived at his home in Lincoln (delivered free from London) his father gave him a good clip round the ear for buying it ‘on the never, never’. Leslie ran errands, dug gardens and earned the money to pay for the clock and like the song, it has stood on the floor of Leslie’s house for ninety-years. After analysts telling us oldies about our choice of sweets, they’ve moved on to pets, another blindingly obvious waste of money. The pet for “third agers”, they say, is the West Highland terrier, or Westie, because, “it has such a friendly and companionable nature and likes regular but not excessive exercise.” The Chihuahua is evidently too chi-chi and only lounge lizards get the Siamese cat - geeks get the rat. More research, Sainsbury’s have discovered that customers were too embarrassed to ask for pollack, a cheap cod substitute, so they’ve renamed it colin, pronounced ‘colan’. “We expect coach-loads to travel by land and

sea to see it,” says their designer, Mark Hemingway, who is responsible for the bold new-look packaging inspired by the artist, Jackson Pollock. Sounds a bit fishy. But imagine going to your local chippie and being offered jellyfish or squid and chips. The marine conservation and the fishing industry are predicting that plaice and cod will eventually disappear due to over fishing, pollution and climate change. I heard that the Chinese have been eating jellyfish for l,000 years but squid sausages and jellyfish rings won’t be on my shopping list. And here’s the week’s gardening tip. The Royal Horticultural Society garden at Wisley found that tomato plants respond well to having a MP3 player connected to their roots playing ‘A Midsummer’s Night Dream’ or a reading of ‘The Day of the Triffids’. Evidently the vibrations from low frequency sounds stimulate growth. I’m planning ‘The Deil amang the Tailors,’ a stirring Scottish reel, for my tomato plants.

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Wine and Dine

8

Green and Growing 30

Bella Pulls Through 3

Shanklin special

12

Pet Loving

31

Music

4

Sailing By

22

Hospice News

32

Entertainment

6

Island Bounty

26


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lifestyle profile

Bella wins out against the odds It took a blood transfusion for Bella the dog to recover from her life saving splenectomy operation - here’s her story from her grateful family...

WE’RE in National Pet Month at the moment – it runs until May 4 – so it seemed apt to cover a heart-warming story about Bella, a well-loved family pet who wouldn’t be here if it hadn’t been for a blood transfusion. And in doing so we highlight a big problem here on the Island too – apparently there is a need for doggy blood donors.

Although she’s 13 years old, Bella is usually a very active dog but on Saturday March 14, she collapsed at the family home in Shanklin and the Jackson family rushed her to the Riverbank veterinary hospitol in Newport. There she was found to be anaemic and tests were run to find out the cause. At 8pm she took a downward spiral and the Jackson family were called in to say good-bye. The spleen was really swollen and they thought it might be cancer. Opting for surgery, and waiving the cost aside, the Jacksons waited by the phone when Bella went down for surgery at midnight. “They were phoning us at every stage,” said mum Margo. “They called after the operation and then when she came around from the anaesthetic. The nurses stayed up all night with her.” When they opened Bella up she had over a litre of blood in her stomach and was given only a 30% chance of survival. Luckily the Riverbank has a suction machine and was able to clear the blood to find that her spleen had ruptured and had to be removed. During the operation Bella was given synthetic blood, haemaccel, but after the operation she didn’t start to produce her own red blood cells – the spleen usually does this but now her bone marrow would have to take over the task. “She couldn’t raise her PCV (packed cell volume) from 10,” said dad Bob. “It should be 37 for any dog, but she wasn’t going to be able to manage it. On the Monday after the operation Anne Marie, behaviourist at Riverbank, brought in her dog Golly who gave Bella a blood transfusion. They just took it out from the jugular into a bag and then put it back in through a cannula in the back of Bella’s paw. It doesn’t hurt the

dog.” Margo, Bob and daughters Sarah and Gayle, who begins a degree in equine science at Hartpury College next year, were at the hospital whilst she had the transfusion. Afterwards the PVC peaks and then falls and they then had to wait to see if the count would start to increase again. It was a nail biting time for everyone. Sarah, who is studying psychology at Surrey University, came home for the weekend and wouldn’t go back until Bella was better. Son Keith, at Southampton University studying mechanical engineering was at the end of the phone. “She was covered in blankets and duvets and her tail would still lift the blankets,” said Margo. “Everyone was willing her to live. We really thought we were going to lose her. It was horrible, it really was,” said Margo. “And it came out of the blue,” said Gayle. Only a week before Bella had been for her yearly injections and had had her stomach palpitated and she had been fine. At last Bella did begin to produce her own red blood cells and by the Wednesday she was allowed home. By Thursday she could shakily stand to go out into the garden. Now she’s bounding around in a manner that belies her age and is the dog they’ve all known and loved since she was only six weeks old. But without the blood transfusion from Golly it would have been different story. At the Riverbank Hospital it is usually the staff’s dogs who are called in to donate blood in an emergency but they are finding that the aging population of their bank of staff-owned dogs is beginning to be a problem. Receptionist Trina Edkins rescues bloodhounds, and they have all been into the hospital to donate blood. “Drew was a ten stone dog and he used to donate blood and he loved it. He used to know that the Pedigree Chum would be coming at the end. I got him when he was five and he was a blood donor for four years,” said Trina. Riverbank are currently researching setting up a pet donor list and will soon launch a service so that people can sign up their pets. “At the moment we’re researching all the

needs for blood donation and will announce something in the local press shortly,” said practice manager Alice Winter. Do not contact Riverbank to register your dog or cat until the service is launched but bear in mind the criteria for putting your dog or car forward for this service: Dogs should be: - over one year and under 8 years - Over 25kg - Fully vaccinated and not have travelled outside the UK - Up to date with flea, tick and worming control - Relaxed and easy to handle - Not on drug therapy - Not a previous recipient of blood - Not been used for breeding - In good health Cats should be: - Over one year and under eight years - Ideally indoor cats - Fully vaccinated - Have good flea and worm control - Not on medication - Easy to handle - Ideally between 4.5kg and 7kg in weight Healthy dogs can be bled every 3-4 months and immediately after donating their body starts to replace the blood taken. A single donation of 500mls can be used to help save the lives of two other dogs, because the blood is separated into two components – red blood cells and plasma (which can be frozen and kept for longer). The dogs (or cats) don’t need any sedation or anaesthetic, the blood collection process takes approximately 10-20 minutes depending on how quickly they bleed and the jugular vein in the neck is used because it is large and easily accessible, causing the least amount of stress to the dog as possible. Dogs can receive their first transfusion from any donor but subsequent dona tions have to be cross-matched. All transfusions to cats must be cross-matched.

“It’s nice to know that if your dog is fit and healthy it could help another dog and also that blood will be here if you need it,” said Alice Winter. “People might not be aware that dogs can have transfusions and in Bella’s case it made all the difference to her recovery.” If you want to get involved remember to wait until the service is launched. But be aware that you may get a call in the middle of the night. It’s also handy if you live nearby too.


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lifestyle entertainment

Delovely DeLaria

OK, I will be bluntly honest: beyond prog rock and The Project, I have hardly any experience with jazz. Beyond the sadly cancelled Jazz Festival (another local event, like White Air, gone) and the occasional set in the small, rural pubs we hold so dear, there doesn’t seem to be too many places to widen your musical mind in this sense.

However, it is good to see that one venue continues to provide some alternative music to the Island. Previously part of the Jazz Festival, the Royal Hotel in Ventnor is still set to host the multitalented jazz singer, playwright, comedian and activist Lea DeLaria. Just having come over from the states, and playing a show in London the night before, I managed to have a chat with the lady herself. RH: “Have you aimed to keep the venues on this tour quite traditional? LDL: “We’re playing all over the place on this tour. Some of them are traditional jazz clubs, some of them are the back of pubs, some are hotels and some are festivals. We’re going from 300 - 400 seat venues to 75 seat venues. We’re all over the place!” RH: “So, you have used your music to both educate and protest about a number of issues…” LDL: “I do what I do because I am trying to change the world, I am trying to make a statement, I am trying to get paid. And there’s always the

fourth reason we all do it which is to get laid of course.” RH: “Of course, you have toured the world so many times. You must have seen some amazing places. Is there anywhere you would call home?” LDL: “New York City. New York City and London. I’d call those places home. London has some great jazz venues and a terrific music scene which is an integral part [to a home]. I love it here.” RH: “Is there anything new really exciting you at the moment happening? LDL: “There isn’t anything new, which, really blows me away. I know we’re all kind of sitting around wondering who’s going to follow up on ESP. To me, a lot of my problem of what is happening to new jazz is, for example, that every piano trio is either trying to be or sound like ESP or Brad Mehlda so I’m looking for that person that is coming out with something completely different and new.” Catch Lea at the Royal Hotel, Ventnor on Sunday April 19. Alternatively (or as a warm up - your choice) local jazz musician Joe Stilgoe is at the Quay Arts this Saturday (the 18th). Also on Saturday April 18, Gwyneth Herbert is at the Royal Hotel and on Friday 17 ‘princess of jazz’ Jacqui Dankworth, daughter of Dame Cleo Laine and Sir John Dankworth, will entertain diners at the hotel. RH

Accordion clown-core

ACCORDION fuelled clown-core came to the Island last Saturday in the form of Ed Cox of the Life 4 Land party collective. Straight out of Cambridge he joined forces with the Islands very own One33 party curators to make for one very special night of music, visuals and chaos at The Studio. I caught up with ‘b3n’ from the One33 crew for a bit of background on them:

events” for the month everyone in attendance had a certain buzz about them and a gut feeling a good night was to be had. The energy increased as the headliner arrived around 1am, even more so due to one of the resident DJ’s jumping around shouting “Ed Cox is here! Ed Cox is here!” clearly showing his excitement. Ed was met with a huge cheer when he started his usual mix of mashup drum and bass. As much as everyone was enjoying this it was obvious that they were dying for the man to get on the accordion. An even bigger cheer erupted as he reached out for the instrument and what happened next I’m finding hard to explain in words. Try and imagine a spiky-haired raver, mixing sped up DnB, dancing and jumping excitedly behind the decks whilst playing an accordion over the top! Everyone gravitated towards the front of the club to witness the spectacle for themselves and one of the unsuspecting audiences reactions probably paints a picture of events better than my words ever could remarking “What the?! It’s not even music?! Why is everyone dancing like mad?!” Another One33 night not easily forgotten. CC

“One33 isn’t a club-night like most events you see advertised around the Island. It is something that has slowly evolved from a group of friends; who fed up with bland nightlife started having small parties for their mates in secluded spots on the Island.” Originally starting as a night called “Shoom”, named after one of the first dance nights in London events, it spread to various venues around the island. The money made went towards improving the group’s sound system. “In 2008 we upped our game a little and started One33 - one hundred and thirty-three beats per minute is the optimum tempo to keep a dance floor moving all night. We decided to book Ed Cox as we wanted Ed Cox, Accordian meets Drum and Bass at the Studio someone a bit different. It’s always been important for us to push the boundaries of what people are expecting and Ed definitely does that - a dreadlocked clown playing an accordion to mashed up drum and bass!” The night wasn’t just about the headline act though. Support was provided to get the party pumping by resident One33 DJs Loki, Brown Noise, Slater, B3n and Lovegunn playing filthy electro, dubstep, breaks and a bit of house for good measure. Decorated throughout with camouflage netting among other things and visuals supplied as usual by Loki, the One33 sound system was also added to the clubs existing set-up adding an extra 11k of Turbosund rig for earth shattering bass! The party started around 8:30pm with the One33 residents getting the crowd warmed up, not that they needed a lot as the night already had a lot of hype surrounding it. Having been featured in DJ Magazine and listed in the “Top 5 southern UK


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lifestyle entertainment

Electro Magnetic no more

Bassist Scot holds down the rhythm with Drummer Charlie

Meet the Majortones

EVER heard of dual-synth-driven indie pop? No, then meet the Majortones, “surely the only band playing live with two synths”. Jasper, Scott, Lee and Charlie are the guys behind the music and shockingly they have only been together about twelve months.

“Tom Farren from the Guy Page Trio saw us at last year’s Wight Noize competition and asked us to play alongside them at a gig the following week,” recalled Charlie, drummer of the band. “We didn’t have a vocalist and this was our first proper gig so during the performance we announced that we were looking for a singer. Jasper plucked up the courage to come over for a chat and joined us for a practice session the following week. It all kind of went from there.” The Majortones (whose name played on their particularly minor early songs,) reeled off a huge list of their influences ranging from reggae right through to dance and hardcore metal. This explained why their music has such variety about it; so now seemed like a good opportunity to ask about the synthesizer parts of the show. “Lee went to Japan to visit his uncle who gave him a Japanese synth. We plugged it in to the UK mains not

“The band that was Electro Magnetic Workshop is no more,” states the email which dropped into my inbox “It has evolved into the Klockwork Dolls.” If only it was so simple. I wouldn’t worry though - not one of the band members has dropped out of the Island’s music scene. To put it simply: One has become two.

