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Austin College FRONTIER WOMAN FOR MODERN TIMES

Magazine September 2008

50 YEARS OF WYNNE CHAPEL

| WINKLER PRESENTS OPENING ADDRESS | ANNA LAURA PAGE TRIBUTE


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Are you receiving the latest news from Austin College?

Not if we don’t have your email address!

The Office of College Relations distributes the Austin College e-newsletter, @ac, the first Monday of each month with updates and sends notice of significant breaking news from campus as needed. Subscribe: www.austincollege.edu/Form.asp?3477

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When Oscar Page steps down as Austin College president in June 2009, the community also will say goodbye to Anna Laura Page. The editor offers a closer look at the first lady.

magazine.austincollege.edu 10 13 18 21 25 26 31 33 36 38

More Summer VIP Experiences Anna Laura Page Photos: The Austin College Years The Race for Madam President: Reflections from Kiki McLean At the Death House Door: Film Trailer and Details Ties to Presbyterian Seminaries Still Strong Additional Opening of School Photos News Briefs Photos More About the Presidents Climate Commitment The Women’s Soccer Travel Blog Legends Dinner and Golf Photos

Anna Laura Page Tribute

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Emily Austin: Frontier Woman for Modern Times

It was Emily Austin who gave the initial gift to establish Austin College. She was a woman ahead of her time, providing for her family when women had little to no power in society. A new biography by Light Cummins will give the Texas pioneer woman a place in history she long has deserved. 20

In the Shadow of Death

Carroll Pickett served as the Death House chaplain at Texas’ Huntsville Prison for 13 years, and his experiences have been made into a documentary released in May. 22

Wynne Chapel’s 50th Anniversary

Built in 1958, Wynne Chapel has seen thousands of students come through its doors. In November, the College celebrates the 50th anniversary of the building’s dedication. 26

Winkler Presents Opening Address

Henry Winkler shared words of inspiration and hope with students, faculty, staff, and guests at the official opening of the 160th academic year of the College. 28

Out of the Congo

An Austin College art exhibit offers a look at African art that usually accessible only in major museums. The art objects, on loan from Austin College alumni, represent villagers’ gratitude to a missionary doctor.


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AUSTIN COLLEGE

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Oscar C. Page President Nan Davis Vice President Heidi Ellis Vice President Mike Imhoff Vice President Jerry Holbert Vice President Tim Millerick Vice President

for Institutional Enrollment for Business Affairs for Academic Affairs for Institutional Advancement for Student Affairs and Athletics

AUSTIN COLLEGE MAGAZINE

September 2008 Editor

Vickie S. Kirby Senior Director of Editorial Communication Design Mark Steele Art Director Editorial Dara McCoy Senior Writer Jeff Kelly Sports Information Coordinator Victoria Hughes Production Coordinator Vickie S. Kirby

28 IN EVERY ISSUE: 3 7 26 35 39 48 49

Faculty Notebook Student Achievers Around Campus Home Team ‘Roo Notes Calendar of Events Ever y Picture Tells a Stor y The Stor y Behind the Photo

Photography Vickie S. Kirby Office of College Relations Michael Strysick Executive Director The Austin College Magazine is published by the Office of College Relations, Institutional Advancement Division. The Office of College Relations retains the right to determine the editorial content and presentation of information contained herein. Articles or opinion written by guest writers do not necessarily reflect official views or policy of Austin College and its Board of Trustees. Contact Austin College Magazine: Office of College Relations, Suite 6H Austin College 900 North Grand Avenue Sherman, TX 75090-4400 Editor: 903.813.2414 Fax: 903.813.2415 Email: editor@austincollege.edu Austin College does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, or status as a veteran in the administration of its educational policies and programs, employment policies and practices, enrollment policies and practices, and athletics program, as well as any other College-administered policy, procedure, practice, or program. Reasonable accommodations are made for individuals with disabilities.

