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Olivette Connects Agriculture & Community

Old Europe

Specialty Pastries Delight

Flavors from Near & Far with Chef Patrick O’Cain

PLUS

SPRING 2017 Vol. 4, No. 1

FoodLifeMag.com

recipes restaurants & more!

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FOODLIFEMAG.COM | SPRING 2017


features SPRING 2017 VOL. 4 • NO. 1

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LOCAL BOY M AKE S GOOD Patrick O’Cain joins East and West through innovative cuisine. by TIFFANY WELSH

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O LIV E TTE CONNE CTS CO MMUN I TY & AGRI CU LTU RE A 346-acre “agrihood” on the banks of the French Broad River. by JOSH O’CONNER

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FRO M EUROPE WI TH LOVE

Old Europe’s pastry case really sets them apart from other local bakeries. by AMY MANIKOWSKI

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WA LKING, TALKI NG, EAT ING, WORKI NG

Stu Helm describes an average day on the job with Asheville Food Tours. by STU HELM

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VOL. 4 NO. 1

SPRING 2017

27

Olivette Connects

Old Europe

Agriculture & Community

Specialty Pastries Delight

O N THE CO V ER Ramen at Gan Shan Station. Photo by Tim Robison

STAY CO NNECTED

FoodLifeMag.com facebook.com/foodlifemag

Flavors from Near & Far with Chef Patrick O’Cain

PLUS

recipes restaurants & more!

SPRING 2017 Vol. 4, No. 1

FoodLifeMag.com

SPRING 2017 | FOODLIFEMAG.COM

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the guide FO O D FO R THO UG HT 19 Asheville based Seed Programs International helps the hungry to feed themselves. by SHANE MAXSON

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SO W WHAT? 14 A guide to planting & harvesting in the Southern Appalachians. TR AV ELI N G LO CAV O R E 27 Tiffany Welsh takes in the sights and tastes of the Big Apple. TI M E TO G ET YO UR HAN DS I N THE DI R T 40 Spring is in the air, here’s what to plant. by KIMBERLY KIRSTEIN

I N TER N ATI O N A L ASHEV I LLE 42 A map of the 39 international eateries in downtown Asheville. by STU HELM

CA LEN DAR 44

recipes G R I LLED SHR I M P WITH PI N EA PPLE & SOY CA R A M EL G LAZ E 22 CHI M I CHUR R I CHI CKEN 32 G LUTEN - FR EE PI TA BR EAD 38 PA LETA S DE FR ESAS 46

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EDITOR’S LETTER It seems like Spring just hit out of nowhere. Not that I’m complaining. The flowers and trees are beautiful this time of year, but what’s even more beautiful is the return of the local farmer’s markets. In the next few weeks, we will start seeing those early Spring fruits and vegetables, which will be an inspiration to chefs and home cooks throughout the area. If Spring also took you by surprise, you may need a little help finishing your garden planning. Check out our article on early Spring crops or drop by the Annual Herb Festival to pick up a few starts. Need more ideas? How about a visit to the yearround farming operation at Olivette Farm. All that garden work is sure to build your appetite. So join us as we talk to Chef Patrick O’Cain, who is taking his ingredient inspiration to the next level by joining mountain grown produce and Asian cooking techniques at Gan Shan Station. We also talk to a Hungarian baker, who has been a long standing fixture in the local food scene. Did you realize that downtown Asheville has nearly 40 different restaurants specializing in international cuisine? Well, we have a complete guide to all of them - so get your tastebuds ready. And if you’d like a little company on your journey, Stu Helm will take you on a walking food tour of Asheville. There’s so much more to share, but you’re probably already hungry just thinking about it...So Dig in Y’all!

EDITOR twelsh@iwanna.com

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General Manager/Publisher PATRICIA MARTIN BETTS Editor TIFFANY WELSH Art Director CARRIE FAYE HARDER Production/IT Manager JEFF RUMINSKI Contributors PHILIP BOLLHOEFER CHELSEA LANE PHOTOGRAPHY STU HELM BEV HOLLIS KIMBERLY KIRSTEIN AMY MANIKOWSKI SHANE MAXSON JOSH O’CONNER TIM ROBISON Advertising Consultants PAM HENSLEY RICK JENKINS ROSE LUNSFORD Production DAVID DENTON DEBI MANFRE RACHEL HOEFT RANDY WHITTINGTON Distribution Manager SAM HOWELL A Publication of

I WA NN A P UB L I C AT I ON S 3 1 CO L L E GE PL ACE A S H E V I L L E O F F I CE PAR K, I WAN N A BUI L D I N G A S H E VI L L E , N C 28801 828. 274. 8888 Food Life, a publication of IWANNA, has accepted contributions which may not reflect the opinion of the publisher. No portion of Food Life may be reproduced without permission of the publisher.

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FEATURE

CHEF

Local Boy Makes Good

CHEF PATRICK O’CAIN joins East and West through innovative cuisine. by TIFFANY WELSH photos by TIM ROBISON

by TIM ROBISON 8photographs FOODLIFEMAG.COM | SPRING 2017

photographs by TIM ROBISON


C

VIEW THE MENU AT GANSHANSTATION.COM

CHEF PATRICK O’CAIN is a man self-described as “33 going on 50.” And it’s no wonder. He is the Chef and Owner of local favorite Gan Shan Station. To say that he’s busy would be an understatement, but he did set out to find a career that was “hands-on.” O’Cain, who was born in Asheville and grew up just north of downtown, is a true local through and through. “We’re few and far between,” he says. Not that he minds the diversity of our city. In his early career, O’Cain spent a good deal of time traveling and experiencing cultural diversity first hand. Through it all, he maintained a love of cooking, albeit as an amateur. He studied English and French and worked for a while in France as an English teacher. He then moved on to work in the publishing industry. It was actually O’Cain’s teaching job in a French culinary high school that inspired him to pursue a restaurant career. So O’Cain decided to return to Asheville to get a more formal culinary education at A-B Tech. In his first year, he scored a job with Cúrate, where he worked for a couple of seasons before moving on to an internship at Sean Brock’s McCrady’s in Charleston. That internship turned into a full time job and it also turned O’Cain into a “culinary school drop-out.”