Klockwork Dolls is the same line up as Electro Magnetic Workshop minus Lady Phaedra. Although the member’s are the same, they seem keen to stress that they will not be using any of Lady Phaedra’s material and are slowly working on original material. Speaking of Lady Phaedra, she has also moved on to pastures new. With previous band members Long realising that Japan uses half the UK John Capt Normal, they have formed Ecurbrekal, voltage... unsurprisingly the power a trio which puts Lady Phaedra’s poetry to music. adaptor went bang instantly! We Look out for their debut ‘Cave on the Styx’ around had to send that off to be repaired the end of May. and in the meantime Scott bought Klockwork Dolls can be found on the old Electro another one to replace it. Eventually Magnetic Workshop, and Ecurbrekal should be the busted one was returned and we online very shortly. Keep watching the listings decided to make use of both!” The Majors have already released an folks. RH EP titled “A serious EP,” which was recorded with Guy Page and Claydon Conner at Studio 5a. The band was given their first gig by the GPT boys and so it was fitting that they were recorded by them. Recently more material has been recorded at Platform One, which Charlie and Scott both attend. Look out for a different version of “The House of Robots,” which is said to sample mobile phone interference and has gone well overDISTURBIA are giving fans the chance to board on synths! remix their forthcoming single ‘Contagious’. The lads recently got through to the The winning track will be chosen at the band’s final stage of this year’s Live Wired discretion and featured on the CD single that competition to play the IOW Festival bandstand. Head along to the final on will be released in late May 2009. The winner will receive free entry to the Single Launch May 20th to give them a listen and show your support. If you can’t make Show, a share of profits made from the CD sales and an exclusive hearing of Disturbia’s that then there are plenty of other second album which is currently being reopportunities to catch the Busytones as they are also playing the forthcom- corded. ing Battle of the Bands, Wight Noize If you would like to take part in the competition, AND Bestival main stage competiplease contact the band through their Myspace page at www.myspace.com/disturbiauk CC tions! CC

Remixing Disturbia

Fightstar fanbase grows as new album hits the streets IN a way, their passion for playing small venues has worked out well for Fightstar fans on the Island and surrounding areas. Over the last few years they have almost become a regular to the Wedgewood Rooms as well as being lined up to play the last Portsmouth and Southsea Festival (which, sadly, had to be dropped due to low ticket sales). I caught up with singer/guitarist/keyboardist Charlie Simpson as they prepare for the release of their third album ‘Be Human’ and gear up for the supporting tour.

“So, starting off with your set at the Teenage Cancer Trust show in London earlier this month at the Royal Albert

Hall: How was that for you?” CS: “That was really cool. For a rock band to play that venue is a real honour. It is one of my favourite venues. I can remember seeing a band called Mogwai there a couple of years ago and it’s one of the best venues I ever seen.” “Looking at the album title and the track listing, I get the feeling that the changing face of British culture is something touched upon quite heavily.” CS: “For sure man. Take a song like Damocles, which is specifically written about knife crime, you know, and just about the horrible situation we’re in. During the making of the record I kept on reading the headlines and it shocked us how young these kids are, and I think that is heard in a couple of songs on the

record. The English Way is very much about wanting to get back a sense of unification in society you know. I think that there’s a lot of horrible things happening and this record is a message to this society saying that we need to group together and make something positive.” I asked him about his relationship with small venues such as the Wedgewood Rooms: “I love those venues. I mean, we love to play festivals as they’re cool but I love the more intimate crowds. It’s always been something I have liked in the live shows. It’s more intense when your right up there in your face and a more personal experience. I love playing the clubs.” Be Human is out 20th April in all good (and probably some bad) record shops.RH


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lifestyle entertainment

The underground Project ANYONE who has frequented the Wight Rock Bar on one of their jazz nights will more then likely agree with me: It feels like one of the small, Smokey Jazz clubs seen in 1950’s American films. Of course, it is without the smoke now the smoking ban has come in but for all intents and purposes I feel that this is a pretty good description.

The Project have become quite a force on the Island music scene with their brand of Instrumental Jazz-Funk. Consisting of a combination of Platform 1 tutors and general jazz enthusiasts as well as a member of The Bees, they managed to fill the club to almost capacity. And it isn’t just the stereotypical jazz fan that turned up, (if there is such a thing), but members

of other local Rock and Indie bands as well as other people you would not expect to see. Maybe it is because they are so accessible to the casual listener - while some acts seem to demand a certain level of jazz experience, The Project are just extremely enjoyable. Tonight, they played as a sextet although you never quite know who is going to join their ranks for any one set. The night’s line up included a saxophonist, trumpeter and pianist on top of the standard set up of bass, drums and guitar. This gave them a very large sound both in a musical sense and in volume. Taking up the stage as well as part of the dance floor. So, next time you see them advertised at the Wight Rock Bar, just drop by, get yourself a Guinness and make yourself comfortable in one of the little alcoves. And above all, enjoy! RH

Movie Review: 17 Again

IN this light hearted rom-com, we find a dissatisfied 37 year old Mike O’Donnell (Mathew Perry) ready to start life over again. In a twist of fate he is transformed into his 17 year old self in the form of High School Musical Pin-up, Zac Effron.

Thinking he now has a chance to right all the wrongs in his life, it soon becomes clear this chance was never about him, it was about helping his wife and kids in ways he couldn’t have before. This well-told story sees Mike realise that the only regret he should have is wasting time regretting. Well

written and surprisingly original, despite films that have touched on similar storylines before, I found this film witty, smart and refreshing. A must-see for all the family! If you liked: ‘Freaky Friday’ or ’13 going on 30’, you’ll love this!! By James Ward

The IW Zoo blog

WHEN our lions throw back their magnificent heads and start to roar, visitors suddenly appear from every corner of the zoo. It’s hardly surprising: this incredible sound is intended to echo across the savannah in Africa to warn other lions that the territory is well and truly occupied. Although Snoopy, Charlie Brown and Nahla are under no threat from marauding prides they still call several times a day and their powerful voices can often be heard as far away as Brading. Last week though, visitors were drawn to investigate the vocal rendition of a slightly less charismatic animal.

Winston is a young micro pig. He is one of several miniature breeds of farm animal that will be living in the Isle of Wight Zoo’s newest attraction, ZooLittle Farm. Staff have been spending time with the little pig, stroking and brushing him and getting him used to being handled. We are planning to bring Winston out of his enclosure to meet young visitors, so he needs to be trained to walk on a lead. Thus it was that last week animal carer Leigh and I buckled the piglet into his little blue harness for his first outing. Winston was not at all both-

ered by the harness or by the lead. He trotted along quite happily by my side as Leigh opened the gate and rattled his food dish. He was completely relaxed as we crossed in front of the play area, although Indian tigress Lola was mesmerised by the sight. To avoid any further predator interest we decided to take Winston along the path furthest from the cats - taking us into the primate area. We had our first inkling that all was not to go smoothly as we rounded the corner. One glimpse of the piglet and the black lemurs shot to the very top of their enclosure, staring hard at the newcomer and alarm calling for all their worth. I managed to persuade Winston to move forwards, where they could not see him. Unfortunately this brought him into view of the gibbons next door who, alerted by the lemur calls, were beside themselves with excitement. Egged on by unruly spider monkeys Ike and Jackson, the gibbon boys whooped wildly and banged on the mesh with their feet. By now it was obvious to us that we needed to abort the ‘walkies’ session for that day. However, although he is not a very big pig Winston is extremely wilful and he dug his trotters in tenaciously as we pulled firmly on his lead. Leigh and I both wondered at the

same time whether it was possible for a harness to slip off over a pig’s head and were relieved when Paul, Head of the big cat section, sauntered into view. Once he had stopped laughing he stepped in to save the day by simply picking the piglet up and tucking him under his arm. And that is when everyone in the zoo became aware of the little drama and the roaring of the lions met serious competition. When a piglet is picked up it squeals - very, very loudly! The person who coined the phrase ‘squealed like a stuck pig’ certainly knew a thing or two about porcine decibel levels! Visitors and staff appeared from every nook and cranny to see what on earth was making the horrendous racket. Anxious to bring the episode to a safe and hurried conclusion the three red-faced staff transported the protesting piglet back to his quarters. Needless to say, as soon as his trotters hit terra firma, Winston stopped the terrible din and stuck his snout into his food dish as if nothing had happened. Winston’s harness training will continue, but from now on the route will be planned in advance with military precision. And this pig handler will carry ear plugs - just in case! Tracy Dove


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lifestyle entertainment

In the studio... THE studio in Newport is a multipurpose arts space promoting a whole spectrum of music and is one of very few places on the Island where over 14s are able to attend. Friday nights are band nights and next Friday, April 24, indie rock and drum n’ bass band Astro Physics are down from London, supported by Island bands Papa Do Plenty and Disturbia. On May 1, Brighton band Floors and Walls will be supported by Island bands Carousel Era and Fuzzy Digitz. Both gigs are for over 14s and are only £4 entry.

and it’s great that we now have a venue to see them as they progress. Saturday nights are over 18s club nights and once a month one33 Resurrection happens – look out for this one - it’s been voted one of the top five club nights in the South of England by DJ Magazine. On the first Saturday of the month, including May 2, the Pink Pussycats spin their mixture of 60s, 70s and funk and soul – again for only £4 entry. The studio has some excellent acts lined

up for the summer including The Operators in June and various electro new wave bands from London. The website www. iowstudio.co.uk is linked to the studio’s myspace and facebook pages – join for regular updates and photos. The studio is also available for private hire for events such as parties, weddings, anniversaries or exhibitions at very competitive rates. Call 530444 for further details.

Security is particularly tight on these nights and the studio works in conjunction with the Isle of Wight Police to ensure that these nights are safe. Wristbands are issued to over 18s and they are only allowed to purchase one drink per person at the bar. Zero tolerance is shown to youngsters entering the club – if they smell of alcohol they’re refused entry. Wednesday nights are Platform One nights with a whole host of Island talent to choose from, and again for over 14s. The quality of bands on the Island has improved dramatically since the festivals started, and Platform One began,

It’s just magic as Aaron joins the famous Circle ISLAND-BORN illusionist Aaron Isted has just passed his audition, by unanimous vote of the council, to become a member of the world famous Magic Circle. “It is an honour to be accepted into this select circle of world class magicians,” said Aaron who is one of only three current members of the Magic Circle on the Isle of Wight along with David Randini and his father The Great Randini.

Aaron is already a member of the International Brotherhood of Magicians, for which Ali Bongo was his sponsor. Ali Bongo, as President, signed Aaron’s conformation letter of acceptance into the Magic Circle and, as the great magician died recently, this makes it one of the last letters of acceptance from him - particularly as Aaron was the only

applicant who passed on the of spikes beneath him. Will he audition night. escape the trunk before the rope Ali Bongo designed tricks for burns through and the trunk is David Nixon and later for Paul impaled on the spikes below? Daniels as well as performing Sponsors are being sought for himself. He is also said to have this illusion and if anyone has been the person who TV’s Jonaany metal dexion racking to thon Creek was based upon. spare could they call Jim on On Saturday May 9 Aaron will 855723. be staging a nail-biting illusion of his own Aaron Isted, centre, with his sponsors the magicians design at the David Randini, right, and his father The Great Randini. launch of the Isle of Wight Walking Festival on Newport Quay. Tied in a straightjacket and bolted into a trunk, he will be suspended high over the quay by a burning rope with a row


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lifestyle wine & dine

Enjoy a wide range of delicious home cooked dishes and continental coffee

Stylish dining

WITH it’s quaint multi paned windows, Pendletons in Shanklin looks quite old fashioned from the street, but inside it is a haven of modern, simple styling. This is also reflected in the menu, which is modern, yet with a traditional twist, featuring all-Island reared meats and fresh local fish.

The dark wood furniture with soft cream upholstered seating co-ordinates perfectly with the cream walls and the dark wooden-framed sepia photographs of Shanklin in days of yore. Choose from lovely home cooked dishes such as Isle of Wight lamb and mint sausages served with mashed potato topped with a mint gravy or Shorwell’s finest 8oz sirloin steak, char grilled and served on a bed of chive mashed potato and topped with roasted vine tomatoes and mushrooms. Not surprisingly Pendletons

were finalists in four separate categories of the Island Life Food and Drink Awards 2008. A family run business; Steve Pendleton opened the restaurant seven years ago after working in the catering industry here on the Island and training at the Isle of Wight College. Pendletons is open year round, every evening, and on Saturday and Sunday lunchtimes. It has built up a regular clientele through word of mouth, as well as picking up holiday trade from their Shanklin Old Village location. Sunday lunchtimes a traditional Sunday roast is on offer, and at lunchtimes a smaller a la carte menu and snacks such as sandwiches and ciabatta rolls are available through the summer season. The good selection of wines are complemented by six different bottled beers and Grolsh on tap, along with a wide range of hot and cold drinks and the top of the range Bristot coffees. Smaller weddings and functions can be accommodated – up to 24 can be seated together - and the service is warm and friendly. Staff are as smart as the surroundings in their black shirts and long black aprons, both with the Pendletons logo. To the rear of the restaurant is a small garden that is a ‘real sun trap’ – ideal for those lazy sunny lunchtimes.


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lifestyle wine & dine

Sun is shining on local produce EVERY pub is jumping on the local foods bandwagon – and it’s a worthy cause to support – although few can claim that their produce is from the fields around the pub itself. But when they were looking for locally produced meat, the Sun Inn in Hulverstone looked no further than Chapel Furlong Farm, right next-door.

Head chef Michael Cole lives on the farm and he even helps to butcher the meat and selects the cuts for the restaurant. Wight Aberdeen Angus beef, grazed on the nearby National Trust downland, will be on the menu

along with free range rare breed pigs and lamb. “We’re now concentrating on local produce,” said new owner Mark Blanchard who took over the pub with wife Lesley in February this year. Isle of Wight cheese, bread made from Isle of Wight flour and locally caught fish will also feature along with local ales. The garden is gradually being brought back to its former glory and regular barbecues are planned throughout the summer months. Live music on Saturday nights include Driftwood this Saturday April 18, and The Chale Bay Wailers on April 25. Since taking over Mark and

Lesley have added a small lounge area and a new coffee machine and have further plans for this idyllic thatched pub which has stunning views of the coast from the rear 74 cover restaurant and garden. Double doors to the garden make this the ideal location for a small wedding or party and a marquee can easily be added to extend into the garden too. This is the first pub venture for the couple. Mark returned to the Island in 2001 after a career in London and Lesley is a former tenancy officer for Medina Housing Association.


