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More support for domestic abuse victims Picture by Elace Images

PLANS to provide better support and protec- By Peter White tion for victims of domestic abuse on the Constabulary, Her Majesty’s Courts Service Island have been unveiled. The scheme is also being aimed at helping (HMCS), magistrates, the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), the witnesses in such cases Probation Service, the as well as encouraging IW Women’s Refuge, more consistent senWitness Support and tences for offenders. IW Council have all The new special signed a protocol for domestic abuse court the SDAC. (SDAC) has been set The launch took place up at a time when crime at Northwood House figures are already in Cowes, where guest falling on the Island. speakers included two Now it is hoped the people whose lives system that will deal have been affected by with some of the most domestic abuse. Frank delicate and complex Mullane’s sister and cases will bring further nephew were murreductions in offences. dered in a domestic Partner agencies abuse case in Berkshire on the Island are in 2003, and Helen Frank Mullane at the launch working together on Nelder, a theatrical the project, and a writer and director, dedicated session now hears domestic abuse wrote the play ‘Worn’ about domestic abuse cases every Monday in the courts buildbased on personal experience. ing at Quay Street in Newport.
Hampshire Mr Mullane said: “The authorities must see domestic abuse through victims’ eyes. For my sister, it was a form of ‘coercive control’. If we see domestic violence from the victim’s perspective, we will begin to understand the compromises and choices they are faced with each day. Don’t give up on the victim please. You might be the only group of people with an opportunity to prevent abuse, serious injury and murder.” Helen Nelder said: “It’s difficult to imagine how it feels to experience domestic abuse. My sense of self was eroded through psychological and emotional torture, it was very hard to make rational decisions under the circumstances and I didn’t know where I could go. This court is a fantastic step forward towards eliminating discrepancies in sentencing, and creating a better understanding of the complexities surrounding domestic abuse.” Inspector Owen Kenny, who leads the IW Continued on page 3

Friday May 15 - Thursday May 28 2009

A hole in one – at eight years old! Back Page

In Lifestyle: Sandown and Lake special Picture by OnEdittion

If you can, please make a donation to the hospice

Ellen’s voyage is just capital! DAME Ellen MacArthur has talked to The Gazette about the ‘fantastic response’ she is receiving during her Skandia Round Britain Voyage of Discovery. The round-the-world yachtswoman, who is based in Cowes, set out on her latest – and very special – adventure earlier this month. Having set off from Cowes, Ellen and a host of volunteers are sailing with 85 young people in recovery from cancer on 17 different

legs around Britain. They are sailing the 48ft yacht ‘Scarlet Oyster’ 2,000 nautical miles on a journey that will take four months to complete. And as Ellen puts it: “We have just one aim – to inspire young people’s cancer recovery through sailing.” She and her band of young shipmates, who take it in turns to sail one leg of the journey, have now reached London – despite a few mishaps caused by adverse

Gateway Club can only wait AN ISLAND club for people with learning disabilities has been anxiously waiting to hear whether an IW Council partnership grant will save it from permanent closure. John Phillips has been voluntarily running the IW Gateway Club for the past 14 years in Newport and Ryde, but was forced to close the doors because of a lack of funding. Now Mr Phillips is waiting to hear whether an application for a £10,000 donation has been successful. The money, if granted, will give the Gateway Club a reprieve, although Mr Phillips claims the whole operation costs around £50,000 a year to run and extra revenue will still be urgently required.

weather conditions. Before sailing up the River Thames and under Tower Bridge, Ellen gave us an insight into the journey so far. She said: “All the feedback I’ve had from the five young crew on board the first leg has been fantastic. “I know that a few of them were seasick due to some very bumpy weather conditions on the way to Dover, but all of them recovered in Continued on page 2


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the gazette Contact Details Newsdesk: (01983) 409928 Fax: (01983) 404189 Email: newsdesk@iwgazette.co.uk Address: The Isle of Wight Gazette Unit B18 Spithead Business Centre Newport Road Sandown Isle of Wight PO36 9PH Sales: 01983 402599 Head of Media Sales: Laura Webb James Rolfe Kim Stent Roxy Vaughn Published by: The Isle of Wight Gazette Ltd Editor: Martin Potter Reporters: Jamie White, Peter White, Richard Collins, Justin Gladdis News Editor: Paul Rainford Features Editor: Jo Macaulay Distribution: Isle of Wight Distribution Ltd. Design: Colin Clarke, Dean Chick

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Issue 21

May 15 2009

Friday MAY 15 2009

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Demolition begins on Bembridge boathouse THE PLANNED new lifeboat station boathouse at Bembridge has moved a step closer with the arrival of a jack-up barge in preparation for the demolition of the existing structure. A spokesman for the RNLI’s shoreworks team, which is responsible for the planning, development and building work on the charity’s lifeboat stations, said: “The barge is essentially a platform from which a crane can operate. The barge holds itself in position by extending ‘legs’ which support it off the sea bed. This enables workers to begin work taking the old boathouse apart, regardless of sea state.” The arrival of the barge follows the recent interior strip-out of the boathouse, which involved removing all fittings, fixtures and its timber lining, leaving just the empty shell to demolish. The spokesman added: “The complex nature of the site means materials will be removed from the site by sea, and indeed the majority of materials for the new build will be brought in via the same route. This will minimise any potential environmental impact and also keep to an

absolute minimum the use of the roads in Bembridge.” Graham Hall, RNLI Lifeboat operations manager at Bembridge, said: “The new offshore boathouse is part of a long-term plan to rebuild the lifeboat

station itself, to provide a better environment for the volunteer crew members who so often risk their own lives to save that of others. “The RNLI is currently in the midst of a two-year public

appeal to raise £1m towards the total cost of the rebuild, which is expected to cost in excess of £7m. The money will also go towards funding the new Tamar class lifeboat which is planned to come into service in 2010.”

The jack-up barge takes up its position beside the boathouse in preparation for work to start

More bad news on jobs

THERE are to be more job losses on the Island after the electrical company Parlex Europe, located in Newport, announced that up to 44 jobs are set to be axed. Meanwhile, a further 19 posts could go at the manufacturing company Gurit, which is also based in Newport.

Gurit has said that it will try to reduce the amount of redundancies to the absolute minimum, but insisted the re-structuring of the company is necessary. The news comes on the back of wind turbine company Vestas Blades announcing that around 500 people on the

Island are set to be out of work in three months’ time as the company tries to cut costs. Petitions have been started on the social networking site Facebook and Downing Street’s Number 10 website asking for the Government to reconsider the closure of Vestas.

Ellen and her shipmates

Continued from front page

oncology wards of the hospitals they were treated in and talk time to enjoy their fish and chip about their experiences and supper! recovery path to those currently “When they were interviewed undergoing treatment for cancer. together in Brighton, it was clear To coincide with the voyage, that they had all bonded really Ellen is giving a series of public well during the trip and that they talks across the country about have built some really strong her life and future career, the friendships for the future. first time she has spoken publicly “A new crew joined the boat since her record-breaking roundin Dover but some pretty major the-world voyage in 2005. storm conditions delayed the The Voyage of Adventure is start of the second leg to London, due to be completed on Septemso everyone got a surprise day ber 13, but she is taking some off. It’s going to be a very busy time off during the trip, and will few days in London as the crew take part in the Round the Island and I have a full schedule of yacht race on June 20. media interviews, hospital visits She and her crew will be sailing and sailing under Tower Bridge an Extreme 40 yacht, similar to – I’m sure it will be a memorable the one in which she was first few days for all of us!” home in the event two years ago. The voyage is also providing an With just over a month to go opportunity for the young people before the popular event, entries sailing to return to the paediatric have reached around 1,000.


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Praise for new prison LESS than two months after the shake-up that saw Parkhurst, Albany and Camp Hill become one Island prison, the scheme has been heralded a major success. Even Colin Moses, chair of the national Prison Officers’ Association, who was ‘totally opposed’ to the re-organisation known as clustering, has visited the Island and given Her Majesty’s Prison Isle of Wight, as it is now known, the thumbs-up. Two senior figures from the Ministry of Justice have also been to see the major re-structuring and streamlining process that has taken place at the Newport complex, which could eventually be used as a blueprint for other prison clustering throughout the UK. A recent report by the prison’s Independent Monitoring Board issued a damning verdict on conditions inside Albany. It cited insufficient medical facilities, lack of access for prisoners with mobility problems, and claimed up to 60 inmates who should be in secure mental health units rather than prison cells. Nigel Hawley, chair of the IMB said: “The Board’s worry is that other services may have to go which will impact on the staff and the prisoners. The situation we are in at the moment is that the prison has to save money each year, the budget is reduced each year and savings have to be made in certain areas. “Of course the biggest area for anybody spending money is staff and that is where the cuts are very often made.” But Barry Greenberry, governor of HMP IW, is confident such problems are being overcome,

By Peter White and there will no be major job losses. He also points out that the inspection of Albany took place before the clustering came into being on April 1 this year. Mr Greenberry said: “I welcome the annual report and value the contribution made by the IMB to raise standards. The report is an opportunity for prison staff to be recognised for the specialist work they do to reduce re-offending.”

 He confirmed: “Since the IMB inspected Albany, the three prisons on the island have been clustered into a single prison. The report reflects the natural anxieties experienced by staff prior to a major change, but the result of clustering has been a great success. “The launch of HMP IW has resulted in a saving of £1.1million a year through management and central services efficiencies, which have significantly reduced the need to cut frontline staff. “In this way HMP IW is better able to provide a decent public service aimed at protecting the public and reducing re offending whilst reducing the costs of imprisonment” Mr Greenberry continued: “I recently met the chair of the national POA, Colin Moses, who visited the Island to catch up with progress. I was delighted that he stated his position was to take each cluster by its merits and he wished HMP IW every success. “We also received a visit from two director generals from the Ministry of Justice. Helen Edwards is the director general in charge of market testing policy [private sector involve-

The ramp at Seaclose skate park with its side ripped off

Barry Greenberry: Island prison staff ‘inspiring’

ment in management of prisons] and prison ratings. I am not surprised that so many senior people want to see the how the new cluster is working. “In my opinion the Island prisons were high on a list of potential sites to market test, but the drive towards clustering saved us from that fate. We drove costs of imprisonment down by £1.1million, but we need to demonstrate we are delivering our targets each quarter until March 2010 in order to prove we are no longer the Level 2 establishment described in the recent HMCIP report. “What I am determined to do, and am confident about achiev-

ing, is to create such a culture without the need for an external threat. The experience of Island prison staff is staggering, impressive and inspiring. “Add to that a professional management team with clear direction able to drive change and staff and prisoners will be lead to prioritise what we need to do raise standards. “I want all my staff to share in that confidence and demonstrate it by adopting change, not because it is imposed from above but because it makes us better at protecting the public and reducing re-offending. This is the sure way to avoid any prospect of market testing.”

SEACLOSE skate park in Newport has been temporarily closed after much of the equipment was damaged. The vandalism of the ramps was first reported to the IW Council on Monday May 4, and the site has been closed to the public in the interests of safety. One ramp has had its side ripped off while a quarter-pipe has been effectively dismantled. The running surface on another ramp has been broken. The equipment, which has been damaged beyond repair, has since been removed by the council and the area has been closed.

Stuart Love, IW council director of environment and neighbourhoods, said: “The vandalism of the skate park at Seaclose has deprived children and young people of a valued and popular community facility. “It’s very upsetting that we as a council try and provide these facilities only for some mindless vandals to smash them up and put them out of action. We are working with the police to track down those responsible for this.” There were already ongoing plans to install new equipment at the skate park.

Skate park wrecked

Support for victims Continued from front page Public Protection Unit (PPU), said: “The formation of our SDAC provides confidence to victims and ensures them that they are protected and supported from the time of reporting abuse, throughout the process of the criminal justice system and beyond. This will encourage victims who ‘suffer in silence’ to report abuse with the confidence that they and their children will be looked after.” Fiona Gwinnett, chief executive of the IW Women’s Refuge, said: “It’s been great to see how partnership working has developed on the island. There are well-established networks but we cannot, and must not, rest on our laurels. Domestic abuse victims need to maintain their faith in this system.” Mark Howell, acting director of Community Services at IW Council, said: “The development of the SDAC represents an extremely important step forward for the Island, and the council is delighted to support this initiative. The development of the specialist court also underlines the importance of partnership working and demonstrates how effective partnership working can really help the victims of domestic abuse.”


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Isle of Wight Rotary Clubs

A round up of Island Rotary Club news

Rainbow Centre Sri Lanka

The happier face of Sri Lanka

FOLLOWING the Tsunami of 2004, Rotary District 1110, which includes the Isle of Wight, responded with aid for Sri Lanka where thousands of people lost their family members and homes. There was massive support from the people on the Island so we wanted to bring you up to date with one of

the projects which, with your help, Rotary has been supporting. The Rainbow Centre Orphanage was founded by Alison Nagle, a visitor to Sri Lanka at the time of the Tsunami. They took in orphaned children and children living in extreme poverty following the devastation. Our Rotary district decided to support the charity which is now established and supports approximately 160 children of all ages. Being involved with the Rotary Shoe Box Appeal, Rotarian Maire Reeves approached her club, Vectis Sunrise, about sending gifts to the Rainbow Centre children and remembered from her childhood the packets of Rainbow Drops sweets which were a weekend treat. They decided to call the gifts ’Rainbow Drops’ and package them in a rain drop shape in different colours. We sent very practical items, pens, solar powered calculators and items to use for their schooling, but following a visit to see Rotary projects in Sri Lanka in February 2007, Maire found that the children had very little or nothing which they could call their own. Now each present includes age appropriate gifts including t-shirts, hats, bags toys and fun items, and especially toothbrushes and paste as the children are so proud of their white teeth. This year Vectis Sunrise decided to send the Rainbow Drops for the New Year celebrations on April 14 and hope to do the same next year. The group would especially like to thank Express Courier Solutions who took the presents to London for us ready to be shipped to Sri Lanka. If you want to know more about the Rainbow Centre visit www.rainbowcentresrilanka.com.

The ‘Kids Out’ trips provide a fantastic day out for disadvantaged children

Rotary Clubs around the Island Meetings: Cowes, Royal London Yacht Club Thursday 7pm

Newport, Conservative Club Wednesday 1pm Vectis Sunrise, Riverside Centre, Newport Wednesday 7.30am Ryde, Yelfs Hotel Tuesday 6.30pm

Sandown, Conservative Club, Shanklin Tuesday 7.30pm (fortnightly)

Shanklin, Conservative Club Wednesday 7.30pm Ventnor, Cricket Club Monday 7.30pm

West Wight, Sun Inn, Hulverstone Tuesday 7.30pm

Know your Wight No. 7: Church Litten and Valentine Gray By Peter White

‘Kids Out’ trip

ON JUNE 10 a total of 110 disadvantaged Island children will be going to Paultons Park for a fun day out, where they will be joined by a further 2,000 children from Dorset, South Wiltshire and Hampshire. Last year some 28,000 were taken to theme parks across the UK by Rotarians. The Kids Out charity supports this event. Here on the Island the logistics of taking 197 children, teachers, helpers and Rotarians to the mainland event can only be done with the help of Island Businesses. If any Island business would like to help finance this worthwhile event, please contact Rotarian Ken Lock 855154. Rotary also thanked Wight Link for its generous support for this event.

Island curiosities explained In a quiet corner of Newport stand two monuments that provide a poignant evocation of how difficult life used to be on the Island. The Tudor archway in Church Litten, just opposite Morrison’s supermarket, is a stark reminder of the plague that gripped the country in the late 1500s. A burial ground on the site had to be hastily opened at the height of the plague to cope with the numbers of dead. The grave headstones were removed and in 1930 the area was opened as a public space. One headstone remains, and records show it was the resting place of John Hamilton Reynolds, a close friend of John Keats, who died at Newport in 1852. The Tudor archway still stands on the site, along with several other memorials, including one to Valentine Gray, a boy chimney sweep, who was found dead, aged just nine years in an outhouse in 1822. The monument to Valentine was erected by public subscription in response to the outrage of his death in Scarrots Lane. He had been beaten to death, and his employer was convicted of manslaughter and sent to prison. It was not until 1875 that the practice of sending children up chimneys was outlawed.


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Triple boost for charity A NEWCHURCH-BASED charity has launched three new ventures which it hopes will raise more money for its projects aimed at supporting people with disabilities and learning needs, as well as providing work experience for them. Way Forward, which is part of Osel Entreprises and financed by IW Council, has opened a farm shop, café and secondhand furniture store on its project centre at Wacklands Lane. The farm shop sells only produce grown in Way Forward’s own greenhouses, without the use of chemicals and under the careful stewardship of Jim Willoughby. He is placing the emphasis on growing traditional, lessseen varieties of vegetables: “With the tomatoes, for example, I’m trying to get away from what I call the ‘ping pong ball’ tomatoes sold in the supermarkets that have little or no taste,” he said. Most of the produce sold through the farm shop remains in the ground until the customer asks for it, when it is picked to order. The café sells, among other things, home-made soup made from vegetables grown and picked on site daily. Lee White, Way Forward

Jim Willoughby with the produce for the farm shop

programme manager, said the new ventures have given her clients, who are referred to her from social services, a chance to take on more interesting tasks: “We support people who aren’t able for one reason or another to find paid employment. We’ve completely diversified the site. We’re still a daycare provider but in a very different way that’s given people

worthwhile experiences – before they would come here and perhaps just do weeding.” The launch of the new businesses coincided with project centre’s change of name from Sunnycrest Nurseries to The Greenhouse. • The farm shop and furniture store are open Mon-Fri from 9am to 4pm; the café opens 10.30am to 2.30pm.

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Carnival group shines A SPECTACULAR display from the Island’s carnival learning centre dazzled an international audience at the official opening of the UK Centre for Carnival Arts in Luton recently. A team of over 50 carnival makers, performers and technical crew from the Island performed a 45-minute street parade followed by a five-minute choreographed stage performance entitled Europa. The IW team, from the carnival learning centre at Westridge, Ryde, were one of only five groups to perform at the specially commissioned event which represented the world of carnival, taking in Africa, Asia, Europe, South America and the Caribbean. The Island team included artists from the famous Fratelli Cinquini company from the Viareggio Carnival in Italy, who visited the Island in April. They helped to assist in the construction of a giant bull, which was the stunning centrepiece of the performance. The costumes and routine were led by Island-based artists

Sharon George and Jill WadeSmith, with support from both Sandown and Ryde carnival committee members on the day. The performance attracted attention from event organisers, performers and special guests from the carnival community who travelled from as far away as Brazil, Colombia and Ghana to attend the event. After watching the IW team’s performance, vice president of the World Carnival Commission, Mr Pax Nindi, commented: “If this were a competition then the Isle of Wight would undoubtedly be the winners.” Frankie Goldspink, IW Council carnival arts development officer, said: “The Europa show has been an immense creative challenge for everyone involved on the Island, but we have succeeded in showing the carnival world what we are capable of competing on an international stage. “The Island has a wealth of talent in carnival arts and our involvement in this prestigious event has placed us firmly on the global map as a centre for carnival excellence.”

locked into a trunk, he was hoisted 25 feet into the air by a large crane only to emerge ten minutes later, much to the crowd’s surprise, from the crane’s cab. The illusion had been specially designed by Aaron

for the launch event, with all money raised going to nominated charities. The equipment used in the illusion was supplied by Island companies SDS Scaffolding, Moreys and Island Cranes free of charge.