That Question Which Everyone Asks

How does a local kid become an Asian chef? Growing up, Asian food was O’Cain’s favorite. His family prepared Asian dishes at home weekly, thanks to a Szechuan cookbook gifted to his parents nearly 40 years ago. “It’s funny, because we never went out to Chinese restaurants. We always cooked it at home,” he says. “So that’s where a lot of these taste memories come from and a lot of the inspiration comes from. It’s a pretty direct link to my childhood.” Couple that with his time as sous chef at Xiao Bao Biscuit, also in Charleston, and he has gained a real knowledge of Asian cuisine. Is it authentic? Who’s to say. There are so many regions of every Asian country, that what is authentic to one might be strange to another. O’Cain takes his inspiration from a variety of locales - house made dumplings from China, ramen from Japan, curries from Thailand with an equally diverse drink menu of beer, sake, wine and non-alcoholic beverages.

Service Station Turned Eatery

It was also O’Cain’s time at Xiao Bao, which gave him the confidence to open his own restaurant. He assisted with the opening of XBB and learned a lot about operating a restaurant. “It was really a trial for myself,” he says. “Then this space came to the forefront and I just went for it.” The space: a derelict old BP service station that had been empty for years. O’Cain had decided he wanted to come back to Asheville to be closer to his parents and the space on Charlotte Street really precipitated the move. “I had a vision SPRING 2017 | FOODLIFEMAG.COM

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of something that wasn’t here in the Asheville food scene, as well as something that wasn’t here on Charlotte Street.” The makeover of 143 Charlotte Street was definitely an improvement to the neighborhood. Stepping inside Gan Shan Station, you may be surprised to find an old service station could be warm and inviting. O’Cain has developed the perfect mix of vintage, industrial and comfort. The kitchen is open to dining room with bar side seats allowing diners to interact with the chefs. The prep space is to your right as you enter, baskets of fresh vegetables and ingredients in plain sight to the diner. Plus, the restaurant boasts an amazing outdoor space, perfect for enjoying the great Spring weather.

Western North Carolina Meets the Far East

O’Cain enjoys working with local farmers, Paper Crane Farms and the Culinary Gardener, to source ingredients. “The farmers end up being some of my closest friends,” he says. With Spring arriving, he will be revamping the Gan Shan menu to accommodate the available local ingredients. The menu is structured seasonally, with Spring having the biggest change, then lighter fare in Summer and richer dishes in Fall and Winter. They source as much locally as they can, but of course there are a lot of ingredients specific to Asian cuisine that cannot be found in WNC. And as for libations, O’Cain stocks several options in beer 10

FOODLIFEMAG.COM | SPRING 2017

and sake originating in Asia, which he compliments with some local craft brew. One of the craft options on tap, Starr Hill Beer from Charlottesville, Virginia, where his brother Robbie O’Cain works as Master Brewer.

What’s Around the Curve?

Later this year, O’Cain will be opening a second smaller Gan Shan location, Gan Shan West. Located in the East-West Asheville area known as Beacham’s Curve. Gan Shan West will have only 25 seats compared to the 100+ seats at the Charlotte Street location. West will offer several quick options, ideal for carryout as well as sharing an outdoor space with OWL Bakery. Beacham’s Curve is a booming area for West Asheville - already home to Urban Orchard, OWL Bakery, Short Street Cakes and Taco Billy - there will be several more restaurants and breweries making their mark in the area this year. How is O’Cain managing all of this expansion? With the support of a good team, of course. He concludes, “I’m very confident in their abilities.” Gan Shan Station is located at 143 Charlotte St. Visit ganshanstation.com for menus, hours and more info.


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Connects Concepts of Community & Agriculture Nestled on the banks of the French Broad River just north of Asheville lies the Olivette Community. A 346-acre planned community, self described as an “agrihood” with an integrated vision of housing and agriculture. The Olivette mission is “to create a replicable model for developing healthy, connected communities using the best available practices that align with core values of sustainability, community, family, education and happiness.” The community, which is in its first phase of development, is being established on the site of a previously envisioned high-end housing development that saw bankruptcy in its early stages. by JOSH O’CONNER photos by TIFFANY WELSH & OLIVETTE

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FOR MORE INFO VISIT OLIVETTEFARM.COM OR OLIVETTENC.COM THE OLIVETTE COMMUNITY is modeled in the vein of greens, salad vegetables (such as baby radishes, baby car“Agrarian Urbanism”, an urban planning concept uniting rots, cherry tomatoes) and specialty produce for chefs. Aiello agriculture and housing in order to maximize the economic, notes that the farm’s four-season production is unique to the environmental, and social benefits associated with tightening area with just as many vegetables available and growing in the connection between people, their food, and farming. The January as there are July. The farm also offers Community concept has roots within the “New Urbanism” movement, Supported Agriculture (CSA) shares that allow customers to an urban planning effort seeking to curb urban sprawl and purchase subscriptions of the farm’s seasonal produce. create liveable, walkable communities that place residents The farm has close relationships with ten different chefs closer to the urban amenities they use frequently. The idea and restaurants across Asheville providing them with high of agriculturally-oriented residential development received quality, farm fresh produce for their dishes. The farm also attention locally with previously proposed housing develpartners with Roots and Fruits Market in Black Mountain. As opments, such as the original design concepts for Coggins a partner, Olivette farm helped Roots and Fruits start the first Farm near Swannanoa; however, the Olivette Community is winter farmers market in Black Mountain. the first to take root. Olivette is also unique in its relationOlivette Farm occupies a former family ship with its neighbors, the residents of the farm property adjacent to the main properOlivette Community. In addition to providing ty, which the developers negotiated the puraccess to local foods, the farm is also an educhase of as an addition to the site. “Olivette cational hub where residents can gain expeFarm is an integral part of the Olivette comrience with agriculture. Aiello is clear that his munity”, says Farm Manager Justin Aiello, top priorities are to connect residents with “As the neighborhood grows the farm will how and where their food is grown, educate provide fresh produce for residents through the community on how to properly steward our CSA program and through our farmfarmland, and also build a strong sense of stand.” The farm is attached directly to the community through the sharing of meals, neighborhood promoting a heightened visworkdays on the farm, and the CSA program. ibility of agriculture. There is also an acre He underscores that experience stating, “In of the farm’s operation located within the addition to providing produce for Olivette center of the neighborhood ensuring that residents, we’ll also assist residents in planeveryone that enters experiences the intening and planting community garden plots, gration of farming within the community. we’ll have educational gardening workshops, Farm Manager Justin Aiello Something Aiello envisions as providing and host volunteer work days for those who families a place to grow immersed in the food world. want to get their hands dirty and learn more about farming. Aiello, who had been farming on land just west of Atlanta We’ll also be growing landscape plants for edible gardens for three years prior to his transition to Olivette, has been at throughout the neighborhood and for residents’ homes.” the helm for a little over a year. As self-proclaimed, “Landless As Aiello looks to the future of Olivette Farm he eyes exFarmers,” he and his wife both wanted find a more permapansion of winter offerings and eventually adding a 52 week nent place to farm and put down roots and found themselves CSA option that will provide fresh produce year round. He is falling in love “with the laid-back, food-loving ways of Asheadamant about the central role that the farm will play in the ville”. He attributes his position at the farm to “good luck community, “One of my biggest hopes is that we can create and good timing”. Having heard about the community and a sense of community through food and the farm.” He sees its plans to include a farm as an element of its plan, Aiello had the farm developing not only a as resource for the commuthe opportunity to meet with the developers and articulate nity’s food needs but as hub where people can connect and his own ideas for the project, a presentation which lead to form meaningful, lasting relationships. He adds, “Wouldn’t it his current role, which he describes as his “dream job at his be cool to be a kid growing up in the middle of all of this?” dream farm.” The farm serves customers at the Asheville City Market on The farm is “Certified Naturally Grown” and grows using Saturdays, the Black Mountain Tailgate Market on Saturdays, organic practices (although it is not yet organic certified) and the Asheville City Market South on Wednesdays. They backed by high standards of land stewardship. Among the are offering 30 CSA shares this season with pick-up options practices incorporated into the farms land stewardship ethos on the farm, in East Asheville, and at each of their farmers are conservation tillage, integrated pest management, and market locations. More information on Olivette Farm can be no-spray crop production. The production focus on the farm found at olivettefarm.com; more information on the Olivette centers on year-round production of a wide range of salad Community can be found at olivettenc.com. SPRING 2017 | FOODLIFEMAG.COM