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lifestyle wine & dine

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lifestyle living


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lifestyle shanklin old village

Warm glow awaits at Vernon Cottage Stunning views and home-cooked cuisine

Vernon Cottage: Very much the traditional English thatched pub

BEAUTIFUL views over the Old Village to the hills beyond can be seen from the garden of Vernon Cottage, which also has lovely little heated arbours outside for intimate cosy dining. Lit by fairy lights and each with two tables, these arbours also offer a little privacy and shelter.

Family friendly with home cooked food and open seven days and nights a week, this picturesque old thatched building seats 40 people within its nautical themed interior and 160 outside in the spacious garden. Many tables have umbrellas and

the garden is very dog friendly with numerous water bowls for thirsty hounds. Cathy Jones and Wendy Southwell took over in 2005 and have invested heavily in the business. “We want to make a memorable eating experience,” said Cathy. The food is all home cooked from daily delivered fresh produce. Seafood platters and cod and chips are perennially popular, with daily specials on the blackboards. But it is for their crab cakes that the Vernon Cottage were praised most highly. A former buyer for Harrods and wife of a chef who had worked at the Ritz in

Paris and Claridges in London declared them the “best in the world” in 2006. Fully licensed with mood music playing inside and out, there are posts around the garden that hold oil lamps to give a warm glow as the evening draws in. Not surprisingly Pimms in the garden is a favourite in the summer. Whether for morning coffee, lunch, afternoon cream tea or dinner with, last food orders between 8.30 and 9pm, Vernon Cottage is an idyllic venue at any time.


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lifestyle shanklin old village

Nammet returns to Pencil cottage YOU could sit in the garden of Pencil Cottage taking a cream tea, lunch or snack and be beguiled by red squirrels on the squirrel run in the lower garden. The outside area is deceptively spacious and secluded with room for 120 covers in the upper and lower garden and under the ‘outdoor room’ that offers a refuge from summer showers.

Lisa Hill Whyte had wanted to buy Pencil Cottage since she was five years old and two years ago her dream came true when she and husband Derick made the break from their corporate lives on the mainland. Now Lisa makes all of

the scones and savouries and Derick is a dab hand at cake making – all dishes are made to order using local supplies where possible. Nammet, the traditional Island snack, has been resurrected on the Pencil Cottage menu – Stilton sourced on the Island served with crusty bread and a choice of local ale. Cream teas are another favourite – particularly with Lisa’s father’s homemade jams. Lovely home made sweets include the traditional Knickerbocker glory and banana split. And to tempt you after eating, Derick admits to a fondness for

malt whisky and offers a selection from his private collection. One of the oldest commercial properties in the village, Pencil Cottage is thought to have been a nickname given to the shop that is likely to have sold pencils to visiting writers such as Longfellow and Keats. It still sells pencils today but also has a whole host of items from 50p to £1,000. A tree dripping with jewellery sits on a table in the centre of the front room as you enter the shop, large porcelain pigs look down from the top shelf, hand painted colourful tiles and unusual vases adorn the shelves and a case holds Island designed jewellery from Boneidols. In the back room lovely ‘Lush’ style soaps and bath products from ‘Bath, Bubble and Beyond’ fill the central table and antiques and collectables on the shelves include gold watches, ceramics and art deco figurines. Lovely Isle of Wight Lavender products are also available. There are far too many items to mention but check www.pencilcottage.com to buy or browse.


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lifestyle shanklin old village

THE Old Thatch Tearooms are rightly proud of the fact that they won the best tearoom of the year in Island Life Magazine for 2008, especially as last year was their first season in the business.

Pat and Charles Whybrow came out of retirement to run this popular tearooms and it has paid off handsomely. The attention to detail is quite astounding in this thatched seventeenth century dwelling, which started life as three fishermen’s

cottages and was converted into tearooms in the 1940s. Each of the three rooms inside the beautiful old wooden beamed interior has been color coordinated by Pat. To the right as you enter is the blue room; willow patterned and blue and white china plates cover the blue walls, small blue and white trinkets smother the window sills and blue and white patterned cushions and upholstery are complemented by the bluebell colored tablecloths. To the left as you enter is the pink room with chintz upholstery, chair backs and seat covers and pink tablecloths. A charming old rose patterned tile serves as each place setting. But your eye is drawn to the cake display cabinet in which the biggest homemade cakes you’ll ever see rotate before your eyes. Down the flagstone steps to the back room and you’re in a sea green world with more plates and ceramics covering the walls and green tiled, rose-covered place settings. The doors to the garden have chintz curtains with green tie backs and outside the tables have strawberry covered tablecloths and chintz cushion covers for the iron chairs. Look out for the fairies at the bottom of the garden. The same amount of detail is given to everything on offer from the choice of plain, fruit or apple and ginger scones to the hearty traditional homemade meals such as Steak and Ale pie or old English Lamb Stew. Everything is home cooked in the wonderful old four-oven Aga. Traditional tea is only made from loose leaves and is complimented by a wide range of speciality infusions, which are served in an open bag, suspended over the cup by a bamboo cane. Look out for the tea themed quotations on the wall by the loo. The vast collection of ceramics was amassed by Pat, some bought, some inherited and some given to her. Even customers have been known to offer additions to her amazing hoard and they’re always a talking point not only with local customers but with the many customers young and old who frequent The Old Thatch from all over the world. For a different kind of celebration The Old Thatch also welcomes party bookings and is fully licensed (Telephone: 01983 863184)


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lifestyle wightFM YOUR REGULAR UPDATE ON THE ISLAND’S FIRST Wi-Fi STATION

Taking you into summer bright and early in the morning

Listen now, wherever you are Call the phone-in on 40 99 20

Monday to Friday 12 - 1pm

Listen online at www.wightfm.com


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lifestyle wightFM

“The Easter weekend better for all of If you you have have trouble trouble If tuning in in then then call call the the wightFM wightFM tuning support line line 40-99-21 40-99-21 support

That’s right - wightFM

On the road

THIS is my car and this is what I use to get out and about across the Isle of Wight bringing you the latest news stories.

As you can see, it has a very sexy interior and the whole thing does what it is supposed to do – get me from A to B. I took Alex for a ride in it the other day – he didn’t like it and took this photo for you all to see. Here are some of your thoughts posted on our wightFM facebook

Radio on demand now available We’ve great news if you ever miss our wightFM phone-in show with Alex Dyke and his special guests. Our technical boy, Jessie, has been working hard to ensure you can listen again online. And that’s not all: if you love it, you can keep it forever by downloading the show! The phone-in is back! It was away far too long!

Join in Big Al’s new edgier phone-in

40-99-20

page!

Keith Hibdige – Looks like some kid has run amok with the crayons!

Keep a look out for other cars to be featured in the very near future include Ian Mac’s hearse and the bus which Jessie travels on to get to work!

Mark Peddie – It’s got to be French Paul Tomkins – Looks like somebody threw up in there Maxine Al Furness – JMG, what are you thinking???? No pulling power in those!!!

Our youngest fans

WightFM’s youngest listeners can arguably be found in Ryde because children at Chatterbox Day Nursery are avid fans of the station!

It was founded in 1992 by Stacey Pannell who is the Director of the nursery and comprises the day nursery in Nelson Street and a pre-school in the grounds of Nettlestone Primary. Chatterbox runs on three floors

and caters for children from three months to 12 years – offering a safe and homely environment where the children are happy and secure. “The children are people’s most treasured possessions and they have placed them in our care. It is imperative we never forget that….” said Stacey. “All have access to the huge range of toys and equipment suitable for their age and devel-

opment, including a wonderful outdoor area. The Fun Clubbers have access to the internet to support them with their homework and of course, listen to their favourite station wightFM” “I often click on wightFM as I am working in the office… it’s great to hear Ian and Justine again on the breakfast show and of course Alex Dyke’s phone-in at lunchtime”.


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lifestyle wightFM

has been made even us by wightFM”

is back on the road!

If your company listens to wightFM call us on 40-99-20

Grab a bargain!

Even more presenters on wightFM

Alex Dyke, Ian Mac and all your other favourites THE gang here at wightFM will be up very early this weekend, helping you find a bargain. will be there with the wightFM roadshow.

We’re at St George’s Park for Newport’s car boot sale.

It all gets underway on Sunday at 7am! Don’t be late!

Alex Dyke, Ian Mac, Justine Field, Mike Read, David Hamilton, Paul Burnett, Emperor Rosko, Derek Sandy, Howard Pearce, Chris Stewart, Benny Brown, Richard Cartridge, Shaun Tilley, Johnny Gentle

Can radio get any better?

Programme schedule

our great line-up

Weekdays

6 - 7am Mike Read: The Wight Wake-up 7 - 10am Ian Mac’s Full English (More Music) Breakfast Show with Justine Field 10 - 11am Chris Stewart with the Motown Hour 11am - 3pm Big Al’s Mid-Morning Boogie, including the legendary phone- in between 12 noon - 1pm with all the usual suspects – The Doc, Foxie, and Jessie. 3 - 5pm David Hamilton’s ‘Non-Stop Music’ Afternoon Show 5 - 7pm Paul Burnett’s Tea Time Show 7 - 9pm Shaun Tilley’s Wi-Fi Hits 9 - 11pm Mark Wesley 11pm - 1am Benny Brown 1 - 7am Music Jam

Weekends

7 - 9am Howard Pearce’s Weekend Breakfast Show 9am - 12pm Ed ‘Stewpot’ Stewart’s Bubblegum and Cheese 12 - 1pm Geoff Hughes’ Beatles Hour 1 - 2pm The Shakedown Show with Derek Sandy 2 - 4pm Richard Cartridge 4 - 6pm The Emperor Rosko 6 - 7pm IW Festival’s Greatest Hits 7 - 9pm Steve Robson’s Electric 80s 9 - 10pm Simon & Dave’s Hipshaker Show 10 - 12am Johnny Gentle’s Big Easy. 12 - 2am Opal Bonfante

Wi-Fi...why not?


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lifestyle wightFM

Fact: Nick knows best IF you are thinking of advertising on wightFM, then after a chat with our latest signing to our sales team, you won’t need convincing.

Big Al & the Doc

are rockin’ on wightFM! Monday - Friday, 11am - 3pm

38 year old Nick Cottis from East Cowes is relishing the prospect of meeting you, our listeners. “After 22 years sales experience in different industries, I have chosen wightFM as a new and exciting challenge. Being part of a new radio station, I can be involved in the build up of a new business from the beginning and I intend to drive it forward into a prosperous station, which is second to none” he says. “Even though we are right now a WIFI and internet station, we have retained a large amount of loyal listeners with our presenters and as internet grows and grows – so does our audience”. And Nick is excited about how he can help your business grow. “Advertising with wightFM gives you the opportunity to reach an

audience that would normally be reached through terrestrial radio as a favourite show missed can be downloaded and listened to later. It’s a bit like Radio Plus. I really believe internet and WIFI radio is

the way forward for radio and for people looking to advertise their business”. To find out more about advertising on wightFM call Nick right now on 409921.

Phone in every day between How to contact wightFM 12pm to 1pm with all email: bigal@wightfm.com post: wightFM, thedoc@wightfm.com Spithead Business Centre, studio@wightfm.com Newport Road, Sandown, the big topics and characters sales@wightfm.com Isle of Wight, PO36 9PH

40-99-20

phone:

Reception/sales 01983 409921 (9am - 5pm, Mon - Fri)

The phone-in 01983 409920 (12 - 1pm, Mon - Fri)

Three ways you can listen to wightFM

1

2

Type in www.wightfm.com into

Purchase a Revo Wi-Fi

your Internet browser on your

radio from wightFM and

home computer or laptop and click ‘Listen Live’.

simply connect your radio to the nearest Wi-Fi hub.

3

Coming very soon you will be able to listen to wightFM on certain mobile phones and in the car via WiFi car radio.


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lifestyle shanklin waterfront

On the Waterfront

WITH a name like the Waterfront it not surprising that there’s a film theme to this popular seafront bar and restaurant in Shanklin. You’re sure to find evidence of Marlon Brando and his fellow film stars if you gaze around the walls at the vast collection of movie memorabilia.

Arnold Schwarzenegger is in full battle dress in the hall and Marilyn Monroe in her classic pose could be joining you for dinner – a switch operates her skirt so that it lifts into the air. These life size models are joined by Elvis Presley on a bar stool in the corner and once a month he’s joined by popular Elvis impersonator The Wight Elvis who gives a polished performance of all the old classic rock and roll numbers the King made so famous. Entertainment weekly includes Joe Scott on piano and vocals, international vocalist Cara Warwick and Glen Carrol who was a former winner of Stars In Their Eyes with

his Neil Sedaka impersonation. Rock and roll music is always playing in the bar/ restaurant and the upper and lower terraces outside. The menu has a steak and seafood bias with both being served on hot volcanic rocks for you to cook exactly as you like them at your table. Juicy beef-steaks, tiger prawns and salmon, tuna or swordfish steaks all arrive sizzling to your table for a truly interactive dining experience. Dips to accompany are served with French fries and salad. Local lamb shanks and local cod and chips are also popular, vegetarian options are available and there’s a children’s menu. Local crab and

prawn salads are particularly popular in the summer as is the house cocktail The Bahama Mama, which you could sip on one of the terraces as the sun goes down. Danny and Michelle run a friendly family pub and enjoy a laugh and a joke with their customers, who come from far and wide to sample the unusual dining experience, the atmosphere and the wonderful panoramic sea views.

Summer pursuits NOTHING can beat a traditional seafront amusement arcade and Shanklin has one of the best. The Summer Arcade has everything you could possibly want to keep your kids and yourselves amused in all weathers.