Claire Kay as Talos

Don’t miss the ‘Big Day Out’ CHILDREN’S organisations on the Island are being encouraged to book their place at the Big Day Out event, which takes place in the west Wight in October. Organised by the IW Council, the Big Day Out is in its seventh year and is one of the Island’s largest events specifically aimed at children, young people and their families. As well as providing a range of fun activities for children to enjoy, it also brings together all the services, organisations and

agencies that work with children and young people on the Island. This year’s attractions will include giant games, live music, dance displays, arts and crafts activities, face painting, storytelling, sports tournaments, cooking demonstrations, bouncy castles and much more. The event is completely free for visitors. • Registration forms are available by contacting Claire Critchison at claire.critchison@ iow.gov.uk or by calling 823070.

Freshwater market in need of more support

Aaron Isted prepares for his great escape at Newport Quay

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Aaron’s great escape ISLAND illusionist Aaron Isted helped launch the IW Walking Festival in dramatic style by performing his ‘great escape’ at Newport Quay. After being strapped into his straitjacket and

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THE ORGANISERS of Freshwater Country Market, which allows homebased producers of food to sell their wares direct to the public, have warned that the market may have to close unless it begins to attract more visitors. The market, which

used to be organised by the WI, currently runs once a week, operating out of West Wight Sports Centre from 9-11am every Friday. Its 18 or so stalls sell jams, chutneys, cakes and a range of other items. Annette East, the market’s publicity officer, said: “If we

don’t get more customers to the market we are in danger of folding, which would be a terrible shame as it’s a good community venture.” Mrs East said that a rent increase was one of the factors that had put the future of the market in jeopardy.


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July debut for new Red Jet RED FUNNEL will introduce a new highspeed ferry on its route between Cowes to Southampton in July. It will be a case of in with the new and out with the old as Red Funnel brings in the craft to work alongside Red Jet 3 and Red Jet 4, while the older Red Jets 1 and 2, built in 1991, have been rebranded for their new career with Caspian Mainport Marine, to operate in Kazakhstan & Azerbaijan. The newcomer – to be named Red Jet 5 – represents an investment of £2million in the FBM-designed 35metre Solent Class cata-

By Peter White maran. The vessel built in the USA in 1999, is similar to Red Jet 3 in terms of passenger capacity and performance but offers the benefit of full air conditioning and a brand new interior. The layout will be modelled on Red Funnel’s largest high-speed craft, Red Jet 4. The new vessel is expected to arrive in the UK at the end of this month, and will enter service in July, with a 177-passenger capacity.

Sandown Bay big ships mystery finally solved Andrew Turner and Carole Dennett enjoy a close encounter of the lemur kind

Art attack on Island MP! Caribbean Highway: ‘parked’ in Sandown Bay since early spring

SISTER ships Caribbean Highway and Southern Highway are among a host of vessels that have been moored around the Island for the past couple of months. Now we can reveal why the ships have been hanging around for so long. The recession means there is very little trade, and they simply have nowhere to go.

means the two grey-coloured vessels have been ‘parked’ in Sandown Bay since early The two ‘Highway’ vessels spring. would normally be transA source said: “It’s all porting cars, diggers and down to a lack of trade. other plant machinery from Some companies are even Southampton to various parts using their car boats as car of the world. But the fall parks, because it is cheaper in demand, brought on by to keep the cars onboard the recession, coupled with rather than store them on dry their wait for new contracts, land.”

By Peter White

ISLAND MP Andrew Turner paid a visit to the IW Zoo in Sandown – and left covered in paint! But don’t worry, this wasn’t another Peter Mandelson-type protest; on this occasion it was several small furry lemurs that left their mark. Mr Turner agreed to enter the lemurs’ pen and watch them produce a work of art. The MP was armed with raisins to keep the creatures happy as they paraded around on a paint-covered sheet, before they moved onto a blank canvas to create a multicoloured masterpiece. Mr Turner was visiting the zoo to see how things had progressed in recent months and to see what is planned for the future. He also saw one of the original ‘Pluto’ pumps (as

Sainsbury’s seeks charity Tea for three partner for local projects

THE EARL Mountbatten Hospice is looking for individuals, companies, organisations and social groups willing to hold a tea party, big THE SAINSBURY’S store nomination form and submit- throughout the year. or small, in June to raise funds. in Newport is inviting ting it into the ‘Local Charity Store manager Paul Dyer The Hospice can provide its yellow suncustomers and employees to of the Year’ voting box said: “By supporting a local flowers, butterfly pins, pens and emblems for nominate a local charity to found at the front of store. charity we can give somepeople to sell. It can also offer posters, flyers be the store’s official partner Sainsbury’s will draw up a thing back to the community and invitations. If the party is to be open for the year. shortlist from all nominaby helping with fundraising to the public the hospice will also send out The selected charity will tions submitted. and volunteering. Clearly press releases and assist in raising the profile benefit through working Representatives from the it’s important that we find of the event. in partnership with Sainsthree shortlisted charities a charity that is close to the “This is a great opportunity to have an bury’s employees to organise will be asked to visit the hearts and minds of our cus- event,” said a spokesperson for the charity. fundraising events, including store to talk to colleagues tomers and employees so I “It could be a simple cuppa and cake with a charity collections. Sainsabout what they do and would encourage everyone to raffle in the tea break, fancy dress, high tea, bury’s staff will also support how the Sainsbury’s team come into store and vote.” garden party, cheese and wine party, kiddies the chosen charity through could support them. The The Sainsbury’s local tea party, pets picnic… the only limit is your volunteering. store’s chosen charity will charity of the year initiative imagination!” Island residents have until be announced to customforms part of the retailer’s Anyone willing to hold a tea party for the May 26 to nominate a local ers in June. The store will 140th anniversary celebrahospice should ring the fundraising departcharity by completing a then work with the charity tions. ment at Earl Mountbatten Hospice on 528989.

By Jamie White featured in March 6 issue of The Gazette), which was used to pump oil across the English Channel to France to help provide fuel for the D-Day landings. During the visit, he took the chance to feed three of the tigers with goats milk, including the 16-year-old Siberian, Czar. But Mr Turner stayed on the other side of the cage this time. He was shown around the zoo by Charlotte Corney, who runs the family attraction that draws around 110,000 visitors a year.


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Ticket machines go missing POLICE and the IW Council are appealing for information after a number of parking ticket machines were stolen from locations across the Island. In total six machines have been taken, with those responsible removing the machines from their stands. Two machines in Ventnor, one in La Falaise car park and the other in the Botanic Garden, have been targeted, and two were also stolen from the car park in Yaverland. Stuart Love, IW Council director of environment and neighbourhoods, said: “This kind of criminal activity has an impact on all of us because the taxpayer will now have to foot the repair bill to get the machines replaced.” A new machine can cost up to £3,000 to install, but the council does have some unused ticket machines in reserve and these have been installed in the Yaverland and Ventor car parks. “It is fortunate our car parks department has some old ticket machines in storage which can

be used, otherwise we would’ve been looking at a much larger bill,” added Mr Love. Four other ticket machines, that are operated jointly by the IW Zoo in Sandown and car parking firm, LPS, have also been stolen, depriving the zoo of a vital source of income and costing LPS over £17,000 in equipment loss. IW Zoo’s Charlotte Corney said the theft was a blow to the whole ethos of the attraction. She said: “Entrance rates are deliberately kept as low as possible to ensure as many people as possible are able to visit us. “Parking revenue allows us to be affordable to everyone and that means we are able to spread our environmental, educational and conservation messages to as many people as possible,” she added. “The income from parking also contributes directly to the upkeep of our animals and to our ongoing plans to improve both as a visitor attraction and as a home to endangered and rescued wildlife.”

Jazz legends return

Cleo Laine and John Dankworth: coming in October

JAZZ legends Cleo Laine and John Dankworth are to return to the Island for two special shows in October. The husband and wife team will appear at Ventnor Winter Gardens over the Halloween weekend, Friday October 30 and Saturday October 31. They will be accompanied on stage by John Horler on piano, their son Alec Dankworth on bass, Mark Nightingale on trombone, Christian Garrick on violin and Mike Smith on drums. John Dankworth’s career as performer, composer and conductor spans almost 50 years. Born in 1927, he studied clarinet at London’s Royal Academy of Music. His early career led to a succession of honours and to two hit records. His composing career has covered film, theatre,

ballet and musicals, works for choir and orchestra, symphonic variations, piano and clarinet concerto and string quartet. Cleo Laine’s singing career began in the 1950s when she auditioned successfully for a band led by John. She performed under his banner until 1958, when she and John were married. Then began a career as a singer and actress, in productions such as the musical Valmouth in 1959 and the play A Time to Laugh in 1962. During this period she also had two major recording successes. Tickets cost £38 each and are on sale at the Music Shop at 6 Pier Street, Ventnor or the Box Office at Ventnor Winter Gardens. Alternatively call the music shop on 856206 or 856200, or the Winter Gardens on 857581.

Yaverland was just one of the council-run car parks hit by thieves with cutting equipment

TIC staff wing it STAFF at Cowes tourist information centre scaled new heights of customer care when they went the extra mile to help one bewildered day tripper – an errant homing pigeon. The baffled bird walked in to the Cowes TIC at Fountain Quay last Wednesday (May 6), clearly in need of some travel advice. It was caught by adviser Janet Kingsbury and contact was made with the RSPCA and then the British Racing Pigeon Association. Animal lover Janet was put in touch with Peter Abrook, secretary of the Cowes and District Pigeon Club and she then drove the bird – temporarily housed in a cardboard box – over to Peter’s home. Via his contacts, Peter arranged for the pigeon to be returned to his owner, who lives in Brockenhurst in the New Forest. Janet, who has worked at the Cowes TIC for four years, said she and the staff were happy to help out the bird – even though it meant employing unusual tactics.

Roman villa re-opens A POPULAR Island attraction is due to re-open its doors on Saturday May 23. Newport Roman Villa, in Cypress Road, has been closed since April 6 to allow work to be done on a new roof for the building (as featured in the April 17 issue of The Gazette). The work will ensure that the villa, and particularly its mosaics and baths, will remain protected from the elements in the future. The project was jointly funded by English Heritage and IW Council. The villa was originally scheduled to re-open on May 14, but due to the extent of the building

work the date was moved back. John Metcalfe, IW Council assistant director of economic and tourism development, said: “The works are vital to secure the future of the villa, which attracts over 5000 visitors every year. “Because of the nature and complexity of the work to fit the new roof, and the importance of protecting the mosaics and baths, this type of project takes more time than a usual roof project. “The council apologises for the delay in the re-opening, but I am sure residents and visitors would rather the work was done properly, rather than rushing ahead to get it finished.”

Fostering drive

THE DRIVE to recruit more foster parents on the Island is to continue this week, with IW Council roadshows at key locations. The second half of ‘Foster Care Fortnight’ will see staff from the council’s fostering and adoption team visit Ryde (May 15, Tesco car park), Newport (May 19, St Thomas’s Square), Lake (May 20, Morrisons car park), Freshwater (May 21, Moa Place) and then Newport again (May 22, St Thomas’s Square). The roadshows run from 10am 3pm. Anyone who registers their interest at the roadshows will be invited to an open evening held later in the summer. Foster Care Fortnight, co-ordinated by the Fostering Network, is an annual UK-wide awareness campaign which aims raise the profile of fostering and highlights the need for more foster carers. Following last year’s series of roadshows on the Island, more than two dozen new foster carers were identified. If you would like more information regarding the roadshows or IW Council’s Fostering and Adoption Service, ring 566011 or log on to www.iwight.com.

Work being carried out on the roof at Newport Roman Villa


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Top marks for IW beaches THE ISLAND’S beaches have been voted amongst the best in the country after receiving 14 awards in the Keep Britain Tidy Blue Flags and Quality Coast Awards. Sandown and Ventnor beaches have both been awarded prestigious Blue Flags, while 12 others have been given Quality Coast Awards (QCA), putting the Island joint top alongside Torbay in terms of the number of beach awards for a single local authority area. Other beaches to receive recognition were Colwell, Cowes, East Cowes, Gurnard, Ryde East, Sandown, Seagrove, Shanklin, Springvale, Totland, Ventnor and Yaverland. Phil Barton, chief executive of Keep Britain Tidy, which runs Blue Flag and QCA in England, said: “Holidaying in this country is the perfect

to all types of holidaymaker, and it is pleasing to know way of saving money and our efforts to make sure having a great time. Whether we remain among the best it’s a question of variety, UK seaside destinations are accessibility or value for proving successful. money, enjoying our wonder- “We are dedicated to ensurful beaches is the ideal way ing our beaches are of the to recharge your batteries. highest quality. Not only do QCA criteria include good we carry out comprehensive access, lifeguard provision, beach cleaning, but we have being litter free and having employed beach lifeguards at clean bathing water. Ventnor, Sandown, Shanklin And with 113 QCA’s and Ryde, smartened up seaawarded across the country, fronts and esplanades across it means that the Island can the Island and also taken boast almost ten percent of steps such as updating our the UK’s QCA beaches. dog control orders to make it Stuart Love, IW Council clear when and where dogs head of environment and are allowed on beaches.” neighbourhoods, said: “The l The council did not enter news that we are number previous Blue Flag winning one in the country is a beaches Ryde East (2007) timely boost ahead of what or Shanklin (2008) into the we are predicting to be a Blue Flag awards for 2009 great tourism season on because the areas were the Island. The Island has subject to inclement weather worked to broaden its appeal during much of 2008.

By Jamie White

‘Veg for beer’ scheme keeps pub grub local

Festival volunteers wanted by Oxfam

OXFAM are looking for 35 volunteers to spread the word about the charity’s MANY eateries on the Island beer’ exchange, whereby wild rabbit brought in.” campaigns at this make great play of the ‘local locals would be encouraged And in case the locals fail year’s IW Festival – food’ concept – and not to bring in produce from to keep their end up on the but you will have to always very convincingly. their gardens in return for a supplies front, the pub has its hurry. Applications At the Cask & Taverners pint or two. own vegetable garden to fall close today, May 15. pub in Godshill, however, “Our menu changes every back on. Oxfam’s major they talk in food yards rather day, so we are able to make Roger learned his trade in aim this year is to than food miles. use of these fresh ingredithe hotels and restaurants of increase awareThe owners, Roger and ents, whether it’s rainbow London, where he lived for ness of the human Lisa Serjeant, have hit upon chard, spinach or courgettes,” 20 years before returning to impact on climate the idea of a unique ‘veg for said Roger. “We’ve even had the Island. change, and that is one of the messages they will be hoping to put across to the tens of thousands of revellers who will be turning up at Seaclose from June 11 to 14 for the annual music extravaganza. A spokesperson for Oxfam explained: “We are offering 35 bubbly, confident, passionate and fun people the chance to be part of something big. “We want to engage everyone in fresh and friendly ways across the summer at a number of festivals, including the one on the Isle of Wight. “We hope to gain support to help kickstart a planned ‘sea of blue faces’ rally in London this December. In doing so we will help demonstrate the need for G20 members to commit seriously to tackling climate change at their December Owner Roger Serjeant with some of the supplies brought in by locals

summit in Copenhagen. Action needs to happen globally, and action needs to happen locally on the Isle of Wight! “We need people who are good at communicating ideas, enthusiastic, and inspirational, with an awareness of Oxfam’s campaigns, to volunteer at the IW Festival.” Campaigners, working in pairs, you will undertake an array of tasks to engage festival goers, from painting people’s faces blue and organising them into a human sea to chatting to people and groups about Oxfam. Volunteers will be required to work in shifts of 8.5 hours and will have to complete three of these shifts across the festival, during the daylight hours of Thursday until Sunday. Applicants will be required to make a deposit of £175 but it is fully refundable upon completion of duties. For further information visit the Oxfam Festival Campaigns site at: www.oxfam. org.uk/get_involved/ festivals/campaigning/index.html. Applicants must be over 18.

Expert on autism at conference A RENOWNED autism expert is returning to the Island to take part in a two-day conference dedicated to the condition. Professor Tony Attwood, who specialises in Asperger’s syndrome, a form of autism, will be at the 2009 Asperger’s Conference being held at Cowes Yacht Haven on May 19 and 20 May. Prof Attwood first visited the Island in 2007, and he is regarded as a leading authority on the condition since qualifying in 1975. His book ‘Asperger’s Syndrome – a Guide for Parents and Professionals’ has sold over 300,000 copies and has been translated into 20 languages. He is also an associate professor at Griffith University in Queensland, Australia. On Tuesday May 19, he will focus on current understanding, research, diagnosis and learning. The second day will offer insights into and help with social and emotional difficulties. Keith Woods, IW Council head of children’s services, said: “I look forward to welcoming back Tony, who is a very well respected expert. His visit will assist part of the drive to help schools better meet the needs of pupils and students with Asperger’s. “Following the conference, there will be the roll-out of the Government’s Inclusive Development Programme on Autism Spectrum Disorders. This will begin in Island schools from September, and I am sure professionals and parents will be eager to hear from Tony has to say”. Both days get underway at 9.30am and close at 3.30pm. Tickets to the event cost £50 per day for parents and carers of children with Asperger’s. Tickets for professionals cost £150 per day or £250 for the two days. Early booking is recommended. Conference details can be found on www. wightchyps.org.uk or by contacting Chris Cane at Thompson House on 533523.


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Colin completes flight for sight COLIN MCARTHUR took the controls of an Islander aeroplane during a 20-minute flight from Bembridge Airport last week. Nothing remarkable about that you might think – except Colin is registered blind. Colin, 57, used the flight to help raise funds for the RP Fighting Blindness charity, which aims to restore vision to those who have gone blind through a disease called ‘retinis pigmentosa’. He is hoping to raise more than £1,000 for the charity. He was accompanied on the flight by his wife Linda and co-pilot Maurice Hynett, a Britten-Norman executive. Mr Hynett admitted he was slightly dubious about the flight, but once he had spoken to Colin he was fully behind the idea. “When I first heard that Colin wanted to fly the plane

been a great experience. “Hopefully we can raise I thought it was absurd. enough money and I can However, we discussed the get my eyesight back and fact that it was for charity become a fully fledged pilot. and for a very good cause, so “We took off and flew we decided to go ahead with towards Brading, and as it. Here at Britten-Norman we approached Sandown I we like to support people and took the controls and flew their charity campaigns on myself for some time under the Island. Maurice’s instructions when “Once I had cleared evewe were out at sea. We did a rything with our insurance couple of turns and loops. It company and the Civil Avia- was amazing,” he added. tion Authority I was pretty Mr Hynett was impressed level headed about it.” by Colin’s ability and awareThe flight took them ness during the flight. towards Brading and on “Colin has the makings of a to Sandown and Shanklin, great pilot. He has superb cobefore returning back to ordination and was feeling Bembridge. the turns. I was just giving “I had fantastic commeninstructions on when to roll tary from Maurice and it was left and when to roll right, a very smooth ride. It was when to dive and when to everything I dreamt it would time. be. When I had my eyesight, “It wasn’t scary for me at I saw the aircraft 40 years all. He was perfectly compeago and now flying it has tent at all times.” By Jamie White

Crime-line pays off

THE CRIMESTOPPERS charity played a key role in cutting crime on the Island in the year up to March 31, annual figures have revealed. In our last edition The Gazette highlighted the fall in offences on the Island due to police diligence. Now Hampshire & IW Crimestoppers have confirmed at least 210 telephone calls (over 12 per cent of total calls) disrupted crimes which, had they taken place, would have resulted in the expenditure of more police time, more cost to the public and more erosion of community safety.