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A Guide to Planting & Harvesting in the Southern Appalachians DE C

JAN

FEB

MA R

A PR

MAY

KEY

How to plant

space between plants / planting depth Plant seeds Plant transplants, shoots, or roots Recommended planting dates

JU N E

JU LY

AUG

70-80 days

12” apart / ½” deep

70-80 days

12” apart / 1½” deep

85-95 days 85-95 days 85-95 days

10” apart / 1” deep

90-100 days

60” apart / 1½” deep 75-80 days

4” apart / ½” deep

75-80 days

18” apart / ½” deep 95-120 days

10” apart / ½” deep

2 ft apart / ¾ inches deeper than transplant soil 10” apart / 4” deep

2 years

2 years 95-125 days

12” apart / 5½” deep

18” apart / ½” deep

24” apart / 1½” deep

*seedlings

2 years

18” apart / ½” deep

N OV

50-55 days

4-5 ft apart / plant same depth as nursery

2” apart / ¼” deep

OCT

2 years

3” apart / 1” deep

Days to maturity Winter Spring Summer Fall

6-10 years*

15-18 ft apart / 12-18” deep* 15” apart / 6” deep

S E PT

Harvest

75-85 days 50-60 days

Compiled from research provided by the University of North Carolina Cooperative Extension, ASAP, and the Farmer’s Almanac, this guide includes suggested dates for several crops. Note: The Southern Appalachians are diverse, and growing seasons vary. The months above are approximate.

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FEATURE

OLD EUROPE

From Europe With Love

by AMY MANIKOWSKI photos by BEV HOLLIS

Old Europe feels like a cozy Parisian cafe, with its gold walls, high ceilings and gilded mirrors, but it is what’s in the illuminated pastry case that really sets this pastry shop apart from other local bakeries.

WHEN WE FIRST OPENED people here didn’t understand European pastries,” says owner Melinda Vetro. “They kept asking - where are your pies? Why don’t you have cupcakes or brownies? But we weren’t a shop like that.” Instead they had beautifully decorated cakes made from layers of chocolate, buttercream, homemade whipped cream, custard, puff pastry, mousse and ganache. There are fruit topped cheesecakes that looks like a piece of art, Tiramisu dusted with cocoa patterns, and shiny raspberry glaze atop the Lemon Bavarian. All the creations reflect Melinda’s specialized training in Hungary where she began pastry school at the age of fourteen. At that young age she traveled an hour a day by bus to study and work in a bakery, driven by a passion to create beautiful delicious pastries - a passion that would soon follow her halfway around the world. When she was twenty Melinda married and moved to Minnesota with her husband Z, where she got a job at the Minneapolis Institute of Art’s kitchen. But Melinda only knew a little English (she made herself a cheat sheet of words like ‘sugar’ and ‘flour’) and even the measurements - Tablespoons, teaspoons, cups - were foreign. She learned a lot by having to experiment outside of her European-trained roots; one of the first recipes she made at the MIA called for a mixture of chocolate and sour cream, “I said to myself, ‘these Americans! Sour cream is for soup, not for desserts. But I tried it, and it was good!” Today Melinda still uses some American recipes, like her

I halve the sugar; Europeans always use less sugar.

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highly rated Key Lime Pie, “But when I look at it - I halve the sugar; Europeans always use less sugar.” Authentic European pastries are known for being beautiful, flavorful, and complex, while not being overly sweet. Old Europe’s recipes have been perfected over many decades, and every cake is made by hand and treated as a piece of art for your eyes and tastebuds. Some specialties include a Dobos Torte - Torte is the European word for round cake and the Dobos, named for its Hungarian creator, consists of 5 layers of sponge cake filled with dark chocolate buttercream and topped with caramel. The Black Forest Cake is a traditional German dessert of chocolate sponge cake layered with whip cream and black cherries, sprinkled with Kirsch liquor, and topped with chocolate ganache. The Hazelnut Napoleon is an Italian pastry, not a French Military leader, and it is made of layers of white sponge cake, whipped chocolate hazelnut mousse, and puff pastry. The French Creamy, a custard with puff pastry, is found in every pastry shop in Hungary and across Europe, but is not something you easily find in the US; yet some customers of Old Europe have been coming for twenty years to enjoy that favorite. It is delicate, and delicious, and like almost everything else in the case at Old Europe - not something you would find at most other bakeries - which is what makes this shop a must-visit destination for locals and visitors to Asheville. Old Europe is located at 13 Broadway St. Visit oldeuropepastries.com for menus, hours and more info.