The jungle themed adventure golf is the attraction that first catches your eye with the crashed plane on the rooftop. This two level 12-hole game

even has Dead Man’s Cave to negotiate in the dark with its creepy skulls. And on the way out is a snack bar with hot dogs, ice-creams and teas and coffees. To the left of the premises is the seasonal gift shop with toys, rubber rings and other inflatable items, souvenirs, newspapers and even the lottery along with a useful cash point. The boutique to the right of the adventure golf sells more gifts along with

swimming costumes, T-shirts, towels and a massive pick and mix selection. And to the to the far right is the café with everything from all day breakfast to hamburgers and chips and even a roast on Sundays. Walk through the adventure golf area and you come to the amusement arcade which also has a coin operated kiddy go cart track and a four lane half size bowling alley. There’s a casino for the over 18s and a new ‘ticket town’ area dispenses tickets instead of cash winnings that can be redeemed for prizes. It’s only been operating for three weeks and already two Xbox 360’s have been won by lucky players. Steps up from the middle of the amusement arcade lead to Jungle Jim’s indoor adventure play area – the ideal way for youngsters to let off steam climbing, crawling and tumbling around. There’s something for everyone at Summer Arcade, rain or shine.


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lifestyle shanklin town / waterfront

Handy Taggies at Little Nippers Lovely things for little people YOU’LL find something extra special for your little ones at Little Nippers in Shanklin’s Regent Street. They have beautiful baby clothes in the softest cottons, lovely clothes for boys and girls and toys that might be passed down through your family for generations.

A whole new range of ‘Taggies’, including the popular baby comfort blankets with their silken tags for little mouths to chew on, are all made of 100% organic fair trade cotton. Or you could choose a soft Taggie book - each page tells the story and has one of their distinctive tags. Taggies also have hand puppets, a range of big bouncy balls in vibrant colours or in black and white football design and large brightly coloured giraffes, lions and dogs. A new organic range of clothing from Fugi is for ages to six – ideal for the beach and very good for babies with eczema, this range can be washed over and over again and many pieces don’t need ironing. Lisa Boynton started this business last May, after finding it hard to find the things she wanted for her son Daniel, now two. Seven months into her second preg-

nancy, Lisa is up to date with what little ones need. The timeless John Crane wooden toys include xylophones, puzzles, building blocks, baby walkers and ride-on fire engines. Very soft and beautifully tactile gifts from the French company Kaloo come gift boxed and include chubby bears and bunnies with big floppy ears in vibrant colours. Musical versions can be hung over a cot and play soothing lullabies.

New for this summer is an extra special selection of girls dresses, ranging from 12 months up to 4 years, from the ‘Abella’ and ‘ Just Rose’ collections with prices ranging from £25.00. These are perfect for a summer’s day or that special occasion - very pretty and different with their white and pink floral designs and fully lined. Other patterns and designs available also. Well worth a look. You can now also buy through the new website at www.littlenippersuk.com


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lifestyle shanklin town

Hair for men

SHANKLIN Barber Shop celebrates its twentieth year in business this month and Julie Lee has a special offer to mark the event. All boys haircuts are only £5.50 on Tuesdays and Thursdays as a special anniversary promotion.

This traditional yet modern barbers shop by Shanklin train station, in Atherley Road, is popular with locals and visitors alike – commuters to and from London pop in and in the summer tourists often pay a visit. Many customers have been with Julie since she set up the business in 1999. “Some of the boys I used to cut now bring in their own sons,” said Julie. “Because we’re all mums we’re good with the little ones,” said Julie of her crew of seven. “We do a lot of boy’s first hair cuts. We always ask if people want to keep the hair which is something a man might not think about.” Although they specialise in traditional men’s hairdressing, more modern styles are

also in demand and the shop can now do tinting and bleaching. “A lot of men are having Mohawks with the tips bleached – they call it tipping,” said Julie. “We also do tram lines and clipper designs in the hair. Swirls are particularly popular in the sides of the head with a Mohawk down the middle.” “Boys hairdressing has changed quite a lot over the past 20 years,” said Julie. “They’re much more particular about how they want their hair and they sometimes bring in pictures.” The shop has recently been refurbished with a black and

ivory colour scheme and Julie even has an old-fashioned barber’s pole to go up outside. “Most men come here because it’s a friendly salon – they tend to come in and have a laugh and a joke,” she said. The shop is open five days a week, but closed on Wednesdays.


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lifestyle sailing by

Bembridge Ribs for hire

MOST people would agree that ‘RIBS’ are one of the most popular boats for using to enjoy the sea. However, unless you are a Rib owner, the only way to get out on the water in one has been to beg a ride with a friend... but no longer. Wight Charter, operating out of Bembridge, offers a completely flexible charter service to suit everyone’s needs and any eventuality.

With two 8.5 metre Cobra Ribs powered by 4.2 turbocharged Mercruiser inboards, comfort and stability can be assured,

which means that families can also safely take advantage of Rib cruises. Wight Charter can offer groups of up to eight people per boat the option of a short cruise around local waters or, alternatively, longer trips with interesting information being supplied about the many seamarks and nautical places of interest. For those looking for a water taxi from Portsmouth, Southampton, Chichester, or any other venues, Wight Charter are always happy to oblige. Wight Charter have been particularly successful in their commercial vessel enterprise and

offer a flexible service transferring crew to and from tankers and cargo ships at anchor in St. Helens Roads and Nab anchorages. With captains and crew arriving and departing internationally, office hours obviously don’t apply - it is quite normal to find Wight Charter alongside an oil tanker in St. Helens roads at midnight or in the early hours! With this experience and the professional service that Wight Charter guarantees, you can be assured of a great time on the water. What are you going to do today?


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lifestyle sailing by

It’s all ship shape down by the river ESTABLISHED in 1988, Richardsons is a family run business building and servicing yachts. Terry and Carla Richardson run the slipping, repairs and engineering side of the business while Martin Richardson runs the busy chandlery.

Working within Island Harbour, on the River Medina at Binfield, they have a team of skilled craftsmen and technicians to carry out all types of repairs and refits providing a complete service for all your boating requirements. Working with specialist paint coating company, DS Coatings, they have recently been approved to carry out repair work to lifeboats for the RNLI and have just taken delivery of their 4th contract – a Tyne class vessel from the Isle of Man. Their new 50-ton travel hoist and a 25-ton boat mover have now been in operation for over a year and are proving to be a very efficient system. The chandlery is possibly one of the best stocked in the Solent area with everything

from anti-fouling and anodes to new engines by Lombardini and Vetus. Electrical and plumbing equipment, assorted fenders, ropes, International and Blakes paints, locks and catches, lifejackets and life-rafts, new loos and cookers – you name it, they have it. And if they don’t it can be ordered. There’s even a small grocery section and a selection of boat related gifts. Island Harbour has recently undergone a massive upgrading program that included new electrical and water distribution systems, extensive dredging works, pontoon replacement, resurfacing and much more. All of which has resulted in top class facilities for yachts and motorboats, both afloat and ashore.

During the first three months of the year Richardsons offered a ‘Credit Crunch Special One Week Ashore,’ for only £20 per metre which included haul out, power wash, set up ashore and re-launch including the hard-standing. It was so popular they are planning to re-launch this offer during May – watch out for their advert or contact Carla on 821095 for further information.

Cowes week offer

COWES Yacht Haven, the very heart of Cowes Week, has announced today it will give specially-discounted early bird passes to the Haven during Cowes Week. The marina is giving race competitors access to all its entertainment throughout the famous event for only £15. The passes normally cost £50 but Cowes Yacht Haven has stated that it wants make sure race competitors’ costs are kept as low as possible while ensuring they are still given

the very best of entertainment.

Manager, Steve Cole, said: “We understand that this year is tough for everyone. Because of this we wanted to do something that would take some of the worry away from the dedicated competitors who come back year after year. Cowes Week is such a fantastic event in the sailing calendar and we want to do everything we can to make sure competitors enjoy everything that it has to offer.” As always, Cowes Yacht Haven will be at the centre of the action as it hosts live music on its

stage every day. This year will once again see the return of the Champagne G.H. Mumm bar on the water’s edge, as well as the famous beer tent. Retail units will be set up at Cowes Yacht Haven offering visitors a chance to do some shopping on the waterfront and lots of events will take place in the centre every day throughout the week. For more information or to buy tickets call 01983 299975 or e-mail info@cowesyachthaven. com. Cowes Yacht Haven is offering the discount to any competitor who buys them before June 30.


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lifestyle sailing by

Laser sailing with Pelican FOR the first time ever, Cowes Yacht Haven has become home to a high performance, three-man keelboat racing charter company. The popular marina has welcomed Pelican Racing, which will offer visitors the chance to take part in races, lessons and leisurely sailing, even if they don’t own their own boat.

Pelican Racing is headed up by sailing instructors Ash Holmes and Phil Devereux and aims to make sailing and racing accessible to anyone. The firm has six Laser SB3 high performance sports boats based at Cowes Yacht Haven, which members of the public can charter for leisurely sails, racing or even lessons. Sailors, families, novices and companies buy membership to Pelican Racing, which is available at three different levels, and this gives them time on the boats in return. Pelican Racing will run various racing events, regattas and championships from Cowes Yacht Haven and is the only SB3 race charter company on the Isle of Wight. Joint Director, Ash Holmes, said: “Racing is such a great part of sailing and we want to make that as accessible as possible to everyone from seasoned sailors to total beginners and families. It seems that with

the recession a lot of people are selling their boats, which is sad as sailing is such a great sport. Phil and I are so passionate about racing that we wanted to launch a company that would enable people, whatever their background, to take part. We chose to base ourselves at Cowes Yacht Haven because it is a central place for yachting, not just in the south but for the whole of the UK. It’s very popular and it’s a perfect location for us because people can get on our boats and go straight into the Solent.” Steve Cole, Managing Director of Cowes Yacht Haven, said: “We’re delighted to welcome an exciting new business to our marina, particularly as it is the first racing specialist charter company to establish itself here. The partnership between Cowes Yacht Haven and Pelican Racing means visitors will have even more to see and do, and they don’t even need to own a boat to enjoy going out on the water.” To celebrate the partnership

between the two companies, a launch event will take place at Cowes Yacht Haven on Sunday, April 19. There will be racing in the morning, followed by a BBQ and drinks into the evening.

To find out more about Cowes Yacht Haven visit www.cowesyachthaven.com. To find out more about Pelican Racing visit www.pelican-racing.co.uk.

A fleet of Pelicans race out on the Solent


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lifestyle living


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lifestyle island bounty

Continental and Island deli mix IT was the first anniversary of Jo Davis’s move to Bembridge Deli this Easter and she was incredibly busy as usual. The smell of home cooked food filled the air as she rolled out wholemeal pastry.

Local second home-owners are particularly fond of her home dining meals which can be ordered in advance. Island produce is always in demand and Jo tries to use as many local ingredients in her home cooked foods – local Garlic Farm asparagus in the lovely hand made quiches for example. Jo makes all the cakes, pates, quiches and scones sold in the

shop. Hamilton’s Fine Foods supply all of the Cornish pasties and sausage rolls, but virtually all the other foods are cooked on the premises in the kitchen behind the shop, including the bread and croissants. The hams are all roasted here along with the juicy rare beef. Wight Salad’s tomatoes from the Tomato Stall are used throughout the shop. “The oak smoked tomatoes fly out,” said Jo. Isle of Wight Cheese is also popular, particularly the IOW Blue and the Galleybagger. Bembridge crab is from Richard Barrett in the harbour. Honey is sourced from a local man who has just half a dozen hives in his back garden. Horringford jams and chutneys are another popular choice along with the Sharon Orchard apple juices. Ice cream is from Minghellas. There are no additives or preservatives in any foods and Jo does try to use Island produce as much as possible. The emphasis is on quality whether Island sourced or from elsewhere. The shop has a fresh blue and white upto-date New England style interior with white painted wood and blue shelving. Little French touches add a continental ambience. Brazilian Azore Blue coffee makes an ideal accompaniment to a slice of home made cake or one of Jo’s scones with Isle of Wight cream and jam and you can sit outside the shop and watch the world go by under the striped awning.

Keeping it local ALTHOUGH Manor House Produce are one of the major wholesale suppliers of fresh Island fruit and vegetables, they are also able to supply individual customers, from their Daish Way premises, or they can deliver.

From an old Island family, Nick Yates runs this family business, which has been trading for many years. “We’ve got IOW aubergines and IOW asparagus from the Garlic Farm and we’ve got some very nice local rhubarb,” said Nick. “And we’re still selling some extremely good local cauliflower, potatoes, leeks, parsnips, red and white cabbage and purple sprouting broccoli and new potatoes will be arriving shortly.” Manor House are also one of the few places you can buy Isle of Wight Salad produce – you can’t get their tomatoes in the local supermarkets. “They’re much better quality than you’ll get from any other commercial grower,” said Nick. “They’re at the cutting edge of the horticultural industry. For value of product their tomatoes are our best line.” “We work closely with the local growers so we do have a better range than anyone else. I’ve always believed in local produce, long before food miles and carbon footprints,” said Nick. “If you’re eating something that’s been travelling for several days then all you’re eating is fibre – all of the vitamins have gone.”

On the plus side, Nick has seen customers returning to independent traders. “The shops that are prepared to give it a go are usually rewarded with a good response from their customers,” said Nick. Manor House supply many catering establishments from works canteens to top of the range hotels, the Co Op stores and smaller shops such as Orchard Brothers in Freshwater, Briddlesford Farm shop and the Hollis’s shop in Brighstone.


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lifestyle island bounty

All dressed up and ready to tempt your palate

THIS delightful small family run business in Bembridge has now been established for 13 years.