By Peter White Examples of disruption include information on habitually drunk drivers, under age sales of alcohol and planned crime. Simon Hayes, who chairs the local board, said: “Crimestoppers is better known for information which leads to arrests. The success in disrupting crime with information we have passed to the police is very satisfying. You could say that we do just what it says on the tin.” In addition, at least 194 arrests can be attributed to information received through Crimestoppers. A total of 43 arrests

were made for drunk driving – the highest total for the second successive year. There were 41 arrests for drug trafficking and supply, 13 for possession of drugs and four for manufacture and supply of drugs. Simon Theobalds, the charity’s project officer, said: “On average we receive four good calls a day about crime in Hampshire and the Isle of Wight which results in four crimes a week being disrupted and four arrests being made. Our results should be seen in the context of a fall in reported crime of 2.8 per cent across the Force.”

Colin McArthur, back safely on land after his flight in the Britten-Norman Islander

Paul puts best foot Smallbrook party planned forward for Legion

A NEW festival that will raise money A FORMER Royal for several Island charities is coming to Hampshire RegiRyde later this month. ment soldier is to More than 150 volwalk all the way unteer performers and around the Island will come together at to raise money for Smallbrook Stadium the Royal British on May 24 for the IW Legion Poppy Community RenaisAppeal. sance Festival. Paul ‘Jack’ BerAll production ridge, 53, will members, particibegin his route in pants, entertainers Newport before striding up the Medina Valley to West Cowes and site crew have given their time and and then turning left to circumnavigate the Island in an anti-clockwise direction, finally skills free of charge and all profits from finishing at East Cowes Town Hall. Paul starts the walk on June 4 and is hoping the festival will go to four selected charito complete it on June 7. So far Paul has raised £190 in sponsorship ties: IW Hospice, money for the walk, but is obviously hoping IW Branch of the for more. If you would like to support Paul’s National Autistic Society, IW Lions walk, sponsorship forms are available at and Ryde East ComRoyal British Legion Clubs around the munity Association. Island. For further information about Paul’s The idea for the fundraising challenge, call him on 07776 festival stemmed 361829.

from a discussion between community development workers Cora Wade and Marcelle Edwards, who are based at The Park Centre in Ryde and were were looking for ideas to give the community as a whole the opportunity to work together. Cora said: “The idea was to create a celebration of community, a fun day for the family that wouldn’t cost the earth for those coming along. The support that the project has received has been amazing. The only money that has been spent on making it happen is for the absolute essentials such as licensing, first aid and

a bus for the day.” The programme includes a diverse range of musical acts as well as a hog roast, skittle run, tug of war, belly dancers, bouncy castles and lots more. Tickets for the event are £6 for adults and £4 for children. Organisers invite festival-goers to bring their own picnics for the day, although food and drink will also be available on site. A bus service will also run throughout the day to ensure safe travel to and from the site. The timetable will be released on the website and on fliers and posters. Website: www. islandrenfest.moonfruit.com


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gazette feature

A learning experience A Rotary Club charity mission last Christmas has boosted links with Romania. Justin Gladdis discovers how young Islanders will be gaining an insight into life under a different culture following the visit of two teachers from the eastern European country A chance meeting in Romania has broadened educational horizons between the Island and the east European outpost. Sandown Rotary Club’s Bill Wyke, the Island’s People’s People award winner for 2008, was part of a team delivering computers to a school in Romania last Christmas, when the special link was formed. It has resulted in two Romanian teachers flying over to the Island to see how our education system works. Mr Wyke said: “It wasn’t planned at all. We took some computers to the school out there, just got talking and it snowballed from there.” Tina Asanache, headteacher of Nisipari School, and Alina Vasile, who teaches English at Mihail Sadoveanu School, took in a number of Island schools, starting with Sandown High. They were greeted by senior staff members, including vice principal, Cath Scallon. “We’re very excited to be welcoming Tina and Alina. Sandown has a long history of international links and we’re hoping they’re going to spend a very pleasant time in the school, meeting students and seeing how things work here, forming a very productive link in the future,” she said. “It’s very important we have an exchange of cultures with other places – students on the Island can become very insular and I hope we learn a lot about each other and exchange ideas. At the same time it’s great to find out how education is done in other countries.” Tina responded: “I’m delighted to be here. Sandown High is very big and the people are very warm and the kids are very happy here – they love it. “I think the whole system is a bit different here, starting with the age. Schools here have a less central system but we are already making changes back home. “Even if the resources in Romania are not

From left: Jemma Harding, Kate Calloway, Tina Asanache, Alina Vasile, Cath Scallon and Kelly Daniel,

as good as here, our level of education is very high. In my school we achieve excellent results in maths, science, chemistry. I have just learnt the pupils may be visiting here and I am very excited. The project will help improve their language and that will motivate them to do even better.”

From left to right: Ian Ward, Dorothy Dye, Alina, Bill Wyke, Tina and Paul Drayton

For Alina, her visit to the Island couldn’t have been more special. Indeed, it’s the first time she has been out of Romania. “I am so happy to be here for the first time. I will be learning lots about the Isle of Wight and its schools and it will be very worthwhile. We want to boost links between the two countries, which is very exciting,” she said. “Sandown High has extraordinary facilities. An exchange trip is important because our children will now get a different perspective on life and to improve not only their life experience but also mine,” she added. Key stage 3 leader of English at Sandown High, Jemma Harding, said: “It’s really important for students to experience other cultures. We are looking forward to having some Romanian students come to Sandown to experience English cultures and classes. The students are very excited. “I am working with a group in Year 9 who are looking to foster links with a group of Romanians – they’ve not had the opportunity to do such a thing before.”

And she says she intends to make the most of the opportunity herself. “Personally as a teacher you’re always looking to learn from colleagues so I can’t wait to get other viewpoints on how things are done in different areas. That will mean chatting with like minded colleagues on different methods of teaching English.” The Romanian party spent the rest of their stay at Grove Road School, Lake Middle, Sandown Sailing Club, other Island Rotary clubs and have been enjoying a whole host of dinner parties, including, of course, a traditional fish and chip supper! Last Christmas a 44-tonne lorry delivered shoeboxes loaded with gifts, filled by Islanders, to orphanages, schools and villages in Romania. “We would like to thank everyone for their wonderful kindness. The pupils have been so happy and excited,” said Tina. “To see the look on the children’s faces was something else!” added Mr Wyke. And these smiles are set return this winter as plans are well underway for another Rotary Shoebox Appeal.


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The Faith Force

Street pastors wear baseball caps, say prayers before they go out on patrol and will be appearing on the streets of Ryde very soon. Paul Rainford met their leader

ON A typical Friday night, Union Street in Ryde is no place for the fainthearted. It may be full of people out for a good time, but that can soon turn into a bad time when the alcohol starts to flow and tempers begin to flare. To put it mildly, the police are kept on their toes. But as from next week (May 22) the police will be getting some help – from the street pastors. The street pastor movement started in London in 2003 as a Church-based response to urban problems. Wearing distinctive uniforms, street pastors go out onto the streets of many of the country’s towns and cities and keep a look-out for anyone who appears to be in trouble, or simply in a vulnerable position that might lead them into trouble. An example might be a young girl, drunk and alone late at night at a bus station. They talk to them and offer a sympathetic ear and help if required. The Island branch of the street pastors is headed up by David Ouston, who may be better known to some locals as ‘D.O.’, a musician who has performed on piano and sax at many of our hotels and pubs. About four years ago, quite suddenly, David became a Christian. “It totally changed my life around,” says David. “It was quite a blinding light experience. Not many people have them, but when you do have them they are pretty strong. I was definitely going one way in my life and now I’m going another. I think I just got to that point where I was in my late thirties and you have that midlife crisis and start asking yourself what’s it all about.” So last year, when the job of local co-ordinator for street pastors was advertised, he wasted no time in filling out his application. “I looked at it and thought this is really good, because the church has got bad PR, and I thought this could be a really wonderful way to get alongside people without preaching, in a way that people would be able to look at us and think, ‘you know, they’re all right, they’re OK, they’re just like normal people’.” As a Ryde resident, having moved to the Island in the 1990s, David was no stranger to the potential drinkfuelled hazards of his home town. “I love Ryde and I love my local community but Union Street on a Friday night is really not a nice place to be. I just thought we could something that really positively impacts that place, as long as we do it right. I had actually been a non-Christian for quite a long time so I thought I could do it sensitively.” David will be in charge of 22 volunteers drawn from 14 different Island churches, the oldest of whom is 84 and the youngest in his forties. All share a strong Christian faith and a desire to make a positive difference

David Ouston: ‘We don’t want to be seen as undercover policemen’

to their society. They will go out in pairs, as part of a team of five or six, and cover an area running from the top end of the High Street right down to the boating lake on Ryde Esplanade. But won’t they be putting themselves in danger? David thinks not. “We’re totally non-confrontational. There are 4,000 street pastors in the country and the scheme’s been going six years but there has never been a street pastor attacked. If it kicks off, unfortunately we just have to stand back. Sometimes there’ll be a fight going on and somebody will see a street pastor and they’ll say ‘do something’ but apart from shouting ‘please stop, I’ve got a mobile phone and I’m going to ring the police’ we don’t get involved. “There is this thing called the granny factor. If you get older women and men out on the streets, there is that inherent respect from young kids.” Though the street pastors will have a close working relationship with the police, David is keen to differentiate their respective roles. “We don’t want to be seen as undercover policemen. The police have supported it massively. I’m happy if people come up to us and say ‘you’re not the police’, because that starts a conversation. “What we have to do primarily is build trust, so that people won’t see as undercover policemen – they can tell us anything. Hopefully, within our ethos and our morals, we will just be good listeners and be able to signpost them to the relevant agencies if we feel that that would be

helpful to them. “We can do all the stuff the police can’t do – we can do all that aftercare stuff. If there’s been a fight we can hang around for hours if we have to. Then the police are free to go off. I think so much of police time is taken up with people just wanting to talk.” There will be those, though, who would argue that the job of looking after people in trouble should be left to the police, and not to those who could be seen as having a Christian ‘agenda’ to promote. Before they go out on patrol the street pastors will pray together and, indeed, if you are not a member of a church you cannot become a street pastor. To put it bluntly, if people have already had six pints of lager and a couple of vodka shots, do they really need God being shoved down their throats as well? “We would not bring up God unless people brought up God first,” claims David. “So if people say to us ‘I’m really questioning my faith and I’d love to try a church’, then we’d definitely suggest a church they could go to. We meet people where they’re at. If people want to talk about the football, we talk about the football. If they want to talk about their crap relationship with their parents, we’ll talk about that. “What I have to do is make sure people are trained properly so they’re not going out preaching. This is more about Good Samaritan stuff – how can we help people practically – there’s no desire for conversion, it’s about ‘how can we get you home safely?’”


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Friday MAY 15 2009

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Dusting down In the latest of The Gazette’s series on how different Island attractions are gearing up for the summer season, Paul Rainford followed some giant footprints to the Dinosaur Farm Museum

Top: a big green welcome to the Dinosaur Farm Museum. Above: Martin Simpson, owner of the museum, who has put his huge collection on display

CHANGES are afoot on the Military Road. In the not too distant future, drivers barrelling along on what is officially the A3055 may be distracted by some larger-than-life characters at the side of the road. Dinosaurshaped characters, that is. They are being put there to attract passersby to the Dinosaur Farm Museum, an established attraction which was originally set up in 1993 by a group of fossil enthusiasts following the discovery of a brachiosaur-like dinosaur in the cliffs nearby. The museum, which is housed in a couple of redundant farm buildings, is now under the stewardship of Martin Simpson, who has brought with him his vast fossil collection. Cheshire-born but a long-time Island resident, Martin is a renowned dinosaur expert who used to run the fossil shop at Blackgang Chine. He is now entering his third season in charge of the museum, which he runs with the help of a willing group of volunteers. Walking with Martin around his dinosaur domain, his enthusiasm is palpable. He has big plans for the museum, but he knows he has a lot on his plate. The ancient farm buildings are by no means weatherproof, and money is tight. “Sometimes I wake up in the morning and I think ‘my God, what have I done?’” says Martin. He is convinced, however, he is in exactly the right place. “If you said to me, ‘where do you want me to build a dinosaur museum?’, I’d put a cross on the map right here.” People point out that he is now in competition with the IW Council run Dinosaur Isle in Sandown, which has public money behind it and is well promoted. Martin, however, is not convinced that this upstart attraction has got it right. “Sandown is trying to do two things, be a museum and a robot attraction, and that’s really difficult.” By comparison, Martin is eschewing hi-tech gizmos and trying to keep things simple. For him, the personal touch is what counts, so if visitors to his attraction don’t get to poke at interactive screens, they do, he says, always get the personal and knowledgeable attention of Martin or one of his volunteers. “You have to have people who are good with the public – that’s what was lacking before here. If a family came in here now and walked around on their own they might be out in five minutes. But if you grab them as they walk through the door and give them a proper guided tour they really get something out of it. “It’s really bizarre: I went to the Roman Baths museum in Bath and you just get given a walkie-talkie with all the information on it – there’s no interaction with the staff.” If all goes to plan, there will be plenty of interaction between Martin’s staff and the visitors this summer. “I’m going to get a team of volunteers to chip away at all these bones that came out of the cliff and talk to visitors about them.” So far, says Martin, the back-to-basics ap-


Gazette

Lifestyle 15 May 2009

Buy with Confidence Sandown and Lake Special Scarrots Lane,

Newport


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the gazette lifestyle  

  Friday May 15 2009

lifestyle comment

Contents Lou Marsh interview

3

Entertainment

4

Days Out

6

Wine and Dine

8

Scarrots Lane

10

Sandown and Lake

11

Buy with Confidence

18

Wedding

19

Tasty Take Aways

20

Health & Beauty

22

Caravans & Camping

24

Shopping for Food

26

Gardening

27

Hospice & June Elford

28

David Holmes

SHOULD I be worried? If so how worried? I haven’t had my swine flu leaflet yet and apparently they’ve sent one to every home in the country. As we all know the biggest outbreak of swine flu seems to have been going on at Westminster. The Cabinet MPs have been acting like drunken pigs at the trough, seemingly oblivious to the consequences of discovery. It’s a fact; Teachers hate Ofsted inspections, Firefighters hate Home Office inspections and businessmen fear the Inland Revenue and VAT officers studying their books, even when we think we’re doing a good job.

Jo Macaulay Features Editor

David is your typical ‘Grumpy Old Man’. In his late 40’s David has been involved in several businesses and was also a local Councillor for a short while. He regularly appears with Alex (Grumpy 2) on wightFM. A VAT inspector once spent a very long day examining my records. I can’t say it was a pleasant experience. After eight hours of totally silent study he announced he was taking everything away. Imagine my horror! I was fairly sure my books were straight, but like that moment you arrive in an airport terminal, the situation has you believing you look extremely guilty. Never having entered any country with more than an extra packet or two of fags, I still feel it’s me they’ll pull over for the full examination, maybe even the unpleasant rubber glove treatment. The reality of the Customs man removing my records crushed me like bereavement. As the following days passed I became mildly suicidal. What could I have done wrong? I should say this experience was some years ago. I lacked experience. After two very long weeks the civil servant telephoned. ‘Could you come into the office please Mr Holmes?’ I was in like a shot, desperate for him to end my misery. The dismal dank office was very Eastern European; it reminded me of the Michael Caine film, Funeral in Berlin. Harry Palmer goes over to the other side to meet a defector, the Russian Colonel Stock. Anyway, back to the VAT office. I swear the huge shadowy windowless room had but a solitary light bulb dangling from the centre of the ceiling. A desk and two simple chairs were the only items of furniture. All my records were on the table. This was it; surely my business career was about to end in a long and possibly well deserved prison sentence? Er, actually no. The kindly official patiently explained that we had

made a minor mistake. Once he pointed out my error he told me they would be sending me a cheque for about £250. I can honestly say I left his oppressive office feeling more joy than I did at the birth of my children, or even on the day I collected a new Aston from a garage in Mayfair. My VAT experience lives with me, possibly even haunts me. I think we all need something to fear, even if it’s just the fear of discovery. It keeps us from temptation. Things can only get better, we were told when Labour came to power 12 years ago. Yeah right. Now we know what they meant. Ask anyone, our own Member of Parliament is a very good one. I believe he conducts himself as we funeral directors do, as if the people we serve are standing behind us, looking over our shoulder. In Turner’s case perhaps he thinks of the pensioner who barely gets by on her modest income or the hundreds of Island families earning so little there isn’t anything left for luxuries. I think that’s how it should be, how it must be, it is our money. They should always spend it wisely. Your local GP now earns over £100,000 a year. Can it be right that the one person we elect to represent us earns only a little over half the amount we pay local doctors? Surely we should pay MPs a more realistic salary. We badly need the best people to run our country, to deal with our many and various problems. Like everything in life, you get what you pay for. Now, who should I ring about that missing flu leaflet?

