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Gazette THE ISLE OF WIGHT

THE ISLAND PEOPLE’S PAPER

Friday November 5, 2010 Issue 75

www.iwgazette.co.uk

30p

CARISBROOKE TO OSBORNE IT’S ALL ON OUR NEW MONOPOLY BOARD

SPOOKTACULAR GOINGS ON TO CELEBRATE HALLOWEEN ON THE ISLAND

KELLY DROPS HEPTATHLON TO BOOST HOPES OF OLYMPIC GAMES SPOT

See page 21

See page 30

See page 47

DISTRAUGHT MOTHER: BRING DAMIEN HOME ISLAND EXCLUSIVE BY JASON KAY VALERIE NETTLES, the mother of Damien Nettles who went missing on the Island 14 years ago this week, admits she spends every day agonizing over what happened to her son. Mrs. Nettles has spoken exclusively to The Gazette about the anguish she stills suffers over the mystery disappearance. She now lives in the United States as do her three other children. In an emotional plea, she said: “I just need to know what happened to him. If my son is dead and lying out there I want

live with it. I don’t think there are words to describe how I cope. You just do what you have to do every day but it’s always there. “At some level you have to keep your emotions hidden away, as you do have work and try to be a ‘normal’ person. But at the same time I have this thing going on in my soul in my heart - my son!

to know. I want to bring him home and bury him. I just want to take care of him. I’m not looking for recrimination or blame. I just want Damien back.” She continued: “I think Continued on page 3 about how his birthday should be a celebration. But it just marks another day without knowing were Damien went. Life doesn’t go on, I think it just becomes the new normal that you have to live in. I once said that if anything happened to one of my children I would die. But you somehow just keep on living and you learn to

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The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

‘DAMO’ APPEAL GOES ON

ON A WET and stormy November night exactly 14 years ago Island teenager Damien Nettles went out for the evening, but never returned. Damien, then aged 16, went into a fish and chip shop in Cowes. He was seen on CCTV at ‘Yorkies’ at around 11:35pm. Since that night of November 2, 1996, there has been no trace of Damien, whose family then lived in Woodvale Road, Gurnard. “Damo”, as he was known to his friends, had a great sense of humour. He had an unusual mannerism of blowing on his thumb, in the way that tennis players are often seen doing. He was also an accomplished musician, playing guitar and trombone, and was looking forward to a try-out with friends with hopes of being involved in the formation of a small band. Damien also enjoyed computer games and sea fishing and occasionally used weights and body building equipment. Damien was developing into a deep thinker and had taken an interest in psychology, often discussing the subject with his older sister. At the time he disappeared he was a tall, slim lad, about 6ft 3ins, and still growing. He had a short hair cut, but was known to favour longer hair. He had talked about growing a beard, probably favouring a goatee style. He had a small scar under his chin. Although the CCTV footage from Yorkie’s fish and chip shop has been circulated widely over the past 14 years, some of the men seen in the shop at the same time as Damien have not been identified. The video can be viewed on Hampshire Constabulary’s website under the ‘Casebook’ section, which highlights ongoing investigations: www.hampshire.police. uk/Internet/news/casebook/index.htm This web page also includes an age progressed

Damien Nettles as a young teenager

image of Damien, aged 27, produced in 2007 by Missing People (formerly the National Missing Persons Helpline). June 21st 2010 marked Damien’s 30th birthday. At the time of his disappearance, he was wearing a black fleece jacket, dark blue jeans and black boots. Detective Inspector Nick Heelan of Hampshire Constabulary’s Major Crime Department said: “Police remain determined to find and pursue new leads into this unresolved missing person case after 14 years. The disappearance of Damien Nettles continues to have a considerable impact on the community of the Isle of Wight. “The Nettles family displays tremendous tenacity and courage in campaigning consistently to raise this case’s profile in an attempt to encourage new witnesses and evidence. We welcome the support of charities, professional partner agencies, local businesses and the community in reinforcing awareness of the family’s billboard campaign across the Island this year. “There has been an intermittent flow of information since 1996, and people have come forward years after Damien’s disappearance, suggesting there is still the possibility that members of the community have knowledge that could take the investigation forward. Detectives are keeping an open mind about what happened to Damien because a wide range of information has been received over the past 14 years.” Detective Inspector Heelan added: “I would ask anyone who was in and around Cowes on November 2, 1996 to search their memories of that date for the smallest piece of information or detail that may provide a promising line of enquiry into Damien’s movements and intentions on the night he was last seen.”


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‘EMPTY SPACE ALWAYS THERE’ Continued page

from

front find out if that information has provided anything new.” There have been some “It’s not like a lost puppy hurtful false alarms, with where you can just go out and Mrs. Nettles recalling: “It when get another one. I can’t replace was very upsetting Damien. I have another son, someone went to the police two daughters and three claiming that he knew what beautiful grandchildren, but had happened to Damien. I am always aware that there The man who was in prison is a hole in my life. There is at the time took the police to a space at the dinner table a field in Newchurch. But the when we all sit to together. person wasted the police time There is this person missing by trying to embrass a family who went out one night, was who lived nearby. I was very last seen on Cowes High upset and hurt by it.” Damien’s mother also Street and has never been claimed she was very upset seen again.” Police mislayed Mrs. Nettles continued: when “We as a family can’t come evidence of a CCTV tape, up with a reason why this showing Damien walking happened. There are so along a street earlier in the many families I have come evening. Police claimed the across who have loved ones tape had been sent to HQ at Netley for enhancement. who have gone missing. “But overall there isn’t a lot When Valerie asked to see of support out there for things the tape the police claimed like this. We end up doing a that Council taped over it. lot of the things ourselves. Valerie contacted the person There is nowhere you can in charge of the tapes who go. There is the missing stated ‘hand on heart’ that persons charity but they are the Police had signed for the unfunded and overwhelmed. tape, and taken it away. Police later told Valerie So we just keep up the fight and the focus so one day that the tapes were left at the someone will let us know Cowes Marina as it required specialist video equipment to where Damien is. “In January the police watch them. They didn’t have were making some more this equipment at Cowes enquiries after receiving new Police. The tapes were left information. The police have on the top of the recording kept in touch with me. They equipment with a rubber say that the case isn’t closed band around them mark for but their contact is very the Police. The Police claim limited. I get the odd email that the Council than taped from the police , but I don’t over them. “I would have thought think that I should have had to wait until nearly July to the tapes would have

been treated with more importance as they were evidence that could have helped find Damien,” said his distraught mother. “I will never let go. I thought after ten years that I would give up; it’s exhausting, very exhausting, “But I can’t just turn it off, Damien filled our lives with this wonderful personality for 16 years. Lots of people say that Damien fell in the sea. My husband and father went down to the harbour master, and he claimed that tide was out when Damien went missing just after midnight. Damien had a lot of respect for the sea. He was a very strong swimmer as well. If he’d fallen in he would have been able to get out.” Valerie added: “What I am dreading is in two years time if Damien is still lost. That will then be 16 years – as long I had him. I want to know; I need to know before that. It doesn’t matter how silly information may sound, just maybe we will get enough pieces of the jigsaw to make a picture to help find Damien.” A Hampshire Constabulary spokesman said: “The current Operation Ridgewood investigation team are aware of concerns raised about the handling of CCTV footage in 1996. A review of the exact circumstances surrounding what happened to this original evidence is part of ongoing enquiries led by the Major Crime Department.”

Above and below: the last footage of Damien

LORRAINE LENDS SUPPORT

Damians sister Sarah (left) and mother Valerie

WITH THE ANNIVERSARY of the disappearance of Damien, TV presenter Lorraine Kelly has launched a new fundraising appeal for the charity Missing People. Lorraine, a Patron of Missing People, is encouraging the public to ‘Join The Search’ by collecting loose change in disposable money boxes so that the charity can be a lifeline when someone disappears. Lorraine said: “More than 100,000 calls for help are made to Missing People each year. Sadly one in four cannot currently be answered. Just by

collecting loose change in a money box, you can help this independent charity to be a lifeline to every single caller in the Isle of Wight.” The family of Damien have been appealing for news of his whereabouts via a billboard in the heart of Newport. In addition to the billboard, volunteers with the YMCA Fairthorne Group have marked the occasion by wearing T-shirts featuring Damien’s image, and handing out posters made by the charity Missing People. Damien’s mother, Valerie, added: “We’d like to thank those who made

this possible, including Biltmore Printers, Wight Local, Wight Quote, Vectis Radio, IW Gazette, IW YMCA, the Print Store, the National Policing Improvement Agency and the charity Missing People. We hope this will encourage anyone who may have knowledge of what happened to come forward.” For further information about Damien, go to www. damiennettles.com. To request a free Missing People moneybox, call 020 8392 4521 or visit www. missingpeople.org.uk/ moneybox.


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The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

Gazette FIGHTING FOR THE YAR THE ISLE OF WIGHT

THE ISLAND PEOPLE’S PAPER

HOW TO CONTACT THE IW GAZETTE SEND YOUR NEWS TO Address: Unit B18, Spithead Business Centre, Newport Road, Isle of Wight, PO36 9PH Tel: 01983 898340 Fax: (01983) 404819

THE NEWS EDITOR Write to: Jason Kay, Unit B18, Spithead Business Centre, Newport Road, IW, PO36 9PH Tel: 01983 898341 Email: jason@ iwgazette.co.uk

OUR NEWS TEAM John Coles Tel: 01983 898347 Email: newsdesk@iwgazette.co.uk Penny Newnham Tel: 01983 898347 Email: penny@iwgazette.co.uk

THE FEATURES EDITOR Jo Macaulay Tel: 01983 898346 Email: jo@iwgazette.co.uk

OUR ADMIN TEAM Della Harris Tel: 01983 898340 Email: admin@iwgazette.co.uk

OUR SALES TEAM Diane Gray Tel: 01983 898348 Email: diane@iwgazette.co.uk

A KEY EMPLOYER in West Wight is taking a lead in the continuing battle to handle the effects of climate change. The Yarmouth Harbour Commissioners estimate they will have to spend more than £4million rebuilding the breakwater that protects the Island’s Western Yar, its estuary and the town of Yarmouth. “The recent relaunch of the 10:10 campaign reminded us that it’s not just what we do, or even how well we do it,” says Chris Lisher, harbour master and chief executive. “It’s a question of telling people exactly what we’re doing. As a business our commitment to dealing with climate change goes further than installing solar panels to cut the cost of hot water to the showers and ‘green energy’ electricity, though that does save us thousands of pounds a year. “But we’re also taking the right action to protect the environment; the wildlife habitats, residential areas, roads and leisure activities. “Investing in maintaining the breakwater at Yarmouth is a priority for the harbour commissioners. The current breakwater dates from the early 1960s and is made of old railway lines and sleepers. The steelwork is unlikely to last more than another 15 years. The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) predicts that the sea level will rise one metre by the end of the century.” From the mouth of the river upstream to the causeway,

the River Yar is home to an abundance of plants and wildlife. In the salt marshes glasswort, cordgrass, sea purslane and, in summer, sea lavender can be found. At low tide the mud reveals snails, shrimps, shellfish and marine worms. The tidal water of the Yar is a nursery for fish and a feeding ground for wading birds and waterfowl: dunlin, redshank, curlew, oystercatcher, shelduck, godwits and, in winter, brent geese.

Wight it breaks through below Old Freshwater. The ancient river flowing north to the Solent would be restored, this time as salt water with tides. Freshwater would be a separate island again. “But the shoreline from Freshwater Bay via the Needles to Yarmouth Harbour alters all the time. This natural process has given us an attractive range of spectacular features… Freshwater Cliffs, Tennyson Down, the Needles, Alum Bay,

There is a circular walk taking in Saltern Wood on the west bank of the Yar and the former railway line, now a cycle route and bridleway, along the east bank. Red squirrels live here. “The Yar, a short river with a large estuary, is tidal for its five kilometres (three miles) north from the fresh water of Afton Marsh,” adds Charlotte Beeby, deputy harbour master. “If, thanks to climate change and rising tides, the sea breaks through anywhere on the Isle of

Headon Warren, Totland Bay, Colwell Bay and more.” Yarmouth Harbour, as the gateway to West Wight, welcomes more than 500,000 visitors a year by car ferry from Lymington, and 100,000 visitors by boat, many from elsewhere in the Solent, but also from Ireland, the Channel Islands, France, Belgium, Holland, Germany and Scandinavia. The Yarmouth Harbour Commissioners have control of the Western Yar from the

causeway, below Old Freshwater, to the harbour entrance where the river meets the Solent. They also have authority in the Solent for about one and a half kilometres (one mile) to the west of the harbour entrance and for about one kilometre (half a mile) out from the shore. The harbour is the largest employer in the town of Yarmouth with 20 permanent employees rising to 30 employees in the tourist season. Yarmouth Harbour owns the wooden pier built in 1876, reputedly the longest wooden pier in the UK open to the public and grade II listed; operates the linkspan for the ferries; collects tickets from foot passengers; manages the harbour and river moorings; supplies marine fuel; operates the swingbridge; and provides a birth for the RNLI lifeboat. The harbour at the mouth of the Isle of Wight’s Western Yar also offers permanent moorings to 250 Islander-owned yachts and commercial vessels including 11 fishing boats. The swingbridge connecting Yarmouth with Freshwater is used by hundreds of drivers, cyclists and pedestrians, residents and visitors every day. The IW Council is currently consulting the public on its shoreline management plan (SMP2). This considers that the breakwater at Yarmouth is critical for the protection of the river Yar, the estuary and the town of Yarmouth. For further details visit the websites www. yarmouth-harbour.co.uk and www.coastalwight.gov.uk/smp.

SMOKE - BUT NOT MUCH FIRE

Lynette Dixon Tel:01983 898343 Email: lynette@iwgazette.co.uk

OUR DESIGN TEAM Colin Clarke Tel: 01983 898342 Email: gazettead@mac.com

OUR WEB TEAM David Marshall Tel: 01983 898349 Email: webteam@iwgazette.co.uk

A FIRE in a deep fat fryer sent smoke billowing above the Needles amusement park. “It looked worse than it was,” said IW Station Manager from

Yarmouth Phil Selby at the scene. “Everything and everyone worked like they were supposed to in a fire,” he said.

Employees evacuated the Pantry Café – luckily the fire started before the café had opened for the day to the general public.

Fire crews from Yarmouth and Newport attended the blaze and the fire was quickly put out using a foam extinguisher.


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THE PILL OR NOT THE PILL Gazette - THAT IS THE QUESTION! SOUTHERN WATER THE ISLE OF WIGHT

NEWS IN BRIEF

A CONTROVERSIAL scheme that will allow Island girls as young as 13 to be prescribed the contraceptive pill has been given a mixed reception. The scheme is being trialed on the Island, and if it proves successful it could be taken up in other parts of the country. It is hoped it will reduce the number of unwanted pregnancies The latest figures for teenage pregnancy on the Island show a year-onyear increase, with 96 girls under the age of 18 becoming pregnant in 2008. Now teenagers below the age of consent will be able to get the pill from one of 10 pharmacies without first seeing a doctor. The pharmacists will not be obliged

to inform the girls’ parents. But while the Isle of Wight Primary Care Trust claim the scheme would allow girls to get important advice about contraception and reduce unwanted pregnancies, the church and other campaign groups have labelled it ‘irresponsible’. The pharmacies will be able to provide a month’s supply of the pill, with girls under 16 given a follow-up appointment with a nurse. Jennifer Smith from the IW NHS Primary Care Trust said: “We are linking them with people most able to support them in further decisionmaking and appropriate behaviour in future.”