It is not a restaurant but a place to buy some of the Island’s most famous produce. ‘The Best Dressed Crab In Town’ specialises in the freshest, finest crabs and lobsters, which are caught locally, and only the very best are selected. They sell beautiful fresh local dressed crabs - served in their shell, ready to eat, fantastic whole crabs, amazing giant crab claws, tubs of fresh crab and fresh local lobsters - simply cooked, cooked and prepared or live. Local Bembridge Prawns, which are an absolute delicacy, are available when in season (usually July to September). They also stock an unusual selection of large raw tiger prawns either whole, tail on or peeled and de-veined - a wonderful addition to any barbeque! All produce is subject to availability. Not even salt is added to the water, it’s simply pure fresh food. To be able to supply the demand at busy times such as bank holidays the produce are kept alive in tanks deep out to sea during the week and bought in and cooked for the weekend. The Best Dressed Crab In Town supply

most of the Islands more prestigious hotels and restaurants as the quality of the meat is, as stated by so many customers, the most delicious crab in the world. Did you know their lobsters are actually some of the cheapest in the world? Just compare to Thailand, Borneo, Dublin (to name but a few) - the countries that you would think would be cheaper are far more expensive. Prices seem to be approximately £30 plus per kilo – compared with The Best Dressed Crab’s floating prices of around £20 per kilo. And have you ever tried it in America or Australia? It is a different type (crayfish), but there is no comparison in taste. Our local lobster is a league ahead of any in the world – try it and see! All produce is subject to availability due to tides and weather conditions. Ivar Cottage, Hillway

The Best Dressed Crab use only locally caught produce

Road, Bembridge, PO35 5PJ - near Whitecliff Bay Holiday Park on Bembridge outskirts. Tel:874758


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lifestyle island bounty

Island focus

THE Island Deli is the place to buy your Island produce in Ventnor and you could also pop in for a coffee and a bite to eat. The home-made soups have been particularly popular throughout the winter and since the weather has been warmer they’ve been moving into salad production.

Organic eggs and flour from Matt Bowman at the Stoneground Flour Company are on sale and the daily delivered bread is made from his flour at the Village Bakery in Freshwater. A lot of the cakes and pastries sold in the café area are made in the shop. “We’re trying to stock and use

as much Island produce as possible,” said owner Jenny Richards who opened the deli last August bank holiday. “People are particularly attached to the bread which keeps very well.” In the centre of the shop is the selection of vegetables and fruit. “We’ve got great apples, plums and pears at the moment,” said Jenny. Seasonal fruit and vegetables are always on sale and at the moment include the Garlic Farm’s fresh asparagus. Chutneys, mayonnaise and garlic from the Garlic Farm are always in stock. Sharon Orchard’s apple juices include the new apple and mango and apple and blackcurrant varieties. Tomatoes from Wight Salad’s

Tomato Stall are stocked including the oven and oak roasted tomatoes in various different oils. Cheeses from the Isle of Wight Cheese Company are popular and milk, butter and cream is from Rew Valley Farm. Island Deli do also sell a range of continental meats and cheeses to complement the Island produce and have a range of tinned specialist products such as organic coconut milk. They even have lemon grass on sale. In the small café area you could try one of the seasonal specials of the week, depending on the season. Or you could pop in for a Lavazza coffee and come out with the ingredients for a tasty meal.

Taste the difference

FOR Island reared meat, look no further than Island Foods in Sandown who have Island beef, pork and lamb. Predominantly suppliers to restaurants, private customers are also welcome to buy from this well established wholesale foods company.

Island Foods buy the animals direct from the farms, arrange the slaughter and then they are returned to the Faulkner Lane premises for butchering. “We have a very good relationship with the abattoir and trace-ability is excellent,” said Steve Doe of Island Foods. Beef is from Ron Holland at Kemphill Farm in Havenstreet, and all the cattle are grazed outside. The cattle are 23 months old and the meat is hung for 23 days to ensure it is tender and matured. “We do pride ourselves on our beef - It’s lovely quality meat,” said Steve. “Ron picks out all of the cattle for us and all of his animals go to Island Foods.” “All of our cattle are bought as nine month old single-suckle calves in the autumn,” explained Ron Holland. “By the time they leave me they’ve had two summers on grass and I insist that they are hung for three weeks – that’s the difference between my beef and anyone else’s.” Last year Ron bought 90 of his cattle here on the Island too – so they really are home grown.

Pork comes from Moor Farm in Godshill. “We buy as many as we’re able to take from them,” said Steve. Lamb comes from Les Morris at Parkwater Farm on Forest Road in Newport. His sheep graze all over the Island – you may have seen them recently finishing off the cauliflower and sprout stalks in fields at the side of the road. All meat is vacuum packed for freshness and can be cut in any portions you require, on or off the bone. Island Foods also make burgers and various different kinds of sausages – you could get them to make some for a barbeque or party if you want to impress your guests with Island produce. “It’s great that people are pushing local foods and the suppliers are such nice people – so helpful,” said Steve.


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lifestyle living


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lifestyle garden and green

Toby’s gardening tips By Toby Beasley, head gardener, Osborne House THIS is one of the best times of year for planting so we have been putting in some new shrubs around the pleasure grounds. It’s worth bearing a couple of things in mind however. It’s too late to plant any bare root trees or shrubs so now it’s probably best to buy plants grown in pots. The other thing to consider is how hardy the plant is. We may still get a frost - it’s unlikely, and if we do get one it will probably be very slight - but it’s probably worth waiting until May to plant out any tender plants.

There are three factors that I feel are important when planting. I’m a firm believer that shrubs grown in pots should have their roots teased out when planting. The roots normally curve around following the shape of the pot and if left can continue growing in this manner. I’ve dug up poorly performing shrubs that have been planted five years previously only to find the root ball is still the same shape as the pot it had been grown in all those years

before. There’s no need to be too rough with the plants but when they are knocked out of their pot just pull the roots apart slightly to encourage them to spread. Next make sure you dig a hole large enough to take the plant’s root ball. I have seen a lot of poor planting where the shrub has been jammed into a small hole and a size 10 boot has been used to force it in. A few weeks later the top of the root ball becomes exposed as rain washes the soil away and the plant will suffer with every dry spell. Planting is the only time you can get this right so make sure the hole is larger than the pot the plant is grown in, twice as large is a good rule

of thumb. Incorporate some well rotted garden compost and a high phosphate fertiliser to promote good root growth. Make sure the plant is also planted so the soil level in the pot is at the same level, or fractionally below the level, of the soil in your border. Finally make sure the plants are well watered in. A really good initial soaking will also help any subsequent rainfall penetrate through the soil rather than just damp the surface. If you have any garden compost left over this will also make an ideal mulch. Spread it around your plants a couple of inches thick and this will help to keep the moisture where it is needed.

Now is one of the best times of year for planting


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lifestyle pets

Cutting it fine K9 CUTZ, at the bottom of Shanklin’s train station yard, move into their third year this month and the dog grooming business is booming. Winners of the Retail and Service Industry Award at last year’s IW Chamber of Commerce Business Awards for Excellence, husband and wife team Leon and Donna Sayer are also experienced at dog showing with their award The K9 Cutz van makes keeping your pet triimed a breeze winning Yorkies.

Donna is fully qualified with City and Guilds qualifications in dog grooming and first aid qualifications for dogs and cats. You will find K9 Cutz at many of the Island shows this summer where they have found that their range of designer petwear and dog accessories with brands such as Puchi, Pet London and Rogz leads and collars have sold particularly well. For more details visit www. k9cutz.co.uk

Healthy grooming WE’RE in National Pet Month at the moment – it began on April 4 and runs until May 4 – and this year the theme is “Healthy Pets Make Happy Pets. ” This is something that Judy Angus at ABC Grooming is keen to promote.

“A groomer should be able to pick up on health issues that owners may miss such as mammary tumours, testicular tumours and pests such as ticks and fleas,” said Judy. “We also check inside the pads of your dog’s feet and chip their toenails,” she added. “Every dog has a full body massage when they’re shampooed and this is particularly good for older dogs. They might limp in and go out with a spring in their step.” “We get to know dogs who come in regularly and can spot any skin issues, hair loss or other problems. We can act as an intermediary between the dog owner and the vets,” continued Judy, “and suggest a visit to the vet if we see a problem. We also check the dog’s teeth and the condition of the eyes.” Members of the British Dog Groomers Association, fully qualified and insured, Judy and Katie Dobson work in restful lilac coloured premises in Newport’s New Street. Judy is now in her sixth year here and is also experienced at dog showing – her miniature and standard Schnauzers have qualified for Crufts in the past.

Pictured here is the Alfie, the two-year old Bichon Frise, who has just been combed prior to having his hair clipped. He happily sat on the hydraulic table having his hair carefully combed out by Katie, whilst being blow-dried with one of the enormous hair dryers.


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lifestyle hospice

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  Friday April 17 2009

Hospice News Earl Mountbatten Hospice - Newport

Last few days to register for Walk the Wight 2009

WALK the Wight 2009 is almost here. If you intend to walk but have not registered you must do so by May 1st. There will be NO registration accepted on the day this year for any of the walk options. Please register even if you are not absolutely sure you are going to walk – registering does not commit you to anything.

The hospice is requiring everyone to register by May 1st in order to ensure enough support services are available on the day, Sunday May 17th. David Cheek, Head of Fundraising said “We are very grateful to the thousands of people who walk for us every year. Now though, the event has got so big

The Gazette with your help has so far raised

17,309.55

we need to know numbers in advance so we can plan the buses, marshals, toilets, refreshments etc and this will help us to make the day a safe and enjoyable one for everybody taking part.”

sored you for. In order to do this please ensure your sponsors put down their full first name on your sponsor form. Unfortunately the tax man will no longer accept an initial.

15 per cent off for walkers at Millets

Schools Walk the Wight

PLEASE remember on Saturday 25 April there is 15% off all purchases at Millets in Newport on production of your walker number. Representatives from the hospice will be there and people will be able to register at the shop for that day only.

Gift Aid – full name required WHEN your sponsors fill in your sponsor form, if they are British tax payers the Island’s Hospice can claim gift aid on the amount they have spon-

Hospice Fundraising: Telephone - 528989

IF your child is taking part in Schools Walk the Wight please remember that only children who are registered through their school, have completed their virtual miles and have their walker number with them on May 17th will be able to collect a medal at the end of the event when they complete their final four miles. Unfortunately we will not be able to issue medals to anyone that isn’t registered and doesn’t have a number.

The final four mile walk for Schools Walk the Wight begins at Freshwater at 10am. Please may we ask that accompanied children do not start walking from Freshwater before this time.


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Send your news to newsdesk@iwgazette.co.uk or tel. (01983) 409928

gazette feature

High hopes for new sheriff The new High Sheriff at a glance • Born in Kent, raised in Buckinghamshire • Married with two children, four grandchildren and a young labrador • Lived in London as a young woman and worked in publishing and films • Moved to the Island in 1968 • She worked for the family firm of Dabells, running one of their department stores • She is trained as a garden designer • In 1979 she was appointed to the Parole Board • She chaired the Hampshire Probation Board and the Hampshire Care Trust • She enjoys houses, gardens, driving, opera, cinema, theatre and good food – and skis “because David does”

What is a High Sheriff? • The Office of High Sheriff in England and Wales began over 1,000 years ago and is the oldest continuous secular Office under the Crown • High Sheriffs were originally the main tax collectors for the king • The High Sheriff is the Sovereign’s representative on all matters relating to civil law and order • The High Sheriff comes second in precedence to the County’s Lord-Lieutenant.

Historical functions

The High Sheriff: • Attends Royal visits to the Isle of Wight • Provides hospitality and looks after the wellbeing of High Court judges visiting the Isle of Wight • Acts as the Returning Officer for parliamentary elections • Was responsible for the proclamation of the accession of a new Sovereign • Maintained the loyalty of subjects to the Crown.

THE ISLAND’S new High Sheriff is going to put the focus firmly on our young people. Paul Rainford met her GAY EDWARDS has a tough act to follow. Her predecessor in the office of High Sheriff of the Isle of Wight was a certain gardener and TV presenter whose face was never away for too long from our local media. Alan Titchmarsh (for it is he) may have been a controversial choice for some, but there can be no doubt that he raised the profile of the Island, rarely wasting a chance to give it a plug on his daytime TV show, for example. Funnily enough, Mrs Edwards also has green fingers

– she runs a garden design business. But, unlike her predecessor, she has lived on the Island for over 40 years, moving here in 1968 when she married David Edwards, owner of the Dabells furnishings firm. Mrs Edwards knows that her stint as High Sheriff will probably be lower profile than Alan Titchmarsh’s, but that suits her just fine. She sees her role as a sort of facilitator, supporting and encouraging voluntary organisations engaged in all aspects of civil law and order. “I see the job as making

things better for other people, helping to showcase other people’s work in these area,” says Mrs Edwards. “All I can do is put myself at the disposal of the relevant agencies. All sorts of good things are already happening – I can just help draw attention to them.” Her involvement in the criminal justice system, which began in the 1970s when she sat on the Local Review Committee at Camp Hill and Parkhurst Prisons, has obviously left its mark on her. She knows all too well how young

In addition to the functions listed above, the High Sheriff: • Undertakes duties to support and encourage voluntary and statutory organisations engaged in all aspects of civil law and order • Works with organisations involved with young people, particularly those that seek to keep them from drifting into crime • Makes awards to those who, in the opinion of the judges at a criminal trial, have been active in the apprehension of certain offenders • Participates in Citizenship Ceremonies • Is advised and assisted by a legally trained Under-Sheriff.