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28th Annual Asheville Spring Herb Festival MAY 5 - 7, 2017

WNC FARMERS MARKET 570 BREVARD ROAD • ASHEVILLE

FRI & SAT: 8:30AM - 5PM; SUN: 10AM - 3PM 828-301-8968 or AshevilleHerbFestival.org

FREE ADMISSION

FREE WORKSHOP SCHEDULE (All workshops & presentations in Booth 16)

FRIDAY, MAY 5

10AM: Edible & Medicinal Landscaping

w/ Jennifer Flynn, Grass to Greens & NC Natural Products Assoc./Blue Ridge Naturally

1PM: How to grow Chinese Herbs for Health & Longevity w/ Joe Hollis, Mountain Gardens 3PM: Making Herbal Vinegars

w/ Jeannie Dunn, Red Moon Herbs & NCNPA

SATURDAY, MAY 6

10AM: Organic Herb Farm’s Post-Harvest Handling w/ Charles & Pam Leonard, Gentle Harmony Farm

1PM: Weeds to Remedies: Herbs for Allergies

w/ Dr. Dave Hamilton, Naturopathic Physician, Of The Earth Wellness

3PM: Growing Ginseng, Goldenseal & Other Woodland Medicinals

w/ Robert Eidus, Eagle Feather Organic Farm

SUNDAY, MAY 7

10AM: Starting an Herb Business w/ Camille Edwards, NC Herb Association & BEE SOW HAPPY Farm

1PM: Wild Foods & Nutrition

w/ Alexander Meander, Ardea Homestead Sanctuary

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FOOD FOR THOUGHT

THE GUIDE

Wedly Deceus, a Haitian Agronomist, visits a garden in Haiti as part of a partnership between Seed Programs International and AKV. Photo Credit: Jon Brack

Can a Simple Vegetable Garden Change the World? by SHANE MAXSON

ENVISION A SEED - a small capsule containing all the genes, enzymes, and energy needed to create life. Each year seed companies dispose of billions of seeds because their progeny may not conform to acceptable commercial standards, they are left over from previous years inventory, or perhaps the company wants to donate seed for a cause. What if this wasted food source truly could be the answer to the eradication of global hunger? John Batcha discovered this hidden wealth and transformed it into an organization that not only helps to feed the hungry, but provide the means for them to feed themselves - the Asheville based nonprofit Seed Programs International (SPI) It all began in a private home in Charlotte, North Carolina back in 1998. Batcha, the retired Executive Director of Asgrow Seed Company, sat at a table packing seeds into envelopes. Those humble packets were destined to journey across the world where they would blossom into village gardens; providing food and livelihoods for countless families, women, and children. “Here in the US the purpose of a garden tends to be a hobby or just giving a little more variety of food,” says Peter

Marks, Executive Director of SPI, “But the gardens for which we provide seeds and support do so much more than most people would imagine.” Working with organizations in seventy-five countries, SPI has been able to distribute 14.5 million seed packets since 1999. By building active relationships with humanitarian organizations, SPI ensures that seed recipients have ongoing support through the process of establishing gardens and farms. The programs that SPI work with are often “ local, indigenous community groups.” Marks says, “They take the lead in telling us how vegetable seeds and vegetable gardens can help, make decisions about what to grow, and provide the training and technical support.” Currently, SPI is focusing efforts in areas affected by disaster such as the Ebola epidemic in Liberia, Hurricane Matthew in Haiti, and severe drought in Kenya. “The original goals were to increase agro-biodiversity for the population and women’s empowerment, and those goals continue, but there is now a short-term survival aspect as well.” says Marks. SPRING 2017 | FOODLIFEMAG.COM

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FOR MORE INFO VISIT SEEDPROGRAMS.ORG

Seed packets from Seed Programs International are distributed by SPI partner HODI in Northern Kenya. Photo Credit: Noor Abdulqadir

Bong County, Liberia Women’s Group. Photo Credit: Unknown

While SPI may have begun with one man filling envelopes with seeds in his living room, it has now grown into a vast network of programs the world over. In talking about the work that Seed Programs International does, Marks says, “This is an example of a tiny paper packet leading to a simple vegetable garden and this (after much hard work by the recipient) becomes life-changing for more than one generation.” If you are interested in learning more about the work of Seed Programs International visit www.seedprograms.org 20

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THE GUIDE

RECIPE

Grilled Shrimp with Pineapple & Soy Caramel Glaze created by CHEF PHILIP BOLLHOEFER photo by CHELSEA LANE PHOTOGRAPHY

SOY CARAMEL GLAZE ½ C Sugar ¾ C Soy Sauce 1 clove Garlic, smashed 1ea Star Anise ¼ C Water ¼ C Molasses 1 Tbsp Ginger, crushed Place sugar in a heavy bottomed sauce pan. Heat over medium high heat. As the sugar begins to melt slowly stir with a wooden or heat resistant spoon. Continue to cook sugar until completely melted and golden in color. Add remaining ingredients and boil for 10 minutes. Remove from heat and chill. 24 large peeled and deveined Shrimp ½ ea Fresh Pineapple ½ C Soy Caramel Glaze Cilantro for garnish 24 ea bamboo skewers Soak bamboo skewer for 1 hour. Peel the Pineapple. Remove core and cut pineapple into ¾ inch cubes. Skewer the pineapple in the center of the shrimp. Lightly season with salt and pepper. Grill shrimp over a very hot grill from 1.5 minutes on each side. Drizzle with soy caramel and garnish with fresh cilantro.

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RECIPE

THE GUIDE

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TRAVELING LOCAVORE

THE GUIDE

What can I say about New York City that you haven’t heard before? Probably not a lot. Anyone who has ever visited can tell you it is the largest city in the U.S. with more than 8.5 million inhabitants. It is also the most ethnically diverse, with approximately 37% of the population being foreign born. This being my first visit to New York, I was overwhelmed by the number of things to do, see and eat...but hey, I’m willing to do my best to eat my way through this town. by TIFFANY WELSH

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THE GUIDE

TRAVELING LOCAVORE

Day 1

10am

below freezing I wake up in New York, to find it snowing andI am determined se. suppo I , March in g visitin for what I get

outside. That’s so I set out in search of a to make the most of my two days in the city, my future. I decide to hit g in walkin of miles the all fuel to fast break y heart the “Best Cheesecake in New JUNIOR’S DINER, known as the the home of big windows overlooking with airy, and rn mode York”. The restaurant is coming down. A review snow the of Broadway, which provide a great view for breakfast. I decide to fare diner l typica serve they s show menu of the s. The food is good, not the play it safe with eggs, ham and hash brown However, at this first stop ge. avera than r bette best breakfast I’ve had but mics - everything you econo York New t on my journey, I learn a lesson abou times as much as you normally 3 least at cost will ille Ashev in buy ally norm pay. Prepare yourself and your wallet.

11am

After breakfast, I head to the AMERICAN OF NATURAL HISTORY, home of an epic UM MUSE d to see display of dinosaur fossils. I personally wante easily the size of a T-Rex and have determined it could the largest have eaten me! But the T-Rex was not nearly aurus Baros t talles the house They here. y displa on dino al sever also are There high. s storie 5 at in the world, um is other giant creatures to amaze you. The muse I ended massive and takes most of the day to view. museum the d visite I so , lunch gh throu there being up the meal cafeteria for my midday meal. Unfortunately, d plan was quite disappointing. If possible, you shoul your visit between meals to avoid the same.