THE DAY looms ever closer and I get no fitter – I managed a walk up to the Longstone last weekend, through the beautiful bluebell woods behind Mottistone Manor, but it’s hardly an arduous training session. Walk the Wight is going to kill me. I also managed to fall over when I went to the supermarket. Striding through the entrance barriers I slipped on a large puddle of water and went flying, bumping my knee quite hard – the subsequent bruise is quite impressive. And what was their response? Well the customer services person was called for and they investigated the incident by looking at the pool of water with me, arranging for a nice yellow warning notice and then getting someone to mop it up. “It must have been from the flowers,” said the customer services person sagely. I was then referred to the first aid person who looked at my knee and then I had to give all the details of the accident to help another person fill in a piece of paper. But what was missing from all of this? To my mind it was an apology and some measure of sympathy. My heart was pounding, adrenalin was rushing through my body and at no point did anyone actually offer any kind words that might have calmed me. Presumably because they’re trained not to take any responsibility just in case customers later sue? Unfortunately this just served to channel my adrenalin into rage. “I’ve just slipped over on the way into your shop and badly hurt my knee,” I pointed out to the supermarket manager when I rang him upon returning to my nearby office. “I’m sorry about that,” was his reply. “Well you’re the first person who has been,” was my angry reply to the poor man. It’s not very pleasant to have your dignity dented and your fight or flight responses triggered when you enter a supermarket – after all we don’t have to kill our food before eating it these days do we? To be confronted with indifference and the feeling that you’ve inconvenienced everybody by hurting yourself is hardly the response you need though. But hey, it could have been worse – at least I’m not elderly or disabled and I wasn’t badly hurt. I have, however, been avoiding the shop ever since – in embarrassment as much as anything. I’d be interested to hear of reader’s similar experiences. jo@iwgazette. co.uk


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lifestyle profile

Don’t give up Mum Jo Macaulay meets Lou Marsh, a woman who is determined that personal tragedy will not stand in the way of her plumbing career. TRYING to start her business as a plumber has been something of an uphill struggle for Lou Marsh. A single mum of two, Lou’s fledgling business was just beginning to get off the ground when tragedy struck her family - twice. But it hasn’t deterred her determination to succeed at her career. Attaining her NVQ level 2 plumbing qualifications in 2004, Lou also received a Learning and Skills Award whilst she was attending the Isle of Wight College. “There were a few girls on my course but they all left within a month,” said Lou. After completing a placement position Lou went on to set up on her own. “I found it easier on my own,” said Lou. “My college lecturer Ian Johnston used to help if I had anything I wasn’t quite sure of.” But then in 2006 ‘Brookie’ (Andrew Brooks), the father of her son Dale, now 13, was diagnosed with Metastatic Ganglioneuro Blastoma and told that he only had two years to live. “He had a lump in his neck and went to the doctors and they thought it was just his glands. But they sent him to the hospital for tests and found it was cancer. They also found a large tumour in his stomach,” said Lou. Lou, Dale and her daughter Charlie, now nine, had just moved to the beautiful Tapnell location where they live now and Brookie had a flat in Ryde. At first Lou was travelling back and forth from Ryde to visit him and taking him to appointments at Southampton General Hospital. Eventually she gave up her plumbing in order to nurse him full time. “I had to let a lot of people down

because I was so busy with Brookie, which was a shame,” said Lou. In February 2008, during a stay at the IOW Hospice, Brookie awoke one day to find that he’d lost all feeling from his waist down. “ They took him to Southampton hospital and they thought he wouldn’t live for much longer and I got the ambulance to bring him to my home. I wanted to nurse him there rather than for him to stay at the hospice,” she explained. Lou’s home was ideal for Brookie as it’s mostly on ground level with double doors leading outside which was good for wheelchair access. “The hospice team would come in every day in the mornings and if you needed anything they were at the end of the phone,” she explained although it must have been very hard to cope with at the time. Brookie had to be hoisted with an electric hoist when Lou needed to move him, but she coped valiantly, even making a make shift ramp out of two scaffolding boards to get his wheelchair and the hoist into the back of her four by four truck. On May 3, 2008 they had a blessing at their home and a big party - ‘The Blesstival’ as it was named - for Brookie to say goodbye to all of his friends, but little

Lou and Brookie exchange rings at the ‘Blesstival’

did they know that they would be saying goodbye to Brookie’s best friend too. After a lovely ceremony by the vicar of All Saints in Freshwater where Lou and Brookie exchanged rings in front of all of their friends, a party continued into the small hours and many chose to stay over and camp.

At around 2am, after Brookie had gone back to the house, Adrian Sullivan, (Age), decided to climb a tree and was swinging from the branches and then fell from an eight foot branch to the ground below, sustaining such massive injuries that he died at 10am the next morning. “It was absolutely shocking,” said Lou. “And I had to tell Brookie that his best friend had died. It must have been a one in a million chance of that happening – especially at a party. We all went to Age’s funeral and then within two months we were at Brookie’s funeral.” Brookie died on July 15 – he was only 38.

Less than a year later, Lou is determined to get back on track with her plumbing career. “Our son Dale said “Don’t give up on it Mum” and basically I just want to get back where I was,” said Lou. “Self employment is good because I can fit it around my family and I’m determined to continue with my career.” Seeing her slight figure in her red plumbing overalls it’s hard to imagine her drilling holes in walls and lugging large plumbing fixtures around but you have to remember that this is a lady with a lot of strength both physically and mentally. “A lot of people look at me and think, “You can’t do the heavy work,” but it’s not a problem,” said Lou – and I’m sure she’s right.


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lifestyle entertainment

Majortones play festival MEDINA High hosted another successful battle of the bands with some interestingly diverse entries from groups of young people. Indie, synth pop lads, The Majortones grabbed the top spot to play on the main stage at the Isle of Wight Pop Festival after a sizzling performance, whilst chilled and folky Groovecat came in second place with their joyful melodies and stunning vocals. The Sessions, who came in third place with their fun filled rock and roll antics, will perform on the festival’s bandstand. The finals hosted an array of young talent ranging from powerful femme rock of band

By Mhairi Macaulay Nearly New to the gutsy, guns n roses-esque Blacktop Highway and a storming impression yet again from Kosmik Debris who won first place last year. But as only three places were up for grabs to play the at legendary Isle of Wight festival, the acts which showed striking originality and musicianship took the titles. Goodbye Stereo, the well-known island band who are off to play a scattering of festivals all over the country this year, also played a special set for the Battle of the Bands audience, while the judges representing

Solo, Strings Guitar Centre, Island musicians and former students from Medina High made their decision.

To check out the winners make sure to see The Majortones play the main stage on Sunday afternoon plus Groovecat

and The Sessions on the bandstand at the Isle of Wight Festival from June 12 to 14.

Patti Smith’s words & images FARRINGFORD Hotel, the Julia Margaret Cameron Trust and music promoters Vaguely Sunny are combining forces to bring to the Island the American musician/poet/artist Patti Smith. An iconic figure, who first came to prominence in the mid-seventies with the release of her debut album ‘Horses’, Patti will be performing a solo show of poetry and music at Farringford Hotel,

Freshwater on Thursday, June 11th. Patti has chosen this date for the concert, as it is the date of Julia Margaret Cameron’s birthday. Ahead of that on June 10th, an exhibition of Patti’s photographs will open at Dimbola Lodge, Freshwater Bay. Dimbola is the former home of the pioneering Victorian photographer Julia Margaret Cameron, and her work has influenced both Patti’s own

Material world of Milly’s art MILLY STEVEN’S exhibits her most recent body of work in the Rope Gallery at Quay Arts until May 23. Pentimenti, a collection of paintings, collages and assemblages, was created intensively during the past year. “The artist is engaged in a dialogue with the ‘languages’ of

materials through a process of layering, scratching, scraping, adding and subtracting. These processes produce parallel responses to the naturally occurring patina and weathered surfaces that constitute the pivotal inspiration for the work.”

photography and also that of Robert Mapplethorpe the celebrated American photographer who took the pictures for the covers of Patti’s albums - ‘Horses’ and ‘Easter’. Tickets for the Farringford concert are £15.00 and a few may be left on her website at www.pattismith.net with entrance to all of Dimbola’s exhibitions priced at £4.


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lifestyle entertainment

Bars, bands and beer garden

THE OLD Comical in Sandown’s St John’s Road is becoming something of an institution in the live music scene. Bands play every Friday and Saturday with bookings until the end of the year. Open mic night on Thursdays, hosted by the 14 Inch Remotes, is very popular too – just turn up and plug in. This weekend sees the popular Island band Sporting Life playing live tonight, Friday 15, and on Saturday May 16 the joint will be jumping to the sounds of the rockabilly band The Lonesome Valley Boys. Wendy Blake took over at the Old Comical almost exactly three years ago when the pub was purchased from Dean and Sam who were featured on the programme Relocation Relocation. Records show that the pub is over 150

years old and began life as the Commercial Hotel. In 1996 it was renamed the Cask and Codpiece but local opposition was so great that it was renamed The Cask and Old Comical within the year, which quickly became shortened to The Old Comical. The pub is a really traditional community pub with a local following. The front bar is for over eighteens only with original flagstone flooring and wooden floorboards. High shelves in the ‘beams’ are full of old bottles, plates and plates with drinking related quotations daubed above them. Nooks and crannies hold games and books or you could play ‘get the hoop over the horn’, a unique challenge featuring a cow horn and a hoop hanging from a rope from the ceiling. The far corner of the

bar houses a growing collection of old Sandown and Isle of Wight photographs and postcards. To the rear of the pub is the family/ children and games room with pool table – matches are on Tuesdays and on Mondays pool is free all day. Outside the back door is an outdoor undercover area with tables and chairs - ideal for smokers. Beyond this the pub garden opens out and is surprisingly enormous with patio and grass seating, petanque pitch (matches on Wednesdays) and a fenced play area where the bouncy castle sits on sunny days. Happy hours of 5pm till 7pm operate daily with all branded doubles for a £1 and real ales are always on sale. Wendy doesn’t offer food but is happy for punters to bring in their own takeaways as long as they clear up afterwards.

Boost your business! Advertise with The Gazette! Call our marketing team on 402599


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  Friday May 15 2009

lifestyle days out

Hop on the Bustival

The IW Zoo Blog by Tracy Dove

renamed the company the Southern Vectis Omnibus Company. THIS Since then the bus summer company has gone from heralds the eightieth strength to strength, buying up anniversary of the Southern Vectis Bus most of the competing bus companies on Company and to celebrate a Bustival of the Island and introducing open top buses buses through the ages will be gathering at in the 1950s. Various forms of ownership the Isle of Wight Steam Railway on Bank have ensued but the name has remained Holiday Monday May 25. Not only will the same. The National Bus Company there be these beautifully restored and well owned Southern Vectis at one point, and cared for vehicles but Andi Penn will be there was a management buy out during entertaining the children with magic and deregulation in the 1980s. In 2005 Southern tricks, there will be an inflatable slide, Vectis became part of the Go Ahead Group, trampoline and swing boat and traditional based in Newcastle and now have up to 70 coconut shy and other family entertainment. buses operating from the Newport and Ryde It’s fitting for the Bustival to be at the IW depots. Steam Railway because it is actually part Buses at the event will range from a 1939 of its history. In 1929 train companies were vintage bus to the most modern bus on the permitted to buy shares in the bus companies Island – the Scania Omnicity double decker, in order to regulate competition. When which operates on all of the double decker Southern Railways, who ran the Island’s routes except for the 1s – because it can’t train services, bought shares in the Vectis get under the arch at Cowes Pontoon. A free Bus Company, as it was then called, they vintage bus service will operate from the event to the bus museum on Newport Quay. Entrance will be free, although there will be collections by the IW Hospice. On Sunday a cavalcade of around 15 buses of varying ages will be travelling around the Island before arriving at the IW Steam Railway for the following day’s festivities.

THE MOST popular animal in the zoo with our visitors is our white Indian tiger, Zena. She is also possibly the most misunderstood. Contrary to most people’s beliefs white tigers are not snow tigers, neither are they Siberian. Siberian tigers are never white and there is no such animal as a snow tiger. Siberian tigers (more correctly called Amur tigers) are the largest subspecies and are found in forested areas of Eastern Russia where there is snow cover for much of the year. However, it is not snowy there all the year round. A white tiger might be well camouflaged there during the winter, but once the snow has melted the deer upon which it preys would be able to see it coming from far away. Deer can easily outrun tigers so the predator relies on an ambush hunting strategy that requires stealth and concealment. A bright white tiger in a dark shadowy forest would simply not be able to get close enough to its prey to make a kill. White tigers occur as a result of an inherited condition called leucism. The genes inside their cells which are responsible for the production of colour pigments do not function properly and not all the pigments necessary for normal tiger colouration are produced. They are not albinos. Albinos produce no pigment at all. The ‘white’ gene is recessive – a tiger will only be white if it carries two copies, one from each parent. Any tiger that inherits one ‘normal’ colour gene and one ‘white’ gene will be a normallycoloured orange tiger with black stripes because the effect of the abnormal gene is masked. This is why Zena (with two ‘white’ genes) is a white tiger and her sister Zia (with one ‘white’ and one ‘normal’ gene) is orange. White tigers are only found in the Indian tiger subspecies. They are thought to all be descended from a wild white male tiger called Mohan, which was captured in the 1950s by a Maharaja. There are now no wild white tigers. They are not extinct in the wild; it is simply nature’s way of saying ‘this is not a good design’. Our white tiger, Zena, has endured problems with her vision for much of her life. In 2006 she was diagnosed with glaucoma that has rendered her blind in her right eye. As the pressure in her eye increased she became increasingly unwell and she eventually underwent surgery to remove the affected eye. Although this sounds drastic to us we must remember that Zena is a tiger and that she does not think as we do. She never looks in the mirror and does not care what she looks like. Her blind eye was useless to her and caused her considerable discomfort. Once she had recovered from the surgery she felt much better and was soon eating well and enjoying life again. And, although she looks like she is winking at us, we think she is as beautiful as ever.


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lifestyle days out

Rigged up and ready! THIS year’s Yarmouth Old Gaffers Festival takes place from Friday May 29 through to Sunday May 31. The annual celebrations will be opened by Geoff Holt who hit the headlines for sailing solo around Britain despite living with being paralysed from the waist down. He’s the fastest disabled person to sail around the Isle of Wight and was also named the BBC South sports personality of the year 2007. This year’s festival also recognises a special landmark. It’s now fifty years since the first race in the Solent organised specially for gaff-rigged craft. This saw the birth of the Old Gaffers Association four years later.

To celebrate, more than a hundred beautiful old boats will be on show. On shore, there’s a huge range of attractions to keep the thousands of visitors entertained morning noon and night. The official opening will take place at mid-day on the Friday on the quay and will be followed by gaff rigged boat racing, craft fairs and markets, a flower festival in the church and a lifeboat demonstration. There will also be face painting, ghost walks, story-telling, Morris Dancers, magic shows courtesy of David Randini, Grand Theatre of Lemmings, Street entertainers Vince and Richard, Medina Marching Band,

Bournemouth Carnival Band, The Trafalgar Drummer, Spencers Comedy Costumes and there’s a Continental Market in the square. The daytime diverse mix of music ranges from pop and rock from Ventnor Guitar Club, reggae numbers from Derek Sandy and melodic folk/rock from Lucid. In the evenings Fidgety Feet are a strolling Dixieland Fun Band, The Lonesome Valley Boys play rockabilly, The Dance Preachers provide good time folk and blues and The Enormous Small Band have swing, soul and rock and roll. Organisers are keen to stress, admittance to Quayside entertainments after 6pm is by ticket only, costing £6. They can be bought from the Tourist Board, Angela’s Delicatessen and the Information Desk. For safety requirements numbers are limited so you are urged to buy early! There is also a late night bus to Freshwater on the Saturday leaving at 0015 hours from the bus station.


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  Friday May 15 2009

lifestyle wine & dine

Wine & dine on the Island

Watching the boats go by

TAKE supper on the terrace of the New Holmwood Hotel and you could watch the cruise ship Arcadia leaving Southampton for sunnier climes this Sunday evening (May 17) at 8pm. The table d’hote, a la carte and bar snack menus all have 20% off on Sunday evenings too. The Best Western New Holmwood is the ideal place to sit and watch the boats go by – Ellen MacArthur often moors her yacht just outside. You can choose the restaurant or bar areas with their large picture windows, one of the

seven tables on the terrace or sit at one of the four tables around the pool – ideal in the summer if you have children who might like a dip after lunch. The outside tables are on a first come first served basis so with lunch starting at 12 noon and evening meals at 7pm, make sure you arrive early. But wherever you sit you’ll have panoramic views of the Solent. It was the summer haunt of Edward Heath when he used to race in Cowes, and has paid host to many famous visitors in the past. But this top class hotel is

surprisingly good value for money with the daily changing table d’hote menu priced at £20 for three courses and coffee. Dishes might include a starter of smoked salmon and prawn salad and main course of roast topside of beef and a sweet of orange and cointreau panna cotta. The a la carte menu changes with seasonal availability and at present includes a starter of sliced smoked duck breast with orange, pine nut and parmesan salad, main course of roast lamb fillet wrapped in parma ham with garlic

and rosemary stuffing and sweet of lemon baked Alaska. Dishes start at £4.95 for a starter and £10.95 for a main course and all sweets are £5.50. Breakfast between 7.30am and 9.30am at the New Holmwood is the ideal way to view the start of the Round The Island Race on June 18. The breathtaking fleet of yachts are often very close to the shore – you almost feel you could reach out and touch them. For cruise liner schedule check the website at www. newholmwoodhotel.co.uk


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lifestyle wine & dine

Colourful fruit in East Cowes

PURPLE Mango, the new Indian restaurant near to the chain ferry in East Cowes, is getting rave reviews. At this vibrant contemporary restaurant you will find the finest Indian cuisine with a wide range of freshly prepared dishes cooked with chicken, lamb, duck, seafood and fish, as well as several delicious vegetable dishes. Purple Mango offer a wonderful selection of speciality dishes as well

as the old favourites that we all know and love. All the mouth-watering dishes have a unique aroma and flavour and they use only the finest ingredients and traditional cooking methods. Any dish not found on the menu can be prepared on request. Banquet nights on Wednesdays and Sundays are particularly popular with any starter, main course, side dish, rice and naan for only £11.95. Reservations are recommended on

these nights. In addition to a top class Indian restaurant, Purple Mango can also offer a takeaway service, with free home delivery (minimum order £15 and subject to location). Collection of a takeaway benefits from a 15% discount. If you have any dietary restrictions, such as nut or dairy allergies please let them know.


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  Friday May 15 2009

lifestyle scarrots lane

Bridal sweets and more... IT WAS organising her own wedding to Paul Yeates last July that led to Jackie starting her own business providing all of the sweet things you need for your guests plus a great deal more. She also needed a job that would fit around her large family of six children, one grandchild and another ‘on

the way’. Individualised favours for your guests are her particular talent with her home made truffles, coconut ice, fudge and Scottish style tablet on sale in the shop. “Truffles are particularly popular at the moment – a little box of four different flavours for each favour,” said Jackie who also has a truffle tree, a stand holding around 25 truffles, a tasty decoration for your tables. Or you can choose from a selection of small gifts, which can be beautifully wrapped and which double as place names for all of your guests and all can be presented in a way to match your wedding colours exactly. See examples of the wedding and party cakes that Jackie has also made, both traditional and contemporary such as the popular stands of cup cakes, in The Stables in Scarrots Lane. Choose from a selection of wedding invitations, which are handcrafted locally along with a collection of hand made cards. The shop also has wedding and birthday gifts, confetti, party banners and balloons. A display of the silk flower arrangements,

bridal and bridesmaid’s bouquets and a flower girl basket along with buttonholes – all made by Jackie - can be viewed in the shop and made to match your wedding from swatches of fabric. She can decorate your venue and even invite your guests. Jackie offers a particularly personal service. “I’m trying to offer something different but my prices are very reasonable,” said Jackie.

Bloomin’ lovely at Top Table ONE of Scarrots Lane’s well-established businesses is Top Table Florists who offer beautiful flower arrangements for any occasions. They specialise in weddings and were voted amongst the top 25 wedding florists in the UK by Brides Magazine. As well as wedding bouquets, button-holes and table decorations, Top Table can provide balloon displays to decorate any function room. Top Table is not just about flowers. They sell a range of indoor and outdoor plants and specialise in more exotic plants such as palms and olive trees. Large plants both real and silk are available to hire for that special occasion. For the hobbyist Top table can supply a range of floral sundries and cellophane and will shortly be offering craft workshops. Flowers can be ordered online at toptableflorist.co.uk or telephone 520215.