Picture by Gretl Lewis

Modern functions

From left to right: John Matthews (Under Sheriff), Stephen Howe (Chairman of the Magistrates Bench), Gay Edwards, Archdeacon Caroline Baston, Judge Cowling

people, without the right help and guidance, can easily slip into a futile life of crime. For this reason, she sees her focus as High Sheriff being very much on Island youth. “We need to keep the children out of trouble – the prison system has taught me that. We need to keep them away from the courts and police stations.” She believes that the secret is getting to the kids early on, at primary school age if possible. One of the existing projects that she holds up as an example of the sort of projects she seeks to support is ‘Ventnor Together’, which has given the youth of the town a café as a safe place to meet in, amongst other things. At her Declaration ceremony in Sts Thomas’ Minster in Newport on April 6, Mrs Edwards emphasised her commitment to Island youth by having a guard of honour made up of girl guides at the entrance to the Minster to greet her on her arrival. And in her address she elaborated on the theme of Island youth. Though she has plenty of appointments already in her diary, as yet Mrs Edwards has no real idea of how much time her High Sheriff duties will take up. But while she may not be called to as many photo opportunities as her celebrity predecessor, it is probably safe to assume that she will have a bit less time for designing gardens.


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gazette property

the gazette  

Friday APRIL 17 2009

Send your news to newsdesk@iwgazette.co.uk or tel. (01983) 409928

MELBURY, ROOKLEY - £365,000

• Jaccuzi • Games Room/Bar • 3 Lettting Bedrooms • Conservatory • Rural Location • Chain Free Melbury is a detached chalet bungalow nestling in the beautiful Island countryside with far reaching views of Downland. The bungalow has been de-registered as a guest house, with 4 bedrooms (3 letting bedrooms), owners accommodation good size kitchen, dining hall, living room, conservatory, former residents bar and games room, annexe with jacuzzi, laundry room, play room and study, landscaped gardens with pond, garden railway, sun terrace, decking terrace, log store, garden shed, garden store and ample parking for several vehicles.

• 80ft Garden • Period Features • Convenient Location • Off Road Parking • Completly Refurbished • Garden Workshop • Chain Free A Semi-Detached house which has undergone a complete make-over with a luxury bathroom and quality kitchen, 2 bedrooms, 2 reception rooms, garden and driveway. Done to a modern minimalist style yet retaining many period features. Centrally located in Lake village, ideal for local shops and schools.

MELVILLE STREET, SANDOWN - £85,000 • Chain Free • Ground Floor • Town Location • Double Glazing • Seperate Kitchen • Private Rear Garden A ground floor apartment that comprises bedroom, kitchen, living room, bathroom and garden. It has been updated by the current owner and is centrally located in Sandown. The sandy beaches of Sandown are accessible and have safe swimming due to generally calm waters.

N pr ew ic e

in N st e ru w ct io n

NEW ROAD, LAKE - £153,000


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gazette property

Send your news to newsdesk@iwgazette.co.uk or tel. (01983) 409928

A rare chance to acquire this three bedroom country cottage believed to date back to 1820. Sat on approximately 2 Acres of land with breathtaking panoramic sea and country views for as far as the eye can see. This home which was extended around 1840 has over the years been continuously cared for, retaining many original features and maintained to a very high standard. It is located in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Southdown Corner, Chale, could be the dream home you have been looking for.

34 STAPLERS ROAD, NEWPORT - £170,000

16 LOWER FURRLONGS, BRADING - £160,000

• 70 ft Garden • Patio • Three Bedrooms • Workshop • Conservatory • Cloakroom

• Off Road Parking • Garden • Double Glazed • Village Location • Chain Free • Cloakroom

A Semi detached house which benefits from 3 bedrooms, conservatory, living room, large kitchen diner, cloakroom, garden, patio & workshop. Accessible to the beautiful island countryside via the Downs and Bridle paths

A semi-detached house comprising two Bedrooms, Kitchen, Living Room,Cloakroom, Shower Room, Garden and Off Road Parking. Located in the historic town of Brading the property is within a short walk of the Downs, Brading village and train station. Brading is a picturesque village situated at the eastern end of the Island in the beautiful Yar Valley, a popular Wildlife and Sailing centre.

re Pr du ic ct e io n

• Detached Cottage • Amazing Views • Double Glazing • Approx. 2 Acres of Land • Oil Fired Central Heating • Well Maintained • Chain Free

re Pr du ic ct e io n

SOUTHDOWN CORNER, CHALE - £365,000


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the gazette  

gazette business news

Friday APRIL 17 2009

Send your news to newsdesk@iwgazette.co.uk or tel. (01983) 409928

Fresh start for town pub THE NEW owners of the Plough and Barleycorn pub in Shanklin have vowed to turn their new business into a success, despite recent figures showing that up to six pubs a day are closing across the country. Gillian and Jack Bell reopened opened the doors April 6 after it was closed for over a year and fell into a state of disrepair. The couple know that they face a challenge, but it is one that they are looking forward to. “We like to take on pubs that have gone as low as they possibly can. We own a hotel not far away, and hopefully the two can complement each other. They are close enough so we can run the two businesses. And we have already had some great support from other hoteliers in the town,” said Mrs Bell. “This is such a great pub in a great location and it was crying out to be turned into a dining pub. It had been closed for 68 weeks before we took it on. “We are right in the middle of town and we have already had a few people in for food and for drinks, which is very encouraging. We see this as a great adventure,” said Mrs Bell.

By Jamie White The new owners are keen to be seen as offering real value for money: “I’m a believer in not raising prices in the summer and lowering them in the winter. We want to provide a good standard of service all year round, and be consistent. “There is a philosophy on the Island that it is only holidaymakers who eat out during the summer holidays. That is not the case. “We want to attract families and locals all year round and obviously holidaymakers as well. We want to cater for everyone,” added Mrs Bell. Mr and Mrs Bell also know the importance of thinking local when it comes to running a successful business. “We want to use as much local food as possible and also get some local beers in behind the bar. To help them with their ambitious plans they have had to find plenty of help. “Many of the 20 staff that we have employed were out of work. I got about 300 people phoning us up and sending their CVs through to us. “We have got a couple of people who worked with us at our last pub and we know that

they are fully behind us – that has helped with transition. We are confident that if we are not here then the pub is in safe hands.” Mrs Bell was quick to praise the efforts of the brewery that have helped them finally re-open after many problems and hurdles were overcome. “The Enterprise brewery have been fantastic and couldn’t have done anymore to help us. When we first got in here we had problems with the roof and leaking and troubles with gas. The brewery has sorted everything out for us. Unfortunately it has been the utility companies that have created the most problems.” Mr Bell admitted that they did consider re-naming the pub, but decided against it due

to concerns of identity loss. “We decided to keep the name because a lot of people know where it is. If we changed it we ran the risk of perhaps getting lost in the crowd and people not knowing who or where we are.” The couple are hopeful that they can turn it around and build a reputable dining pub where people will want to come and visit time and time again. “We want to build a good reputation. We have removed the sports theme and made it more of a family pub. Shanklin has got sports pubs and purely drinking pubs already. We want people to come here and feel comfortable in a friendly and relaxed atmosphere.”

Scouting for talent

RAPANUI, the Lake-based online ecoclothing brand, is looking to source new design talent to work on its 2010 collection. The company, which was founded by Rob and Mart Drake-Knight, is welcoming online design submissions from students worldwide, after a similar competition run in 2008 for UK students proved a success. The competition is being organised by Eve Ottaway, a fashion technology graduate, who has recently been recruited to the Rapanui team. The deadline for entries is May 10. Interested artists can email email eve@rapanuiclothing.com for further details and a design brief.

New owners Gillian and Jack Bell: ready for the challenge


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Send your news to newsdesk@iwgazette.co.uk or tel. (01983) 409928

gazette business news

Keelboats for hire at Haven Phil Devereux (left) and Ash Holmes: fleet of six Laser SB3s at Cowes Yacht Haven

A NEW yacht charter company has been launched in Cowes with the aim of giving sailors of all abilities the opportunity to sail and race highperformance keelboats – without the hassle and expense of actually running a boat. Pelican Racing, run by Phil Devereux and Ash Holmes, is starting off with a fleet of six Laser SB3s based at Cowes Yacht Haven. The long-term plan is to roll out to other ports around Europe with a reputation for competitive sports keel boat fleets. Members at Cowes would then be provided with transferable

By Paul Rainford membership points to use in other locations. To mark the launch of the company, Pelican Racing is entering all six Laser SB3s into the Warash Raymarine Spring Championships on April 18-19. Mr Devereux is originally from the North East of England and learned to sail in the Solent as a boy when visiting family. Mr Holmes grew up and learned to sail in Cornwall before moving to the Island in 2004.

Gurit donation supports St Catherine’s GURIT, the composites company that is one of the Island’s major employers, has presented a cheque for £1,250 to St Catherine’s, the Ventnor-based speech, language and communications charity. Gurit’s Tony Green said: “We chose St Catherine’s as they provide an invaluable service for young people with speech, language and communication disabilities, helping them move successfully into adulthood and giving them equal opportunities along whatever path they choose to take”. Kim Fry, community fundraiser at St Catherine’s, added: “We are absolutely delighted to receive such a

wonderful donation. “St Catherine’s is working hard to raise funds to support The Worx, our new vocational training programme and to purchase specialist therapy equipment. Part of the donation will also support recreational and sporting activities as many of our young people who live at St Catherine’s participate in sports activities across the Island.” St Catherine’s residential centre on the Island encompasses a specialist main school and further education centre, intensive speech, language and occupational therapy, vocational training facilities and residential and care provision.

Liz Earle’s guide to better skin

LIZ EARLE, cofounder of the Rydebased beauty brand Liz Earle Naturally Active Skincare, has published an in-depth guide to healthy skin. Drawing on the author’s problems with eczema when growing up, Liz Earle’s Skin Secrets looks at solutions to common skin complaints such as eczema, acne, rosacea and psoriasis. The book also focuses on the holistic approach to skincare, emphasising the importance of what you eat and how you sleep. Before starting her beauty business with colleague Kim Buckland in 1995, Liz worked as a magazine beauty editor. Liz Earle products

are now sold in over 80 countries worldwide, with much of the business done online or by mail order. Liz was awarded the

MBE for services to the beauty industry in 2007. Liz Earle’s Skin Secrets is published by Kyle Cathie, priced £19.99.

Tony Green and Katherine Lloyd of Gurit present the cheque to St Catherine’s learners

Landmark for Down

A FIRM of Island stonemasons is branching out from its core work of engraving memorial stones to create what is sure to become a popular landmark on Tennyson Down.

Wight Stonemasonry, based at Dinglers Farm near Shalfleet, are preparing to start work on a toposcope, a monument which indicates the distance and direction from a set point of named landmarks. AS THE new cricket season approaches, Newclose It will be placed close to the existing Tennyson County Cricket Ground (pictured) has announced Memorial, to help mark the 200th anniversary of two new recruits to its hospitality team. the Victorian poet’s birth. Head chef Kevin Crew and bar and restau“It’s something a little bit different for us,” said rant manager Pete Muspratt have joined general Dave Hailstone, a stonemason with the company. manager Mike Scott on a full time basis. “We’re hoping to get the final design through Mr Muspratt and and Mr Crew have both worked before the end of April. I’ve got to go up Tennyson in the hotel and catering sector on the Island for Down to take some final measurements before we several years, and latterly have run their own busi- get started on it.” nesses. Mr Scott said: “It was a difficult task finding The toposcope, made of black granite, will be the right people for these roles – I didn’t want unveiled on August 6. people who would just do their job. It is important The design is the work of Tim O’Brien, an Island that they would provide service of the highest pos- graphic artist, and pupils at West Wight Middle sible quality, and that whoever we employed was School are also helping with the project by calculatprepared to take responsibility for their areas of the ing the distances of the landmarks indicated by the business. toposcope. “I am confident that in Pete and Kevin we have The project is being supported by the National the right people, and that Newclose will benefit Trust, Totland Parish Council, the Freshwater Bay from their input.” Residents’ Association and the Tennyson Society.

Newclose team grows


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Bag yourself a Burgman FUEL prices have sunk somewhat, but they are still a lot higher than they used to be. How can you fight back? Isle of Wight Motorcycles have the answer for you. It’s called the Burgman, and it’s been a very successful line of scooters for Suzuki throughout the UK and the rest of the world. Available in 125cc, 200cc, 400cc and 650cc versions. The first impression is one of imposing size on the 400 and 650cc models, which dissipates once you discover the low, stepped saddle with adjustable back rest and even lower centre of gravity. The bike is easy to lift off the stand and purrs to life very quickly and quietly. The bike rolls through streets with twist n’ go simplicity, easy to ride as it soaks up bumps and bends gently into corners with plenty of ground clearance to spare. But that’s not only what the larger Burgmans are about. It’s about good handling and being powerful enough to keep experienced riders entertained while having the convenience features that make a scooter such a great transportation tool. On a Burgman, the rider and passenger can enjoy power about on a par with the average middleweight cruiser while offering touring bike levels of seating comfort and wind

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Audi shines again

protection. At the destination, protective gear can be doffed and stowed in the spacious storage compartments, allowing care-free exploration. Maybe you can even change your shoes for more comfortable walking. The smaller engined Burgmans aren’t about ultimate performance, ultimate style or even being the member of some exclusive twowheeled club. It’s about using two wheels as fun, practical, convenient transportation. It delivers. Pick up a few items from the shop, and you will have no trouble stowing them in the cavernous space under the wide, comfortable seat. There’s room for two helmets under there, or for a couple bags of groceries, as well as three smaller compartments in the front of the bike. There is no doubt that the Burgman is an excellent scooter, perhaps the best available. Prices range from £3,070 to £7,391 for the Executive model, inclusive of government charges. Phone Isle of Wight Motorcycles on 522675 or call in to the showroom at 15 Daish Way, Newport to try one. At Isle of Wight Motorcycles, you choose a scooter because it’s simply the smartest way to get around. And now with four engine sizes to choose THE 2009 Audi A4 just oozes luxury and quality. The newly from. styled body is slightly longer and wider than before and is very easy on the eye, with its prowling LED front lights. It looks sleek, sporting and yet solid. Its small headlamps and large grille, which Audi have adapted on most of their new models, give the front a slightly aggressive look, while the rear is tight and compact. The model I took out around the Island’s winding roads was the sporty 1.8 TFSI S-line. It has a top speed of around 140mph and can do 0-62mph in a little over eight seconds. All of the new A4s have halogen daytime running lights, fog lights front and rear, alloy

By Jamie White wheels, climate control, a parking brake with the switch of a button, powered and heated door mirrors, an impressive audio system with display – and offer a general feeling of well being. The S-line is a much sportier car with larger 18-inch alloys, lowered sports suspension, partleather upholstery and body-styling including exclusive bumper design. There is certainly a sense of well-sorted suspension, as it handles bends with ease and cushions the bumps – and we all know there are plenty of those on the Island! The braking is very responsive,

perhaps a little bit too much so at times, but has that strong feel of German efficiency. The slick gearshift makes you want to swap gears just for the fun of it. Inside there is plenty of room. There is an executive feel to the car, as is the case with most of the new Audis, but the sport feature adds that extra bit of bite. Inside there is a bedazzling, cockpit-like amount of detail on the dash and you really do feel like you are about to fly a fighter jet rather than drive a car. The new Audi A4 is competing with the BMW 3 series and the Mercedes C Class, which are both established and impressive, but after this latest Audi masterpiece, I can’t see them having too many problems on that front.