Pro-life campaigner Chris Whitehouse, from Totland described it as “dangerous, reckless and unprofessional” he said: “For younger children in that age group, the proper context for the care and support they need should be through their GP.” The Rev Anthony Glaysher of the Catholic Diocese of Portsmouth said: “I think this is going to spiral out of control to be quite honest. We are saying that young people really cannot aspire to anything above the basic level of sexual promiscuity. We need to be teaching them the fundamentals about relationships and commitment.” He added: “To allow this to happen to 13-year-old girls is quite unacceptable - their parents wouldn’t be aware of what is happening.” Mike Judge of The Christian Institute said: “Cutting parents out of the equation is not the answer. Studies show that children whose parents are involved in their lives are less likely to engage in premature sexual activity.

TO SPEND BIG ON ISLAND UPGRADES

“Doling out contraceptive pills like sweeties will do nothing to protect girls from the soaring STI rate, and sterilising girls will only help boys put more pressure on them for sex. This scheme sends out a truly depressing message of low expectations to our teenage girls, rather than inspiring them to delay sex until they are at least older.” Jade Bell, herself a teenage mum said: “I would want to know if my children were taking the contraceptive pill, to help them make the right decision, because parents know their children better than anyone else.”

B u t Pharmacist Kevin Noble said: “I cannot see how this service actually encourages sex in any age group. The decision has already been made by that patient to become sexually active. This service looks to support that patient, provide them with appropriate advice, and it is very controlled.” Professor David Paton of Nottingham University has examined the evidence and concluded that easier access to contraception may lead to a false sense of security, increasing risk-taking behaviour among young people.

LIFT IN BETWEEN FLOORS

THE MOVE by IW Council’s deputy leader George Brown to spend up to £220,000 on a new lift at Ventnor Botanic Gardens appears to be getting stuck between floors. As revealed in the last edition of The Gazette, Cllr. George Brown committed the funding amid claims by the IW Council that the Island attraction lost £7,000 a week in the summer because tourists could not access the site due to the inadequate facilities. But with wholesale cuts, and many other Council attractions due to be sold off to raise cash, the timing of Cllr. Brown’s

decision has been brought into question. Now his decision will go back to the Council’s Scrutiny Committee for deliberation and recommendation. In turn they will send it back to Cllr. Brown for further consideration, which could force him into a change of mind, although he remains defiant. He Brown, said: “The reasons for the decisions have been fully set out in the delegated decision report “However I welcome the opportunity to attend the call-in meeting of November 11 and explain once again why this decision is in the interests

both of council tax payers and the long term future of Ventnor Botanic Garden. “I hope this call-in will not affect our ability to install a new, fully functional, lift in time for the 2011 season thereby further affecting the garden’s opportunity to accommodate all visitors and to maximise income.” Several opposition councillors have raised their concerns about the massive outlay claiming there was has not been enough consultation before the decision was made, as well as questioning why the funding decision was being rushed through.

SOUTHERN WATER have announced plans to spend more than £7.5 million pounds on improvements and upgrades on the Island. The work will take place over the next five years. Southern Water plan to carry out the changes to ensure they can to meet the needs of the Island’s increasing population. Improvement include Chillerton and Newtown Wastewater Treatment Works so that waste water is treated to a higher standard. Paul Kent, Southern Water’s Wastewater Planning and Strategy Manager said: “These are all important schemes that will enhance the environment on the Isle of Wight and ensure that wastewater treatment on the Island reaches the highest standard”. Work will get underway next summer with a scheme costing around £2.5million aimed at tackling localised flooding and pollution in the Dodnor Lane area of Newport. Roud and Brading treatment works will also be upgraded and Fairlee Wastewater Treatment Works will also see a scheme to help improve the quality of the River Medina.

COACH ATTACKED BY VANDALS AT SHANKLIN HOTEL

A COACH, parked in the car park of a Shanklin hotel, has been vandalised. Police are asking witnesses to come forward after allegations that a number of youths were seen damaging a coach in the car park at Holliers Hotel in Shanklin Old Village. The youths were seen running away from the car park towards the area of Big Mead at approximately 7.15pm on Saturday, October 30. PC Russ Skinner of the Isle of Wight Targeted Patrol Team said: “At the moment it’s estimated the vandals caused up to £2,000 of damage to the coach. We understand one witness saw what happened and told Holliers hotel staff. “I’m appealing for that person to contact police so we can confirm more details to help track down the suspects swiftly. We’re also keen to speak with any other witnesses who were in the Shanklin Old Village area between 7pm and 7.30pm on Saturday night.” Anyone with information is asked to contact PC Russ Skinner at Shanklin police station by phoning 101.


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The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010


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NOW COUNCIL ARE SELLING OFF TOP ISLAND ATTRACTIONS TO RAISE CASH

FIVE of the Island’s leading small tourist attractions are being sold off by the cash-strapped IW Council in a bid to secure their long-term future. The five leisure complexes, and all the associated premises and equipment that go with them, are the latest Council-owned facilities being put on the market to try to further ease the financial burden. But the Council claim it is for the good of the facilities, and they are only attempting to lease them to third party operators. Two Sandown attractions and two at Ryde are included in the sale. They are the popular Brown’s golfing complex and the Sandham Grounds in Sandown and The Boating Lake and Appley Pitch and Putt at Ryde. Also up for grabs are the Shanklin Esplanade Gardens. The sales are being conducted by

Newport based Scotcher and Co, who have invited ‘early expressions of interest’ to reach them in writing by no later than November 20. IW Council Cabinet member responsible for property, George Brown confirmed: “As part of the council’s ongoing review to ensure residents are getting best value for money, the council has instructed Scotcher and Co to market five of its seasonal leisure facilities sites. “We are not looking to sell off the facilities or the land they are on – we are looking to secure the long term future of the sites by leasing them to third party operators who will be able to invest and develop them to improve the Island’s leisure offer to residents and visitors. The intention is for the sites to remain as they are and continue providing entertainment to all.”

Ryde Boating Lake

Shanklin Esplanade Gardens

CHANGES AT NEWPORT PASSPORT OFFICE CAUSE FOR CONCERN - MP

NEWPORT Passport Interview Office faces possible changes as a result of the Comprehensive Spending Review, in which the Home Office has to save £2.4 billion over the next five years. The Identity and Passport Service (IPS), as part of the Home Office, has to make changes in how it delivers services, aiming to reduce waste but maintaining an efficient and accessible service. They have announced that nationally they intend to reduce staff numbers by 150 and close 39 local offices. This is because, since interviews were introduced in 2007, fewer interviews have been carried out than

anticipated. Island MP Andrew Turner has been informed that the Newport office, the only one on the Island, is scheduled to close. It will be replaced by a new customer service centre based in Newport. The IPS say they have ‘successfully piloted this approach on the Isle of Wight’. Under the new plans the nearest full passport office would be in Portsmouth. Mr. Turner said: ‘These plans will potentially impact on Islanders who are applying for a passport for the first time. This change follows what has been described as a successful trial of the new arrangements. I would be keen to hear from anyone

who has encountered any difficulties so that I can make representations to the Home Office about the impact the arrangements will have on Islanders. “We do need to save money, but we also need to ensure that people can still access the services they need without crossing the Solent in view of the difficulties and costs of doing so. I have contacted the Identity and Passport Service asking for information on their exact plans for the Newport office and for more information on how they intend to continue providing the service. I really want to hear the experiences of Islanders on this issue.”

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Browns Golf Course

Gazette THE ISLE OF WIGHT

NEWS IN BRIEF

GIRLIE NIGHT TO RAISE FUNDS FOR TYRA

THREE GIRLS from the Riverside Centre are organising a special “Ladies’ Night” to raise some funds for Tyra Atkinson, a three-year-old Newport girl with a serious illness. The event takes place on Friday December 3 at The Studio, Newport. Doors open at 7pm with the show getting underway at 8pm. The Dream Boys will be providing the entertainment, and tickets, priced £15 are available by calling 07738 359 524. Details are also on Facebook and Wight Bay.


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TOURISM MINISTER’S VISIT

TOURISM MINISTER John Penrose was on the Island last week at the special invitation of our MP Andrew Turner. Ostensibly on the Island to consider the future of Osborne House’s former convalescent home, as the law will have to be changed in order to change the use of the building, Mr. Penrose also took the opportunity to talk to representatives from the tourism industry on the Island. He was also given a quick tour of one of our attractions followed by a question and answer session at the Priory Bay Hotel. Unfortunately his visit fell on what was one of the wettest days we’ve had this autumn and a day when the roads on the Island were totally clogged with traffic due to a few accidents and untimely roadworks. But the minister’s spirits were not dampened as he made his way to Sandown Zoo for an indoor encounter with the lemurs and to learn about their beautiful big cats. And the visit was made all the more memorable by a ‘Blue Peter moment’ during the proceedings. “It was the first ministerial visit to be held up by lemur poo,” laughed MP Andrew Turner’s partner Carole Dennett who organised the event. One of the lemurs who was ‘meeting’ Mr. Penrose was unfortunately a little overcome by all of the attention when he got to Mr. Turner and had a small accident on his shoulder, which was quickly rectified. After his zoo encounter the Minister and his entourage made their way to the Priory Bay Hotel in Seaview for an ‘in camera’ meeting with a few specially chosen representatives from the tourism industry and a question and answer session with a larger group, many of whom had special deals with Wightlink for their holiday accommodations. “David Cameron wants to give tourism a push,” said Mr. Penrose. “The document I am preparing on tourism is nine tenths written and will be going

BY JO MACAULAY to him next week. “The figures for the country show that this last summer season has been particularly good.

Tourism Minister John Penrose “Everyone agrees that quality matters and how you improve that is exercising policy makers. What’s your view on the quality – how do we drive up quality in the industry?” Andrew Palmer from the Priory Bay asked: “How do we overcome the season extend it? Quality requires investment, which needs profitability or support from the banks. Over the years we have had support from the banks but this is now gone – they need kicking or encouraging.” Asking how many people had asked for money from banks in the past three to four months resulted in only a smattering of hands. “It’s best not to ask the banks for money at the moment,” remarked an audience member sagely. The minister then asked about the rating systems and whether they made a difference. One hotel owner said that it used to but that there were now a greater number of four and five star rated self catering and luxury apartments. “To pay every year for a cursory inspection that costs a lot of money is not really

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offering us any benefits,” she said. It was pointed out that many people just log on to Trip Advisor to check out potential holiday destinations. One comment was that there was a necessity for better communication between the Chamber of Commerce and the Council – “We have failed to see and councillors interested in the tourism sector.” Another observation was that there was no strong branding for the Island’s tourism ‘product’ and that there had not been enough communication with tourism providers about national advertising campaigns. “It would be useful to know how the council is marketing us and where prior to the campaign,” was one observation with particular regard to the ‘Just Add Water’ advertisements on national television and billboards in London. “If you had that information and you were told your brand would be on that marketing would that mean you would be prepared to contribute to that revenue?, asked the minister. “We need joined up thinking and communicating. We have a great

opportunity but we must not miss it because we’re not helping each other. Joining up is really crucial for the Island,” he stressed. In conclusion John Penrose said: “ I cannot promise you large swadges (sic) of government cash…In George Osborne’s austere budget in June one of the rare rays of light was the reduction in holiday lettings rules. Moves to cut corporation tax should also be beneficial and there are moves to reduce the amount of red tape – we’re trying to get rid of that,” he said. Afterwards the minister told The Gazette that the document he is

preparing is going to the Prime Minister this week and should be evaluated by the end of the year. “If you can get the private sector to band together that’s step one,” he stressed. “They can’t operate independently and fight each other. “One of the bits not noticed in George Osborne’s spending review is that it gives authorities the chance to keep some of the business rates. Previously central government nicked it. “If next year the tourism industry has grown the local authorities get to hold onto that growth. It’s a quick effective way of getting cash.”

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DAREDEVIL JIM JUMPS TO IT

The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

DAREDEVIL pensioner Jim Long will be making a parachute jump for charity later this month – at the age of 94! World War II veteran Jim, who lives at Brighstone, will be making the jump to help raise funds as part of the Royal British Legion Poppy Appeal. He said: “I feel so sad when I see some of our boys coming home from Afghanistan with their limbs missing, so I want to try to raise money to help them. Some people say I am mad doing a parachute jump at my age, but I have been to see my doctor to get checked over, and he told me to go for it!” The jump will take place on November 27. Anyone wishing to sponsor Jim should send cheques, payable to ‘Royal British Legion, Brighstone,’ to Jim Long at Mimosa, Galley, Lane, Brighstone, Isle of Wight, PO30 4BT. It’s not the first time Jim has jumped made a parachute jump. Only a couple of years ago he took to the skies hoping to raise £1,000 for the Poppy appeal, and in the end he managed to secure three times that amount. He made the tandem jump over Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire, and will be returning there towards the end of the month to do it all over again. He smiled: “I’m hoping this jump will be like the last one; simply wonderful”. Jim, originally from Carisbrooke, volunteered to serve his country, along with his two brothers, when war broke out in 1939, and served as a corporal in the Royal Armoured Service Corps, spending much of his time in the Far East.

‘NO’ TO PRISON VOTING

ANDREW TURNER, the Island’s MP, has hit out at the move to give prisoners the vote, saying we should stop being ruled by Europe. Mr. Turner insists it is

time to push for a British Bill of Rights so such decisions can be made from within this country. . He said: “A key pledge in the Conservative

Party manifesto was the scrapping of the Human Rights Act and replacing it with a British Bill of Rights. The aim was to stop Europe dictating to us and enable us to return to common sense which the Act seemed to have overlooked. “The British Bill of Rights is not just about rights, but also about the responsibilities which every citizen should uphold in order to earn rights. It is about common sense; for example, when a victim defends themselves, they should not be treated as a criminal. It is about putting the honest, law abiding citizen first. “These are sound principles, which are hard to argue against. However the Liberal Democrats have done just that. One of the compromises for coalition government was that the British Bill of Rights be dropped. This has upset many people: MPs, party supporters and many members of the public who support this approach. I

still support the British Bill of Rights and will push for it in every way possible. “Now we see the effect of this deal. We have been told by the European Court of Human Rights that it is ‘unlawful’ to prevent prisoners from voting. This is exactly why we need a British Bill of Rights - to stop Europe from telling us how to govern our country. Why should we give the vote to prisoners, to those who decided that they would not uphold their responsibilities and abide by our laws? When you break the law so seriously that your right to liberty is removed, so should your right to vote. “Allowing prisoners the vote insults those who choose to abide by the law and uphold their responsibilities as British Citizens. It is an undesirable diktat from Europe supported by the Liberal Democrats. We must fight it and continue to push for a British Bill of Rights.”

AN OPEN-TOP bus carrying sightseers to the Needles was damaged when it was hit by a mini tornado. Several passengers suffered minor injuries caused by flying glass when the ‘Needles Breezer’ was hit by the tornado while en route from Alum Bay car park to the Needles Old Battery.

Marc Morgan-Huws, Managing Director of Southern Vectis, who own the bus, said,” It appeared that the mini tornado had picked up stones and they smashed a window in the upper deck of the bus. That caused a few minor injuries and the ambulance service attended the scene.”

RED JET TRIPS ARE REDUCED RED FUNNEL FERRIES, have introduced a streamlined winter timetable aimed at cutting fuel consumption and costs. The revised service began on Monday. The crossings from Cowes to Southampton will operate hourly from Cowes between 11.15am and 3.15pm from Monday to Friday and all day on Sundays, departing at 15 minutes past the hour from Cowes, and at

45 minutes past the hour from Southampton. James Fulford, Red Funnel’s chief executive officer said: “We have been one of very few transport operators to provide peak-hour commuter frequencies throughout the day, seven days a week. Given fuel and rapidly rising repair costs, and the eventual need to save up for fleet replacement, this is no longer sustainable.”