4pm

a After the museum I went across the street for and the oon aftern late was It stroll. PARK RAL CENT I didn’t park was simply gorgeous covered in snow. to the venture far because I wanted to get back g again subway before dark. I look forward to visitin when it’s a bit warmer outside.

7 pm

Dinner in New York on a Friday night….need I say more? It took me quite a while to find restaurant accepting reservations and close to my hotel, since I had already walked nearly five miles during the day. I settled on GUY FIERI’S AMERICAN KITCHEN AND BAR. As a food lover, I am an avid Food Network watcher. Plus, it was close to Times Square, which would provide some after dinner entertainment. The interior of the restaurant was a study in contradictions - both modern and country. Think rough sawn lumber and black gloss bricks, meets stainless steel and taxidermy. The food was surprisingly delicious. I had a half rotisserie chicken with roasted potatoes and seasonal vegetables and I would recommend it to anyone. It may have a chain restaurant vibe, but Guy’s was one of the best meals I ate in New York. I guess there’s a reason he made it to TV fame.

9pm

Given the opportunity, everyone should take a walk around TIME SQUARE. Sure it’s a massive tourist trap, but it is also the “Crossroads of America”. Nearly every restaurant and brand has a flagship store here - so think huge selection and products you never knew existed. Not to mention it’s right on the time. Broadway, so there is theater after theater with shows happening all of the night The billboards and lights make it look like daytime even in the middle something you truly is It day. of time what matter no crowds hugh are there and have to experience at least once. 28

FOODLIFEMAG.COM | SPRING 2017


TRAVELING LOCAVORE

11am

THE GUIDE

Day 2

After all the excitement of the first day, I overslept! I’m out the door as quickly as possible, because I want to visit the CHELSEA MARKET today. I hop on the subway and just a quick ride away, I’m deposited one block from my destination. Lucky for me too, because even though the snow has stopped it’s only about 25 degrees out today. Yikes! Chelsea Market lies just east of the Hudson River in the Meatpacking district of New York. It houses 35 different food vendors, including the MANHATTAN FRUIT MARKET and several non-food stores plus an artist and flea area. This place is just cool. It’s an old warehouse transformed into an indoor market with plenty of remnants to remind you of its past. Walking through the market, it’s hard to decide what to drool over first. But I’ve come here with a recommendation from a friend - eat brunch at FRIEDMAN’S. They are farm to table and amenable to food intolerances. Their special of the day is french toast covered in candied walnuts, bananas and strawberries and dripping in maple syrup. Yum! They also serve fresh squeezed juice daily. There are plenty of other breakfast offerings - like eggs and pancakes, too.

12pm

With a full belly, I decide it’s safe to walk around the rest of the market. This place is as diverse as it can be. The restaurants range from Italian to Mexican to Middle Eastern to Thai. They have bakeries and creperies and donut shops. Coffee and tea and spices and nuts. Basically, if it’s made of food it’s in this building. And the smells are amazing! I believe you could spend an entire day inside this building eating and be happy.

2pm

LINE. Once without seeing the HIGH it was then You cannot visit Chelsea and 0s 198 the train ran here in an elevated railway, the last on of some local residents and many years of visi the h oug Thr . ned ndo lic park. It has plenty aba has been turned into a pub planning and fundraising it , food trucks, river lays of seating, public art disp Statue of Liberty. views and even a view of the

5pm

Back on the train again and headed for GRAND CENTRAL STATION. The scene of so many movies and TV shows - it was so much more than I ever imagined. Interestingly, the Vanderbilt family, While I’m in who is well known to us downtown, I decide in Asheville, also had to hop a train to a major hand in the CHINATOWN. As soon Grand Central Terminal as I step off the train, we know today. As there is a shift in culture. owner of 3 of the 4 major railroads in New York has the highest New York, Cornelius Vanderbilt led the way to a Chinese population central train depot in Manhattan. The Grand Central Station outside of Asia and it is main terminal is something to behold. With soaring ceilings, apparent here. If a sign decorated with constellations, it is simply breathtaking. During is printed in English, it is my visit, there was a couple celebrating their wedding in the also printed in Chinese. midst of thousands of people walking around. There are over 60 Not to mention the many primarily Chinese shops. It’s too bad I’m shops, including an Apple store, and 35 restaurants including a still full from brunch, otherwise I might be able to take in some of branch of the world renowned MAGNOLIA BAKERY - where I the Chinese food, as well as the sights. simply had to sample a cupcake. The perfect sweet ending to my whirlwind trip to the Big Apple!

4pm

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2017 farm tour

PARTICIPATING FARMS A sneak peek of the Appalachian Grown farms you can visit: CANDLER CLUSTER Smoking J’s Fiery Foods Venezia Dream

BARNARDSVILLE CLUSTER Big Ivy Little Farm new! Gather Heritage Farm new! Good Fibrations Angora Goats

FAIRVIEW CLUSTER Cane Creek Creamery Flying Cloud Farm Hickory Nut Gap Farm

HENDERSON CLUSTER

Holly Spring Farm North River Farms Saint Paul Mountain Vineyards

LEICESTER CLUSTER

Addison Farms Vineyard Farm House Beef Franny’s Farm Long Branch Environmental Education Center Reeves Home Place Farm

MADISON CLUSTER

Dry Ridge Farm Spinning Spider Creamery Zimmerman Berry Farm

SMITH MILL WORKS CLUSTER

Jah Works Farm at Smith Mill Works new! Experience other local producers & businesses at the Smith Mill Works Community.

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THE GUIDE

RECIPE

Now that Spring has finally sprung,

what better way to celebrate than a picnic! WNC may have some of the most beautiful picnic locations around and local author Ashley English’s new book, A Year of Picnics, has the perfect food to accompany every locale from waterside to mountaintop. Grab your picnic blanket and enjoy the recipe below, an excerpt from the Table to Farm Picnic. A Year of Picnics ($24.95) is available now, where books are sold.