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lifestyle sandown and lake

Taking a dip into Lake LAKE is situated between the Island’s beach resorts, Sandown and Shanklin. It’s named after the Old English “Lacu” referring to the creek, which runs along Scotchells Brook between the Isle of Wight Airport, Morrisons and the Spithead Industrial Park. You can catch up with day’s big headlines with all the day’s newspapers and magazines at Lake News. Run by Malcolm Johnston, you will receive a warm welcome at 29 Sandown Road. Just a short walk away, you can send your parcels, post your postcards, or pocket your pension at Lake Post Office at number 32, which is run by Mike Grattage. Along at number 27, Glen

Creed and Hugh Harrison are the partners behind Lake Natural Therapy Centre, which specialise in chiropractic and holistic treatments. Along with treatments for general aches and pains and musculoskeletal complaints, you can get help to stop smoking, for weight loss and foot and nail care, Accountants and tax consultants Allegri and Co can be found at number 32C. Situated at number four New Road, Lake Taxi Service can get you from A to B. It’s run by Brian Ryall and can take 24 hour bookings. You can ring them on 402641. At Unit A13 on the Spithead Business Centre, you will find Roy William Eccott and Sons

Limited. The swimming pool and hot tub specialists have introduced “costcutting” supplies, bringing their prices down during this recession. They also sell Doctor Detox Units – which are relaxing and therapeutic and are weight loss without the diet! Roy is celebrating fifty years of trading and can be contacted on 401800. Having opened in 1987, Lake railway station was the newest on the island until the construction of a station at Smallbrook Junction in 1994. Lake Beach is reached by a steep path down the sandstone cliffs to the revetment, which contains two cafes, beach huts, a sea-scout hut and inshore lifeboat.

Get fit and healthy for summer at TJs gym

TJS ARE a family-run gym that caters for all ages and levels of fitness. Although there is a wonderful large gym and class area with 25 stationary bikes, the atmosphere is friendly and the staff are always willing to help. Owners Steve and Tina Marsh have each at least 25 years of experience in the fitness industry. Gym programmes are devised to suit individual client’s needs and members are encouraged to have regular re-assessments and to modify their programmes accordingly. All levels of fitness can be accommodated – an MS sufferer’s group meet once a week for sessions and wheelchair access is good as the gym is all on the ground floor at its Spithead Business Centre location. In the large floor class area Body Balance is particularly popular with its mix of tai chi, Pilates and yoga with the emphasis on stretching and strengthening the muscles and bones, leaving you with a lovely sense of calm. It is suitable for all ages and levels of fitness including pregnant mums and those who are suffering with back problems. Body Pump is a weight resistance class to music for all ages from 13 to adult, and this class will see your body changing shape within six weeks. RPM is the group studio cycling class from 11

years to adult, to invigorating music, which is great fun and an excellent fat burner. Other classes include kick and abs, kick boxing for children and adults, and freestyle, street and modern dance classes from three years to adult. In the relaxing reception area a range of nutritional health products including protein drinks and bars are on sale with nutritional advice on hand. Take a refreshing drink or a free coffee and chat with the helpful staff. The latest upright sun shower can give you a great tan for the summer.

Open from 7am till late every day, those on a busy schedule can easily drop in before work, workout, shower and change. Recession busting prices make joining particularly attractive at the moment with free induction and no joining fee. A pay-as-you-go scheme is also offered for those who don’t wish to commit to membership. Now is the time to get fit for the summer months and TJs is the ideal location to choose. The gym is never too crowded, the classes are fun, the staff are friendly and there is plenty of free parking.


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lifestyle sandown and lake

Three realms of fashion SANDOWN boasts three separate Ladies Realm shops on the High Street and each has different stock. The Bed, Body and Beach shop at number 29 is Ladies Realm’s stand alone shop selling nightwear, lingerie and an extensive range of swimwear along with loads of costume jewellery, handbags and beach bags. The Clearance Shop at number 37 has amazing bargains from end of lines and ranges in all Ladies Realm shops and nothing is over £10. But is the flagship store at 43-45, which has all of the latest clothing fashions for this summer. Relaxed suiting styles from Oscar B come in chestnut, coral or electric blue for spring. Teamed with printed stretch tops, shirts or fancy striped jackets these separates look smart and classic with a modern edge. This season’s Pomodoro has effortlessly wearable dresses and separates that become canvasses for exotic jungle blooms. The amazon print combines combines ivory with deep reds, golds and greens and the cuba inspired range has crisp cotton and cool linens in flamingo pink and white with bold flower print dresses finished with ethnic

beads and shells. Summer weddings, garden parties and social events call for this season’s abstract print in sea green, with beautiful beading on the necklines of dresses and tops. Create layers with bolero jackets or dainty shrugs. Earth red, papyrus, bark and delta blue comprise the colour palette from Emreco for spring. Known for their superb quality, the striking prints sit with embellished tops or plain separates to ease you into a relaxed summer mood. Brighten up your existing wardrobe with classic leisurewear from Ladies Realm’s exclusive First Avenue range. Choose from a palette of electric blue, navy, coral and stone with many styles in easy care fabrics at popular prices.


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lifestyle sandown and lake

New style on Tap

THERE have been changes to the Tap in Sandown, and all for the better as far as the locals are concerned. Live bands are back on the billing and a recent refurbishment has made the pub more accessible to both locals and holidaymakers. Inside the smaller bar has been made cosier and more welcoming with the addition of antique furniture and old church pews. “It’s encouraged the locals back to the pub,” said Nina Swallow who took over the lease with partner Ben Barlow last month. “I’m really proud of the small lounge,” added Nina who has been trawling antique shops for the furnishings and fittings such as Victorian photographs of Sandown and other Isle of Wight memorabilia. The larger bar has been given a new stage area for live bands - Sean Goodfield plays tonight (15), Lucid on Saturday (16) and Ben Barnes on Sunday (17). The Tap was the place to see bands and Nina and Ben intend to restore this reputation. It will also be the place to see sport - a massive overhead projector for Setanta sport

screenings is in the larger bar, with another screen in the lounge showing alternative matches and sports. Nina is from a rugby loving family and has introduced a big promotion to accompany the Lions tour of S. Africa, starting at the end of May, with a chance to win tickets to the finals. The pub has house real ale and every week they swap the Isle of Wight ale, with suggestions from the locals. Happy hours at the pub are from 5pm till 7pm, Monday to Friday and there are poker nights in the bigger bar on Monday and Thursday nights, with a pub quiz on Tuesdays and the pub pool team playing on alternate Tuesdays. Nibbles are often on the bar for these events. “Anything from chocolates, to chips, to roast potatoes,” said Nina who also provides pub grub such as burgers and chips, paninis and roast dinners. Outside a big glass roof over the patio provides shelter, and there are brand new benches and pretty hanging baskets. Wifi is available to customers – just ask behind the bar for the password.


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Limited editions

A taste of Baileys WELL-KNOWN Island retailer, Baileys, has begun a refurbishment of its Sandown store. First to benefit is the lingerie

department, which now has a dedicated area incorporating dressing rooms and fittings in a décor with a fresh, feminine touch. Staff who have commenced a programme of training provide the

fitting service. As an independent, Baileys are able to stock ranges by the current most popular brands such as Triumph, Ballet and Vanity Fair, together with a selection of new season swimwear and nightwear

SANDOWN Jewellers is now in their eleventh year at 32-34 High Street, Sandown, and owner Stephen Wiltshire has an eclectic and often exclusive range of jewellery. The wide range of gold and silver jewellery is complemented by designer pieces and lots of desirable gift items. Valentina have a designer range of Murano glass jewellery from Italy in beautiful rainbow colours. Fiorelli specialise in silver jewellery and the shop only stock single pieces so you’re likely to have a unique item. Charlotte Borgen is a Danish range of beads similar to Troll beads but much more reasonably priced with lots of colours and a wide range of decorative trinkets – make your choice and design your own bracelet or necklace that will be unique to you. As you enter the shop it is the lovely smell that you first

notice – from the Yankee scented candles that are also on sale – before you spy the glittering array of jewellery within. Gift ideas include jewel-encrusted shoes and the standing lady styled jewellery holders. Bottle stoppers are labelled with different ages and huge ‘diamond’ paperweights are particularly popular along with gold, silver and novelty cufflinks. Other items include crystal pill-boxes, novelty clocks and Venetian glass mirror jewellery boxes. Camper van money boxes in different colours are also in stock. Second hand gold items are for sale and they may buy items too. There is a lot of beautiful opal jewellery set in gold and amber pieces set in silver. The shop can also arrange repairs and if you want to design your own pieces they can have your jewellery made at very competitive prices.


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lifestyle sandown and lake

Snacks at the shack

THE BEACH Shack on Sandown beachfront has the most wonderful location, overlooking the wide sweep of the bay towards Lake and on to Shanklin. A family run business, Greg Orr took over from his mother five years ago and now runs it with wife Amanda. The cafe was refurbished last year and the name changed from Devonia to the Beach Shack in line with the restyling. At the same time they widened their menu and acquired a licence to sell alcohol. Greg’s homemade crab cakes, described as, “the best crab cake I have ever tasted - ever, anywhere

in the whole wide world,” by Angela Hewitt in the 2008/09 Wight Good Food Guide, are made from fresh Bembridge crab from the Best Dressed Crab in Town and are among the favourites, as is Greg’s ‘fantastic’ home made humous,served with pitta bread and bacon, brie and avocado baguettes. Full English breakfasts are also very popular and are served all day. “We spend the winter months devising and trying out new recipes,” said Amanda who makes the homemade red pesto and helps out in café during the summer. icensed since last year the Beach

Shack has Magners cider, bottled and canned beers, wines and champagne and Pimms is particularly popular in the summer. An ideal place to take cream tea, the Beach Shack also sells a wide range of icecreams and Greg makes homemade sweet and savoury pancakes. Open from early in the morning until around sunset, there is a small indoor seating area and outside the capacity has recently been increased with the addition of a large sheltered area to the side, which is a real suntrap.


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Looking at Faulkner Lane

IT CAN be confusing to negotiate your way around Sandown’s trading estates – possibly because there are two and they almost join up. But the entrances to each are totally separate and the Faulkner Lane estate is accessed via East End Yar Road, just north of the service station on Avenue Road. Drive down this road to the fork and Sandown fire station is to the left and Faulkner trading estate to the right. Businesses here include Studiophase, a company who specialise in the reception side of television viewing – ariels, Freeview, FreeSat, satellite and subscription television. Mark Upson started this business in the mid 90s and they are one of the few independent suppliers of Sky on the Island. Sandham Office Supplies have just gained accreditation from Canon to supply all of their softwear office solutions and are sole Island dealers for Ricoh too. Terry Jarman started the business in 1982 to supply and service typewriters and dictation machines. Moving into copiers and photocopiers, the company now has all the more modern multi-functional machines, wide format printers and document management solutions. WPM Property are newer arrivals with 18 months at this location. Simon and Sarah Pointer started the business from home and are fast developing a good reputation as one of the leading up and coming building and refurbishment companies on the Isle of Wight, working with a wide range of clients on both commercial and

residential properties. Their team of six multi skilled experienced professionals can cover every aspect of building and maintenance – assisting with everything from a leaky tap to full renovations, even on listed properties requiring specialist building skills and materials. Wightways Holidays specialise in

coach tours, day trips and fly drive holidays both nationwide and to worldwide destinations. Included in their holiday prices are dinner, bed and breakfast (unless otherwise stated), all travel including ferries and excursions and entrance charges as detailed. A home pick-up service provides a return taxi between your home and the coach pick up point. Wight Fire Co Ltd at Unit 16 is the largest fire safety specialist on the Island with over 4000 customer accounts ranging from council properties to private homes. It is the only BAFE registered company on the Island and all engineers are BAFE registered technicians. Wight Fire is also NICEIC approved for the installation and maintenance of fire alarms and emergency lighting and a BSI ISO9001 approved company. Key West Glazing have been trading here for nearly ten years and have the largest stock of assorted glass on this side of the Island. Assembling double glazing units on site and supplying and installing them Islandwide, Ann and Tony Monteith have a well-established business with FENSA approval. A same day service for smaller orders is offered and single glazed glass can be cut while you wait. Floor Design moved here from their Lake Road location in December 2008 and the new large showroom incorporates the only Karndean showroom: top of the range luxury slate, wood and ceramic style vinyl tiles. Floor Design specialise in safety vinyl but also have a wide range of carpets, carpet tiles and luxury vinyl tiles.


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lifestyle sandown and lake

Into Senator Estate By Justin Gladdis COLLEGE Close in Sandown can be found just off Avenue Road on the outskirts of the town. Drive into the Close and a mini roundabout marks the beginning of Senator Trading Estate. At Unit nine on the Senator Trading Estate, The Window Surgeon promises a complete range of uPVC products to all their domestic and commercial customers at an excellent price. The company specialises in repair and replacement of all types of windows and doors with high-quality uPVC items. FENSA registered, The Window Surgeon can tackle projects of any size and also offers uPVC Fascias and Guttering. All their work comes with a 10-year insurance backed guarantee and is carried out to the highest standard with extremely competitive prices. The family run company has been established for two years with over 10 years experience and prides itself on the quality of its work. For more details, contact Stuart Ellwood on 401119. At Unit six you will find re-cycle-d. It’s a bike shop with a different approach to selling and maintaining cycles. Whilst servicing to a high standard, they offer customers the choice of using new parts of eco friendly reconditioned parts. Any second hand bikes will have all bearings

and cables meticulously checked. There have also been some big changes. re-cycle-d now offer brand new Barracuda cycles and BMX’s and are also stocking new parts, tyres, tubes, spares and BMX parts. On the sales side, you can purchase good honest reconditioned cycle and for an extra charge, have your cycle personalised by having it sprayed any colour you would like. They also restore and sell classic bikes of yesteryear, even old school BMX bikes, so if you’re looking for that old racing bike

you once had, give Al a ring on 409744. Spencer Simpson has been running Spencer’s Decorative Glass at Unit 10 for the past year. He has 26 years experience in the trade. There you can decide how you can decorate your front door, windows or conservatories, with lead work on stained glass. Kingfishers and flower shapes are proving extremely popular at the moment. Anyone is welcome to pop in for a chat about possible designs or call 404011.

Riding high

SANDHAM Rides have a wonderful selection of attractions to entertain kids and adults alike. The most prominent must be the big bumpy slide, which has six lanes and falls from quite a height. Petrol go-karts are a big favourite with nine karts negotiating the circular track at any one time. Suitable for youngsters from 4ft in height to adults, it’s a great way to introduce

your kids to driving. But it’s The Mine Train roller coaster that takes pride of place. This wonderful old bone-shaking ride is one of the first metal roller coasters to be built in England and is on the roller coaster database for the world. Enthusiasts travel from far and wide to see it in action and a dedicated team of engineers keep it in top condition. It’s also one

of the fastest for its size and really flies around the track. Kids love the inflatable assault course, a 50ft apparatus in three sections – two enclosed chambers for children to run, jump and dive within and a small slide at the end. The café sells hot and cold snacks and drinks and has a special slush factory where you can make your own slushy

drinks, choosing from seven different flavours and assorted colours. You can also decorate your soft ice-cream with as many hundreds and thousands, sauces, wafers and flakes as it will take – very messy and lots of fun. Hot freshly made tiny donuts are also on sale with sugar or cinnamon coating and you can always add some of those ice-cream sauces – hmmm.


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lifestyle buy with confidence

IW Buy With Confidence scheme – what is it?

THE ISLE of Wight Buy With Confidence scheme is designed to help consumers to avoid rogue traders and rip off artists. Set up by the Trading

By Justin Gladdis Standards Authority on the Island in 2005 it ensures all businesses trade fairly and work within the law.

Firms who sign up to the scheme get independent recognition of their standards, excellent publicity and a certificate to display on their premises. All applications are vetted to ensure the credibility of

the scheme and high standards are maintained. At the same time, it’s hoped the number of customer complaints will drop and consumer confidence will soar. The scheme is completely free but if

you are required to have criminal conviction checks carried out it will cost £20 per check.

Playing it cool IT WAS a complaint about a rogue trader to the Isle of Wight Trading Standards authority that led to Arctic Air Conditioning and Refrigeration becoming members of the Buy With Confidence scheme. Obviously the guilty trader was not a member of the scheme, but hearing that there was an organisation that would ensure that its members were bone fide traders made good sense to Sue and Steve Massey who quickly joined. Steve has worked in air conditioning and refrigeration for over 25 years, and has travelled and trained engineers in Russia and the USA. After leaving school he took up a five-year electrical apprenticeship, followed by three years at Willesdon College in London to train in air conditioning and refrigeration. He also holds a Nebosh qualification in health and safety, and can do PAT (Portable Appliance Testing). “After we applied in February, Trading Standards officer Gary Patterson came here and had a two hour meeting and went through all of our paperwork, making sure we had all of the necessary qualifications, insurances and permissions,” said Sue, who runs the office. “We had to apply for a police disclosure and submit eight job references to enable the trading standards office to check out our standard of work and service.” Sue and Steve

received their acceptance to the scheme and were awarded their certificate on March 26, enabling them to appear as an approved trader on the Buy With Confidence website. Established just two years ago, Arctic have secured maintenance contracts with numerous Island businesses on the Island including The Needles Pleasure Park, Easy Weigh in Newport and Vics Store in Nettlestone. They recently installed the up to the minute Samsung ‘Mirror Image’ air conditioning units in the new Coffee Republic in Newport owned by Abi and Steve Chiverton. Not only do they fit and supply new units, but they service and repair existing equipment and are subcontracted by Capital Cooling ‘Refrigeration for the Nation’, a nationwide company based in Scotland who have supplied refrigeration equipment to many pubs and supermarkets on the Island.

Tying it all together PETER MONK Wall Ties and Repointing is a small, friendly company, offering high quality cavity wall tie replacement, re-pointing (with full dust extraction), traditional lime mortar work, professional crack repair systems and directly associated works. Peter is proud to be a member of the Island’s prestigious Buy With Confidence scheme, which he joined this March, and he is also a member of the Wall Tie Installers’ Federation. “If you have a wall that needs some serious support and TLC or just a little tidy up I’ll always try to help you, whether you choose to use my service or not,” said Peter. Call him on 863999 or 07780 904464 for a prompt, professional service offering simple, sensible solutions.


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lifestyle bridal

The wedding of OWENS - OTTLEY STEPHEN OWENS and Lisa Ottley were married at St Blasius Church, Shanklin. The reception was held at the nearby Village Inn in the Old Village, Shanklin, which is owned by Lisa’s parents Paul and Joan Ottley. The bridegroom is a drayman for Scottish and Newcastle Brewery and the couple met when Stephen was delivering beer to the family pub where

Lisa is manageress. “I’m still waiting for the joke about the drayman and the barmaid,” laughed Lisa who has known Stephen for about eight years. Stephen’s parents Stephen and Lynn Owens live in Ventnor and best man was Stephen’s brother Chris Owens. Lisa’s mother Joan was maid of honour and her aunt Karen Bates was bridesmaid. A honeymoon was spent in Egypt.