The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

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ONE SET TO BECOME TWO

THE MOVE to split the Isle of Wight into two Parliamentary constituencies has taken a significant step forward, to the disappointment of Island MP Andrew Turner. The House of Commons voted to split the Island by a majority of 81 – but Mr Turner will continue his OneWight campaign. A total of 245 MPs supported an amendment to the Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Bill that would ensure special consideration was given to the Isle of Wight, and other areas including the Islands of Argyle & Bute and Anglesey and the ancient duchy of Cornwall, when equalising constituencies. However, the amendment was defeated with 326 MPs opposing it. The Bill will have passed through the Commons later tonight and will now be considered in detail by the House of Lords where the decision could

still be overturned. Mr Turner said: “The timetable of this Bill has not allowed proper discussion or debate in the Commons about these issues and how it will affect different areas. The Bill is now going to the House of Lords where the Government do not have the same powers to cut short (or guillotine) debates. “As I said during my speech, the proper body to make decisions about parliamentary boundaries is the independent Boundary Commission. Major constitutional changes should not be made by diktat of the Deputy Prime Minister. I will now be working with members of the House of Lords to get support in the upper House for amendments to the Bill to protect the Isle of Wight. I admit I am disappointed with this setback but we are not yet defeated and I will fight on - as I promised in my election address. ”

The effect of the proposals on the Isle of Wight were criticised during the debate by MPs of all parties as well as Mr Turner. The former leader of the Liberal Democrats Charles Kennedy MP said: “The sense of a natural, distinct identity in the Isle of Wight should surely be reflected

in the attitude that officialdom takes’ and described the plans as ‘an affront’.” And Paul Murphy, a Welsh Labour MP, asked: “What Government in their right mind could think that the Isle of Wight could be anything other than a constituency?”

CHEERS FOR SHANKLIN FIRM

A SHANKLIN firm is celebrating after winning an order that will help make drinking water safer in disaster areas around the world. The HypoTech company has won the deal to supply its environmentally friendly product, SteriSan, to Swiss water filtration firm, WAL, to help it kill all known life-threatening germs in its jug and pitcher products. The contract is for the next five years, and Dan Spacie, HypoTech’s chief executive, said:

“SteriSan has developed a natural biocide that deters the use of chemicals and helps prevent illness. This multi-million pound contract allows WAL to remove pathogens from water safely, effectively and in an environmentally-friendly way.” Dan added: “WAL and SteriSan are donating 10,000 litres of product to Peshawar in Pakistan to enable several million litres of drinking water. SteriSan has discovered a technology that ensures the highest standards of water sanitation.”

MAN HURT IN RYDE

NEWS

ISLAND COMPANY BACKS CAMPAIGN FOR SAFE BLINDS

THE OWNER of an Island company is backing a national newspaper campaign to raise awareness of safety devices which could prevent child tragedies. John Youle from Apollo Blinds hopes the ‘Daily Mirror’, who began the campaign will be the first of a number of national and regional media to use their influence to inform their readers about the simple steps that parents can take to make their homes safe. The paper has teamed up with the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) and the British Blind & Shutter Association (BBSA) to give away safety packs and devices to secure cords from window blinds out of the way of children. Now The Gazette is pleased to publicise the campaign. Five toddlers have died this year as a result of getting tangled in the cords from window blinds and John said his company stressed the importance of getting the message across to households where children lived or visited. “All Apollo Blinds products which have corded mechanisms come with safety devices as standard but there are lots of blinds in people’s homes which don’t have them,” he said. “We have been doing our bit to raise awareness of child safety products for nearly two years with all our customers but it’s brilliant that a national newspaper is finally championing the issue.” The most recent research from the BBSA estimates that there are 100 million blinds in UK homes which do not have safety devices and John said it would only take a few moments to fit safety devices to existing blinds. He commends RoSPA for giving away 60,000 safety packs, which include leaflets and safety devices, as part of the campaign but said that people could get free devices from Apollo Blinds as well. “We ran a campaign in conjunction with Child Safety Week in the summer to raise awareness of the issue and have been giving away safety devices,” he added. “My franchise company is happy to continue to give away safety devices to anyone on the Island.”

CASH IS STOLEN

EMERGENCY services were called to the junction of Pellhurst Road and Queens Road in Ryde after a man was involved in an accident with a car on a pedestrian crossing. The unnamed man in his 20s

was using the crossing. Police closed one lane of Queens Road whilst Paramedics from IW Ambulance Service treated the man for a suspected broken leg. The man was taken by ambulance to St Mary’s

Hospital in Newport for further treatment. A Hampshire and IW Police Spokesman said, “We were called to a road traffic collision involving one vehicle and a pedestrian. Officers

attended from the Shanklin Roads Policing Unit and have launched an investigation into how the collision happened.” The spokesman went on to say that no one had been arrested.

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DETECTIVES are investigating a report of a burglary at a house in Adgestone near Sandown. Several items were missing from the address in Lower Adgestone Road when a householder returned home at 3.30pm on Saturday, October 30. Entry to the property is believed to have been forced sometime between approximately 8.30am and 3.30pm. A search appears to have been carried out in one room within the house where £140 in cash and a small Kodak digital camera are missing. Also reported stolen is a light blue coloured bath towel, which measures 36 inches by 18 inches. Investigating officer Detective Constable Phil Harrison-Smith of the Isle of Wight Priority Crime Unit (PCU) said: “Police carried out initial enquires and searches in the local area over the weekend. We are keen to gather as much information as possible from the community.


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NEWS

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The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

HAVENSTREET GOES PINK

PINK RIBBONS for the locomotive and pink overalls for the train crew. That was again the dress code at The IW Steam Railway, as they went pink in support of the Islandwide ‘Isle of Pink’ initiative to help raise funds for the national Breast Cancer Campaign charity. Locomotive driver Paul Beale and his fireman Steve Smart both donned pink ‘bib and braces’ overalls, wearing them throughout the day as they took charge of the day’s busy half-term and ‘Wizard Week’ train service. To complement the loco crew’s unusual attire, the duty steam locomotive, Hunslet Austerity saddle tank locomotive No.198 ‘Royal Engineer’, was suitably adorned with plenty of pink ribbons and bows, plus special pink ‘head-code’ discs. Elsewhere around the Railway, the ticket clerk, signalman, guard, platform staff, catering

team, office and shop staff all joined in and wore something pink for the day! The pink theme at the Isle of Wight Steam Railway was part of the annual Isle of Pink initiative to turn the Island pink for one day in support of Breast Cancer Campaign’s drive to raise awareness of breast cancer, encourage women to be breast aware, and to generate crucial funds to aid breast cancer research. Throughout the day, visitors were encouraged to make donations to this very worthy cause. “The Isle of Wight Steam Railway is always keen to support these initiatives here on the Island, so we hope that having our train and operating crews attired in our specially dyed ‘uniforms’ was suitably eye-catching and helped boost the profile of this very important campaign,” said Railway Commercial Manager Jim Loe.

The train crew from Friday’s Breast Cancer Awareness Day at Havenstreet. Left to right, Guard Clive Miller, Conductor Chris Tagart, Fireman Steve Smart & Driver Paul Beale, with Locomotive No. 198 ‘Royal Engineer’ and train in the platform at Havenstreet Station


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NEWS

MAJOR ROADWORKS BRING CHAOS TO ISLAND ROADS - JUST AT WRONG TIME CONGRATULATIONS to the Isle of Wight Council officers responsible for highways who have brought total chaos to the Island roads. Surely, they must have won the award for the most naive and short-sighted decisions of 2010! It’s half term, it’s the Christmas shopping season – so what do they do? Close virtually every route in and out of Newport – that’s what! Binstead Hill is closed, so traffic from Ryde is being forced towards Robin Hill Island, and then down Long Lane towards Staplers. Then they decide to close the road from Arreton Cross to Blackwater for resurfacing. So where does traffic from Sandown and Shanklin, heading towards Newport go? You’ve guessed it – towards Robin Hill and down Long Lane. Of course there is the alternative route – through Godshill, where temporary traffic lights have caused chaos for weeks. Earlier this week, the traffic coming out of Newport towards Godshill

stretched back nearly to Rookley. Of course there is always the route out of Newport via Carisbrooke. But, oh no. Guess what? The roads have been closed because of road works. The Gazette specifically approached the IW Council last week about the possibility of such chaos, and they dismissed it out of hand, saying there would be no knock-on effect. Have they ventured out of their ivory tower this week, and seen what’s going on around Coppins Bridge and beyond? The Council issued a statement about the chaotic conditions. It read: “The council received reports of large traffic build-ups around the Blackwater and Godshill areas between 4 – 7pm last night (25 October). One of the main causes was the volume of traffic which normally uses the Blackwater Road being diverted due to resurfacing works on the A3056 between Blackwater Junction and Arreton Cross. These resurfacing works are due to be completed at 5pm on

INCOME SUPPORT CHANGES THE 1,470 lone parents on Income Support on the Island will have to look for work three years earlier following changes in the benefits system. Previously they would have to start to look for work when their children were aged ten but benefit changes will mean that they will now get help to look for work, rather than stay on benefits, once their children are aged seven or over. From October 25 lone parents whose child is aged seven or over will now claim Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA) if they are able work, rather than Income Support. On JSA they will benefit from a comprehensive range of support including training opportunities, job application advice and other financial grants to help them return to work. Lone parents with children of 12 or under will be able to specify schoolhours only jobs without it affecting their benefits. A lone parent’s availability for work must take into

account their childcare responsibilities and they will not be expected to take up a job if appropriate childcare is not available. They will also receive advice on childcare, benefits and part-time or family friendly working from specialist lone parent advisers at Jobcentre Plus. The Work Programme is also being introduced to give flexible support to get people in jobs and other back-to-work measures are available including Work Clubs. These provide unemployed people with a place to meet and exchange skills, find opportunities, make contacts, share experiences and receive support to help them in their return to work. Those with a health condition or disability, which limits their capability for work will be able to claim Employment and Support Allowance (ESA). Some lone parents will continue to receive Income Support if they have a child in receipt of the middle or highest rate care

Wednesday 27 October and we apologise for any inconvenience caused. We understand there was a road accident around 6pm at Blackwater Hollow which may have contributed to the traffic congestion. ”We are also aware of concerns relating to a set of temporary lights that are in place outside the Godshill Cider Barns. These traffic lights were put in place by a private contractor as a result of building works. We have taken this up with the contractor to ensure that the issue is addressed. We have been assured the lights will be working properly today which should help reduce congestion. “With the increased traffic flow due to the diversion and the problems with the temporary lights, this would have resulted in increased congestion at peak times. However, with the problem with the temporary lights remedied, and the resurfacing work due to finish tomorrow, traffic should flow more smoothly.”

Someone wants their backside kicking from Bembridge to Freshwater – the trouble is you would never find a clear route to do it!

The Wight Fair Writers Circle presents:

A Winter Short Story Writing Competition Great prizes to be won as well as some winners being published! Under 12s up to 750 words - £2 per entry Under 18s up to 750 words - £2 per entry Adults 1,500 – 2,000 words - £4 per entry All proceeds to:Love Russia Charity, The Multiple Sclerosis Society and The Barely Born Appeal

component of Disability Living Allowance, they receive Carer’s Allowance, or if they are Fostering. Work and Pensions Minister Maria Miller said:“We know that work is the best route out of poverty. This is why lone parents with younger children will now be able

to have access to help and support to look for work through Jobcentre Plus. “Getting a good balance between work and family responsibilities is important for every parent. Job Centre Plus advisors will actively support lone parents so that they can get that balance right too.”

Closing date 22nd November 2010 Winners announced 21st December 2010 at a reception in Newport Entry forms & rules can be obtained by:- E-mail to: carolbridgestock@hotmail.com Telephone: Carol Bridgestock on 402393 or Margaret Norris on 533494 Collect from: Books2Love, 53 Pyle Street, Newport (next to the Santander Bank)


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The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010


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FEATURE

WAITROSE OPENS ITS DOORS

RICHARD TUDOR THOMAS, manager of the new Waitrose store in East Cowes welcomed Islanders to an evening preview on Wednesday, before the official opening on Thursday morning by Queensgate Foundation Primary School. Mayor of East Cowes, Peter Lloyd was amongst the invited guests on Wednesday evening and was bowled over by the choice of products and the layout of the store. “I admire them for choosing East Cowes and wish them every success,” said Peter. Richard Tudor Thomas thought that the evening had gone very well. “It’s not something we always do but this store is special,” said Richard. “It’s our first overseas branch,” joked Richard who grew up on the Isle of Purbeck in Dorset. “I used to wake up every morning and look across to the Isle of Wight,” said Richard little knowing that one day he would be living here. Formerly in the Royal Navy, Richard has been with Waitrose for seven years. “I’m so excited. This store has such a lot of potential,” he added. “A lot of people couldn’t wait to get here,” added Peter Lloyd who was keen to buy a Heston Blumenthal Christmas pudding when the store opened the following day. There are 12 lines from Heston in the store, and the

puddings are selling fast. At the reception the three Island producers whose products are currently stocked at the store were on hand to give samples of their products to visitors. The Tomato Stall will be supplying two chutneys and two tomato juices, including a ‘golden’ tomato drink made from yellow tomatoes, and both the red and golden varieties were available for tasting. Jeff MacDonald from The Tomato Stall said that the golden ‘sunshine’ variety, which has a slightly less acidic flavour than the red, is proving a better seller at the moment. They also had samples of their delicious chutneys on the stall. Paul Thomas from the company said, “We are very excited about being involved with the new Waitrose store and feel that the regional sourcing team’s championing of local produce has been fantastic. A couple of weeks ago it was great to meet some of the staff who will be working at East Cowes to show them how the tomatoes are grown and let them taste the products we produce from them.” Also on hand to give out samples were the other two Island producers stocked at the store. The Garlic Farm had their chutney varieties Vampire’s Delight, Fig, Apple & Garlic, Rhubarb & Pear and Garlic & Horseradish

Mustard. Goddards Brewery will be stocking East Cowes with four varieties of ale and bitter and had samples on offer for tasting. Waitrose Local and Regional Manager, Oliver O’Mara, comments “It’s fantastic to be bringing on board three totally new local suppliers to our new East Cowes store. Their passion and commitment really show in the quality of their produce - all of which look as good as they taste.” The 18,000 sq ft store will eventually be the first shop to be fully powered by a biomas boiler by early summer 2011 when the Energy Centre has been approved and built, making it the most ‘green’ supermarket in the UK. Other green initiatives include HFC-free fridges, the use of cold air retrieval instead of air-conditioning and ‘sun pipes’ to illuminate the checkout areas. The company advertised for 160 staff to run the new store and received over 900 applicants. All successful applicants have now been given a comprehensive training programme and are ready to welcome shoppers to the store. The store will have £1000 each month to give away to a local charity or cause and this month Cowes RNLI will receive the bonus. Mr. Mark Southwell from Cowes RNLI was at the reception and

Left to right: Matthew Simmonds. Duncan Bell, Richard Tudor Thomas, Peter Lloyd looking forward to using the windfall for improvements to their service. Members of the East Cowes Business Action Group were very impressed with the store, especially the amount of choice and the prices. Waitrose East Cowes Branch Manager, Richard Tudor Thomas, remarked.