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VISIT ASHLEY ENGLISH AT SMALLMEASURE.COM

Chimichurri Chicken Of Argentinian origin, chimichurri is a green, herb-based sauce meant to accompany grilled or roasted meats. It is immensely flavorful without being overwhelming. Here I’ve tossed the sauce with roast chicken. You might have a little extra chimichurri left over, depending on the size of your chicken and how liberally you dress it. Store any unused portion in the refrigerator and consider having it with other meats (grilled steak is especially delicious) or eggs. SERVES 4 TO 6, depending on the size of your chicken

you will need

2 garlic cloves 1⁄2 teaspoon coarse sea salt Bunch of fresh cilantro Bunch of fresh parsley, stems chopped off Leaves from about 4 sprigs of fresh oregano 1⁄2 cup olive oil 1⁄4 cup sherry vinegar, red wine vinegar, or white wine vinegar Juice of 1⁄2 lime A few dashes hot sauce 1⁄2 teaspoon fine sea salt Several grinds of black pepper Meat from 1 whole roast chicken (set the bones aside for making stock)

to make

1. Mince the garlic very finely, and then chop the coarse salt into it. Leave to sit and mellow for 20 minutes. 2. Pulse the minced garlic and all the ingredients except the chicken in a food processor or blender until saucy. 3. In a large bowl, toss the sauce with the pulled chicken, cover, and refrigerate for at least 1 hour before serving. From A Year of Picnics by Ashley English © 2017 by Ashley English. Photographs © 2017 by Jen Altman. Reprinted in arrangement with Roost Books, an imprint of Shambhala Publications, Inc. Boulder, CO. www.roostbooks.com [[pg. 46]] SPRING 2017 | FOODLIFEMAG.COM

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A S A P FA R M TO UR

THE GUIDE

2017

farm tour Join the fun this June 24 & 25

FROM VINEYARDS TO CREAMERIES, from fruit and vegetable growers to animal farms, choose from a diverse selection of farms to visit and experience during Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project’s annual Farm Tour. Meet your local producers in person and learn about the methods and philosophies of farming in the Southern Appalachian Mountains. Taste farm-fresh goods, see farm animals, and meet the community’s local food producers. Discover some of Western North Carolina’s diverse and beautiful working farms through tours, demonstrations, and hands-on activities. Pick up a Farm Tour guide, choose your tour route, and set out with your friends and family to learn about the region’s rich agricultural communities and heritage. Farm Tour passes are on sale now at asapconnections. org. Passes are $30 in advance. One pass admits an entire carload. The tour runs 12-5 pm Saturday and Sunday. About Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project ASAP’s mission is to help local farms thrive, link farmers to markets and supporters, and build healthy communities through connections to local food. To learn more about ASAP’s work in the region, visit asapconnections.org, or call (828) 236-1282.

photo by TIFFANY WELSH SPRING 2017 | FOODLIFEMAG.COM

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FEATURE

ASHEVILLE FOOD TOURS

Walking, Talking, Eating, Working

Everybody gather around! Hi, welcome to Asheville Food Tours! I’m Stu Helm, your tour guide, and I’m also a food writer here in Asheville. I took this tour initially, just to see if my readers would like it, and I had so much fun, that when it was over, I asked for a job!”

LOCAL PROVISIONS

BLACKBIRD

FRENCH BROAD CHOCOLATE LOUNGE

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by STU HELM photos by TIFFANY WELSH THAT’S PRETTY MUCH how I start work every Saturday and Sunday, because I have the greatest gig on Earth: I lead walking food tours of downtown Asheville, North Carolina! What is a walking food tour? It’s more or less what it sounds like: I walk with a group of up to 17 patrons to several downtown Asheville eateries, where we all indulge in delicious samples of food and beverages. Or as I tell my patrons, “We walk, we eat, we walk, we eat, etc. etc. rinse, repeat, until we’re all so full, we kinda wanna die… and then the tour ends!” In between eateries, I rattle-off a constant stream of facts, stories, and jokes about Asheville, as well as opinions about restaurants, cafes, ice cream shops, and nightclubs as we walk past them. I answer questions from the patrons, and blather on-and-on about Asheville’s past, present, and future growth, including how the food scene came to be what it is today. I talk about everything from how many hotels are being built (and more importantly who’s running the restaurants in those hotels!), to why there are statues of pigs and turkeys in Pack Square. I even tell the glorious story of the ill-fated “Downtown Mall.” The patrons love it all, and I have learned something about myself: I seem to have a never ending supply of things to say about food and Asheville. Food tours happen in every major American city, and Asheville is lucky to have several, some of which leave city limits to forage and frolic in field and farm, but Asheville Food Tours is the original walking food tour of downtown. I learned everything I know from the best food tour guide ever, Paddy Riels, who is fun, and informative, and really loves his job. He smiles,


FOR MORE INFO VISIT ASHEVILLEFOODTOURS.COM

BHRAMARI

NIGHTBELL

jokes, laughs, cajoles, and knows every person in downtown Asheville. He’s like an ambassador to the food scene, or just a friendly local, who likes to show off his town, and fill hungry people with great food. My kinda guy! Asheville Food Tours is a small company owned by Chris Ortwein… a name you gotta love because “ort” means “morsel of food,” and “wein” is German for wine, and that’s exactly what a food tour involves: A splash of wine here, a little nosh there, a pleasant stroll through a beautiful city with a local resident who knows a thing or two. When we’re lucky, the chefs come out to chat with us! A food tour can and should be a very special experience. As a food writer, as well as a guide, and patron of several local food tours, I recommend food tours very highly!

THE RHU

Asheville Food Tours run daily April through December. Visit ashevillefoodtours.com for tickets, tour schedules, and more info.

SOVEREIGN REMEDIES

STRADA

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THE GUIDE

RECIPE

Gluten-Free Pita Bread recipe & photo by TIFFANY WELSH

1 ¾ C Bob’s Red Mill 1 to 1 Baking Mix, plus more for rolling dough ¼ C Tapioca Starch 1 ½ tsp Baking powder 1 tsp Kosher Salt 1 Tbsp Oil 1 Egg + 1 Egg White ¾ C Milk Preheat oven to 400º. Place an inverted cookie sheet or pizza stone into the warming oven. In a food processor, combine dry ingredients. Process to mix thoroughly. Add wet ingredients to food processor. Mix about 2 minutes more until the dough starts to pull away from the sides. The dough will be wet and sticky. Using a spatula, scrape dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Sprinkle the top of the dough with a bit more flour to keep it from sticking to your hands. Shape the dough into a square and cut into 8 even pieces. Using a bit of flour, roll each piece into a small ball. Place the balls onto a piece of parchment paper. Flatten to about ¼ inch thick using floured hands. Place onto baking sheet in oven. Cook for 3 minutes, then quickly flip over. Bake for an additional 2 minutes then flip again. Cook until lightly browned, 2-3 minutes more. Cool for 3 minutes and serve warm.