Book for our bridal feature in the May 29 2009 Gazette issue. Call 01983 402599

Let everyone see your special day. Put your wedding in The Gazette. Call Jo on 402599


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lifestyle tasty takeaways

Would you like to advertise in one of our features? Call the marketing team on 402599 to find out what the latest features are and what a good deal they can give you

The Nabab

The Island’s Best Take-aways

A lesson from the pasty master THE FAMOUS Pasty Co was founded in 2001. The first shop opened its doors for business in July at St James St. Newport and the second shop in the Old Village, Shanklin followed shortly afterwards. Both shops are independently owned and operated as a family concern, by a family who have a background of catering spanning generations and who believe in home made food using only the finest ingredients. A decade ago, most takeaways were fast food and the Island had also become a fan of this industry. There was at that time, a gap in the market for pasties, which were fast becoming popular across the nation, mainly from named factory suppliers or large companies from Cornwall expanding their businesses. At the Famous Pasty all the pasties are made by hand in both of the premises and customers can watch them being put together. The ingredients are all sourced locally and prepared by hand on site. Each morning batches of each variety are made and cooked fresh, sold hot from

the cabinet. There are at least ten different varieties on sale each day to suit all tastes and of course as they are made by hand, pasties can be made to order as long as the ingredients are available. Not only are they an ideal meal on the go, they can be purchased unbaked and taken home to enjoy from your own oven or to be frozen for another day. There is no minimum order and you can make your choice and purchase on the day. The pasties are very popular for parties and get-togethers and orders can be taken to deliver the products hot to any venue on the Island. On those hot days, or just when you feel like a treat, both shops also offer a large choice of ice creams, in a variety of cones. There is the whippy ice cream, which has eight different flavours of sauces, or just a good old fashioned ‘99’ and the shop now stocks Minghella home made scooped ice cream with an assortment of flavours from the favourites to the exotic.

Respect for the Codfather IF YOU’RE planning a pleasant stroll along Ryde seafront this summer, why not walk off some traditional fish and chips at the same time. The Codfather, situated ideally along the Esplanade, specialises in real fish and chips, cooked to order. Proprietor Tommy Booth has been running the family business for the last eight years. “I have people coming all over the Island to buy from my shop, said Tommy. “I’ve lost count of the number of people who say to me “thank god, a proper fish and

chips shop!” We also serve up a selection of fish cakes and our pies and pasties are also cooked to order.” “However, as we are a traditional fish and chips outlet, kebabs are strictly off the menu!” he points out. Tommy, who comes from Wales, has been living on the Island for the last 49 years and is hoping for a busy holiday season. The Codfather is open seven days a week from as early as 10.45am to 11.00pm.


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lifestyle tasty takeaways

Behind the Blue Door

FOR SITTING in the sun, sipping a coffee or eating a light lunch, the Blue Door in St James’ Square in Newport must be one of the best locations in the town. It’s so easy to arrange to meet friends at this friendly café, and the service is always with a smile and swift which is ideal if you need to take away any of the dishes, and haven’t time to linger. The summer salads are particularly tasty to take away or eat in. John and Lyn Fleming celebrate ten years

at the café this June. They took it on as semi retirement project but the business has grown and grown – Blue Door now offers outside catering for parties, weddings or any functions you wish. Lyn is presently mayor of Shanklin, a post John held in 2000/2001, so it’s not surprising that Blue Door do cater for a few council events. Both will be standing in the local elections in June. Outside tables seat up to 24 and smart

green umbrellas will shade you from the sunshine if you wish and inside seats a further 24. Sandwiches, paninis, baguettes, jacket potatoes, pizzas or delicious salads can all be eaten in or taken away. Blue Door is famed for its cakes, which are home made by Lyn and her mother, such as coffee walnut, lemon and banana, bread pudding and German crumble cake – lovely with cream.


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lifestyle health & beauty

Have you got a winning smile? DO YOU or someone you know have a winning smile? In these times of economic uncertainty, the credit crunch and recession we want to encourage people to smile and celebrate all that is good about life, family, friends our beautiful Island and so much more – whatever makes you smile is important to us. This free to enter competition is brought to you by St. James Clinic Newport and St. Johns Clinic Ryde in conjunction with the Isle of Wight Gazette. To enter this free competition and a chance to win some great prizes, simply send us

a photograph of you or a loved one that shows a ‘happy smile’ the sort of smile that make you stop just for a moment and think about all the great things in life. It doesn’t need to be a great photograph in an amazing setting – it’s all about the smile! Amazing prizes to give you something to smile about! 1st prize – a year’s free Family Dental Plan from St. James or St. Johns Clinics, the Islands most advanced dental clinics, worth over £500. 2nd prize - free laser hair removal treatment for bikini line or armpits at the Orchard Cosmetic Skin Centre with Dr Maire Rhatigan 3rd prize – a free Dermalogica consultation, covering complete prescriptive dermalogica facial plus a range of dermalogica products for you to take away Plus... 3 runners-up prizes of Dental and Beauty products worth over £50 Entering is easy.

Send your photograph complete with your name, address and telephone number by post or drop it into us at: St. James Clinic, Upper St. James Street, Newport, Isle of Wight, PO30 1LQ or to St. Johns Clinic, IOW Dental Studio, 18 St. Johns Road, Ryde, Isle of Wight, PO33 2RN. Or email us with your photograph and details to: smile@iowdentalstudio.com All entries need to be with us on or before 5pm Friday, June 19th 2009. Prize winners will be notified by Friday, June 26th.

St James and St Johns Clinics THE ST. JAMES and St. Johns Clinics are the Island’s most advanced dental

clinics. Their new Dental Plan provides the very best in private dental healthcare for you and your family. A simple low monthly fee provides a comprehensive range of benefits and helps you to budget your dental treatments; giving you peace of mind through outstanding dental care and treatment for you or your family.

Justin’s Gym Blog NOW I have been told that a girl likes a man with strong arms. If you had told me that at the start of the year I would have fallen into a deep depression. At school I was always physically weak and despite being out of shape right now I am pleased to report some improvements in my life. The arms are getting stronger and I no longer feel tired at three o clock in the afternoon. I have TJ’s gym in Lake to thank for that. As I write, I have just completed my third Bodypump session and that’s straight off the back of a fifty minute spinning session. Admittedly the sweat pours – my heart races and I let out huge grunts and groans whilst working out – Maria Sharapova would have been proud. But the feeling when I leave TJ’s after a session, having also had a protein shake, is one of elation. I didn’t realise exercise could be so much fun. And that’s the key. You have got to have a laugh as the endorphins are released. I have great fun warming up with IW Gazette’s Jamie White as he takes me through some simple weight training. That

stands me in very good stead for the RPM and Bodypump sessions. Drinking plenty of water is vital too. Being dehydrated whilst spinning away on a bike is no fun! Colin from our office asked me the other day if I was losing weight. It appeared so to him. Is there a greater feeling in the world when you are asked that? If people are noticing physical changes in my body then that is fantastic. It urges me to keep going. The summer is almost here. No time to let up!!


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lifestyle camping & caravans

Give your kids a summer holiday to remember WHAT will your children be doing this summer school holidays? Don’t let them be bored at home playing computer games - Camp Beaumont summer camp “The Island”, near Bembridge offers children and teenagers an adventure to remember in the outdoors this July and August. Camp Beaumont is the original operator of summer camps in the UK. Established for almost 30 years, over a million children have been welcomed at camps around the country. Working parents often find camp particularly useful as a childcare solution, with guaranteed peace of mind that your children will be having fun in a safe and supervised environment, trying

lots of new activities, with new friends. They even accept childcare vouchers.

Great Holiday Options

Monday to Friday or Residential Holidays for seven nights.

What’s Camp Like?

Days are packed with over 50 Camp Beaumont’s “The Island” Camp amazing activities from climbing to offers several fantastic options for Zipwire, abseiling to archery, exciting children this summer holiday. Drop excursions in the local area such as your child off each morning at Camp ice-skating and also time to relax with Beaumont Day Camps, running new friends. They’ve also got some Monday to Friday, and collect them superb specialist holidays available, happy and exhausted in the afternoon where children get to spend more after great days of activities. Camp time on their favourite activity, Beaumont also offers Residential anything from horse riding to Talent Holidays where children can stay Academy and water sports, and loads away from home for seven nights. of great new theme parties and free Staying away from home with new special events, like Island of Rock and friends, maybe for their first time, Big Beach Beats. gives children the opportunity to Safely Having Fun increase self-confidence and develop Safely having fun is the focus at Camp key life skills, challenging their own Beaumont, so the British Activity boundaries. Whichever option parents Holiday Association (BAHA) and choose, this will be the summer Adventure Activities Licensing Service holiday of a lifetime for children. (AALS) inspect their camps. May Half Term Activities include a selection of: Camp Beaumont also operate during Abseiling, aero ball, archery, arts, the May Half Term break for one crafts & jewellery making, basketball, week, either Day Activity Camps beach games, BBQs, canoe splash,

caving, circus skills, climbing, computing, dance eJay, face painting, fencing, field games, five-a-side football, Frisbee, Giant Games, go karts, high ropes, initiative games, internet café, Jacob’s Ladder, Laser Zone, Leap of Faith, low ropes, Mission Possible, Nightline, orienteering, parachute games, Power Climb, problem solving, quad biking, softball, soccer, swimming, Team Challenge, Team Tech, Twilight Zone evening entertainment, volleyball, water games, Zipwire.

How Do I find Out More? For more information on “The Island” Summer Camp or to check out their five other UK camps and new European Holidays, click on www. campbeaumont.co.uk/iowgazette or call on 01603 660 333 Exclusive reader offer - Quote “Isle of Wight Gazette” and save 10% on your child’s residential adventure holiday. (Terms & conditions apply)


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lifestyle shopping for food Last issues competition winner of the meal for four and a bottle of wine at the Broadway Inn, Totland was was Gus Baker of Bembridge.

Meats and more from the Hamilton family HAMILTONS Fine Foods is a genuinely family-run Isle of Wight business, by father and daughter team Andy and Kerry Gustar, and has specialised in local produce since long before it became fashionable. They have an established and loyal Isle of Wight client base for their Island-reared meats and wide range of delicious quality foods including bacon, ham, sausages and pies, which are produced in-house. Beef is from Andrew Hodgson at Newbarn Farm in Shorwell, where his top rate husbandry ensures delicious top quality beef. The meat is matured for a minimum of 14 days for the forequarters and 21 days for the hindquarters. Lamb is also from Newbarn Farm for 40 weeks of the year and for the remaining 12 weeks is from other Island farms. Isle of Wight pork is from Branstone Farm at Apse Heath for approximately 30 weeks of the year. Two Hampshire farms with consistently high quality meat support the local pork supply throughout the year. Highview Farm in Newport supply Isle of Wight free-range chicken. Quality cuts such as supremes and breast fillets are from other suppliers but only A grade poultry. When in season Isle of Wight pheasants, mallard and partridge are available as well as New Forest venison, grouse and partridge.

Their dry smoked bacon, whether smoked or unsmoked, is as bacon should be – with no added water. Smoked bacon is produced at their own in-house smokery, which burns hardwoods to create that special flavour. Wiltshire cure and finest quality Danish rindless back bacon is also stocked. Hams are cooked slowly for seven hours with the skins on to produce a succulent flavour with a choice of smoked, unsmoked or honey roast

No time to cook? See our Wine and Dine section on pages 8-9 for the best places around the Island to go and grab lunch, have a drink or sit down to dinner

hams – all of them mild cured and with no added water. The in-house team also produce natural roast leg of pork, natural roast beef, old-fashioned faggots, rissoles and gammon knuckles and a range of meat pies. Fruit pies and quiches are also produced from individual to family and catering sizes. A range of British and continental cheeses can be supplied as whole cheeses, chopped or grated and rare cheeses can be supplied upon request.


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lifestyle gardening

Toby’s gardening tips By Toby Beasley, head gardener, Osborne House

AT LAST! We are planting our tender annuals and perennials around the garden. Mid May is about the time of year when we shouldn’t get any more frosts in the south of England. With a much milder climate on the Island you could get away with planting tender species as early as mid April but you never know what the weather has in store. In my previous job as Charles Darwin’s head gardener in Kent we had our last frost on the 31st May one year. The bedding plants had been ordered to arrive the day before but the nursery delivered late due to a problem, which proved to be a lucky break for me. But before you all rush out and start planting those plants you have been nurturing in your greenhouse there are a few things to consider. The nights are still cool and the weather can be unpredictable with strong winds and heavy downpours. If your plants are taken from a nice warm greenhouse and planted straight outside they may well get quite a shock due to the change in environment. They need hardening off to get used to the outside conditions. The first thing to do is switch off any overnight heating in your greenhouse. Make sure all the

doors and vents are wide open during the day then after a few days transfer your plants to an open cold frame. If you don’t have a cold frame put them out during the day and take them back in before it gets dark. This might seem like a great effort but after a few days of this sort of treatment they will be much more used to conditions outside the greenhouse and less likely to be shocked by a sudden change in temperature. If you don’t have a greenhouse but buy all your bedding and other tender plants

from the garden centre bear in mind that they may have been in a greenhouse until very recently and may need the same hardening off treatment. If the plants are still being kept inside by the garden centre I would err on the side of caution and bring them into the porch or garage just before it gets dark for a few days before you plant them. If they are being sold outside or under a temporary cover then the garden centre is doing the job of hardening off for you and you should be safe to plant out as soon as you get home.

Mary Baker Planting Salvias

Do you want to show the Island your garden? Then we want to hear from you! Call Jo on 01983 402599

& have your green fingers displayed in The Gazette


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lifestyle hospice

  Friday May 15 2009

Hospice News Earl Mountbatten Hospice - Newport

Flowers, Gardens and Local Produce at Barton Manor Barton Manor is once again opening its doors to raise funds for the Earl Mountbatten Hospice. Open days at Barton Manor regularly attract around 1000 visitors and on June 7 the theme for the day will be “Flowers, Gardens and Local Produce” and the Hospice is taking bookings for stalls that fall into this category. Pitches will be approximately 3m x 3m and will cost £25. All the money raised will be going directly to patient care. Businesses can set up during the day on Friday 5 June and on the morning of Sunday 7 June between 7.30 and 9.30. Visitors to Barton Manor on the 7th can expect a wide range of stalls, café, gift shop and live music from Brian Sharpe, Keith Roberts and Doug Watson, The Unity Stompers and the Sandown and Shanklin Military Band. Entry to the public on the day will cost £3. Anyone interested in having a stall at the Open Day should call the Hospice Fundraising Office on 528989.

Businesses and Tea at Three If you would like to promote your business through an open day or invitation-only event but are not sure how to attract people to attend it might be an ideal opportunity to take part in the Earl Mountbatten Hospice “Tea at Three” campaign. Tea at Three is an opportunity to throw a party, get-together, knees-up or quiet tea party and raise some money for the Hospice at the same time. The Hospice can help by producing posters, flyers and invitations, promote the event on its website and send out press releases to local media. The hospice can also provide sunflowers and butterfly pins for sale and a large Teddy Bear if you would like to do a Name the Teddy contest. If you would like to hold a Tea at Three event at your place of work or at your home or anywhere else please call Lisa Burt in the fundraising office on 528989.

Island Hospice at Business Expo 09 The Island’s hospice will be attending

Business Expo 09 on the May 29 and 30 at the Isle of Wight College. The event is billed as The Island’s first complete business exhibition featuring over 100 companies representing nearly all business sectors plus a full programme of seminars and workshops. This is an opportunity for any Island company to come and talk to the hospice about the different ways they can support the Island’s hospice, including promoting the Hospice Lottery through payroll and promoting ‘give as you earn.’

Sail the Wight May 30 Sail the Wight, a sponsored sail to raise funds for the Island’s Hospice is taking place on the May 30. The event will include an 18 nautical mile race or cruise in the Solent for boats under 20ft or any others that would like to join a cruise around the Solent to raise money. In the evening participants can enjoy celebrations at East Cowes Sailing Club including a BBQ, Bar and Band. For details please go to http://homepages. rya-online.net/ecsc/

Hospice Fundraising: Telephone - 528989

Remember Your Loved One at Summer Service

On the evening of Saturday 25 July the Hospice is holding a “Harbour Light up a Light” service around Ventnor Harbour to remember loved ones, whether they died at home, in the hospice or in hospital. You can dedicate a light in their memory and they will be placed along the harbour wall stretching out to sea. The name of your loved one will then be read out during the service. Lights can be dedicated for a minimum donation of £10. For more information please call the fundraising team on 528989.

The Gazette with your help has so far raised £18,999.31 for the Earl Mountbatten Hospice

June Elford

June Elford is a book and feature writer who lives below the castle in Carisbrooke with her cat. She enjoys gardening and Scottish dancing.

DO YOU think Britain’s teenagers are feckless, lazy and rude? Apparently only 9 percent of adults believe young people make a positive contribution to their communities and there is widespread fear and dislike of young people among adults, especially the elderly. The media are partly to blame for highly publicising youngsters’ crimes when things go wrong but how many of us are guilty of using the words ‘yobs’ instead of ‘youths’ when we cross the road to avoid them. Research by the Prince’s Trust showed that teenagers are more likely to volunteer to help in the community than any other age group. Chris Smy is the Youth Empowerment Worker who acts as secretary for the Isle of Wight Youth Council, an elected group of young people financed by the council. Elections are held every year and candidates seeking election must have ideas on issues, one girl chose the safety issue of zebra crossings near schools. Votes are carried and 24 members are then selected to represent the north, south, east and west areas of the Island. Chris visits the college, schools and youth centres to liase with teachers and young people while different bodies like the NHS, police and Isle of Wight councillors are invited to meetings. The Island Youth Council has won two BT UK Youth Parliament National awards and Chris is particularly proud of the one for MUGA, the multi-use games area and floodlit sports pitch at Freshwater. Previously there had been a lot of resentment against youngsters by the local community until some of the lads came up with an idea for the derelict tennis courts near the skate park, youth centre and sports centre to be made into an all-weather pitch. Funding from various sources was approved for the project and MUGA has been an outstanding success with the Island police

reporting that vandalism and graffiti in the area are down by seventy-one per cent. We’ve heard about foreign students being abused by local youngsters but at the MUGA last summer they set up a mini-world cup for their foreign visitors. And then there’s ‘Needs and Seeds’, a charity run by some of the Newport churches. Every Saturday of the month, young people, aged between eleven and fifteen, clear and maintain people’s gardens on Pan Estate. They also deliver food donated by the churches to the elderly and single mums. Emma Woodford says, “they are sowing seeds in the community, building relationships to help communities work together.” Counteract boredom and you’ll get young people out of trouble. “It’s great to see them change,” says Chris who often hears them complain, “Adults don’t listen.” Perhaps it’s time we started listening.


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gazette feature

the dinosaurs

Above: prehistoric bones and teeth abound in the main exhibition hall. Below: on your marks, get set, go… the dinosaurs line up in the car park, waiting for a lick of paint before they are taken out onto the Military Road to alert passing motorists to the museum’s existence

proach seems to be working. “It’s working, I’m getting a good reaction. If the public hated it I’d give up.” Martin reckons he needs about 30,000 visitors a year to stay afloat, and claims he is on about 24,000 a year at the moment. He is optimistic about this season, not least because of what is being show on the nation’s multiplex cinemas: “Dinosaurs are always relevant on the Island, but every so often you get a top-up. This year we’ve got two dinosaur films coming out. And next year Jurassic Park 4 is due to be out!” Martin is also banking on his relatively low price of admission – £2.50 – counting for a lot in these recessionary times. “People are cutting out the big attractions,” he believes. “They tend to do one or the other; for example, they might do Blackgang Chine or they might do Robin Hill, but not both. And what about those roadside dinosaurs? “The Council were a bit iffy but said ‘as long as they don’t blow over and hit the traffic it’s OK’.” Fingers crossed that south-westerly doesn’t blow too strong, then.