“It’s great to be finally opening on the Island. The store looks amazing, and now that we have permission for the Energy Centre, I look forward to East Cowes being the most sustainable supermarket store in the UK when the Centre is up and running next year. “We have an absolutely

fantastic team, plus some great local suppliers, and hope that our customers are as enthusiastic about the store’s opening as our team is. I’m really looking forward to introducing myself to and working with the community and can’t wait to hear what our customers think of the new store.”


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VIP TRIP TO FIREWORKS

GUNWHARF QUAYS was the venue for 70 secret VIPS who sipped champagne and nibbled on canapes after winning tickets in a competition held by Hovertravel. The special evening celebrated a new partnership between Hovertravel and Gunwharf Quays with the launch of their HoverShopper winter promotion. It included travel from Ryde to Gunwharf Quays and a special VIP Charter direct from Gunwharf Quays Marina and tickets for the famous annual fireworks display. For the first time ever the

Spinnaker Tower was lit up in sequence to the display. Nearly 10,000 people attended the event last October, and this year even more turned out in force for what promised to be a spectacular display at Gunwharf’s Marina. The fireworks began at 8pm and they were preceded by a vast, carnival style parade, which wove its way through the city, starting at St. Georges Church at 6.30pm and making its way to the waterfront. Both the parade and fireworks were themed around the Mexican Day of the Dead, or Dia de los

Muertos, with the procession led by a giant 15ft skull. People lined the streets to witness and follow the parade of beautiful costumes, amazing dancers, musicians and performers. Skull lantern carriers from schools including Milton Cross, King Richards, St Georges, St Edmunds, and Park Community School accompanied the professional carnival artistes as they headed towards the marina ready for the fireworks finale. Neil Chapman, Hovertravel managing director said: “Teaming up with Gunwharf Quays to charter our craft from their fireworks spectacular was our way of giving something back to our loyal customers and a great opportunity to put on a fun and exclusive event. We gave away 70 freetickets to travel on the craft to the display; on arrival guests were shown to a VIP area in the slug and Lettuce where they enjoyed complimentary drinks and canapés whilst watching the fireworks. Everyone had a great time and enjoyed the unique trip back on a night service directly from the Gunwharf Marina. When we announced the competition islanders all jumped at the chance to attend and I am pleased we gave the winners an extra special treat.


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NEWS

DON’T PUT LIVES AT RISK Gazette THE ISLE OF WIGHT

IRRESPONSIBLE motorists on the Island will continue to face prosecution for putting lives at risk on the roads. PC Matt Rowlands and Police Community Support Officer Lotte O’Sullivan from the Newport Safer Neighbourhoods team are taking action in response to ongoing community concerns about anti-social drivers. Sergeant Phil Smith of the Newport Safer Neighbourhoods team said: “Local residents are contacting us to complain about speeding and noise nuisance caused by reckless motorists around the town centre, particularly the dual carriageway and roads on the nearby business parks and industrial estates. “We are responding with extra patrols to catch anyone who displays a dangerous disregard for road safety and people’s quality of life. These issues remain top policing priorities that

the community want us to tackle. “The lawful power to seize vehicles under section 59 of the Police Reform Act 2002 will be used if necessary. This legislation relates to the driver, not the vehicle, so a motorist caught breaking the law in someone else’s car can face having that car seized. The cost of reclaiming a vehicle could run into several hundred pounds. “Our message to motorists is for them to think long and hard about the consequences of anti-social driving on other people’s lives, and their own independence. Can they really afford to receive a warning or lose their vehicle? We also continue to offer opportunities for people to take up further education so they know how to avoid committing offences with vehicles.” Anyone with information about anti-social motorists in Newport is encouraged to phone police on 101 or 0845 0454545.

NEWS IN BRIEF

NEW SCHOOL FOR COWES ON TRACK

PCSO Lotte O’Sullivan and PC Matt Rowlands

‘WE WILL FIGHT ON’

THE FIGHT is continuing by frustrated Ryde residents to get a pathway near to their homes closed, even though the Town Council insist it is likely to stay open. A campaign has been going on for the past six months to get the walkway near Meaders Road shut, because of unruly behaviour by yobs to use it.

But at a public meeting of Ryde Town Council it was revealed that the walkway, which links Oakvale with Meaders Road would stay open. Residents have vented their anger at the decision saying they are inundated with drunken abuse as well as damage to their properties and cars. But IW Council Head of Planning Services

‘MOTH’ FINDS ITS LIGHT!

THE FUTURE of Gipsy Moth, one of the country’s most iconic yachts, has been safeguarded, and will stay on the Island at her current home with the UKSA. Gipsy Moth, famous for being the boat used by Sir Francis Chichester to make his solo round-theworld trip in 1966, has been sold to new British owners, and will be used by disadvantaged young people on the water. The yacht was bought by UKSA six years ago and she was refurbished after a fundraising campaign.

UKSA chief executive John Ely explained: “The restoration and round-the-world voyage completed again in 2007 changed the lives of many disadvantaged youngsters and restored a sad and decaying Gipsy Moth to a fine seaworthy condition. “This philanthropic purchase will ensure that the historic craft remains in UK waters and available

to the public and will based in Cowes under our ensure that she remains care, and look forward in a good seaworthy to working with her new owners to ensure that she is preserved as a piece of the nation’s marine heritage.” The new owners who are remaining anonymous, said they are delighted to be in a position to keep such a historic yacht available to public, and are pleased to be able to safeguard her future, condition. We are delighted that as well as keeping her the yacht will remain sailing.

BIKE STOLEN IN RYDE POLICE have released this picture of a limited edition bicycle reported stolen on the Island. The yellow and black Carrera TDF road racing bike was taken from a block of flats in Union Street in Ryde sometime between

3pm and 7pm on Saturday, October 23. Anyone with information is asked to contact PCSO Neil Harris at Ryde police station by phoning 101. Mini-Com users can call the police on 01962 875000.

Bill Murphy said: “The council is of the view that any alleged problems related to the footpath can be managed in ways that don’t require the closure of the path and this is the position that we have discussed with local residents and interested parties. “ While residents have pledged to fight the decision, Sergeant Andy Gill of the Ryde Safer Neighbourhoods team said: “We continue to work closely with partner agencies to find the best long-term solution to the problems highlighted with the footpath linking Meaders Road and Oakvale. Information has been passed to the local Council and Housing Association about how the closure of the new footpath could help to reduce crime. “Police are determined to keep crime levels low and maintain Oakfield as a safe place to live. The mindless actions of a few individuals will not be allowed to disrupt the quality of life for residents in an area that saw a reduction in crime last year. “We appreciate the support of the community, and I would encourage people to continue reporting crime and disorder to us so police can respond swiftly and effectively.”

WORK could soon be starting on a new secondary school for Cowes. The project was given the green after being unanimously approved by IW Councillors. The school will be built on the existing Crossfield Avenue site, and will virtually double the current capacity from 960 to 1650 students. The school will include an early-years facility, sports hall, internal and external performance spaces and kitchen for catering and teaching. It will also be powered by a biomass boiler and grass roof. Jonathon Russell, the school’s new Principle Designate, said: “You will see a phenomenally innovative building, a really inspirational place that when you walk through the doors, our learning ethos and a culture of aspiration and inspiration will be very clear. “We can open our doors and actually enhance the Island-wide provision in terms of education, because I’m hoping that we create that dynamic that our door is open and people come in and engage with us - even some of those people on the Island that when they cast their minds back to their schooling may not have had the best experience.”

WITNESSES SOUGHT AFTER ASSAULT

POLICE are still seeking witnesses after a report of an assault on a woman in Godshill. It is alleged a man and a woman were involved in a disturbance on the pavement in the School Road area of the village near Godshill Primary School at around 8am on Friday, October 8. A 26-year-old man from the Isle of Wight was arrested on October 12 on suspicion of assault by beating. He was taken to Newport police station for questioning, and later bailed until November 5, pending further enquiries. A Hampshire Constabulary spokesman said: “We would like to thank members of the public who have contacted the police so far to report their concerns. Officers have conducted a number of enquiries in the past few weeks and arrested a suspect. “We remain keen to hear from anyone else who thinks they may have witnessed an assault involving a man and a woman on the pavement in the School Road area of Godshill on the morning of October 8. This disturbance is alleged to have happened at around 8am when the main road through Godshill would have been busy with morning traffic.” Anyone with information is asked to contact Shanklin police station by phoning 101 or 0845 0454545.


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FEATURE

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The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

CLEAR GLIMPSE INTO RYD IT’S WONDERFUL to look at old photographs of towns on the Island to see how much they have changed over the years and the photographs of Ryde at the turn of the last century featured on these pages are no exception. It’s especially interesting to see a town like Ryde as the iconic buildings that grace her streets were then relatively new and many look little changed over the years. The building on the corner of Union Street and Cross Street is a particular case in point as the current owner Mike Ward has spent a considerable amount of money restoring the ‘Ward House’ to its former glory. Many will remember the building as Lloyds Bank and formerly it was a branch of Timothy Whites chemists. But when Mike took over the building for his financial consultancy company he set about restoring the lovely old façade and windows to the way they would have looked when it was built – a fact you can see from these photos. “I bought the buiding from Lloyds TSB in 2003 and putting it back to its Georgian roots cost around £180k, with £30k for the wood and glass shop front alone,” explained Mike who is the longest serving Independent Financial Advisor on the Island with over 30 years under his belt. The prime site has also been home to the Halifax Building Society, which was closed last week and is soon to house a new Yorkshire Building Society branch – and Mike is looking forward to meeting his new tenants. Mike is a well-known figure in Ryde and across the Island. He’s president of Ryde Inshore Rescue, Chair of Vectis Housing Association and has served as a local councillor in previous years. He has over 3,000 regular customers who come to him for his sound financial advice. Across the road from Ward House sits the traditional ladies and gents clothes shop Packs, and to enter

Mike Ward into the doors of this establishment is like going back in time to an age where service was of paramount importance and the customer was treated with reverence. The family business started its days as Culliford’s of Totland and the Guy family took over Packs of Ryde, becoming Pack and Culliford, in the fifties. The stairs still have the intertwined P and C in wrought iron beneath the handrails. Packs had been a shop in Ryde since 1845. The shop formerly occupied a large corner plot wrapped around Union Street and Lind Street, but moved to its current location in the late fifties. “This particular shop was called Woods and Wilkins,” said Mrs Barrow (nee Guy). “We had the shop on the opposite corner that is now

the opticians and the charity shop, and then I told my mother that we ought to buy this property when it came up for sale. “We also had number nine in the High Street that was Miss Pack’s.” This shop was one of the first ever ‘boutiques’ on the Island when it opened in the early seventies and was quite a daring move in its day. Pack’s are well known for their wedding dresses, occasion and party wear and in the time honoured fashion a chaise is situated across from the changing room so that the mother of the bride can watch her daughter emerge in her fairy tale dress and twirl in front of the full length mirror. “We started in wedding dresses after the war,” said Mrs Barrow who


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FEATURE

DE’S PAST AND PRESENT left school at 15 to join the family firm during the hostilities. “The first dress we made had to have small buttons all down the back and I have never wanted to see a covered button since,” she laughed as she remembered making each button by hand. “I had a girl who walked all the way from the church in Totland to the Church Hall for the reception for all the village people to see her,” she remembered fondly. “After my mother died the rest of the family wanted to give up the shop but I took it over. My customers are loyal to me because they get exactly what they want,” added Mrs Barrow who is still involved in all of the buying for the shop. Packs now occupy a fraction of the premises they once did in Ryde, although the Guy family still own much of the former shop’s freeholds. Take a look at these photos and see if you can recognise other buildings in Ryde. Some have gone altogether such as the church in Cross Street and the theatre that once occupied the spot where Nat West Bank now stands.

Mrs Barrow with senior sales staff at Packs


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VECTIS RADIO FEATURE

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The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

Vectis Radio: Finding the future of local radio!

Vectis Radio was set up with finding the future in mind: Nothing at all to do with a time machine, but to find new presenter talent. Although we have had incredible talent on the Island in the last few decades, we haven’t been looking forward to when we have all hung up our headphones. Too many have been looking after their own nest and put nothing back into the industry that has been kind to them. It’s not about ego’s or any one individual, it’s about safeguarding the future of local radio. Over the last few months Vectis Radio has launched a few broadcasting

dreams - people who never would never have been given the chance normally, but with such positivity. We launched The Headfunk Radio Show which was a revelation, then came along a 57 year old gas man with a dream and an amazing voice and now a 15 year old lad who has been a sidekick until recently with our sports show presenter. That presenter left us and George expressed an interest in carrying on the show. Now obviously there are rules about a 15 year old being left alone, so we found a new co-host for him in Simon Cooper, but it’s George who drives the show and has

Macca’s Moan

Driven anywhere recently? I bet if the answer is yes then it would have taken longer than anticipated; nobody wants to take take responsibillity. After a very busy Isle of Wight Phone-In on Vectis Radio, taking calls from irate drivers, we decided to investigate. The first port of call was the council. We were told that there was a lot going on at the moment and it was just one of those things. Then I made the point of saying that the Island roads were amazingly busy in

the summer holidays, so why so many roadworks during half term? We were told that it was nothing at all to do with the council because at least 2 of the sets of roadworks causing congestion were down to Southern Electric. My reply was “Doesn’t the council highways department have to sanction those roadworks? After all they can’t just go and dig up the road without the consent of the councils highways dept. Bad luck or bad management?

100% control of the desk. G e o r g e Steed came to us in July this year for work experience through Carisbrooke High school, and has progressed into a major asset for Vectis Radio. At 15 he must be the youngest host of a sports show in the UK. He

If it’s the latter, is the man making the decisions really worth in excess of £80,000 our taxes a year or could we do without him?

wouldn’t have got the chance elsewhere, but look at what happens when you give people a chance! George Steed, together with Simon Cooper, can be heard on Vectis Radio on Saturdays from 2pm.


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FEATURE

MONOPOLY HAS LANDED

PUPILS AT Oakfield Primary School were overjoyed to welcome the new Isle of Wight edition of the iconic Monopoly board this week and happily posed with their free copies of the game. Children from the school were the guests of honour at Osborne House as it was they who wrote to Mark Marriott, managing director at Monopoly, requesting that an Isle of Wight Monopoly Board was made. Not surprisingly the school was given their own location on the board – as one of the orange properties. Not one, but three launch events for the new Isle of Wight edition Monopoly board tumbled across the Island on Monday (November 1). First on the timetable was the press launch at ‘Mayfair’ or Osborne House in this instance as it is Queen Victoria’s family home that takes pride of place on the new Monopoly board’s prestigious location. The two top slots, Mayfair and Park Lane are taken by Osborne House and Carisbrooke Castle respectively and cost M400 each (that’s 400 Monopoly pounds). These jewels in the Island’s crown are two of English Heritage’s most visited properties in the country and came top in the poll that the Monopoly Company staged to find the most suitable locations to be included. Each ‘street’ on the board was taken by a location on the Island with many being associated with Island businesses. Some actually took the location too such as The Isle of Wight Festival which occupies what was Piccadilly. Town and Village estate agency took another of the yellow slots, with their location ‘Shanklin High Street’, and is accompanied by fellow yellow property East Dene, who hosted the lunch stop on the launch and took the ‘Bonchurch’ location. The Needles took what is arguably the trendiest slot on the board at ‘Angel Islington’ (cost M100) and the other two pale blue slots were taken by The Leafy Bean Café at ‘Falcon Cross Road, Shanklin’ (M100) and Alum Bay (M120). One of the utilities slots was taken by the Island’s only cable supplier Wight Cable and the other by Island Training. The four train stations were taken by three different modes of transport and Cowes Marina. The IW Steam Railway and Hovertravel took two further station slots with Wightlink taking the fourth location all at M200. Continued on page 25


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The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010


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FEATURE

HOVER’S PRIME SPOT

WITH ICONIC status around the world built up over the past 45 years, Hovertravel has now secured a prime position on the recently launched Island monopoly game. Hovertravel’s terminal at Ryde replaces the traditional station Liverpool Station and occupies one of only four transport squares on the board.