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THE GUIDE

SPRING GARDENING

Time to Get Your Hands in the Dirt! by KIMBERLY KIRSTEIN

The ground is thawing, the days are warming, and spring is in the air! As the trees get their leaves, the tulips bloom, and the birds start singing, many of us start to think about planting a garden imagining buckets full of tomatoes, baskets of cucumbers, and fresh corn on the cob. WAIT! SPRING IN THE MOUNTAINS brings unpredictable weather and late cold snaps. The safe planting date for many of these summer vegetables isn’t until mid-May in Asheville and can be later than that in the high mountains. And even the safe planting date isn’t guaranteed protection for those veggies that have no ability to survive any type of frost. So now that the days are longer and you are itching to get your hands dirty, what can you safely plant and be eating soon? Here are six quick to grow spring delights:

RADISHES - You can pick up seeds for the standard red radish or brighten up your plate with Amethyst, Black Spanish, Watermelon, and Pink Beauty varieties.

ARUGULA - This flavorful, slightly spicy green brightens up any salad or can be the shining green in a spring salad with apples, dried cherries, walnuts, and balsamic vinaigrette.

LETTUCE - You can buy a single seed pack that includes a

rieties includes yellow, red, pink, orange, and white stalks.

MIZUNA - This slightly spicy Asian green goes great in a mixed green salad, but can also stand alone sautéed as a side dish for seafood and is particularly delicious with shrimp. All of these can be planted from seed and won’t take long to sprout, but if you are in a hurry to see your garden growing, pick up seedlings for the greens from your local tailgate market. If you still have some room in your garden, consider planting some onions and potatoes. While they take a bit more time to grow, they will be ready to start eating by early summer. Potato varieties such as Kennebec, Yukon Gold, and Dark Red Norlands grow well in our area and a couple of well-planted seed potatoes can make several meals for your family. Add a quick row of onion sets to the border of your garden and you can start using these as spring onions in about six weeks.

variety of lettuces that you can’t get at the grocery store and have a colorful salad bowl next month or choose from varieties like Flashy Trout Back (a red speckled romaine), Red Salad Bowl (a red leaf), Black Seeded Simpson (a delicate green leaf), and Dark Red Lola Rosa (frilled green leaves with red edges).

HAPPY GARDENING & HAPPY EATING!

KALE - This hearty green will grow through the summer and

ARUGULA

RADICCHIO

KALE

SWISS CHARD

MIZUNA

SPINACH

well into the fall keeping you in greens for months to come. As you harvest it, make sure to only harvest one-third of the leaves at a time and give it a week to grow in between harvests. Red Russian and Siberian varieties are both delicious and easy to grow in WNC.

SWISS CHARD - Look for a pack of Bright Lights chard and brighten up your spring green garden. This mix of chard va40

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Use this list to find each of these delicious downtown eateries on the International Asheville map designed by Stu Helm.

1

ADDISSAE Ethiopian

21 13 Eagle St • 828-252-2327 • limonesrestaurant.com

2

BABA NAHM

Middle Eastern 1 Page Ave • 828-575-2075 • babanahm.com

22 45 S French Broad Ave • 828-239-8808 • littlebeethai.com

3

BARTACO Latin American inspired

23 77 Biltmore Ave • 828-255-8080 • mamacitasgrill.com

4

BEN’S TUNE UP Asian fusion

195 Hilliard • 828-424-7580 • benstuneup.com

24 70 N Lexington Ave • 828-225-8880 • melaasheville.com

5

BLUE DREAM CURRY HOUSE Pan-Asian 81 Patton Ave • 828-258-2500 • bluedreamcurry.com

25 19 Wall St • 828-254-4363 • mgroadlounge.com

6

BOUCHON French

26 1 Page Ave • 828-225-4133 • modestonc.com

7

BRASILIA Brazilian

27 13 W Walnut St • 828-251-8879 • mountainmadreavl.com

8

CALYPSO Caribbean

28 3 Pack Square • 828-250-9898

9

CHAI PANI

Indian 22 Battery Park Ave • 828-254-4003 • chaipani.net

29 62 N Lexington • 828-505-2708 • petespiesavl.com

CHAMPA Japanese

30 82 Patton Ave • 828-505-8688 • redgingerasheville.com

48 Commerce St • 828-707-6563 • addissae.com

121 Biltmore • 984-229-8226 • bartaco.com

62 N Lexington • 828-350-1140 • ashevillebouchon.com 26 E Walnut • 828-785-1599 • brasiliasteakhouse.com 18 N Lexington • 828-575-9494 • calypsoasheville.com

10 3 Biltmore Ave • 828-225-8885 • champaasheville.com CRÊPERIE BOUCHON French

LIMONES

Latin American

LITTLE BEE THAI MAMACITAS

Thai

Mexican

MELA INDIAN RESTAURANT Indian MG ROAD Indian

MODESTO Italian

MOUNTAIN MADRE Mexican NOODLE SHOP

PETE’S PIES

RED GINGER SALSA’S

Asian

British pub

Dim Sum & Tapas

11 68 N Lexington • 828-350-3741 • creperiebouchon.com 31 6 Patton Ave • 828-252-9805 • salsasnc.com CUCINA 24

12 24 Wall St • 828-254-6170 • cucina24restaurant.com CÚRATE

Italian

13 11 Biltmore Ave • 828-239-2946 • curatetapasbar.com Mediterranean

DOC CHEY’S

14 37 Biltmore Ave • 828-252-8220 • doccheys.com Asian

32 89 Patton Ave • 828-232-7370 • sonoranc.com Mexican

STRADA ITALIANO

33 27 Broadway • 828-348-8448 • stradaasheville.com Italian

SUWANA’S THAI ORCHID Thai

34 11 Broadway • 828-281-8151 • suwanasthaiorchid.com

EN LA CALLE Mexican tapas

35 1 Page Ave • 828-774-5554 • thaitaranc.com

HANA

36 130 College St • 828-552-3240 • twistedlaurel.com

15 15 Eagle St • 828-232-7012 • enlacalleasheville.com 16 5B Biltmore Ave • 828-251-1661 • hanaasheville.com 17

SONORA

Latin American

Japanese

THAI TARA Thai

TWISTED LAUREL Mediterranean

HEIWA SHOKUDO

Japanese 87 N Lexington • 828-254-7761 • heiwashokudo.com

37 19 Broadway • 828-225-2551 • wasabiasheville.com

JERUSALEM GARDEN Mediterranean

38 12 Biltmore • 828-232-9191 • whiteducktacoshop.com

18 78 Patton • 828-254-0255 • jerusalemgardencafe.com KATHMANDU CAFE Indian/Tibetan