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gazette feature

A bank for the people As the recession tightens its grip, has the credit unions’ time finally come? Paul Rainford visited the Island branch to find out THE BANKS have never been less popular. Rightly or wrongly, they are seen as the principal villains of the piece in the current recession, as they accept bail-out millions from the Government while continuing to offer their directors Lottery-win pay and perks packages. It is small wonder, then, that people are looking for alternative places to put their hard-earned money. One such place is the credit union. Credit unions began in Germany in the nineteenth century to meet the banking needs of farmers’ co-operatives. Today they have spread all over the world, finding particular favour in Canada and Ireland. They are co-operatives and are unique in that all members of a credit union must share a ‘common bond’. This might be living in the same area, working for the same employer or belonging to the same trade union, church or other association. They are run on a ‘not-for-profit’ model, but any surplus is paid back to members each year in the form of a dividend. This, in effect, is the interest on their savings. They aim to help people for whom money may be tight to take control of their finances by encouraging them to save what they can and only borrow what they can afford to repay. Isle of Wight Credit Union has been going 11 years, during which time it has steadily built up its number of account holders to its present-day level of around 800. It has an office in Pyle Street, Newport, where its small but committed staff, made up mainly of volunteers, looks after the financial needs of its client base. One of those volunteers is Louis Lawrence, a retired marketing professional from Ventnor, who helps out the credit union a couple of days a week doing whatever needs to be done. “The basic principle is thrift,” says Mr Lawrence. “We encourage people to save for the future, but the advantage of people all saving together is that the money becomes available to use, so if you’ve been saving you don’t need the money right away so we’ll lend it to someone else. It’s a way of circulating money in the community. “The idea is that you save for a reasonable period of time if you’re starting with us – we expect you to save with us for a little while to show you’re serious, and then, on the basis of what you’ve saved, we’ll lend you money. You keep your savings in the bank and we lend you a multiple of that – sometimes up to three times your savings.” According to Mr Lawrence, the average loan to members of the credit union is around £300, and is often put towards the cost of a holiday or new domestic appliance. But depending on how much a member has saved, loans of up to £10,000 are available. “We are obviously cheaper than higher purchase, for a start. Our average interest rate for a loan would be around 19 per cent, but it varies as as you pay off your loan the amount of interest you pay gets less and less.” And because credit unions can sometimes offer loans to people who, for whatever reason, are unable to borrow money from a conventional bank, it keeps them out of the hands of less scrupulous lenders. “We’re definitely an antidote to the loan sharking

The IW Credit Union’s office in Newport, with staff members Louis Lawrence (left), Steve Falla and Rachel Fruen

which goes on – and people keep telling me there’s a lot of it on the Island,” says Mr Lawrence. “This is what the ‘no cold-calling business’ that the council has been promoting is all about. The levels of interest these loan sharks charge are appalling because they load it upfront.” By comparison, says Mr Lawrence, the credit union’s rates are reasonable. “That’s the major difference between us and banks – we don’t load the interest rates on upfront. If you take a loan from the bank, they put the interest rate on at the beginning, and then you’re paying off the whole amount for that time, but with us the interest rate is per month, as it were. Our APR tends to be much lower.” The credit union also acts as a conduit for some IW Council funding. Recently

the credit union has been working with the council on its ‘Supporting People’ programme, whereby funding is provided for those people looking to move out of hostel accommodation and into their own place. “The council passed the funding on to us to act as their bankers,” says Mr Lawrence. “So we handle the money, and the housing associations then pass onto us the people who they want to help out of homelessness. What we’re doing is passing this money onto these people in the form of a loan for a deposit on a flat to help them get started. Normally they wouldn’t be able to get a loan of any kind.” Like banks, the credit union is bound by the rules of the Financial Services Authority. They also qualify for the FSA’s compensation scheme, which guarantees an individual’s savings up to £50,000.

The credit union also provides a form of life insurance, as in the event of a member’s death, all his or her savings are repaid to their estate twice over and any loans that they might have outstanding are cancelled outright. And with recent news of job cuts on the Island, the credit union could well become more important than ever, as Mr Lawrence recognises. “It’s a useful service in hard times; it’s the people’s bank. We tend to be not quite so hard-nosed as your basic bank because we’re not a commercial business. “We take our responsibilities very seriously – we don’t want to encourage people to get into debt, on the other hand, we might well be the only people who will lend money to them.”


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gazette property

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• Two Bedrooms • Master En-Suite • Long Lease • Parking • Close To Beach • Fitted Kitchen

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OAKLEIGH, RYDE - £130,000

Oakleigh Court is a modern apartment block constructed in 1997 Flat 7 is on the top floor with views over the garden & woodland. Located within walking distance of Ryde Esplanade with Bowling Ally, Ice Rink and six miles of beautiful sandy beaches which are gently sloping making it one of the islands safest places to swim

This well proportioned Victorian home comprises 4 bedrooms, 2 reception rooms, kitchen/diner, bathroom, garden & off road parking. It’s been maintained to a very high standard.

MEADOW DRIVE, BEMBRIDGE - £335,000 • Detached Bungalow • Conservatory • Garage • Off Road Parking • Double Glazing • Gas Central Heating This bungalow comprises three bedrooms, kitchen, living room, conservatory, bathroom, garden and garage. Located in a peaceful cul-de-sac in the sought after Appley area.

• 70 Ft Garden • Patio • Three Bedrooms • Workshop • Conservatory • Cloakroom A semi detached house which benefits from 3 bedrooms, conservatory, living room, large kitchen diner, cloakroom, garden, patio & workshop.

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• Stamp Duty Paid • Two Reception Rooms • Kitchen/ Diner • Enclosed Rear Garden • Double Glazing

STAPLERS RD, NEWPORT - £169,500

In

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MELVILLE STREET, SANDOWN - £85,000 • Chain Free • Ground Floor • Town Location • Double Glazing • Separate Kitchen • Private Rear Garden A ground floor apartment that comprises bedroom, kitchen, living room, bathroom and garden. It has been updated by the current owner and is centrally located in Sandown Town.

HARVEY ROAD, NEWPORT - £179,950 • Modern Kitchen • Conservatory A very impressive and well cared for home comprising three • Off Road Parking • Double bedrooms, kitchen/diner, living room, conservatory, bathroom, Glazing • Gardens • Chain Free downstairs wc, gardens and off road parking. In a quiet location, overlooking trees and grass.


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gazette motoring


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The magnificent seven offer THE LATEST offer from Isle of Wight Motorcycles is £500 deposit and three years’ 0% finance. Seven different Suzuki bikes are now included within the latest offer from Isle of Wight Motorcycles of Newport. And all the different variations available means a total of 14 models are now included in Suzuki’s upgraded 0% finance campaign from two to three years, from May 1 2009. The larger range on offer will appeal to many bikers. Suzuki models ranging from the 125cc super-moto to the popular Bandit 1250GT touring model are included along with the 600cc and 750cc sports models, so many more bikers can enjoy the benefits of owning a new Suzuki. And if you are thinking of buying a larger or a smaller capacity bike, now is an excellent opportunity to change. Also if you currently have a finance agreement, you may be able to reduce your monthly payments. All Suzuki is asking is a minimum deposit of £500 or you may be able to use your existing bike or scooter as the deposit. For a free no obligation valuation of your bike call in to Isle of Wight Motorcycles, Daish Way Newport. You can always

• SV650 Sport – the winning formula of the SV with a stylish and purposeful full fairing, Little wonder use this free service to see what the SV family has been a European your bike is worth before selling it bestseller since its launch. privately, they may even offer to buy • GSX-R750, a new cast-aluminiumyour bike or scooter on the spot for alloy frame. Exciting new bodywork cash. with improved aerodynamics. An Available models on £500 deposit advanced engine management and and three years’ 0% credit: fuel injection system with adjustable • DR125SM, built, equipped and on-the-fly mapping. styled on fun to make your every • Bandit 1250 – all models in the ride on the streets enjoyable and range. Suzuki led the way with the refreshing. Bandit back in 1996. Now the new • GSX-R600, including the Bruce Bandit comes with a new liquidAnstey Ltd edition. cooled 1250cc engine with high-tech A product of Suzuki’s legendary fuel-injection to keep it where it’s integrated design approach. Packed always been, at the front of the line with exciting new styling and imfor big-bore urban bruisers. proved lighting and aerodynamics, Additional Suzuki promotions this is also the cleanest-running four available with or without interest cylinder 600cc Suzuki has ever built, free finance are the DR125SM with • GSX-650F (MCN Sport /Touring discounted insurance, free insurWinner) – a great all-round sportance on other 125cc road models, ing motorcycle, featuring exciting free restrictors on all Suzuki models styling, with a sporty full fairing and applicable, pass your motorcycle test all-day comfort. with Suzuki and buy insurance on • V-STROM 650 – all models in selected brand-new Suzuki models the range. This great all rounder, the for just £99. V-Strom 650 is an excellent choice Terms and conditions apply to for leisure riders, commuters and offers. tourers alike.

Advertising feature


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gazette motoring

A Smart way to get around BEING 6’1” tall I thought there could be a few issues when I attempted to take the new Smart car out for a test drive. What I didn’t expect was the amount space that I found myself in once inside. The particular Smart I took out was the 1.0litre, 71bhp, mhd (micro hybrid drive) Passion model. Mhd

roads. Inside, the amount of room is truly surprising. The dash means there is no battery, but instead features a starter is neatly laid out, with a well built stereo sound system generator that means the fitting in well amongst the engine can stop and start when needed, with a press of other dials. Trademark Smart the ‘eco’ button. It has a top features include the pod speed of around 70mph, but I clock and rev counter, plus didn’t dare take it anywhere carpeted dash and a centrally near that kind of speed on the mounted key. The boot isn’t the biggest, Island but the passenger seat does fold forward. This car is designed for nipping around town rather than long motorway journeys with lots of luggage. What you do get is ESP sta-

By Jamie White

bility control, a CD player, electric windows, air-conditioning, alloy wheels and a panoramic roof all coming as standard. From the outside the car is compact looking, and is certainly quite easy on the eye. It has a short wheelbase, which is something that you must remember, as understeer can be a problem if you enter a corner a little bit too quickly.

It boasts a semi-automatic gearbox with full automatic options, which can be overridden, so there is no clutch to tackle. The windscreen is sizeable, meaning visibility is good, and the tight turning circle and tiny dimensions make it easy to park. It is easy to see why the Smart is very popular in the bigger cities. Rivals of the Smart include the Fiat 500 and the Toyota

Aygo, which both have their own particular qualities. But for an eco-friendly two-seater car for a reasonable price, you won’t go far wrong with the Smart. And despite the Smart car’s small frame, I didn’t bang my head once! More information on the Smart car can be obtained at the new dealership at Esplanade, Newport or by calling 523232. The coupé Passion Smart car starts at £8,700.


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wightFM Media Group This rapidly expanding media group is looking for two highly motivated and skilled marketing/ sales executives to take this inspiring company to the next level

Call wightFM on 402599

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Looking for new staff? Then make sure the whole Island knows it! Advertise your vacancies in the NEW Recruitment Section of the Isle of Wight Gazette today and find that new staff member that you’ve been looking for

Call our marketing department on 402599 or email sales@iwgazette.co.uk


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Richard’s a big cheese! SANDOWN-BASED cheesemaker Richard Hodgson has been named as one of the ‘21 future stars of the foodie world’ in the BBC’s mass-circulation food magazine Olive. Richard, 29, started the Isle of Wight Cheese Company when he moved back to down to the Island after a spell working as a TV editor in Newcastle. His three trademark cheeses – IW Blue, IW Soft and Gallybagger – have since gone on to gain a large following and win numerous awards. Since teaming up a chill distribution company on the mainland, Richard has managed to extend his market reach, and his

By Paul Rainford cheeses now reach as far west as Cornwall and as far east as Kent. In London, he is stocked by Harvey Nichols as well as in a range of independent delis. According to Richard, word of mouth has been his most effective form of marketing: “A lot of people come down here and they try the cheese at the hotels they’re staying at or pick it up at the farmer’s market. When they go back home they go into their local deli and say ‘have you got this cheese?’ and then we get a lot of inquiries that way.”

Richard was born in Newcastle but grew up on the Island when his parents moved down to run the Sentry Mead hotel in Totland. “I never thought I’d ever come back, but then this opportunity came up when my mum decided to embark on a cheese venture with the head chef of her old hotel, and then the chef pulled out,” he said. “I decided to give it a go and went to an agricultural college in Cheshire to learn how to make cheese. IW Blue is his current best-seller, at between 500 and 1,000 units both on and off the Island.

Litter code for businesses Business Expo 09

FAST-FOOD giant McDonald’s, which regularly comes under criticism for the amount of litter its customers generate, has put its name to a new voluntary code of practice for businesses which aims to reduce the amount of rubbish cause by take-away outlets on the Island. The IW Council led initiative follows the recent ‘Big Tidy Up’ campaign, which saw many Island groups get involved to help keep their local areas litter free. The council’s Community Safety Service is keen to continue this good work by joining up with businesses to find solutions to local litter problems caused by fast food packaging. The scheme is also being supported by the Island Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership and the IW Chamber of Commerce. McDonald’s says its staff already carry out regular checks in its car parks and

conduct daily litter picks in areas prone to McDonald’s litter, particularly Scarrots Lane and Grays Walk in Newport. Steve Smith, who is responsible for McDonald’s in Newport and Ryde fully supports the voluntary code: “We didn’t hesitate to sign up, and I would encourage other businesses to sign up as well. The guidance of the code coupled with the support offered by the council helps us make a real difference to our local areas. We would also like to ask for the public’s help in alerting us to areas where litter from McDonald’s is a problem so that we can work to address it by including them in our litter picks.” The voluntary code encourages businesses to tackle the issues surrounding food related litter using a range of measures, including litter picks around their fast food premises. The code promotes businesses working in part-

ISLAND businesses looking for fresh ideas and a chance to network are being invited to attend Business Expo, a free exhibition which takes place at the IW College on May 29-30. The exhibition will feature 100 stands, with leading Island companies including Steve Porter Transport, Lifeline, Premier Ford, Clarke Willmott Solicitors and Sandham Office Services all having a presence. Each day will see 14 free seminars and workshop sessions by business speakers and specialists in their field, including International business coach Tom Flatau presenting his acclaimed ‘What every leader needs to know’ seminar. ‘The Wall’ is a new and free addition to the nership with local authorities event providing visitors with the opportunity to try to change people’s to display their business card or promotional attitudes towards litter and to flyer. ‘Speed networking sessions’ will be reduce the amount of packrunning each day, delivering an opportunity aging they give away. It also to develop contacts. provides guidance on how to The Meeting Zone will provide advice manage waste properly. from the experts and organisations that can Any businesses interested help a business develop and grow. Specialin finding out more about re- ists on hand will include representatives ducing litter caused by take- from Business Link, MAS, UKTI and the awau food and the voluntary Chamber of Commerce to discuss business code of practice should issues and give practical suggestions. There contact their local environwill also be the chance to experience what ment and neighbourhoods it’s like to be interviewed on TV and radio to officer by calling 821000 or improve your media skills. emailing community.safety@ To find out more and to register to attend iow.gov.uk . visit www.businessexpo09.co.uk.


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gazette sport

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Ventnor clinch last gasp win VENTNOR Cricket Club’s first team overcame Hook & Newnham Basics in a dramatic last over finish in their Southern Electric Premier League Division 2 clash at Steephill. The hosts looked to be heading for defeat after slipping to 151-7 in pursuit of the north Hampshire team’s total of 203, but a splendid unbeaten knock of 83 from Zanzima ‘Nono’ Pongolo won the match for his side. Even with their young South African in such inspired form, the odds seemed stacked against the champions, with 30 runs required from the remaining three overs with just two wickets in hand. But having survived a drop catch on 61, Pongolo hit four boundaries and a six in an exciting finale to clinch a second successive league victory. Although the talented player from the Langa Township was the match winner, Joby Wells’ patient innings of 28 played an important part in the win, keeping the score moving with some excellent running with Pongolo, meaning their partnership of 62 helped repair the innings. Earlier in the day, Charlie Freeston (3-33) Mark Allen on his Southern League debut (3-43) and David Beven (2-41) had

helped restrict Hook to 203, the last six wickets falling for only 50 runs. * * * The second team, captained by Robert Snell, hammered Paultons II by nine wickets in their opening match in Hampshire League Division 4. Adam Wilson, with 3-6 from an excellent eight over spell made early in-roads for Ventnor, who continued the good work to dismiss the home team for 130. Teenager James Cheek took 4-41 and Snell 2-17. The Islanders made short work of the target, with 16-year-old Cheek having a day to remember with an unbeaten 79 to lead his side to victory. * * * A terrific innings of 110 not out from Andy White and 70 from Mark Price saw Ventnor’s third team post an enormous total of 272-3 against Shanklin II at Newclose in the Harwood’s League. Shanklin could only reply with 154-9, with Andy White taking three wickets for Ventnor. * * * Ventnor’s second round tie at Havant in the National Club Championship will now take place on Sunday May 24.

ST HELENS’ Under 11 cricket team (above) are on the look out for budding young cricketers to join their squad. The club runs on a Thursday evening from

5-7pm on St Helens Green and everyone is welcome to come along and join in the action. The team is run by Billy Sampson, and he is urging youngsters to come forward to try and

develop their cricketing skills. “We are very well supported and I would like to encourage more young players to get involved. We play in a league on the

Island and want to give as many youngsters as possible an opportunity to play in the league,” said Billy. For information you can contact Billy on 872656 or 07800 924954.

Easter success at Brading Haven BRADING Haven Yacht Club held its first sail training day for adults and cadets to improve their racing skills. The special series of events began with shore training, a practice sail followed by an official race. The race was held inside of Bembridge Harbour in ideal conditions of a force three, run by race officer Gordon Osborne with plenty of help from the on-water sailing instructors. The excellent turnout of 12 assorted dinghies completed two laps of the course with the Europe of Giles Easter taking the winning honours. Joe Moore came in a very respectable second place sailing a Scow, with Zak Chiverton a close third in a Topper. Sunday was the first race in the BHYC Spring Series. John Carter was in charge, and a course out by St Helens Fort was set consisting of several triangles for both fleets of 14 boats. The fast handicap had the Europe of Giles Easter steaming ahead of the rest at the start, but Roger and Gill Herbert in their Wayfarer soon overtook him. Although the Herbert

team were the first to cross the finish line, they had to settle for a second place on corrected time leaving the winning spot to Giles Easter by almost two minutes. Gareth Jones kept up a steady pace in his Solo to earn himself a third place finish. Last Saturday proved to be another very successful training session for the cadet section of the Brading Haven Yacht Club. After a couple of hours instruction afloat and ashore, a race was held with eleven dinghies taking part. Roger Herbert took over as race officer and with a mixture of boats all with cadets at the helm, a course was set inside of Bembridge Harbour. Ollie Parkinson led the race right from the start with the opposition trying hard to overtake, but with no success. Across the line and on corrected time it was Ollie to collect the fine win of the day, with Charlie Norman in second place and Zak Chiverton a close third. Last Sunday saw the second of the Spring Series being held in very spring-like conditions, but with a

sharp breeze from the east causing some very heavy seas made it very challenging for the smaller boats. With Robin Lobb in charge, setting an excellent course out to the Tide Gauge for the fast handicap, a great turnout of 17 dinghies waited for the starting gun. Martyn Davies was way ahead in his Contender, showing the rest of the fleet the way around. He was the first boat to finish, but unfortunately had to settle for a second place on handicap. The other two in the winning line up were Giles Easter, who took the honours with a 19 second win on corrected time, with Chris Wilkinson earning a well deserved third, both in Europes. Due to the weather conditions there were a few retirements in the slow handicap field but the remaining boats, all Scows, enjoyed the race. Graham Sutton took position in front of the group to cross the winning line 187 seconds ahead of the rest and claim a victory. David Earee finished in second place sailing his wooden craft and Michael Quinn a very close third.