CUSTOMERS at the Leafy Bean in Shanklin were pleased to welcome the new IW Monopoly boards and keen to try them out after the avid campaign they waged to get their favourite café into the game. Owner Bob Robins was bowled over by the support his customers gave to the

online voting procedure put in place for people to suggest companies and places for inclusion on the board. “We had quite a lot of support,” said Bob modestly. “We had emails of support from abroad too, from Denmark, Switzerland, Singapore, Bankok, America and Canada.”

The café not only supply thirsty customers with excellent coffees and teas they also sell their coffee beans, ground coffee and loose tea over the internet. Now in their fifteenth year, the café is popular with locals and holiday-makers alike.

Neil Chapman, managing director at Hovertravel, added, “Monopoly is a great British invention just like our hovercraft so we are overjoyed to be associated with what must be the world’s greatest board game. Our staff, who are rightly proud of our international reputation, have all expressed an interest in buying this

version and we will be using several in competition and promotions over the coming months. I know that many people on the Island will be buying this version of the game for Christmas presents this year but I also strongly suspect that the Isle of Wight Monopoly game will also become a firm favourite around the globe.”


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The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

Continued from page 21 The IW Gazette and the County Press took Community Chest locations on the board. We were given the slot between ‘Old Kent Road’ that took on the new mantle of the Military Road and Brading featuring the Roman Villa, both at M60. An ideal location for us we thought – we can only go up from there! And we have a square that is frequently landed upon, featuring in every opening throw of the game. The centre of the board is a montage of photographs of the Island in a diamond shape with the ‘Go’ square at the top. The Island at night features to the top

of this clever collection of photos designed by Natasha Malik at Monopoly, with the Longstone to the left, Cowes fireworks in the top centre and a large Dinosaur to the right. The Island during the day features on the bottom of the montage and includes walkers on Tennyson Down, a hovercraft, two divers, Godshill’s cute thatched cottages and the Needles. Pride of place to the far right is the new Metropole building on Ventnor’s seafront and a sweeping view of Ventnor’s beachfront. Next stop on the Monopoly launch Roadshow was the lovely East Dene House - a children’s holiday centre and wedding and party venue.

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Invited guests were offered Champagne and orange juice as they entered through the heavy oak door. Walking through to the stunning wood paneled room that stretches the width of the house with bay windows overlooking the sea, boards were laid out on tables for all to see. East Dene donated a bottle of special fizz for the launch ceremony on the lawn where Mark Marriott became a Formula One racing car driver (as portrayed in one of the die cast player pieces in the game) and shook the bottle before opening it in a cascade of bubbles and Champagne. Posing with an enormous copy of the board on the lawn were all of the invited guests

along with representatives from Monopoly. Teachers from Oakfield School invited everyone to sign ‘their’ squares on two Monopoly boards that are to be auctioned to raise funds for the school. After this guests tucked into a spread of honey roast ham, succulent chicken pieces, home made samosas, deep fried potato wedges, mini lamb and veggie burgers, spicy sausage pieces and other savoury delights accompanied by tomatoes and salad bits. All the ingredients had been sourced from Island producers where possible. White and milk chocolate mini cheesecakes followed the buffet with an

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eye-catching fruit salad platter and Isle of Wight cheeseboard and fresh coffee to complete the meal. Unfortunately the Monopoly representatives were running late and in a rush to get to Oakfield School to present all of the children with a free copy of the new board and missed the end of the meal. “It’s fantastic!” said Steve Gascoigne of Available Light Photography who provided many of the images for the board and whose son Ewan (3) was playing with the board at the lunchtime reception with Steve and mum Sharon - a new Monopoly player in the making. Lastly on the whistle stop tour around the Island was

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Monopoly’s final port of call at Oakfield Primary School in Ryde. Here copies of the board were given to each child who was involved in the project as they left to go home. “A big thanks to the thirty or so landmarks on the board. Without these attractions the board would not have been produced,” said Graham Barnes for Monopoly Plc. “Also a big thanks to the great Isle of Wight public. Without their suggestions and support, again we could not have put together this Monopoly board and of course to the children of Oakfield Primary School for suggesting the idea in the first place.”


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The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

Shereleagh Jones – Finance Manager, Andy Chubb – Networks Manager, Jacqueline Berry – Customer Operations Manager, Karen Critchley – PA and Deputy to the Chief Executive

WIGHTCABLE PROVIDES UTILITY FOR MONOPOLY

SITTING on one of the two utility company slots on the Monopoly board is Wightcable who are based in Cowes. Many people on the Island are not aware that they have their very own telecommunications company called Wightcable on their doorstep who are the only single supplier of Telephone, Broadband and Cable TV. Your location will depend upon what service they can offer you. “High quality customer service is of great importance to us – we do not believe in an automated answering service, you deal with real people,” said Karen Critchley of Wightcable. “We

do not outsource customer service or technical support, which a lot of our competitors do. “It’s very important that we support our local community and charities. An ongoing donation to the Earl Mountbatten Hospice is sent regularly. We now sponsor Cowes based charity and leading maritime training provider UKSA, providing Free Telephone and Broadband services 24/7 through a new fibre optic cable installation for two years. This will enhance the training, personal development and learning opportunities provided by UKSA. “Not only do we service

the residential sector of the island we also provide service to Island Businesses. We are very proud in providing Hosted VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) to Island Businesses – a revolutionary technology. “If you’ve never heard of VoIP, it is a method for taking ‘analog’ audio signals, like the kind you hear when you talk on the phone, and turning them into digital data that can be transmitted over the internet. “If you would like to find out more about what Wightcable can offer you, please visit www.wightcable.com or phone freephone 0800 785 1000.”


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LEARNING CENTRE CLOSE TO FREE PARKING

CARE LEARNING CENTRE secured the Monks Brook, Newport location on the Monopoly board, right next to free parking and the red colour cleverly matched their red and white logo. Throughout the Isle of Wight and the South region,

Care Learning Centre has become the market leader for the delivery of Apprenticeships to Health and Social Care employers. CLC has gained an enviable reputation as the flexible, responsive and supportive training provider for the

Health and Social Care sector. Care Learning Centre started nine years ago, employing four Island staff members and training 60 learners on the Isle of Wight. Nine years on, CLC employ 43 staff members

throughout the South and are providing training to over 750 learners throughout the South region. During CLC’s Ofsted inspection in January 2010, it was recognised that learners and employers needs are met particularly

well through well designed and innovative learning programmes. Claire Turner, Managing Director of CLC said, ”CLCs ongoing growth and expansion is very exciting. The CLC staff team is passionate about developing

the skills and knowledge of learners, which has resulted in over 96 per cent of learners successfully achieving their Apprenticeship / NVQ programmes - we now have one of the highest learner success rates in the country.”


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The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

SPOOKTACULAR HALLOW IT WAS A bewitching weekend for Islanders last weekend when all manner of weird and wonderful creatures hit the streets and pubs and clubs to celebrate Halloween or All Hallow’s Eve. Halloween is fast becoming as popular a festival as it is in the States where ‘trick or treating’ has been the annual October 31 pastime for many years. These photos are from around the Island – a party and trick or treating in East Cowes, the Balcony night club in Ryde and even Hovertravel staff at Ryde took the opportunity to dress up. At the award winning IW Steam Railway at Havenstreet trains had been dressed as pumpkins and a special spooktacular magic show was staged by David Randini. Staff made the effort to don fancy dress and gave out free spooky gift bags. Later on Saturday evening Ryde Balcony nightclub had ‘The Boiler Room Halloween Gathering’ and clubbers got into the spooky mood with guests the Shanklin Freakshow. Many people heeded warnings issued earlier in the week by Island police not to cause distress or carry out acts of anti-social behaviour on their neighbours. The Gazette caught up with one organiser of a private Halloween party attended by over thirty children in East Cowes that was jam packed with skeletons,

devils, bats and even a werewolf attended the bash. The youngsters, ranged between four and eighty-eight, enjoyed a range of activities including apple bobbing, guess the number of pumpkin seeds and a pre-arranged trick or treating route organised with their neighbours. Organiser known as Sandra the Witch said, “The Halloween party was a great success. All the

children had a ghoulish time with lots of shrieking and spooking.” Island police bosses went off with no major incidences. They admitted being called to a number of anti-social behaviour incidents but officers reported being pleased with the outcome of the weekend that traditionally sees a rise in the number of reported disturbances. The number of calls received by Hampshire Constabulary’s

control room this Halloween dropped compared to last year. Over the Halloween weekend this year (Friday October 29, to Sunday October 31, 2010), 5,479 non-emergency calls were made to 101 and 0845 045 45 45. During last year’s festivities across the same time period (Thursday, October 29 to Saturday October 31, 2009) 6,386 calls were made to 101 and 0845. The number of calls to 101 and 0845 during this year’s Halloween dropped by 907 compared to last year, a reduction of 14 per cent. A total of 2,598 calls were also made to 999 during this year’s Halloween weekend. During the run up to Halloween, Hampshire Constabulary distributed thousands of ‘No trick or treat’ posters to vulnerable and elderly residents for them to display by their front doors to deter unwanted visitors. Local shops were also encouraged to display posters stating that they would not be selling eggs or flour to anyone under the age of 18 in the week before Halloween. The ‘No trick or treat’ poster, which was available in the previous edition of The Gazette as well as from the Hampshire Constabulary web pages proved hugely successful, said a police spokesman.


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WEEN PROVES A TREAT


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SPOOKY SPECIAL AT THE ZOO

WHERE WOULD you go for a paranormal investigation on the eve of Halloween? Carisbrooke Castle? Appuldurcombe House? Osborne House? Quarr Abbey? Wrong, wrong, wrong and wrong – it would be the Isle of Wight Zoo, if you joined the special spooky search organised by VIP (Vectis Investigations Paranormal) on the night of October 30/31. But it was a strangely suitable location. Firstly walking in the dark through a zoo is scary enough and arriving at the large bonfire outside the ‘cave’ gave a spooky safari air to the whole experience. Leading us over towards the enclosures, Zoo owner Charlotte Corney called to her majestic tigers by name and they came loping over to make an investigation of their own. “What were all these strange humans doing in their neighbourhood after dark and why were they

BY JO MACAULAY flashing lights in our eyes?” To see the big cats come to Charlotte’s call was most endearing, as well as exciting, as she told us that she had known them all since they were tiny cubs and had even hand reared some of them. Inspection over and the cats lumbered off into the darkness as the group of sixteen were led into the cave to sit at a long table bedecked with spooky skulls, flashing orb lights and Halloween themed candles – all very atmospheric. A three-course meal, which included the choice of sausage hot pot or vegetarian lasagna, was accompanied by a film made by the VIP team about their exploits and a discussion about our personal brushes with the paranormal. In discussions it transpired that two ‘believers’, who

had brought their ‘doubting’ partners with them, flanked me at the table. The lady to my left did not see a conflict between her paranormal beliefs and her Christian faith, although I wondered if her fellow parishioners would agree. At the head of the table a well seasoned paranormal sympathizer and alternative practitioner was dressed as a witch – and had even brought her own pendulum, which many use to ‘sense’ a visiting spirit. Names of those on the adventure I will not reveal, suffice to say that some preferred to remain anonymous. The paranormal topic often opens a floodgate of unsympathetic responses. After eating the hearty home cooked meal we were led to the remains of the old fort that surrounds the zoo. Palmerston built this in around 1830 to ward off invasion by the French. Much of the original building has been lost but the large room we entered had housed two large guns. It had been reported that a young boy had been ‘sliced in half’ accidently when one of these guns was being moved. Into the candlelit room and the bewitching began. A sensor across a door area was triggered and Linda from the VIP team could sense a presence in the side room housing the PLUTO (Pipe Line Under The Ocean) pump that had pumped fuel to France during the war. Apparently the spirit that had been encountered was of a man who had drowned

accidentally at sea, according to Paul from VIP. “There is also the spirit of a woman here but he cannot communicate with her,” he added. One of the guests later reported being overcome by the spirit of a young boy – an experience that she found very upsetting. Trigger items had been placed in front of one of the old gun emplacements to see if the spirits might move them and a computer that played white noise that could pick up spirit communications if you listened hard enough. I could make out the words “Help Me”, but it could have just been an aural aberration. Later two séance style tables were used to try and communicate with the spirits but by this time I was beginning to wilt, although to the question “When did you die?” it replied “1967” – quite a contemporary ghost I

thought. Leaving at around midnight I later heard that the party formed a ring and the spirits had pushed people who chose to stand in the middle. Spirits had also pushed one of the VIP team off of a chair. My feeling for the spirits, if there were any, was that they perhaps ought to be either left in peace or allowed to make their way onwards. But it made for an very different way to spend a Saturday night and at a very reasonable £20 per person a sizeable donation towards the building of new enclosures for the big cats in the Zoo was raised – the VIP team donated their services for free to the zoo in return for allowing them to stage the event. Charlotte Corney said: “On the way out we asked everyone and they said they’d like to do it again and

it’s good that the evening stretched over the bewitching hour of midnight. “When we were stood in a ring toward the end of the evening my colleague Sonia and I had our backs to the Pluto room and the door opened and shut twice and there were no other doors open to cause a draught. Sonia and I looked at each other and laughed. “It was a huge success. Some people had more intense experiences than others and I certainly feel a little bit more uncomfortable about being around the fort late at night, especially as the nights are drawing in. “One man said that he was happy to do a sponsored sleep over at the fort to raise more money for the tiger’s enclosure because he was such a skeptic, which was very generous of him, but I don’t think I’d want to.”


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ENTERTAINMENT

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The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

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ENTERTAINMENT

DESPICABLE ME 3-D (U) (10.30am, 2.20 Saturday - Sunday only), 4.40, (7.00pm except Thursday) Steve Carell provides the voice of the world’s greatest super-villain in a great new animated 3D comedy.

CONCERT PERFORMANCE BON JOVI - THE CIRCLE TOUR (PG) - greatest hits tour recorded LIVE from New Jersey (8.00pm Thursday only) Legendary rock band Bon Jovi’s The Circle tour has been one of 2010’s most lavish and talked about in history and now exclusively cinema-goers can taste something of the excitement of a live Bon Jovi gig with the release of the Circle Tour movie for one show and on one night only.