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gazette sport

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Bahrain honour for Brian NORTHWOODBASED yachtsman Brian Thompson has been awarded the Order of Bahrain from The King of Bahrain, His Majesty King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa. The prestigious accolade was awarded for Thompson’s historic completion of the solo, non-stop, round-theworld yacht race, the Vendée Globe – the first time a yacht carrying the King’s name and the Kingdom of Bahrain livery has sailed around the globe. Thompson, who is visiting the Kingdom of Bahrain for the first time since completing his epic voyage in February, was presented to His Majesty at a special reception in Manama, attended by other senior Bahrain representatives, including Labour Minister, His Excellency Dr Al Alawi and Bahrain Team Pindar’s reigning Double ISAF World Match Racing Champion, Ian Williams and chairman, Andrew Pindar OBE. On receiving the award, Brian said: “I am immensely proud to receive this award from His Majesty King Hamad. It was an honour and a privilege to sail around the world on a yacht bearing both his name and the national identity of the Kingdom of Bahrain.”

Thompson: proud

Keith strikes it Rich to land trophy again KEITH FILES is again the proud holder of Shanklin and Sandown Golf Club’s Rich Cup – an incredible 47 years after he first won the trophy. Keith, a member of SSGC for 51 years, beat Clive Robinson in the final of the winter knockout competition, a singles matchplay competition. He said: “It has been a long time coming, but I am delighted to have won it again.” Having joined the club as a junior in 1958, Keith was the first Island Junior Champion in the 1960s and followed in the footsteps of his father, who was also a member of SSGC for more than 50 years. There was a tight finish to the SSGC Pro’s Day medal event, when 133 members contested the competition. No fewer than five players finished with a net 65. Richie Maddocks took the honours on countback, ahead of David Bartlett, Garry Moody, Greg Hammond and John Cockerton. The Easter Monday Texas Scramble proved a hugely popular event with 32 teams of four, using one-quarter of overall handicaps, battling for honours. The quartet of Jonathan West, David Bell, Trevor Mitchell and Josh Craig emerged victorious with an impressive score of 51.8. They finished just ahead of James Hilson, Dominic Norris, Connor Knight and Ben Rayner who carded 52.6. They edged Clive Robinson, Tyler Roberts, Alan Winter and Mark King (52.7) into third place. *

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A busy Easter week at Freshwater Bay Golf Club culminated in Brandon Thompson lifting two pairs trophies, one with Sammi Keen and the other partnering Kevin Garrett. Meanwhile the club entertained over 20 new beginners to the game with instruction in the new covered driving facility and guided introductions to the course. If any prospective members missed the event and would still like to participate please contact the club on 752955. The first competition was a

By Peter White midweek singles stableford played on April 8 with the CSS rising to 68 for the 38 entries. Best score of the day was returned by John Herbert (23) amassing 41 points and winning Division 2 ahead of three players on 15 points, with second place going to Dave Cooke (19) on countback from Graham Ellis (25) in third and Andrew Rann (25) in fourth, all scoring 35 points. Scoring overall was slightly higher in Division 1 with Adam Keen (11) taking first place with 39 points ahead of Hugh Morrison (15) in second on 38 points. Third place went to Kasey Tuckey (11), beating Chris West (12) on countback, both players returning 36 points. The stableford on the Saturday saw the CSS drop this time to 67 due to the consistent high scoring from the 41 entries. Round of the day went to Nat Riddett (6) returning 44 points and a gross 67 to take first place in Division 1. Second and third was decided on the back nine between two players returning 40 points – Brandon Thompson (5) came out ahead of Gary Cooke (14). Chris Tansley scored 42 points to win Division 2 ahead of fellow 18 handicapper John Sexton in second on 40 with David Hartley (15) finishing in third on 38 points, Mike Hailes (16), also on 38 points, came in fourth. The inaugural Freshwater Bay Lifeboat Trophy was played on the Sunday after it was postponed from the Friday due to fog and inclement weather. The American Greensomes event was won by Brandon Thompson and Kevin Garrett returning 45 points ahead of the second-placed father and son pairing of Tony and Mike Black, who had 44 points. Geoff Smith and Chris West managed to sneak third place on countback from Robbie and George Faulkner in fourth with Peter Cooper and Steve Orchard in fifth all recording 43 points. Of the 68 players in Ernie’s Two Ball Scramble on Easter Monday

Keith Files holding the Rich Cup - again!

Brandon again came out on top, this time partnering Sammi Keen to finish 1.5 shots ahead on 57.3. Second place went to Kev Garrett and Kevin McArthur scoring a gross 63, net 59.8 off of their 3.2 handicap allowance to beat Adam Keen and Nat Riddett on countback, returning exactly the same gross and net. The trophy presented to the Club in memory of Ernie Cooke, first played for in 2004, saw a fitting fourth place go to his son Paul partnering Miles Oldershaw to a net 61. *

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In Westridge Golf Club’s stableford competition, Mike Gregory grabbed victory, scoring 37 points to finish just one ahead of Alan Seager, who relegated Tony Ward to third place on countback. Newport took pole position in the IW Junior Spring Meet held at Westridge. The aggregate stableford

even saw Newport score 132 points, to finish ahead of Shanklin, who pipped Osborne for second place by just one point. Results: Stableford, Division 1: 1. Mike Gregory (37pts); 2. Alan Seager (36pts); 3. Tony Ward (36pts) on countback. Division 2: 1. Helen Metcalfe (37pts); 2. Lorna Pacitti (36pts); 3. Nick Geeson (33pts). IW Junior Spring Meet: 1. Newport (132pts); 2. Shanklin (119pts); 3. Osborne (118pts); 4. Freshwater (117pts); 5. Westridge (114pts); 6. Cowes (112pts); 7. Westridge B (100pts). Ladies stableford: 1. Nikki Glasgow (41pts); 2. Fay Seabourne (39pts); 3. Jo Taylor (39pts) on countback. Mixed Par/Bogey Competition: Division 1: 1. Alan Seager (+5); 2. Brian Perry (+3); 3. James Burke (even). Division 2: 1. Billy McCormack (+8); 2. Hannah Wright (+5); 3. Lorna Pacitti (+5) on countback.

Brave Hurries are Bowled over by Trojans in Hants final CONTROVERSIAL refereeing decisions and strong play from the opposition resulted in Sandown and Shanklin rugby team being defeated in the final of the Hampshire Bowl. The Hurries battled well against Trojans RFC, who have been newly promoted to London South West Three, but they couldn’t quite match their mainland counterparts. Straight from the kick-off the Hurries harassed the Trojan defence, forcing a five-metre scrum, but they cleared their line. The Hurries played pressure rugby, giving the visitors little time on

the ball and it showed with various forced errors. However, the visitors worked their way up field and were awarded a penalty. The kick was taken and went under the crossbar. Both linesmen initially kept their flags down, before one gingerly raised his flag, quickly followed by the other, and the referee amazingly awarded the kick giving the away side an undeserved 3-0 lead. This seem to spur the Hurries into action and the next ten minutes were spent in the visitors 22 with Ricky Harris and captain Joe Rees both coming close to

scoring. The Hurries just couldn’t force the ball over the line, and after some close-in phases the visitors scored a converted try, making it 10-0. The visitors raised their game and threw in attack after attack, but the Hurries defence held out with superb and at times last-ditch tackling. Scrum half and Wightlink man of the match Richard Booth was everywhere harassing the visitors’ backrow, and NatWest man-of-thematch went to young hooker Ben Allman. In extended first-half injury time,

the visitors kicked another penalty. Trojans re-started the second half as they finished the first, adding another penalty making it 16-0, as the Hurries were being caught offside. The visitors played very physically most of the game, with some illegal work in the rucks. Several players were warned by the referee, one eventually being sent to the sin bin. Trojans then scored an unconverted try in the corner giving the Hurries no chance of getting back into the game. The Hurries kept battling and thought they

had scored a try when Charlie Sutton kicked on and the oppositon defenders tried to scramble the ball away under the posts but Will Baxendall picked up and scored what looked like a perfect try. However, the home side were once again victims of a frustrating referee decision, who adjudged a knock-on. The visitors then added a penalty making it a final score of Sandown and Shanklin 0-24 Trojans. The Hurries’ next fixture is at home against New Milton on April 25, in a game they must win to secure a play-off promotion spot.


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Friday APRIL 17 2009

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Shaky start for Islanders THE WIGHTLINK Islanders’ much anticipated new season got off to a rocky start as they went down 34-57 at home to Bournemouth Buccaneers last week. It was the team’s first match in the newly formed National League and the fans certainly turned out in force. The Islanders got off to a good start as Welshman Tom Brown battled well against the Buccaneers’ captain Jay Herne in the night’s first race to take a 4-2 lead. However things went downhill rapidly for the team when reserve Andy Braithwaite crashed into the fence, resulting in a broken bone in his hand. Despite his efforts and determination to carry on, Andy had to withdraw from the race. Several engine troubles combined with first night nerves saw the home side slip further behind as the visitors claimed the victory. Last Friday (April 10), the Islanders travelled to Weymouth for the first leg of their Challenge match against the Weymouth Wildcats. However more injury agony hit the team as Dan Berwick was taken to Dorchester Hospital, where X-rays revealed that he has broken his pelvis and is likely to be out of action for a considerable length of time. Brendan Johnson was also injured in the match. With both Dan and Brendan

By Jamie White crashing out, and Andy Braithwaite a non-starter also because of injury, Chris Johnson made his his first competitive track return after breaking his leg, replacing Tom Brown who was away on Premier League duty at Somerset. The misery continued for the Islanders as both Dan and Ryan Sedgmen blew engines, making it a night that the team will not want to remember. Although just 11 points adrift after eight of the 15 heats at 31-20, the Islanders ran out of engines and riders to go down 62-31 by the end. On Tuesday night (April 14) 16 of the country’s top young speedway riders converged at the Wave 105 stadium to do battle in the British Under 21 Championships. Wightlink Islanders’ Brendan Johnson and Ben Hopwood, both safely made it through, and will be bidding to finish top when this year’s title trail reaches its conclusion at the final at the Arena Essex Raceway in Purfleet on April 24. Johnson finished third, with Hopwood finishing just behind in fourth place in Tuesday’s semifinal, together with meeting winner Mark Baseby of the Bournemouth Buccaneers and his team mate and

Brendan Johnson and Jay Herne leave the tapes during the Islanders’ first match of the season

runner-up Kyle Newman. As the tapes rose at the start of a dramatic race it was quickly followed by a fiercely contested first two bends involving all four riders. There was a great atmosphere as they stormed down the

back straight with Johnson leading and fellow Wightlink Islander Hopwood in the vital second place – and that’s the way it stayed for the four laps. However, there was some disappointment for Islanders’ teenager

Awards for cricketers

SEVERAL of the Island’s disabled cricketers were nominated for awards at the recent IW Sports and Recreational Council Awards evening. The awards are given to high achievers on the Island in sporting endeavour, and the nominations come from the nominee’s sport body in charge of that sport on the Island. Peter Brown, David Lloyd and Doug Randall were nominated in the Player Achievement category, whilst Joe Landy, was nominated in the

By Jamie White

Club Volunteer category. Peter continued his progress in the sport throughout 2008, and maintained his position in the England Learning Disabled Cricket squad, moving up to open the bowling through the season. He also performed at the top of his game in every match he played in for the IWCB Disability Team. This resulted in him winning the disabled cricketer of the season for his performances in

The IWCB Disability Team

bowling, fielding and muchimproved batting, including a career-best 96 not out against London CCCA. Peter came out on top of the Disabled Sports Achievement Category, with David and Doug as runners up. Doug is another of the Learning Disabled players on the Island who maintained his position in the England Learning Disabled Cricket squad throughout a difficult 2008 season. He even ended up captaining the side. His fielding and general deport-

ment on the field of play won him many plaudits from opposing players and officials, and his willingness to work on behalf of the team was second to none. David topped the IWCB Disability team’s batting charts for the ninth successive season, averaging over 40 with the bat. This included a second career century, which saw him selected for the South and West Region Physical Disability 20/20 squad to play at selection tournament for an England team. A top score of 85 not out, and an average of over 50 for the four matches played over the weekend saw David regain his position in the England Cricket squad. Joe’s fundraising on behalf of the cricket team for the last six years has meant that players with special equipment requirements are now able to take loan of any the equipment that there is available. As well as the equipment needs, Joe’s efforts have enabled the IWCB Disability Committee to extend the coaching programme to include an additional 10 sessions for complete novices, hopefully securing the future for disabled cricket on the IW for many years to come. Joe was runner up in the club volunteer awards.