WASABI Japanese

WHITE DUCK TACO SHOP

ZAMBRA

Tacos

19 90 Patton • 828-252-1080 • cafekathmanduasheville.com 39 85 Walnut St • 828-232-1060 • zambratapas.com KOREAN HOUSE

20 122 College St • 828-785-1500 • koreanhousenc.com 42

Korean

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Tapas


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THE GUIDE

CALENDAR CAROLINA DONUT FESTIVAL May 20 | Main St, Downtown Marion This family friendly festival is held in Downtown “Mayberrylike” Marion, NC. The festival spotlights vendors from all around and their sweet, delicious treats.There will be booths for local and regional artisans to display and sell their creations.The festival will also feature: a 5K Dash, a Car Raffle, a Donut Pageant and a donut eating contest. carolinadonutfestival.com

Asheville Herb Festival

MAY A S H E V ILLE COC K TAI L W E E K May 1-7 | Various venues A celebration of the art of mixology and craft spirits, combining the best talent and trends the industry has to offer. This week long event provides something for everyone from industry to the occasional cocktail drinker. A variety of events at every price point including workshops, tastings, competitions, and more. carolinacocktailweek.com A S H E V ILLE H E R B F E S T I VAL May 5-7 | WNC Farmers Market The WNC Chapter of the NC Herb Association hosts an incredible festival with an estimated 80,000 attendees. Special guests from the Herb Society of America representing the great variety of herb related businesses in NC, as well as natural gardening and landscaping specialists, makers of herbal ointments, balms, soaps, teas, sauces, and medicines. Free admission, parking, shuttle & workshops. 828-301-8968 or AshevilleHerbFestival.org A S H E V ILLE A R T I S AN B R E AD F E S T I VAL May 6, 10am-4pm | A-B Tech, Magnolia Building The 13th annual ABF brings together millers, bakers, and bread lovers to celebrate Asheville’s vibrant baking community. Over 15 local bakeries will be sampling and selling their bread during the ‘Bakers’ Showcase’ – a free, family-friendly event running from 10am - 2pm. From 10am - 4pm workshops will be held with well-known bakers Peter Reinhart, Jim Lahey, Lionel Vatinet, and Tara Jensen. Workshop tickets are $15 each. ashevillebreadfestival.com 12 TH A NNU A L B L AC K MOUN TAI N GAR DEN SH O W & S A LE May 20, 9am-4pm | The Monte Vista Hotel, Black Mountain Over 20 vendors with a large assortment of plant material and garden accessories. Shoppers enjoy the large selection of plants and leave with arms filled with flats of plants. Learn something new at the mini garden workshops, then relax on the Monte Vista Hotel porch afterwards for a tasty lunch. blackmountainbeautification.org 44

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B E E R C IT Y FEST IVA L May 27, 12-5pm | Roger McGuire Green Asheville, NC’s premier downtown craft beer festival brings the best local and regional breweries from Asheville and surrounding areas together for a great day of beer and music to benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of WNC.. Admission is $45/ advance, $50/day of event. beercityfestival.com

JU NE 4T H A N N UA L B R EVA R D B LUES & B B Q FES TI VAL June 2-3 | Brevard Music Center Two days of music, craft and food vendors, and a BBQ Cook Off. The lineup consists of blues legends like Tinsley Ellis, Anson Funderburgh and Room Full of Blues, while bringing some regional favorites like Delta Moon, Lee Griffin Band, Peggy Ratusz and the Daddy Long Legs, Dangerous Gentlemens, Mojo Brothers Blues Band and many more. brevardbluesfestival.com A SHE VILLE VEG A N FEST June 9-11 | Pack Square Park A celebration of compassionate living. On Saturday, listen to speakers from around the country as they tackle the latest vegan issues. On Sunday, enjoy an outdoor festival with over 100 vendors showcasing vegan food, beer, lifestyle products and more! Hosted by Brother Wolf, the largest no-kill animal rescue organization in North Carolina. Free. veganfest.bwar.org SHR IM P AT T HE FA R M June 24 | Hickory Nut Gap Farm Enjoy cauldron boiled shrimp, HNG Farm grilled sausage, smoked potato salad, coleslaw and finish with seasonal fruit crisp and Ultimate ice cream. Music and a live auction with proceeds supporting Haitian Scholarships, wheelchairs for a Mexican village, and Rotarians Against Hunger who will package more thatn 300,000 meals to be distributed in WNC by MANNA Foodbank. hickorynutgapfarm.com A SA P ’S FA R M T O UR June 24 & 25 | Various locations For one weekend every year, the gates and barns of WNC farms open to the public for the Farm Tour. The self-guided driving tour is your chance to learn how food grows, taste farm-fresh products, hang out with farm animals, and meet the community’s food producers. Buy a pass, pack your car with family/friends, and set off to celebrate the region’s agricultural heritage and beautiful landscapes. $30/pass. Purchase your pass at asapconnections.org


2 0 1 7 o p e n i n g d at e s asheville city market

April 1, Saturdays 8-12

asheville City market South April 5, Wednesdays 12-4

Black mountain tailgate market May 6, Saturdays 9-12

east asheville tailgate market May 5, Fridays 3-6

French Broad Food CoOp tailgate market April 19, Wednesdays 2-6

henderson County tailgate market March 14, Saturdays 7-12

leicester Farmers market April 2, Saturdays 9-2

mills river Farmers market May 7, Saturdays 8-12

north asheville tailgate market April 1, Saturdays 8-12

oakley farmers market

May 4, Thursdays 3:30-6:30

Original waynesville tailgate market May 14, Wednesdays + Saturdays 8-12

river arts district farmers market May 3, Wednesdays 2-6

weaverville tailgate market

April 12, Wednesdays 2:30-6:30

west asheville tailgate market April 4, Tuesdays 3:30-6:30

For a complete list of the 90+ tailgates in the region, including their season closing dates, visit ASAP’s online Local Food Guide at appalachiangrown.org

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THE GUIDE

LAST BITE

Paletas de Fresas

recipe & photo by TIFFANY WELSH

2 C Strawberries, stemmed & quartered ⅛ C Orange Juice ¼ C Agave Nectar ¼ tsp Lime Zest Pinch of Salt Combine all ingredients in a bowl. Using an immersion blender, liquify. If you don’t have an immersion blender, you can dump everything into a countertop blender. Pour mixture into popsicle molds. Freeze until firm, 6 to 8 hours. Makes 4 popsicles

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Profile for IWANNA USA

Food Life Spring 2017  

Food Life Spring 2017  

Profile for iwannausa