SHOWING 5-11TH NOVEMEMBER JACKASS 3-D (18) (12.20, 2.40 Saturday - Sunday only), 5.00, 7.20, (9.00 except Thursday), 9.40pm The Jackass gang are back and this time they’re taking stupid to a whole new level! Johnny Knoxville and his band of maniacs raise the stakes higher than ever before in this outrageous collection of stunts and pranks. DUE DATE (15) (11.50am, 2.10 Saturday - Sunday only), 4.30, 6.50, 9.10pm Robert Downey Jr and Zach Galifianakis star in this wild comedy road-trip about the mishaps befalling a guy trying to get home before his wife gives birth. LET ME IN (15) (1.00 Saturday Sunday only), 3.45, 6.30, 9.15pm A haunting and provocative vampire thriller with a difference from the acclaimed director of ‘Cloverfield’. SAW 3-D (18) 3.00, 5.05, 7.15, 9.30pm Prepare to cover your eyes as yet more elaborate games of carnage are unleashed in the final ‘SAW’ instalment – this time in heart-pounding 3D! BURKE & HARE (15) (1.40 Saturday - Sunday only), 4.00, 6.25, 8.50pm Simon Pegg and Andy Serkis star in a black comedy based on the gruesome exploits of the notorious Edinburgh body-snatchers. THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT (15) 3.50, 6.10, 8.30pm Julianne Moore, Annette Bening

Café

Quay Arts Gourmet Christmas DESPICABLE ME (U) (11.00am, Evenings: Thu Nov 18, Fri 19 1.20 Saturday - Sunday only), Nov, Thu Dec 2, Tue Dec 14, Wed and Mark Ruffalo head the cast 3.40pm Dec 15 from 6.30pm in the Café in this charming comedy about a Bar. Steve Carell provides the voice of lovably unconventional family. the world’s greatest super-villain in a PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2 great new animated comedy. (15) (12.10, 2.30 Saturday - Sunday THE SOCIAL NETWORK (12A) only), 4.50, 7.10, 9.20pm 6.00, 8.40pm It’s terror by night once more in The amazing true story of the the much-anticipated sequel to last computer nerd who came up with year’s surprise box office smash. the idea for Facebook while still a LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS student - and found 500 million new - THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE friends! Kids 3-D(PG) (10.35am, 12.50pm Sa-Su VAMPIRES SUCK (12A) (12.00, Kids’ Art in the Galleries (age only) 2.15 Saturday - Sunday only), 4.20, 8 yrs+) @ Quay Arts: Saturday A brave young owl must embark on 6.20pm Nov 6 and Nov 9 and 30, 10am the journey of a lifetime to save the - 12noon The latest in the popular comedy Quilt Art at 25 - Patchwork Maps owl kingdoms in this animated 3D spoof series sinks its teeth into Explore imaginary worlds made fantasy adventure. vampire-themed teen movies. from made from fabric and paper LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS with Jo Hummel-Newell. TOY STORY 3 (U) (11.15am - THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) (11.10am, 1.30pm Saturday - Saturday - Sunday only) Visual Arts Sunday only) The West Gallery: Quilt Art at 25 Old friends and new faces as Andy’s Sat Oct 23 - Sat Nov 27, 2010 A brave young owl must embark toys find themselves in a brand new The exhibition and accomon the journey of a lifetime to save home. panying book ‘Quilt Art at 25’ the owl kingdoms in this animated celebrates the silver anniversary fantasy adventure. MOVIES FOR of Quilt Art, whose 20 members JUNIORS (£1 PER come from all over Europe. ALPHA AND OMEGA 3-D (U) Formed in 1985 to achieve TICKET) (10.25am, 12.20pm Sa-Su only) wider recognition of the quilt as G-FORCE (PG) (10.00am an art form, the group strives Two mismatched wolves embark to maintain excellence in on an incredible journey in this Saturday only) expression and workmanship. animated 3D family adventure. An elite team of highly-trained RED (12A) (12.40 Saturday - guinea pigs is dispatched to scupper The Rope Store Gallery: Stuconil a billionaire’s wicked plans for world Sat Oct 16 – Sat Nov 20 Sunday only), 3.10, 5.40, 8.10pm Stuconil showcases the work domination. of Island based printmakers Bruce Willis heads an all-star cast THE PRINCESS AND THE Tabitha Fedden, Karen Mead - including Helen Mirren! - in this FROG (U) (10.00am Saturday only) and Ian Whitmore. Linked by explosive action comedy. the medium of linocut, their The classic fairytale romance is individual EASY A (15) 8.20pm and contrasting retold in this magical animated approaches explore identity and A clean-cut student finds a little musical from Walt Disney. the natural world and highlight white lie enhances her social standing the versatility of print. CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE in this smart high school comedy. OF MEATBALLS (U) (10.00am Learning Curve Young People’s RAMONA AND BEEZUS (U) Saturday only) Gallery: Clatterford Tuition (10.40am Sa-Su only) Centre Sat Nov 13 – Sat Dec 11 A young inventor bites of more This exhibition celebrates a The adventures of an extraordinary than he can chew when he creates a year-long project, funded by young girl are brought to life in this fantastical food-making machine. the enquire programme, during heart-warming tale based on the much-loved ‘Ramona’ stories by Beverly Cleary.

which Artist Educators Tim Johnson and Chris Jenkins have facilitated gallery visits and worked on exhibitionrelated themes with the pupils. Clatterford and Thompson House Tuition Centres in Newport give support to children who, for a variety of reasons, are unable to attend school.

Live Events

Literature: Poetry & Music Open Mic Thursday Nov 11, 7.30pm The chance to share poetry and music with an appreciative audience or simply listen over a glass of wine or cup of coffee, All poets and musicians welcome. Dance: Stop Gap Dance Company Thursday November 18 at 8pm doors 7pm StopGAP’s performances have inspired audiences across Europe; with dazzling moves and exciting story-lines, audiences will be thrilled by the drama that will unfold. The evening will also feature a performance by The Hot Green Bus Dance Company, from Isle of Wight College.

CONTACT DETAILS

Bookings Box Office: 822490 www.quayarts.org info@ quayarts.org Steve Ross Foundation for the Arts is the charity which runs Quay Arts (Charity Number: 272007).Quay Arts Trading is the arm that supports the Foundation. All money raised through the Cafe, Craft Shop and Conferencing goes to support the aims and objectives of the charity

GIG AT THE STUDIO

THE STUDIO

with The Beat I.O.W website and Headfunk they will present four Friday November 5 at top bands, with the bands being 8.30pm till Saturday recorded live for The Headfunk November 6 at 2am Radio show on Vectis Radio Doors open at 8.30 and the Tonight The Studio in Newport (which is under new order of play is: management) launches their first 9pm Esther & Jamie band showcase featuring the best 10pm Meet the Public new bands on the Island plus 11pm Golden Strands special guests. 12 pm Paper Romance Once a month, in conjunction


36

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ENTERTAINMENT

www.iwgazette.co.uk

The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010


The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

Contact the Gazette for News and Advertising: 01983 898340

MARK KING TO STAR IN PRINCE’S ROCK GALA ISLAND music maestro Mark King will be joining a host of international stars performing at the Prince’s Trust Rock Gala at the Royal Albert Hall in London, on Wednesday, November 17. Mark, lead singer and guitarist in the world renowned band Level 42, will be playing bass in the ‘house band’ that will also include the likes of Midge Ure, Eric Clapton, Phil Collins and Jools Holland. Mark, who along with his fellow Level 42 members, has just completed a successful tour of the UK, and is now relishing the Trust event. He said: “There are so many guests, it promises to be a fantastic evening. Having just finished the UK tour, this will be the last performance before Christmas, and I am really looking forward to it, as well as helping raise money for such a worthwhile cause.

“After the concert hopefully I can put my few up for a few weeks, or even get in a few games of golf!” Also on the star-studded line up a the Royal Albert Hall are Tom Chaplin, Jamie Cullum, Paloma Faith, Tom Jones, Queen’s Brian May and Roger Taylor, Mike & the Mechanics, Alison Moyet, Paolo Nutini and Status Quo. The evening will be hosted by the best in comedy, multi-award winning actor and comedian Rob Brydon and Barry Humphries as his hilarious alter ego Dame Edna Everage. The Prince’s Trust raises money to help youngsters nationwide. Around one in five young people in the UK are not in work, education or training. Youth unemployment costs the UK economy £10 million a day in lost productivity, while youth crime costs £1 billion every year.

The Prince’s Trust addresses this problem by giving practical and financial support to the young people who need it

most. They help develop key skills, confidence and motivation, enabling young people to move into work, education or training.

www.iwgazette.co.uk

37

ENTERTAINMENT DO YOU HAVE NEWS FOR US? Send your news and pictures to us at newsdesk@iwgazette.co.uk or call our 24hr News Hotline on 01983 898349


38

JOBS FEATURE

Contact the Gazette for News and Advertising: 01983 898340

www.iwgazette.co.uk

The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

FIND YOUR WAY BACK TO WORK WITH JOBCENTRE PLUS

PART OF THE DEPARTMENT FOR WORK AND PENSIONS Carer JOB TITLE

LOCATION

Early Morning Cleaner JOB TITLE

LOCATION East Cowes

Ryde

DESCRIPTION

Duties will include all aspects of caring for the elderly. Previous experience in a similar position is essential. Successful applicants are required to provide an enhanced disclosure. Disclosure expense will be met by employer.

WAGES Wage = £6 - £6.10 per hr. 25-30 hrs per week – days, evenings and weekends.

DURATION Permanent

JOB CENTRE PLUS REFERENCE NUMBER. HOW TO APPLY

RFM/6772 - Visit www.direct.gov.uk or call 01983 273747 to speak to an adviser quoting the reference number.

DURATION Permanent

JOB CENTRE PLUS REFERENCE NUMBER. HOW TO APPLY

NIW/11331 - Visit www.direct.gov.uk or call 01983 273747 to speak to an adviser quoting the reference number

You should have excellent customer service and communication skills, with a good knowledge of food hygiene practices and food preparation. Candidate will need to be able to work weekends. You will be required to cook and prepare meals, process paperwork and other documentation accurately, keep your line manager up to date with issues, adhere to company policies and procedures when dealing with cash handling, food safety, stock procedures and maintain a clean and tidy work area. Where the need arises you will make the most of sales opportunities for your hotel and assist in other departments.

DESCRIPTION

LOCATION East Cowes

Ryde

DESCRIPTION

DESCRIPTION Previous experience is preferred. Duties include cleaning of retail outlet, to include sweeping, vacuuming and all aspects of cleaning as required.

WAGES Wage meets national minimum wage. 4 plus hours per week – Mon – Sun days and evenings.

DESCRIPTION

Newport

Time Cleaner JOBLunch TITLE

Cleaner JOB TITLE

LOCATION

LOCATION

Experience preferred but not essential as full training will be given, duties involve cleaning in a retail environment working early mornings for approx 2 hours a day covering 6 out of 7 days a week. Paid holidays and uniform included.

£7 WAGES per hr Mon – Sat. £9 per hr – Sun. 6 out of 7 days. Mon- Sat 6am-8am, Sun 8am - 10am.

Breakfast Chef JOB TITLE (Bar/Café team member)

DURATION Permanent

JOB CENTRE PLUS REFERENCE NUMBER. HOW TO APPLY

RFM/6707 - Visit www.direct.gov.uk or call 01983 273747 to speak to an adviser quoting the reference number.

Experience preferred but not essential as full training will be given, duties involve cleaning in a retail environment working during the lunch time period for approx 2 hours a day covering Mondays to Saturdays. Paid holidays and uniform included.

WAGES £7 per hr. Mon – Sat 12noon -2pm

DURATION Permanent

JOB CENTRE PLUS REFERENCE NUMBER. HOW TO APPLY

NIW/11332 - Visit www.direct.gov.uk or call 01983 273747 to speak to an adviser quoting the reference number.

Meets National Minimum Wage. WAGES 15-20 hours per week 3/4 mornings Hours will be 6.30 - 11.30am weekdays and 7.30am - 12.30pm weekends.

DURATION Permanent

NIW/11421 - Visit www.direct.gov.uk or call 01983 273747 to speak to an adviser quoting the reference number.

JOB CENTRE PLUS REFERENCE NUMBER. HOW TO APPLY


The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

Sales Executive JOB TITLE

LOCATION

Newport

DESCRIPTION

There are a range of excellent opportunities available to suit hard working and target motivated people where meeting target equals financial reward. We offer an attractive basic salary and a competitive bonus and commission structure to motivate and reward staff and high achievers.We encourage a high performance culture in the field with our sales teams responsible for representing the ‘face’ of the Company to the public and promoting the brand.

WAGES

£11,500 - £17,500 per annum. 40hrs per week Mon – Fri, days and evenings.

DURATION Permanent

JOB CENTRE PLUS REFERENCE NUMBER. HOW TO APPLY

NIW/11409 - Visit www.direct.gov.uk or call 01983 273747 to speak to an adviser quoting the reference number.

Chef/Kitchen JOB TITLE Manager

LOCATION

Sandown

DESCRIPTION

Must have catering qualifications and current food and hygiene certificate. Essential organisation, and menu planning skills. Able to work as a team member, a good sense of humour and be flexible with working hours for holidays and sickness. Duties involve cooking to a high standard and paying particular attention to presentation of meals and portions sizes.

WAGES

Wage negotiable depending on experience. 30 hrs per week. 5 days from 7. Between 7am – 2pm flexible.

DURATION Permanent

JOB CENTRE PLUS REFERENCE NUMBER. HOW TO APPLY

RFM/6755 - Visit www.direct.gov.uk or call 01983 273747 to speak to an adviser quoting the reference number.

Representative JOBSales TITLE

LOCATION Islandwide

DESCRIPTION

This is a self-employed vacancy. Previous sales experience an advantage but not essential. Must have full driving licence and your own car. Full training will be given. Must have excellent customer service skills and be of smart appearance. Duties are calling at potential customer’s premises and discussing products face to face and maximising sales.

WAGES Commission Only. OTE £25,000 to £30,000. Full Time Hours

DURATION Permanent

JOB CENTRE PLUS REFERENCE NUMBER. HOW TO APPLY

RFM/6763 - Visit www.direct.gov.uk or call 01983 273747 to speak to an adviser quoting the reference number.

Contact the Gazette for News and Advertising: 01983 898340

Sales Person JOB TITLE

LOCATION Islandwide

DESCRIPTION

WAGES

DURATION Permanent

JOB CENTRE PLUS REFERENCE NUMBER. HOW TO APPLY

NIW/11452 - Visit www.direct.gov.uk or call 01983 273747 to speak to an adviser quoting the reference number.

Care/Support JOB TITLE Worker

LOCATION Islandwide

DESCRIPTION

Must have access to a vehicle and a full driving licence is essential. Previous experience is not required as full training will be given. You will be required to care and support vulnerable people in their own homes in the community, duties include shopping, housework and any other related tasks to support the care for the vulnerable. Two references will be required.

WAGES

£6.20 to £7.74 per hr depending on experience. Various hrs available to suit applicants – full and part time.

DURATION Permanent

JOB CENTRE PLUS REFERENCE NUMBER. HOW TO APPLY

RFM/6628 - Visit www.direct.gov.uk or call 01983 273747 to speak to an adviser quoting the reference number.

JOBDispensary TITLE Assistant LOCATION

Shanklin

DESCRIPTION

Applicants must have dispensary experience, and be able to work on your own, or as part of a team. Must possess excellent customer service skills. Duties will include dispensing items, using the computer to produce medication labels and order stock, checking and putting away deliveries, answering the telephone, and keeping the dispensary clean and tidy.

WAGES £6 per hr. 16hrs per week. Tues and Thurs 9am – 6pm.

DURATION Permanent

JOB CENTRE PLUS REFERENCE NUMBER. HOW TO APPLY

RFM/6666 - Visit www.direct.gov.uk or call 01983 273747 to speak to an adviser quoting the reference number

39

JOBS FEATURE

Canvasser/Collection Agent/ JOB TITLE Team Leader/Manager

LOCATION

This is a self employed vacancy. You will sell a wide range of low cost Website Design and Hosting products to local businesses and the self-employed. Applicants must have a car and telephone. We offer a Jargon Free service so no previous experience of websites or computers is needed. Full training will be given on our products and services.