Adam Braithwaite, whose brave bid to ride through the pain of a broken right hand sustained in a collision with the safety fence last week proved too much as he scored just four points in his heats.

Your chance to sample the surf AN ISLAND surf school is offering free lessons for those who want to get on board this summer. The iSurf mobile surf school, run by Chris Mannion, provides all boards and wetsuits. The lessons typically take place at Compton beach, though Shanklin and Yaverland are also used, depending on weather conditions. The dates of the lessons are as follows: April 25, April 26, May 2 and May 3. If you are interested in making a booking, contact Chris by email at info@iowsurf.com. Those booked in will receive a text message on the night before or on the morning of the lesson to let them know which beach the lesson will be take place on. Chris’s surfing career has taken him all over the world, his favourite surfing spot being Indonesia.

The bouncier way to fitness THE IW Council has set up a new sports club for youngsters that are interested in trampolining. The sport is a great way to keep fit while also having fun, and every Monday from April 20, sessions will run between 3.30-4.30pm for ages 6-11, and 4.30-5.45pm for ages 11-16 at Ryde Sports Centre. The club is lottery funded and is held during term time only. It costs £2 per session with early booking recommended as spaces are limited. Children must be registered before they can attend. Anyone wanting to find out more or to register should contact the IW Council Sports Unit on 823818 or email sports.unit@iow.gov.uk.


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Old guard out in front IT WAS a great Easter Weekend for sailing at the Brading Haven Yacht Club with 44 boats competing during the four days. Richard Coleman took charge as race officer on Good Friday setting a course just south of St Helens Fort using triangles and sausages. The wind, just a steady force 3 from the south, managed to push the boats round the course fairly quickly and though Martyn Davies was first across the finish line in his Contender in the fast handicap, he was only able to claim a third place on corrected time. This allowed the Wayfarers to flourish with the two boats almost neck and neck. Across the line, however it was Georgia and Peter Hudson claiming a well deserved victory with John Carter and Ken Nye a mere seven seconds behind in second place. There was some excellent sailing by the old guard in the slow handicap with Barry Dyer pulling off a fine win in his Scow, 13 seconds before the Mirror of Robin Lobb on corrected time and Martin Moore a very close third, also sailing a Scow. Young Isobel McInnes sailed a superb race in her Pico to be the first across the line but unfortunately missed a place on handicap. Steve DeBoise took over as race officer on the Saturday, setting a very similar course but with the breeze from the north and unfortunately dropping before the end, all races had to be shortened. The Wayfarers triumphed once again in the fast handicap with Roger and Gill Herbert coming home worthy winners in their boat but Giles Easter earning a second place in his Europe and the Wayfarer of John and

Luke Carter third. There was a great turnout of 13 boats in the slow handicap but with a few retirements due to the lack of wind. Robin Lobb battled it out to the end in his Mirror to hear the sound of the winning gun with the Scow of Barry Dyer in second place and Joe Martin third also in a Scow. Martyn Davies took control of Easter Sunday’s race using a similar course once again with what breeze there was coming from the North West. Ben Smith and Emily Ball sailed a stunning race in their RS200 to take both line and corrected time honours. Chris Wilkinson was there in their wake, to claim a well-deserved second place in his Europe, with John Carter sailing solo in his Wayfarer third. It was all Scows in the slow handicap with Ellie Moore way ahead of the rest of the fleet all the way round to enjoy the sweet taste of success. Francesca Morgan came home in second place and Robin Powell in third. It was bright sunshine and a pleasant force 3 from the south west on the Easter Monday with Barry Dyer running the race. Out of the eleven starters, it was the Europe of Giles Easter to dominate the course. He had the rest eating out of his hand to cross the line a winner with a pair of RS200s close behind on corrected time. Sam and Ben Stitt earned a second spot with the team of Ben Smith and Emily Ball a close third. It was Jodi Dyer, sailing a Scow, who dominated the slow handicap, to pull off a fine win of over a minute from the excellent sailing of Joe Moore in second place with Mike Quinn a close third, all in Scows.

Chernikeeff 2, with a crew from the Cowes-based UKSA, won the Super Zero Class

UKSA crew triumphs

AT A regatta that suffered from a distinct lack of wind, Peter Harrison’s Farr 52, Chernikeeff 2, staged a great end to the RORC Red Funnel Easter Challenge, reeling off a hat-trick of bullets to win the Super Zero Class. Its crew, all from the Cowesbased UKSA, was skippered by 25-year-old Luke Cross, who said: “We have been out for the last two weekends racing and I think that really helped, but it is always nice to get a win early in the season.” The RYA keelboat’s TP52, John Merricks II, was second and Tony Langley’s Farr 45, Atomic of Cowes, was third in class. In Class Zero, regatta debutant

Island fans nervous as end of season unfolds

ISLAND football fans who support Portsmouth, Southampton or Bournemouth are all bracing themselves for a nailbiting end to the season. All three clubs have struggled to make a real impact in their respective divisions this campaign, and go into the final few matches still under the threat of relegation. Southampton supporters have had arguably the most traumatic time. Saints have been struggling near the foot of the Championship for much of the season, and recently their parent company, Southampton Leisure Holdings, went into administration with debts of more than £30million. A Football League meeting to discuss whether they should incur a 10-point deduction because of administration problems was deferred. Former Saints chairman Leon Crouch is adamant that a points penalty should not be implemented, arguing that that SLH and the football club are two separate entities, and points can be taken away only if Saints, rather than the parent company, go into administration. It could yet prove academic

By Peter White

unless Saints can haul themselves out of the bottom three of the Championship. Their plight was eased slightly on Easter Monday when David McGoldrick’s goal earned them as much-needed victory over Crystal Palace. But they remained second bottom of the table, and now desperately need points from their final three games of the season to keep alive their hopes of avoiding dropping into the third tier of English football for the first time in nearly 50 years. Their final games are away to Sheffield Wednesday (April 18), at home to Burnley (April 25) and the crunch clash with fellow strugglers Nottingham Forest away from home on May 3. No Pompey fan will need reminding that a year ago they were relishing the prospect of trips to Wembley for the FA Cup semi-final against West Brom, and then the final against Cardiff. It has been a different scenario this season for Portsmouth who are now playing under Paul Hart, their third manager in a few months following Harry Red-

knapp’s defection to Tottenham quickly followed by the sacking of Tony Adams. Although Pompey have improved their position under Hart they are only too aware of the importance of a good end to the season, beginning with Bolton at home (April 18), followed by Manchester United and Newcastle away, Arsenal at home, Blackburn away, Sunderland at home, and their final game, away to Wigan on May 24. Bournemouth began the season with a massive 17-point deduction after falling into administration, and have so far defied the odds to stay in League One. Skipper Shaun Cooper and striker Lee Bradbury, both from the Island, have been key performers in the battle to avoid the drop. But going into the final games, the Cherries remain in a relegation dogfight leaving their fans in the Island very much on tenterhooks, particularly as two of the three matches are against relegation rivals. Their trip to Chester (April 18) is followed by a home game against Grimsby (April 25) before they wind up the season with a trip to Morecambe.

Michael Bartholomew sailed his King 40, Tokoloshe, to victory. Neil Martin’s J 133, Jammy Dodger, was second and JanWillem Jannink MAT 12, Foxy, was third overall in class. In Class One, Tim and Sophie Harrington’s X 35, Vortex, managed to hold off Peter Robson’s, First 40.7, Playing Around and Paul Anderson’s A 40, Toe in the Water, to clinch the class, a repeat of their win in 2007. “This has been a fantastic start to the season for us and a great boost for our campaign this year, which will include Cowes Week and the X 35 Nationals,” said Tim Harrington. Class Two saw David and

Jackie Riley’s Corby 33, No Retreat, come out on top, but only by half a point from Chris and Hannah Neve’s, First 34.7 No Doubt. Nick and Suzy Jones’ First 34.7, Astarte, was third in class. In IRC 3, Louise Morton’s Quarter Tonner, Espada, won by three points but in the quarter ton class alone, the 1981 Farr designed Espada, was just one point ahead of Mike Till’s Quarter Tonner, Bullet. Paul Kelsey’s Quarter Tonner, Runaway Bus was third. The Quarter Ton Class has made quite a resurgence and it is hoped that more of them will be at the Red Funnel Easter Challenge next year.

Rew Valley get into gear REW Valley youth football team have recently unveiled their new kit, which has been supplied by Ventnor Bathroom Centre. All the players have been training hard throughout the winter months in a bid to increase their skills and their understanding of the game. Parents also attended training sessions to give help and assistance to the players and the team. The youngsters are now looking forward

By Jamie White to the build-up of the 2009/2010 season, when they will join their prospective teams for the football league U8s and U9s. Several players have even been selected for trials with Bournemouth, which gives great encouragement to the players and the club. One member of the team, Charlie Holms, has been missing in recent weeks, but the club are pleased to an-

nounce that he is now on the road to recovery. Rew Valley youth have training sessions throughout the summer, and are recruiting for their U8s team. The club is also looking for managers and coaches for next season. Fully qualified training can be given, or you can just come along and support the club with fundraising and other projects. For more information call John Green on 853128 or Charlie Parsons on 855106.


sport Jamie’s England dream 28

the gazette  

Friday APRIL 17 2009

the gazette

Send your sports news to newsdesk@iwgazette.co.uk

ISLANDER Jamie O’Rourke has unveiled his plans to try to take his England team into the elite of world beach soccer. Jamie, from Ryde, has recently been appointed manager of the national beach soccer team, and now he is preparing his players for the World Cup qualifying games in Spain in June. But Jamie’s only regret is that by trying to take the England team up a few notches, it may mean Island youngsters, who have played a prominent part at national level over the past few years may miss out. Even so, the new boss has promised: “If you are good enough you will get your chance.” Jamie (right) first heard about beach soccer taking place at Small Hope beach in Shanklin a few years ago, and noticed that a couple of players he knew, T.D Al-Said and GC Giancovich, were doing very well in the sport, and going on to become recognised England Internationals. He explained: “I was playing for Havant and Waterlooville at the time, but I was having trouble travelling to all the games, so I thought I would give beach soccer a try. I played for ‘Portsmouth in the community’ to start, and then joined Cloud 9 then Sandown Sociedad, and that’s when I got selected for England. “Beach Soccer in this country started here on the Island, and I hope it will always be seen as the home of beach soccer in England. “On the Island we have got great

beaches for matches and training to take place, but I wanted to get more people involved from around the country. I’m obviously delighted and honoured to be
appointed head coach of the national team and I am hoping the team can enter a successful period under my leadership. Jamie has also stressed the importance of getting the sport out there across England to get more people involved. “If we have events going on in London, Brighton, Bournemouth and other places then it will make more people aware of the sport and help it grow. It is unfortunate for some of the Island players that have been in the team and have given it a good go, but there are going to be changes and players coming in from across the country. “Our England base is at Butlins in Minehead. We can go and use their facilities and there will be cup competitions held there and a there is a European league event being held there as well. “I have approached several players who are playing football at the moment, whereas in previous years there have been players who have been only playing beach soccer. I want to get a higher standard of footballer and then get them adapted to the sand. Only time will tell if this way is successful, but I am pretty confident it will be. “Luke Kerr, who was the manager before myself, did a great job and has now gone on

Jamie O’Rourke in action during his England playing career

to become head of development, which will help our progress even more.” The England squad travel to Spain on June 7 for the World Cup qualifiers, where 24 teams are competing for just five places at the tournament, which is being held in Dubai in November. Jamie’s hopes are to qualify for group A, which consists of the top eight teams from last year, including Eric Cantona’s France, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Poland, Hungary, Russia and the Netherlands. In conjunction with the group A events there are group B events as well, of which some will be held at Butlins. “The World Cup qualifiers will be a great experience for our squad, and I think it will be a great learning curve for our new players. A few have already shown great potential.” “I don’t get paid for managing

the team but do it for the love of the sport and want us to do well.

I want to be successful and I will give it my best shot,” said Jamie.

Ventnor has new commodore VENTNOR Yacht Club held its annual meeting at the Winter Gardens recently, and it was attended by an impressive turnout of 60 members. After eight years, Graham Benson stood down as Commodore and longstanding committee member, Andrew Thorpe, was elected to take over. The other Flag Officers are now: ViceCommodore, Surg. Capt. C. Kershaw RN (rtd); Rear-Commo-

dore House, Doreen Turner; Rear-Commodore Sailing, Tony Saunders and Treasurer, Alan Stovell – all ably assisted by Nancy Ellacott, Secretary. Graham Benson now becomes a Life President. The main activities of Ventnor Yacht Club are social gatherings centred on sailing events, such as the Shanklin Sailing Club annual Race to Ventnor, a Round the Island Barbeque, Com-

modore’s Summer Party at Eastdene, Bonchurch, Trafalgar Day Supper and a Winter Dinner Dance at the Royal Hotel, Ventnor. The club is always pleased to welcome new members and application forms can be obtained from the club’s headquarters at the Spyglass Inn, Esplanade, Ventnor. A buffet was laid on by Graham Perks and his family and staff who run the Winter Gardens.

IW Gazette 19  

The Isle of Wight Gazette for the fortnight beginning from Friday April 17 2009

IW Gazette 19  

The Isle of Wight Gazette for the fortnight beginning from Friday April 17 2009

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