Š 2008 Austin College


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CIRCLING THE GLOBE

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Dear Friends of Austin College, When students returned to campus this fall, I began immediately to hear stories of summer experiences. With the start of the Global Outreach (or GO) program and the continuation of the Lilly Vocational Internship Program, 63 students participated in these two programs in experiential learning experiences that were nothing short of life-changing. The 10 GO Fellows worked with non-profit groups around the globe — five in Africa, two in Peru, and one each in Russia, Pakistan, and Guatemala. Created with a grant from the Todd and Abby Williams Family Foundation of Dallas, the GO program aims to cultivate the next generation of local, national, and global leaders by promoting innovative, experiential servant leadership opportunities around the world. As a GO fellow, Holly Boerner ’09 worked this summer at the Adana Children’s Center, an orphanage in Debre Zeyit, Ethiopia, 45 minutes from that nation’s capital, Addis Ababa. This was Holly’s third visit to Ethiopia as an Austin College student. The first two trips, Holly was at the Kamashi Orphanage and School, which serves the area of Benishangul-Gumuzone, one of Ethiopia’s poorest regions, where there are an estimated 40,000 orphans. By working in these communities, Holly deepened her cultural perspective of a part of the world where few students travel. She also met successfully the challenge to view the world from a global perspective—and from a servant leader’s heart. The Lilly Vocational Internship Program provides support for a wide range of internships throughout the world, but most take place in the United States. As I visited with one Lilly intern, Casie Luong ’10, I realized what a great impact this type of program can have on the life of one person. Casie is the daughter of parents who fled from Vietnam during the war, and this summer Casie went to her parents’ home country to work in a children’s shelter in Ho Chi Minh City. Casie’s experience at the Little Rose Shelter provided her the opportunity to share her gifts with children who had suffered abuse and to contribute positively to her family’s cultural home. The shelter was established in

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1992 in response to growing incidents of human trafficking in Vietnam. Since its founding, Little Rose has provided a safe shelter to hundreds of young girls and continues to help them build a positive future. Casie taught English and music, among other subjects, at Little Rose, and while doing this she had the opportunity to meet relatives she had only heard about. Her parents returned to Vietnam this summer for the first time since their departure decades ago, and they were able to witness their daughter’s servant leadership in action. Austin College always has encouraged students to step outside their comfort zone to serve, and today’s students are no different. These are just two examples of the College’s commitment to global understanding for all students who desire to participate in international experiences. Ten additional students participated in lifechanging internships through our centers for Environmental Studies and for Southwestern and Mexican Studies, as well as our Career Study OffCampus program. When the 2008 graduating class walked across the platform, we knew that 70 percent of these students had participated in a global experience. Our alumni take great pride in their service opportunities and their recognition of the need to understand and participate in the solving of global problems. In reflecting on the experiences of the students who reached out to others this summer, I feel confident that future generations of students will continue this great tradition at Austin College. Service, experiential learning, and concern for people throughout the world will be the enduring theme of the College. As you read about Emily Austin and the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the opening of Wynne Chapel, be reminded that our great traditions have their roots in the vision of our founders, who were inspired by the Presbyterian Church to reach out to the underserved and provide opportunities for service to people throughout the world.

Sincerely, Oscar C. Page President


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Faculty Members Earn Promotions, Tenure Bart Dredge, who joined Austin College’s faculty in 1994, has been promoted to professor of sociology effective this fall. The rank of full professor at Austin College is reserved for those faculty members whose careers reflect outstanding cumulative achievement. Faculty considered for promotion to professor have demonstrated excellence in teaching and in research, publication, or other professional work that supports distinguished teaching and continued intellectual growth. Superior performance in areas such as advising, program development, committee service, and other institutional leadership are required. A faculty member normally completes a minimum of six years of successful full-time teaching at the rank of associate professor before consideration for promotion. Alessandro Garganigo, English; Julie Hempel, Spanish; Elena Oliv´e, Spanish; and Ivette VargasO’Bryan, religion, were granted tenure and promotion to associate professor effective fall 2008. Faculty members considered for tenure are evaluated on teaching, professional development, and service to Austin College, with teaching as the most important factor in evaluation. Tenure is a contractual agreement for continued appointment until retirement unless the faculty members resigns or is dismissed for cause. Austin College tenure-track faculty members are normally considered for tenure in the sixth year of probationary service. In some pre-arranged instances, a faculty member may receive credit at another institution toward satisfying the probationary period for full-time teaching experience.