This is a self employed vacancy Commission Only OTE 30,000. 40 hours per week Monday to Friday

www.iwgazette.co.uk

Newport

DESCRIPTION

This is a self employed vacancy. Must have previous experience in canvassing, not telesales. Own transport would be an advantage but not essential. Duties include canvassing within shows, shops, offices, within a public environment and any other tasks as required.

£10WAGES to £15 per hour. 6+ hours per week flexible to suit applicant, between 10am and 7pm.

Employer states DURATION that the position can be permanent or temporary.

JOB CENTRE PLUS REFERENCE NUMBER. HOW TO APPLY

NIW/11152- Visit www.direct.gov.uk or call 01983 273747 to speak to an adviser quoting the reference number.

JOB TITLE

Trainee Sales Representative

LOCATION

Ryde

DESCRIPTION

Trainee Sales Rep required with OTE of 30,000. Applicants must be positive, enthusiastic and self motivated with good communication skills. Duties include marketing, pricing and selling a full range of home improvements including block driveways, security alarms and CCTV, GRP flat roofs, fascias and guttering. No previous experience needed as full training will be provided. High Quality, qualified appointments supplied. Applicants must have own car and mobile phone.

WAGES

DURATION

Self Employment. Hours are over 5 days.

Permanent

JOB CENTRE PLUS REFERENCE NUMBER. HOW TO APPLY

RFM/6766 - Visit www.direct.gov.uk or call 01983 273747 to speak to an adviser quoting the reference number.

Care Assistant JOB TITLE

LOCATION

Sandown

DESCRIPTION

Experienced carers to cover various shifts day and night and weekends, assisting with delivering care to clients with advanced dementia. Must have experience and NVQ2. Must be committed and flexible in approach to work and be able to work as a team member. Successful applicants are required to provide an enhanced disclosure. Disclosure expense will be met by employer.

WAGES

Negotiable wage depending on experience. 25 hrs + per week over 7 days. Days , evenings and weekends

DURATION Permanent

JOB CENTRE PLUS REFERENCE NUMBER. HOW TO APPLY

RFM/6756 - Visit www.direct.gov.uk or call 01983 273747 to speak to an adviser quoting the reference number


40

NEWS

Contact the Gazette for News and Advertising: 01983 898340

www.iwgazette.co.uk

The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

SCARECROW FESTIVAL IS A REAL AWARD WINNER

ORGANISERS of the inaugural Chillerton and Gatcombe Scarecrow Festival had good reason to crow last week. The hugely successful event was awarded Tourism South East’s highest accolade at its Beautiful South Awards for Excellence. Doug Barber, who organised the festival with neighbour, Felicity Farnham, was presented with a gold award in the Access for All category by guest host, Nicholas Owen, at a glittering ceremony at Mercedes-Benz World, Woking. Doug said: “This was just something we wanted to do for the parish - we never dreamt it would go on to win such a prestigious award. When they announced we were the winners my wife shouted out “No!” in disbelief.” Doug, who lives in Chillerton with wife, Sue,

put forward the idea of a scarecrow festival after an article appeared in the village newsletter asking for bright ideas for a new community event. It sparked a tremendous response from the parish with almost 100 scarecrows on display in residents’ gardens and driveways,

on the village green and at Chillerton Primary School. Many of them were modelled on famous characters, including Michael Jackson, Dr Who, Dolly Parton and Wind in the Willows. The wonderful creations attracted hundreds of visitors to the parish.

Doug added: “After next year’s festival I think we’ll make it a bi-annual event, otherwise I think it could run out of steam. “We have some good ideas for next year.” The village will now go through to the ‘National Finals’, which are to be held next April in Birmingham.


The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

Contact the Gazette for News and Advertising: 01983 898340

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41

NEWS

TURNING BACK THE CLOCKS RIDING OUT FOR CHARITY FOR VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS

THEY are turning back the clocks for Christmas at Osborne House, starting later this month. Decorated bonbons, gilded walnuts, gifts of lockets for ladies and gold waistcoat buttons for gentlemen, were all an integral part of Christmas at Royal Osborne when Queen Victoria was in residence. From Wednesday November 17, themed guided tours turn the clocks back over 100 years to show how the festive season was marked – above and below stairs - at Queen Victoria’s favourite home, beautifully dressed in the seasonal style she loved. The queen spent almost all of her Christmases at Osborne following Prince Albert’s early death in 1861, until her last Christmas in 1900 – she died at Osborne soon afterwards on 22 January 1901. It was customary for trees to be lit when presents were exchanged on Christmas

Eve and relit on Christmas Day. Gifts were graded according to the rank and station of the recipients – labourers received meat or plum pudding while their wives were given blankets or flannel petticoats! Dorothy Blake, a daughter of Queen Victoria’s land agent, attended a family

all the presents, so that she kept herself the centre of the whole thing in the brilliantly lighted drawing room with its cheer and happy, simple pleasure. It really was a wonderful sight.” Some of the personal presents given to Queen Victoria will be on display. Tours take in the ground floor rooms and last around an hour. They can be combined with a stroll on Osborne’s terraces and lunch in the waiter-service Terrace Restaurant. An exhibition, shop and café in the Petty Officers Quarter’s are also open. Normal admission prices apply for guided tours: Adult: £10.90; Concession: £9.30; Child: £5.50: Family ticket £27.30 - group discounts available). Guided Victorian Christmas tours take place from 10am-4pm on Wednesdays to Sundays from November 17 to January 2 (except Nov 20/21, Dec 24-26 and January 1).

“Every present that was given to every child had to be shown to “Gan Gan” – the Queen.” Christmas party. She remembered: “… the Queen sat in her cosy armchair in her widow’s dress and white bonnet and stiff black silk frock, and she was the centre of everything. “Every present that was given to every child had to be shown to “Gan Gan” – the Queen – and there was a constant running to and fro to her chair to show her

AT A RECENT ride out of local Island scooter enthusiasts a grand total of £385 was raised in aid of the Earl Mountbatten Hospice. The event included a photo shoot, snacks, a raffle with 15 prizes donated by local Ventnor businesses and a freebie sixties smoothie soul session provided by ‘Taff’. The £385 raised brings the total raised by Graham and Sue Perks and their customers at Perks’s, in Ventnor High Street to over £1,100 in less than a year since this new traditional lounge and wine bar opened in December last year. “A special thanks should go to the Wight Wasps, who

made a separate collection before setting off from Ryde as well as the Ventnor lads and lasses who put the show on the road, so to speak,” said Graham. Graham and Sue also presented a cheque for £600 to the Breast Cancer Campaign, which had been

FANCY A FINE view of the sea from a beautiful house overlooking the sea to live in for the winter months? We have rooms to rent ranging from £70 to £85 per week and all have a stunning view of the seafront. Prices include council tax and some facility charges. Two have central heating,

three have electric fires and one has an open fire and most can be let furnished or unfurnished. Top floor could be let as a separate apartment with two rooms, bathroom and large landing but is unsuitable for children. Three further rooms could be let as a two-bedroom apartment

raised previously. Graham said it was nice to be back in the driving seat of his own establishment, after leaving the Ventnor Winter Gardens last October and just seeing a nice crowd of people having a good time and raising money for such a worthwhile cause.

YOUR ROOM WITH A VIEW

with lounge (with open fire). All guests share the kitchen, which has range cooker, dishwasher, fridge and freezer. Available from November 2010 until April 2011. Sorry but we are unable to take those on housing benefit or pets. Call: 01983 855466 or 07973 365556


42

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The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010


The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

Contact the Gazette for News and Advertising: 01983 898340

www.iwgazette.co.uk

43

FEATURE

TAKE AN AUTUMN HOBBY

AUTUMN draws in, the clocks go back and we all wonder how to fill our spare time now that lazing in the sun is no longer an option. A walk through the stunning colour-scape of turning leaves is always a pleasant option – and the display is particularly fine this year. Crunch through the carpet of leaves underfoot, and marvel at the canopy of reds, oranges, yellows, fading greens and browns above you. You could even gather nature’s bountiful crop of free foods, which this year are extremely plentiful. Sweet Chestnuts, walnuts, hazelnuts, apples and sloes are all in great supply. Jars of crab apple jelly will make lovely Christmas presents for friends and family and show that you care enough to given them your time and well as your love. And another great way to make your own Christmas presents and to take up an autumn hobby is to try your hand at ceramic painting at Fired Art in Ryde or jewellery making with bohemia beads who are also at the shop. This attractive shop and café at 151 High Street has an amazing selection of white china crockery, objects and figures for you to select and decorate with your own colours and designs. Fired Art has 60 different coloured glazes to choose from and there are decorated

items around the shop to give you inspiration. You could opt for a popular cat for example and match you moggy at home. Or you might like to attempt something a little more daring such as a figurine or a Christmas tree – there are literally hundreds of designs to choose from. Or you might opt for a plate, a mug, a cup and saucer or a cake stand. Again there are loads of different styles and objects in this range

and you can give them a personalized touch – or make a commemorative piece such as a Christening mug. If you require any help friendly owner Anne Brown and her experienced staff are on hand to give you all the help and assistance you may need to create your own masterpiece. You can also order commissioned pieces if you wish. Wedding plates with the church and the names of your guests are a

favourite as are retirement plates – you could even have the person painted onto the surface. Once you have finished painting your ceramic you then leave it to be covered with a clear glaze and fired and the finished item can be collected a few days later. Another option would be to buy beautiful glass beads, semiprecious stones, spacer beads, sterling silver beads, freshwater pearls, Swarovski Crystals, Fire polished beads, English handmade lampwork, Czech silver lined beads and all the findings and tools you need to create your own gorgeous jewellery from bohemia beads. You are welcome to drop in to Fired Art to browse the beautiful beads and collection of jewellery made from these beads, which are for sale or inspiration! They also offer selections of beads in gift boxes with instructions and everything you need (except pliers) to make a unique bracelet, a

lovely Christmas or birthday gift, or choose your own beads and commission your own design. Pop in for a chat about beading, jewellery making and pottery painting, children’s parties, hen nights and workshops. Make sure that you also visit the cute café across the courtyard behind the shop. Fired Art was once the Nags Head public house and the café occupies what were the stables. The café has a sunny yellow interior sprinkled with orange flowers and all of the crockery has been customized with hand painted cups, saucers and plates and beautiful flowercovered cake stands. These are topped with delicious cakes from Not Just Enterprises and you must try a slice. Also off of the courtyard are the kiln rooms and the old Coach House that is now a function and party room – and is lovely and

toasty due to its proximity to the kilns. It is ideal for birthday parties, hen parties, Christmas parties, courses or even business meetings. Don’t be daunted by the idea of painting your own china as it is so easy and so satisfying to see your finished piece. Even if you haven’t painted since you were at school you will find this hobby very fulfilling, and you’ll improve your technique with every visit. Start with a simple piece and/or design and experiment as you gain confidence in this pastime. You could even design yourself a whole new set of crockery for the Christmas table if you start soon. Just imagine all of your guests eating from plates you have painted – you could even name each one and give them as a gift at the end of the meal. The same goes for making jewellery – start with a simple bracelet on a stretchy elastic and advance to more detailed pieces.


44

FEATURE

Contact the Gazette for News and Advertising: 01983 898340

www.iwgazette.co.uk

The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

MORRIS MEN ROUSE SPIRITS

BLOODSTONE Border Morris, pagans and druids gathered at the Longstone last Sunday (October 31) to celebrate the pagan festival of Samhain that falls on Halloween. First the Morris dancers roused the spirits of the noontime gatherers at the Neolithic monument with a selection of their jaunty dances, incorporating stick brandishing and sparring along with menacing snarls and grimaces. Accompanied by a band of minstrels in similar attire the gathering numbered around 50 spectators and performers – a great turn out for an overcast damp day. Once the dances were over the Morris men and women made their way to the Sun Inn at Hulverstone to continue their festivities. It was then the turn of the druids and pagans to make their offerings and ceremony to what is considered to be the Celtic New Year, Samhain. Paganism and Druidism would have been the religions observed in this country before the Romans brought Christianity to our shores and there has been a rise in the observance of both practices in recent years. An altar was set within the circle of around 20 adults and two children who gathered next to the ancient stone and the cloth was laid with bread, mead, honey, herbs and other objects. Those attending the event had been asked to place a memento of a loved one who had passed on if they wished to do so. During the ceremony to worship the earth and elements, the mead - in a traditional horn drinking vessel - and pieces of a freshly

baked loaf were offered to each with the pronouncement “May you never thirst,” and “May you never hunger.” These pictures show some of those taking part in the short ceremony, which commenced with a prayer for peace and another to the Goddess. There are eight celebrations in the druidic calendar – four male and four female. On October 2 Druidry became the first pagan practice to achieve official recognition as a religion. For more information on druidry on the Island go to www. wightdruids.com Samhain (pronounced ‘sow - to rhyme with cow - in’) is a Gaelic harvest festival held on Oct 31 - Nov 1. It is thought that when the British Isles became Christianised that this festival became incorporated into All Saints day (Nov 1) and its predecessor ‘All Hallows Eve’ or ‘Hallow’een’ on October 31. Samhain marked the end of the harvest, the end of the “lighter half” of the year and beginning of the “darker half” and was traditionally celebrated over the course of several days. The festival has some elements of a festival of the dead. The Gaels believed that the border between this world and the otherworld became thin on Samhain; because so many animals and plants were dying, it thus allowed the dead to reach back through the veil that separated them from the living. The Gaelic custom of wearing costumes and masks, was an attempt to copy the evil spirits or placate them. In Scotland the dead were impersonated by young men with masked, veiled or

blackened faces, dressed in white. Samhnag - turnips which were hollowed-out and carved with faces to make lanterns - were also used to ward off harmful spirits. In medieval Ireland, Samhain became the

the Celtic New Year’s Day. The Samhain celebrations have survived in several guises as a festival dedicated to the harvest and the dead. In Ireland and Scotland, the Féile na Marbh, the ‘festival of the dead’ took place on

“The Samhain celebrations have survived in several guises as a festival dedicated to the harvest and the dead.” principal festival, celebrated with a great assembly at the royal court in Tara, lasting for three days. After being ritually started on the Hill of Tlachtga, a bonfire was set alight on the Hill of Tara, which served as a beacon, signaling to people gathered atop hills all across Ireland to light their ritual bonfires. The Gaulish calendar appears to have divided the year into two halves: the ‘dark’ half, beginning with the month Samonios (the October/November lunation), and the ‘light’ half, beginning with the month Giamonios (the April/May lunation). The entire year may have been considered as beginning with the ‘dark’ half, so that the beginning of Samonios may be considered

Samhain. The night of Samhain, in Irish, Oíche Shamhna and Scots Gaelic, Oidhche Shamhna, is one of the principal festivals of the Celtic calendar, and falls on the October 31. It represents the final harvest. In modern Ireland and Scotland, the name by which Halloween is known in the Gaelic language is still Oíche/ Oidhche Shamhna. It is still the custom in some areas to set a place for the dead at the Samhain feast, and to tell tales of the ancestors on that night. Traditionally, Samhain was time to take stock of the herds and grain supplies, and decide which animals would need to be slaughtered in order for the people and livestock to

survive the winter. Bonfires played a large part in the festivities celebrated down through the last several centuries, and up through the present day in some rural areas of the Celtic nations and the diaspora. Villagers were said to have cast the bones of the slaughtered cattle upon the flames. In the pre-Christian Gaelic world, cattle were the primary unit of currency and the center of agricultural and pastoral life. Samhain was the traditional time for slaughter, for preparing stores of meat and grain to last through the coming winter. With the bonfire ablaze, the villagers extinguished

all other fires. Each family then solemnly lit its hearth from the common flame, thus bonding the families of the village together. Often two bonfires would be built side by side, and the people would walk between the fires as a ritual of purification. Sometimes the cattle and other livestock would be driven between the fires, as well. Guisers - men in disguise, were prevalent in 16th century in the Scottish countryside. Children going door to door “guising” (or “Galoshin” on the south bank of the lower Clyde) in costumes and masks carrying turnip lanterns, offering entertainment of various sorts in return for food or coins, was traditional in 19th century, and continued well into 20th century. At the time of mass transatlantic Irish and Scottish immigration that popularized Halloween in North America, Halloween in Ireland and Scotland had a strong tradition of guising and pranks. This is how the festival travelled to the New World and it has now returned to our shores in recent times, rising in popularity over the past thirty or so years.