Wanted: volunteers with bounce

POPULAR trampolining sessions have proved so successful that the IW Council is looking for volunteers to help expand the scheme. The lottery funded sessions, which are organised by the council’s sports unit, have been fully booked since they were launched in April. There are now

long waiting lists of young people wanting to try the sport, so the council is looking for people to assist running the sessions. Anyone interested in becoming a trampoline coach and helping run the activity sessions with existing coaches can contact the council’s Sports Unit. Volunteers are also being

sought to help set up kit and get involved in the administration of the sessions. Lee Matthews, IW Council Community Development Manager said: “We are amazed at the interest being shown in our trampolining sessions, and would love to be able to offer more sessions on the Island. This is a great

opportunity for people with an interest in sport to gain a new qualification and assist with activity sessions that are really valued by the young people taking part.” To find out more about becoming a trampoline coach or assisting in the sessions you can contact the Sports Unit on 823818 or email sports.unit@iow.gov.uk.

Above: Lawrence Douglas spars with Danny Harper

Boxing clever at Ventnor VENTNOR Amateur Boxing By Jamie White Club’s exhibition day turned British and Commonwealth out to be a great success, with champion Sylvester Mittee were hundreds of people making on hand to present the young the journey down to Ventnor competitors with their awards. Esplanade to watch some of the The man behind the event was Island’s best young boxers in Darren Green, who was deaction. The event was held outside The lighted with the day. He said: “I wanted to give people the chance Mill Bay Inn, where all comto see how far our boxing club petitors were treated to a meal afterwards and received a trophy has come over the past year. We now have great boxing facilities. for taking part. I hope we can do something like The Island’s only professional this again in the future.” boxer, Jay Morris, and former


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Island rowers Ryde high!

Left to right: Nick Pike, Ian Hayden, Ben Ade and Tom Clark with their haul of silverware

Kids to brush up soccer skills

FOOTBALL coaching classes for five to seven year olds have started in Ryde as part of the IW Council’s “Sport4Kids” scheme. Choppers FC aim to provide specialist football learning experiences using the latest age appropriate coaching methods and techniques. The aim is to provide both boys and girls with the foundation skills that they would require to play minisoccer at the under-8 age level. The children will have the opportunity to learn and experience the game of football with experienced and highly qualified coaches. In addition to learning football skills the children will also develop important social skills such as listening, sharing, taking turns and teamwork which are all important for team sports and leaning in general. Choppers FC is directed by Island

By Jamie White

We call this period the skill hungry years, where children establish the basic skills. “Our emphasis is on having fun, and if this is in place then learning will follow. I enjoy coaching and seeing the joy on their faces when they try a new technique or score a goal. I believe that the game is the teacher and that my role as a coach is to facilitate that learning experience for them. To see the children having fun with smiles on their faces is fantastic and Choppers FC provides a great platform for young children to learn. All classes at Ryde High School’s astroturf pitch have two FA qualified coaches and parents are welcome to stay to support their children.

football coach Tony Harris, who has been an FA Coach for 22 years and is an FA learning tutor and currently studying the new FA coach education programme for 5-11 year old players. Tony works as a Sports Development Coach for Sandown Schools Sports Partnerships and the IW Council’s Sports Development Unit. He also coaches at the AFC Bournemouth Football Development Centre. Tony is the author of the highly rated book “Fitness Training for Soccer” and has coached in the UK, USA and the Netherlands and has been involved in sports education for 14 years on the Island. Tony said: “I coach a number of sports and movement skills to • For more information you can call children in this 5-11 age group in Tony on 07815 724686. schools and community schemes.

A NEAR record entry of 113 crews from 12 clubs entered Ryde Rowing Club’s Annual Regatta, the first Hants & Dorset Amateur Rowing Association Championship Regatta of the season. There was a packed programme of 19 races for Men’s and Women’s coxed fours, coxless pairs, single sculls and double sculls racing over a 1,820-metre course between Appley Beach and Ryde Pier. There was success for the Island clubs with Newport winning the men’s junior fours, Shanklin the men’s novice sculls, and host club Ryde winning three events. Ian Hayden and Ben Ade began a successful defence of their Hants & Dorset ARA senior pairs’ championship with a comfortable win, Nick Pike won the men’s senior sculls with Ryde’s Mike Jenner in second place, and Tom Clark won the men’s junior sculls, with Ben Ade finishing third. Further good performances came from the men’s senior four of Ben Ade, Russell Page, Mike Jenner and Ian Hayden, with Bryony Reeve coxing, who finished third, with the club’s B crew of Stu Johnson, Sam Cocker, Tom Clark and Nick Pike, with Max Reeve coxing, taking fifth place. The men’s junior-senior four of Allan Evans, Callum Lowe, Florrin Behrle finished second in their final while the novice men’s crew of James Cleary, Donat Debrecan, John Gelding and Curtis

Islanders well beaten

DESPITE having captain Nick Simmons back in the team, the Wightlink Islanders speedway team suffered a heavy defeat against Plymouth Devils in their National League Knockout Cup first round first leg match.

the result and the state of the Devils’ The Islanders went track. He said: down 63-29 against “Let’s just say that the Devils, giving the track wasn’t at them a hard task to its best. The Devils’ reduce the deficit riders put their home in the second leg at knowledge to good the Wave 105FM use by avoiding all Stadium on May 19. the bumps, but our Welshman Tom riders hit them with Brown was missing alarming regularity. from the line up due Barry Evans crashed to commitments for out in the opening Somerset as he feaheat, breaking two tured in their Premier fingers in the process. League cup-tie He attempted to take against Glasgow. another ride but had Barry Evans was to pull out of the Rec were very busy, as was the drafted in as a meeting, as did Andy mobile catering van. guest replacement Braithwaite after tan“Everyone was well behaved gling with Matt Bates and had a good time with lots of from Mildenhall, and along with the on the first bend of teams already saying they want return of Simmons heat 2, putting the to come back next year. The and Chris Johnson Islanders up against it club is very proud to host such declaring himself fit from an early stage. a popular festival and help put following his recent “Any hopes we had the Island on the map, and we of putting on a good are already planning next year’s injury, the Islanders had high hopes for show rapidly went event,” added Mr Green. up in smoke. And to The hockey club is now enter- the match. ing the close season and will take However they soon top it all off I hit a deer in the road on a few months off before starting evaporated as the Devils roared in to an my way back after training in August ahead of the early lead and stayed the match. You could 2009/10 season. in command through- quite easily say I’ve The club is actively seeking out the match. had better days. I players for next season – if you Joint manager won’t forget this in are interested you can find out Chris Hunt was a hurry much as I more and contact the club via disappointed with might like to.” www.iowhockey.co.uk

Bumper turnout for hockey festival

THE IW Hockey Club hosted its annual Festival at Newport’s Victoria Recreational Ground, attracting 36 teams with more than 400 people taking part. The club said it was one of the biggest festivals in recent years despite the credit crunch, and the event was a great boost to the local economy as well as the Island’s image. The festival was blessed with brilliant weather over the two days with sunshine and very little wind. Teams from all across England, Wales and Ireland – and even three teams who travelled from Holland – took part in exhibition games and sampled the local entertainment. With the focus very much on

the fun side of hockey, games are played at a leisurely pace and the event is an ideal opportunity for teams to unwind after a challenging season. Planning is already underway for next season with the club hoping to allow more teams to take part. The weekend also saw the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Air Ambulance benefit with a donation of £122 after the club pledged to donate a pound to the organisation for every league goal it scored in the season. Praising the success of the weekend, IW Hockey Club Chairman, Clive Green, was very keen to point out the boost the local economy and businesses receive during the weekend.

He said: “The current economic climate is challenging for many businesses, but the success of the festival shows people are very willing to get involved in events on the Island. “There were 36 teams here, each averaging about 12 players, meaning over 400 people took part. Many used local taxis, spent money in shops, stayed in local accommodation and went out for meals in local restaurants or pubs.” Colonel Bogeys nightclub in Sandown was hired for the disco venue on the Saturday, giving the nightclub several thousand pounds of business they otherwise wouldn’t have had, while the bar facilities at Victoria

Lowe, with Dale Buckett coxing, finished fourth in their heat, just missing out on the final – and then surprised everyone, racing above their status at Coastal junior and finished second. The ladies’ novice four of Becky Coleman, Leona Fisk, Vici Hewlett and Emily Page, with Max Reeve coxing again, found the going a little tougher finishing sixth in their final, while novice sculler Stu Johnson finished fifth. The Wightlink sponsored Ryde Club had further success when competing at Shanklin Regatta the following day. The men’s senior pair and senior sculler Nick Pike won again, with Mike Jenner again in second place and junior sculler Ben Ade turning the tables on club colleague Tom Clark as they finished first and second. The men’s senior four produced a much better performance winning the Regatta’s premier event and a veteran four of Nick Pike, Russell Page, Mike Jenner and Mark Singleton, competing for the club for the first time in many years, finishing second in their final. The ladies’ novice four, with Bryony Reeve replacing Viki Hewlett, and the men’s novice four both produced encouraging performances, as did Florrin Begrle in the men’s novice sculls. The junior-senior crew were well in contention but a poor buoy turn cost them dear and they eventually finished fourth.

By Jamie White


Friday MAY 15 2009   

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AmAm event proves big winner By Peter White CHRIS REED, Richard Scoble, David Bartlett and Darren Robertson held off fierce opposition from 40 other teams to win the prestigious Shanklin and Sandown Golf Club AmAm competition. The format of the stableford event saw the best two scores count on the first six holes, the best three on the next six, and all four on the final six, and the winners amassed an impressive 124 points. Reed, playing off scratch, hit five birdies in his round, and was ably supported by Scoble (11 handicap), Bartlett (11) and Robertson (12), even though one member of the team registered a The AmAm winning quartet of Darren Robertson, Richard Scoble, David Bartlett and Chris Reed leave the ‘blob’ on the final hole! In a field of 164 players from ninth green on their way to victory the Island and the south of England, the winners finished five points clear of runners up James Summers (8), Adam Summers (12), Matt Holbrook (18) and Ashley Lawrence (10). A team that included new SSGC captain Neil Jackson took third place, on a day that seemed to suit the early starters. Jackson (4), Tony Theakston (17), Adrian Nobbs (6) and Mo Ismail (12) were first starters and scored 115 points. But their lead was short-lived, because the winning quartet were next out. The all-SSGC team of Debbie Berry (18), Sheryl Jackson (14), Stephanie Hart (23) and Lillian Bushby (20) were the highest ladies’ scorers with 112 points – a total that beat many of the men’s scores. SSGC club professional Peter Hammond added to the entertainment by challenging all competitors to hit the ninth green Lillian Bushby, Stephanie Hart and Debbie Berry watch Sheryl Jackson drive off at the 10th tee on their and then two putt for their par. way to winning the ladies’ team title If successful Peter doubled the

Basketball camp back by popular demand

initial stake – anything from £5 to £50 - the golfers could put on to their membership cards to spend in the club shop. *

*

*

SHAUN CLARK, playing off a handicap of 20, lifted Freshwater Bay GC’s Cheverton Cup. Clark carded an impressive 64 to finish just ahead of Division Two rivals Andy Rann (26) who returned a 65 and John Meredith (22) on 66. In Division 1 Jim Whitehead (8) came out on top with a 66 ahead of three players tied on 67 – Simon Smith (5), Brandon Thompson (4) and Chris Pink (12). In a fun competition open to all members the team of Myles Taylor, Keith Wright and Derek Wright returned an excellent 82 points in the Yellow Ball Stableford to finish just ahead of Rob Jackson, Bill Hinchen and John Wisker on 77. Third place was secured on the back nine by Simon Fisher, Stuart Morris and Cliff Sanders scoring 74 points and holding off the top ladies team of Mo Couse, Rita Smith and Shirley Clarke on count back. There was a smaller than usual entry in the stableford due to a hard fought match between the Club Captain’s team and a team of Past Captains being played at the same time. The canny elder statesmen came out resounding winners 4 ½ to ½. In the stableford, Kasey Tuckey (9) scored 37 points for first place ahead of Dave Morey (15) on 35 points, who beat Mike Black (16) and Martin Brett (28) on the back nine score. The junior stableford saw the top two players both cut a shot with Tom Stockley (26) finishing ahead of Sammi Keen (10) with both players scoring 38 points.

Success for Island surfers

ISLANDERS Johnny Fryer and Zoe Sheath are celebrating after winning their respective diviDUE TO the great success of last placed with players of similar sions at the English National year’s basketball camp, some age, experience and ability. On of the very best young English completion of the camp, players Surf Championships. The event was held at Waterprofessional players will once will receive a personal, written gate Bay in Cornwall amongst again be coming to the Island evaluation from the coaches for some epic double overhead this summer to teach youngsters their continued development. and help improve their game. All coaches will be fully quali- waves, which provided a canvas Returning coaches Martin fied, experienced and approach- for an impressive display of Yabsley, Rachel Almond and able, and there will be a qualified surfing for the many spectators. The youngsters, who attend Mark Jackson will join Camp first aider on camp at all times. Carisbrooke High School, Director Pete Almond and Head Awards will be given to the proved worthy contenders Coach Mike Almond in hosting winners of all the various comwinning the Mens and Womens the camp at Cowes High School petitions throughout the week. during the summer holidays. It Campers who show outstanding Open divisions respectively. The pulsing 8ft swell was on is an excellent opportunity for effort, attitude and improvethe limit of contestable condiIslanders to enjoy a fun filled ment will also be rewarded on tions, but Johnny’s opening ride week of basketball drills, skills, Friday. The coaches will also in the first heat was an absolute stations, and competitions. play an ‘All-Star’ style game so show stopper leading him on The camp is open for youngthat campers and guests will be through solid performances to sters aged 11 and upwards, able to see the game played at a the closely fought final. and gives both boys and girls faster, higher level. After receiving his trophy, a chance to get involved in the The cost of the camp is £20 Johnny said: “It was a crazy final sport, whether they have played per day, or £90 for the week. with a lot of waves ridden. I have before or not. For more information you can wanted to win this competition To enable campers to gain the contact Rachel Almond on for ages and it feels great.” most from the week they shall 299091 or email rjhotshot@ Zoe took part when the surf be evaluated on arrival and then hotmail.com.

By Jamie White had subsided to an onshore 4ft. This made for a testing paddle out, giving her plenty of waves to select from. It was a committed and mature show of good scoring rides by the 17-year-old, to prove once again she was a worthy finalist against her older peers. This is the second time in three years that Zoe has claimed first place in the English National Womens Open, and she was thrilled to regain her title. She said: “It was hard work out there and wave selection was quite critical but fun if you got the right wave to work with. All the other girls were surfing well so I was really pleased to win.” As well as winning national titles, the top-placed surfers gained qualification for the English team, which will take part in the European championships in Jersey from September 26 to October 4 later this year.

Zoe Sheath and Johnny Fryer


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Joseph’s hole in one – how Goodey is that! JOSEPH Goodey was the toast of Westridge Golf Club after hitting a hole in one – at the age of just eight. Joseph (right) is the youngest player ever to perform the feat at Westridge, and his achievement was even more remarkable because he was forced on to the sidelines for six weeks earlier this year after suffering a broken left wrist that needed two operations. Despite that lay-off the Ryde Junior School youngster was in sparkling form as he scored his ‘ace’ at the 101-yard seventh hole at Westridge. Joseph has been playing golf at the club since he was five years old and currently plays off a CONGU handicap of 28. He is a regular member of the Westridge junior team, and

his spare time is play golf.” Alas for the ladies, there were no more holes in one at Westridge when last year he qualified for the Wee they competed in the Sybil Bennett Wonders Championships at Hever Cup championship, for players with Castle in Kent, after successfully handicaps ranging between 29 and 36. winning his age group at the FarThe event was won by Alix ringford Golf Course. Joseph’s father David is also a keen Goddard from Shanklin and golfer, but reckons he is now invari- Sandown, playing off 36, who reably on the receiving end of a defeat turned a nett score of 58 in the windy by his son, while mum Mandy is not but sunny conditions. Alix finished just one ahead of Freshwater Bay’s a golfer, but is more than happy to Win George, off her handicap of 30. step in as caddy. Third place went to Sandra Morey Mandy said: “Joseph’s dream one (31) from Newport with 62, who day is to become a professional finished just ahead of Osborne’s Sue golfer and if he is not at home or at Blandford (36) on countback. school, you can guarantee to find him on the golf course whatever the More golf, page 31 weather. All he ever wants to do in

By Jamie White

Gold strike for Newport

Jodie jumps for joy SHOWJUMPER Jodie Warrick (above) is hoping to continue her excellent run of success on the mainland this summer after sweeping the board in Island events. Jodie, 29, from Ryde, and her 14-year-old horse Larigo, have recently

completed an impressive hat-trick of victories. Jodie was named Island Showjumper of the Year, the Isle of Wight leading rider, and she and Larigo were victorious in the Winter Open Championships. Added to that her six-year-old horse

Georgia Rocco, ridden by Jodie, won the Intermediate Championship horse event. Jodie said: “My plan now is to compete on the mainland more, and the main aim is to be a 1.20-metre amateur qualifier for the Horse of the Year Show.”

NEWPORT saw off a brave challenge from West Wight to win the Senior Gold Cup 2-1 at Westwood Park, Cowes. Goals from Jamie White and Tom McInnes were enough to secure the coveted trophy for Newport, despite West Wight’s stubborn resistance, and a reply from Harry Dye. In a tense match, both teams started cautiously with much of the play being contested in midfield. Harry Dye shot over for the IW Saturday League One champions on 10 minutes, while Charlie Smeeton and Iain Seabrook both had chances to put the Port ahead. West Wight were looking dangerous on the break and Ross Gregory got back to deny Casey Tyrell before he could shoot for goal. The breakthrough came on the half hour when White headed goalwards, but his effort was blocked. The ball came back to him and he followed up with a thumping strike into the top corner of the net to give Newport

The victorious Newport team with manager Derek Ohren (far right)

the lead. Newport continued their attack and a close range effort from Darren Powell was somehow turned over the crossbar by man-of-the-match Chris Norris in the West Wight goal. West Wight drew level just before the break, when Tom Scovell conceded a free kick just outside the Port area. From the resulting set-

piece, Harry Dye was left unmarked to head home the equalizer. The second half saw Newport attacking their opponents and Scovell and Sam Dye both had half chances to put the Wessex Premier League side in front. Newport got the decisive goal on 79 minutes, when Seabrook set up McInnes to slot home.


IW Gazette 21