The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

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Gazette MO TAKES HONOURS THE ISLE OF WIGHT

NEWS IN BRIEF

FAIRTRADE HITS MILESTONE ON THE ISLAND

IT IS FIVE years since the Isle of Wight was officially declared a Fairtrade Island and the anniversary coincides with the 500th UK Fairtrade Town. The Island’s MP Andrew Turner welcomed both milestones as a step towards a fairer world. The Isle of Wight achieved Fairtrade status on October 28, 2005 and is one of 11 Fairtrade Islands in the UK. Mr Turner commented: “Fairtrade has been successful because it’s straightforward and people understand it. You don’t have to delve into the intricacies of international trade to know that by choosing a Fairtrade product you are supporting small producers and their communities in poor parts of the world. “People watch TV, see what is going on in the world and feel pretty helpless, but this is something everybody can do that bypasses Government policies and ineffective aid. Fairtrade products used to be perceived as much more expensive but that is no longer true. “Fairtrade gives poor farmers a hand-up not a hand-out - that is something British people like. You don’t have to go on a march, start a campaign or write to politicians, you can just go shopping!” The Fairtrade towns initiative was kicked off in April 2000, when Garstang in Lancashire declared itself the ‘World’s First Fairtrade Town’. Since then the word has spread across 19 countries with over 800 areas achieving Fairtrade status. However the movement has been most successful in the UK, with London being the biggest Fairtrade Town in the World. A Fairtrade Town is an area that has made a commitment to supporting Fairtrade and using products with the Fairtrade mark. Fairtrade producers are paid a price which covers the costs of sustainable production and they also receive a Fairtrade premium, providing income for community development projects. In the last 10 years Fairtrade sales in the UK have grown from almost £33 million to an estimated retail value of over £799m. There are now more than 4,500 Fairtrade certified products available including mainstream brands such as Cadbury’s Dairy Milk, Starbucks and Ben & Jerry’s. Mr Turner also paid tribute to campaigners who worked to get Fairtrade status for the Island, saying: “Chris Murphy of Traidcraft in Freshwater was a leading light in what was originally quite a small band of people committed to the project, but the numbers swelled over time. They can all be proud of what they achieved locally five years ago and I am sure they will also be delighted at the news that there are now 500 Fairtrade Towns in the UK.”

THERE WAS a tight finish to the Shanklin and Sandown Golf Club Men’s October Monthly Stableford Monthly Stableford with the Division One honours going to Mo Ismail with 41 points. He finished just ahead of Brian Dyer (40) with Dave Vale (39) taking third place. In Division Two William Humphries emerged victorious with 39 points, from Richard Prosser (38) and Andrew Wheeler (36). The winners of Shanklin and Sandown Golf Club’s Ladies Captain’s Charity Day were Ronnie Hirst, Christine O’Brien and Alix Goddard with a combined score of 42. They were followed home by Lillian Bushby, Ruth Graves and Joan Gordon with a score of 40. Other recent results: Open Stableford, Division 1: Winner Richard Donn 39. 2nd Martin Fielder 37. Division 2: Winner Martin Henry 39. 2nd

Richard Hodges 39. Hyett Trophy Winners Judy Richardson, Conor Richards 42. 2nd Deborah Richards, Greg Hammond 40. 3rd Brenda Keyte, Tom Gould 40. Junior Medal Net: Winner Tom Gould 66. 2nd Tommy Robinson 67. Junior Stableford Pts Winner Josh Rylatt 40. Open Medal Division 1 Net: Winner Steve Ambrose 66. 2nd Ian Hatcher 68. 3rd Dave Vale 69. Division 2: Winner Kevin Griffiths 69. 2nd Andy Buxton 71. 3rd John Salter 72. Jellicoe Cup: Winner Jackie Stephen. Runner Up Richard Scoble. Losing semi-finalists, Sheryl Jackson and Sam Moorman. Ladies’ June Hyett Trophy: Winner Kathryn Harding 37 points. 2nd Beverley Carroll 36. Ladies’ Monthly Stableford: Silver, Winner Kathryn Harding

37. 2nd Beverley Carroll 36. 3rd Barbara Butler 35. 4th Fran Cole 34. Bronze, Winner Julie Miller 35. 2nd Lynn Guy 33. 3rd Jane Abbott 33. 4th Christine O’Brien 33. Open Stableford: Division 1, Winner Martin Fielder 38. 2nd David Ames 37. Division 2: Winner Colin Ratcliffe 41. 2nd George Johnson 36. Open Stableford: Division 1, Winner Roy George 40. 2nd Keith Files 38. 3rd Fred Sillwood 37. Division 2, Winner Robert Gray 39. 2nd Dennis Hoyle 36. 3rd Barry Groves 35. Cowes Golf Club recent results: Pyrah Stableford: R. Cook (13) 41pts. M. Hodder (17) 41. I. Wood (18) 40. Pyrah Stableford (Oct 29): G. Brooks (10) 40pts. A. Waters (19) 38. D. Haworth (18) 38. Sunday Stableford: G. Milne (28) 40pts. B.Martin (25) 40. P. Young (13) 38.

4 Ball better Ball: K. Colebrook and K. R. Arnold 48pts. D. Haworth and C. Knowles 48. G. Hammond and D. Witcomb 47.

RYDE VICTORS IN AUTUMN JUNIOR MEET

OSBORNE GOLF CLUB hosted the IW Golf Union junior autumn meeting. Teams from most island clubs took part, consisted of four juniors and one adult playing to a stableford format with the best four combined scores counting. Ryde were winners with 148 points The team consisted of Junior Captain Dan West. Billy McCormack, Xav Bishop, Jake Hallett and Vic Langley. Osborne were runners up with 140 points The next competition will be the Winter Meeting at Westridge in February 2011.

ELIZABETH PICKS UP TROPHY

RYDE GOLF CLUB ladies held their annual past captains 13-hole stableford competition, followed by lunch at the club house. The winner, who was presented the Ann Delf trophy by Ann, was Elizabeth Van Wyke with 22 points. Second was Wendy Cameron with 20 points and third was Pauline Kilty also with 20 points. Pictured are 15 ladies from Ryde Golf Club past captains.

SECOND PLACE FOR SIMON

FOUR MEMBERS of the Wightlink-sponsored Ryde Rowing Club’s Senior Masters squad competed in the Marlow Long distance sculling event on the Thames, which was a timed processional race over 4,800 meters and targeted at the more experienced competitor. Simon Saunders, continuing his return to competitive

rowing after a long absence did particularly well to finish second in the Masters B category and in 48th place overall, in a time of 21mins, 18 secs. The other Ryde Scullers were competing in the Masters C category where Mick Jenner achieved another second place, finishing in a time of 20 mins 17 secs, and in 24th place

overall. Nick Pike and Russell Page finished the course with the same recorded time – of 20 mins 58 secs. – with the results showing Nick in third place in this category and Russell as fourth for 35th and 36th position overall respectively. There next event is likely to be the Vesta Scullers Head on Saturday, November 27,

another processional race for single sculls over the 4.25 mile championship course from Mortlake to Putney. First sculled in 1954, this year’s race will involve almost 500 scullers attracting entries from all over the United Kingdom and the world, with standards ranging from internationals to novices.


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The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

BRAVE JEMISON IS BEATEN ON POINTS

VENTNOR Boxing Club light welterweight Ben Jemison took part in the Heart of Portsmouth Club Gym Open Tournament. Jemison was matched against the home club’s strong and willing Conner Whiting, and the first round saw Jemison take control of the contest, keeping Whiting on his back foot for most of the time. Although he faded towards the end, it was his round. In the second, his opponent, roared on by his noisy supporters, just won the round. This left both boxers needing the last to win the contest. They went at it hammer and tongs with Whiting’s superior fitness and crowd support just winning the day and the judges’ decision. But it was a good effort from Jemison, and at the end both boxers were commended by the referee on their performance. For more information about Ventnor ABC contact Darren Green on 852749 or 07855 544 4519.

MARCHBANK HITS A FINE HAT-TRICK West Wight 2

Binstead 3

WEST WIGHT under 9s’ winning streak came to an end in a very competitive match at Weston Field. Binstead raced into a 2 - 0 lead courtesy of two goals from Ryan Marchbank. West Wight’s Johnny Jordan slotted a penalty home to bring the score to 2 - 1 at half time. In a battling second half Marchbank completed his hat trick and Danny Fawcett scored a goal for West Wight. Man of the match for West Wight was goalkeeper Leon Pitman, man of the match for Binstead was Henry McLuckie. Shanklin 2

Brading Town Colts 0

An entertaining end to end game saw plenty of chances at both ends with Shanklin eventually coming out on top.Brading’s man of the match was Ben Robertson with a solid all round performance.

GAMES OFF TO FLYER!

SOUTHAMPTON AIRPORT has announced its support for the NatWest Island Games 2011 which is taking place on the Isle of Wight from June 25 to July 1 next year. The airport will be receiving many of the athletes, officials and supporters from the 25 islands around the world who will be taking part in this major international event. The Island Games take place every two years and is one of the largest participation events in the world behind the Commonwealth Games and Olympics. Next year’s event here on the Island will see thousands of

athletes and officials taking part in hundreds of events across 14 sports in what is expected to be the largest Games to date. It will also be the largest international multi-sport event ever held on the Island. Jan Halliday, Director of Marketing & Communications for Southampton Airport, said: “Southampton Airport is the nearest international airport to the Isle of Wight, and so we’ve been working closely with the event organisers to ensure the visitors to the Games will experience an easy, fast and friendly service at Southampton Airport prior to

going onwards. We look forward to giving a really warm welcome to the NatWest Island Games visitors in June and July 2011.” The Isle of Wight Island

for their sports officials involved in the Olympic programme. An Arts Council grant of £94,000 funded by the National Lottery has also been awarded for a spectacular Opening Ceremony which will be held in Ryde on Saturday June 25, and will include over 1000 young people in a carnival style extravaganza. The Closing Ceremony will take place in Cowes on Friday 1 July. Further details about the NatWest Island Games 2011 and how businesses can get involved, can be found at www. natwestislandgames2011.co.uk

“We look forward to giving a really warm welcome to the NatWest Island Games visitors.” Games Association, responsible for organising the Games has received support from the London Organising Committee for the Olympic Games who will be using the Games as a test bed

WILLIAMS FINDS TOP FORM

THE CYCLO-CROSS season is hotting up, with races so far being fast and dry with hardly any mud in sight. Following his win in the Swindon event last month, Sean Williams of the Wightlink/ Offshore/BAE Systems Race Team has carried on the good form claiming another win at Oxford School in Cowley. Riding Oxford in the combined

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Veterans/Junior/Women race with around 60 starters, Williams used his fast start to his advantage and by the end of the first lap he had a lead of around 30 seconds. With a few steep banks requiring a dismount and a couple of small muddy patches, the course was varied and technical enough to proceed with caution, whilst at the same time fast and flowing, using several straight sections

over the football pitches, where Williams put his time trial ability to good use. Six laps later and 41 minutes of racing completed, Williams crossed the line as outright victor with a one minute, ten second advantage. Team rider Dave Dent has also been in action in Time Trials. With five wins this year and several podium positions, Dave aimed for a handful of late

season events on varying courses and distances after a fairly quiet mid-season where he only rode in a few events. Riding with the after-effects of a cold, the Wightlink rider claimed eighth place in the New Forest CC event but followed that up with two second places, one at the VTTA 15 mile event in Kent and more recently at the Southdown Velo 27 mile event.

Send your news and pictures to us at newsdesk@iwgazette.co.uk or call our 24hr News Hotline 01983 898349


The Gazette, Friday, November 5, 2010

Gazette Sport THE ISLE OF WIGHT

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NEWPORT GO DOWN FIGHTING NEWPORT found the handicap of being reduced to nine men too much when they took on Chichester in their Sydenhams Wessex League, Premier Division game at St George’s Park. The Island side looked to be on their way to three points when they took the

lead with a Matt Evans overhead kick. But then came their problems. They were cut to nine, when Harry Ovnik was sent off for bringing down Ben Dickenson, and then Tom Scovell was dismissed for confronting the referee over his decision to award

a penalty. Christchurch levelled when Ben Osborne scored from the spot, and the striker then completed his hat trick to secure a 3-1 success. Brading Town visited title chasing Winchester City and took a point from a 2-2

draw. Justin Henderson and Kyle Levrier were on target, each time cancelling out Winchester’s lead. In Division 1, Gareth Bricknell scored to earn Cowes Sports a home 1-1 draw against Verwood Town, while E. Cowes Vics lost 3-0 at Tadley Calleva.

SOTHERTON CHANGES TRACK

TOP ISLAND athlete Kelly Sotherton has decided to quit the heptathlon in an attempt to keep her London Olympics dream alive. Kelly, who was born in Newport and attended Ryde High School, has opted to turn her back on the grueling seven-discipline event following a spate of injury problems. Now she will concentrate on trying to make the Great Britain team for the 2012 Olympics in the 400 metres, either individually or as part

of the relay squad. Kelly, who will be celebrating her 34th birthday on November 13, has had an amazing run of successes in the heptathlon, including picking up medals at both the 2004 Olympics and 2007 World Championships. But over the past two years she has been severely hampered by heel and back injuries. Although she has now returned to full training she accepts her body can no longer take the rigours of the heptathlon, which takes place

over two days and embraces the 100 metres hurdles, high jump, shot putt, 200 metres, long jump javelin and 800 metres. During her injury absence Kelly has seen friend and close rival Jessica Ennis – nearly 10 years her junior take over the mantle of world No1 heptathlete. Kelly, who moved from the Island to the Midlands to pursue her athletics career, admitted: “Never say never but my body isn’t going to be able

cope with the stresses of a heptathlon. In my heart I’ll always be a heptathlete and I’ll always think there’s a chance that maybe I could do one again. “Realistically it would be like playing Russian roulette with my career and I don’t want another 12 to 18 months watching other people being successful while I sit thinking I should be out there competing.” Kelly will now turn her attention towards the 400

metres, hoping she will be able to prove herself enough to at least be a part of the women’s 4 x 400 metres relay squad for the London Games. She already has experience of the event. She finished fourth in the heptathlon at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, and also claimed a fifth-placed finish in the women’s 4x400m relay. The same year she ran 52.47secs indoors, the fastest time by a British female that year.

She added: “I’m looking forward to the challenge of qualifying for what should be a superb team in 2012. If everybody is fit we’ve got Christine Ohuruogu, Nicola Sanders, Perri ShakesDrayton, Marilyn Okoro and Lee McConnell, so it’s not going to be easy. “But I’m a hungry competitor and I’ve been part of it before so there’s no reason why I can’t be a part of it again, and even perhaps in the individual event too.”


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