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Faculty Appointed to Leadership Roles as Academic Division Deans The appointment this fall of Patrick Duffey, professor of Spanish, as dean of Humanities completes a cycle of recent updates in the deans’ positions at the College. In fall 2007, Steve Goldsmith, professor of biology, and Jerry Johnson, professor of business administration and economics, began terms as deans in the divisions of Sciences and Social Sciences, respectively. The appointments were made by President Oscar C. Page upon advice from Mike Imhoff, vice president for Academic Affairs, who consulted with division faculty. The appointments are made for a term of six years. Each dean coordinates the departments of the division, supervises staff and facilities, monitors and requests budgeted funds, coordinates new faculty searches, conducts reviews and evaluations of faculty, and assists individual faculty members in support of teaching, advising, scholarship, and other professional activity. Due to heavy administrative duties, deans customarily teach two courses each in the fall and spring terms and may occasionally teach a January Term course. The appointments follow the completion of service as divisional deans in summer 2007 and 2008 by E. Don Williams, professor of mathematics and Chadwick Chair in Mathematics; Howard Starr, professor of psychology; and Bernice Melvin, professor of French and Margaret Root Brown Chair of Foreign Languages.

Bart Dredge

Patrick Duffey

Steve Goldsmith

Annual Awards Honor Faculty Accomplishments Awards presented at the close of each academic year recognize faculty members’ service to the College community, teaching excellence, and individual scholarship. One recipient each from the Sciences Division and Social Sciences Division is selected for each honor. The Humanities Division selects two recipients for each award due to its larger number of faculty. TEACHING: Light Cummins, professor of history; James Johnson, professor of classics; Melanie Fox Kean, assistant professor of economics; and Kelly Reed, associate professor of biology.

SCHOLARSHIP: Nathan Bigelow, assistant professor of

political science; Wayne Crannell, associate professor of music; Michael Higgs, associate professor of mathematics and computer science; and Jacqueline Moore, professor of history. SERVICE: Peter Anderson, associate professor of English; Truett Cates, professor of German; David Griffith, associate professor of business administration; and Donald Salisbury, associate professor of physics.

September 2008

Jerry Johnson

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Of Temples and Teepees

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PHOTO BY JASON JONES

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raveling the world is one of the perks of the job for most Austin College professors. Jackie Moore, professor of history, has taken advantage of that perk on numerous JanTerms and study abroad trips since coming to the College in 1994. One of Jackie’s most memorable trips is a JanTerm 2005 trip after the December 26, 2004, Indian Ocean Tsunami. Austin College students quickly gathered medical supplies and more than $4,000 in donations that students in Jackie’s course, “Thailand, Cambodia, Myanmar: Temples & Empires,” delivered to a relief agency in Thailand. “Being able to make a contribution to those countries was the most rewarding,” she said. During her 2007– 2008 sabbatical, Jackie travelled to India, England, France, Hawaii, New York, and Washington, but it was a 2,500-mile research trip this summer that recently intrigued her most — and she never left Texas. “I was stunned with the diversity of the different parts of the state and with just how flat south Texas plains actually are,” said Jackie of the trip to research her book, Cow Boys and Cattle Men: Nineteenth Century Class and Masculinity on the Texas Frontier, to be published in late 2009 by New York University Press. “I saw desert, mountains, hills, rivers, land-locked sand dunes, beaches, cities, small villages, and even a picnic area made of giant, painted metal teepees.” Though Jackie enjoyed her travel-intensive sabbatical, she is just as happy to be in the classroom this fall. She’s particularly interested in teaching within an area of her research specialty in the course “Gilded Age and Progressive Era, 1877–1919.” This period of American history “has everything — great scandal, but also great reform, spectacular economic and technological achievement alongside spectacular poverty, and Teddy Roosevelt to boot,” Jackie said. Jackie’s teaching usually includes aspects of women’s experiences in history, like Emily Austin’s. She said it’s important that her students know the obstacles women have overcome and what rights exist today, and are able to look critically at situations instead of assuming equality exists. Jackie said she benefited from growing up in an era Jackie Moore where she felt that being a woman was not a barrier to achievement, but admitted that not everyone shared her beliefs. She said the view that women achieve positions based on affirmative action measures instead of their own merit is a sign that women still face perceptual barriers. “As Emily Austin shows, in reality, women have been running things very capably all along so it should be no stretch of the imagination to think that a woman could be as good at the job as anyone else,” Jackie said. Jackie finds the diversity of experiences and academic courses in her role at Austin College as broad as the geographic diversity of Texas. “I love the flexibility I have to teach a variety of courses and the opportunity to take students abroad for JanTerm to places they would never go by themselves,” she said. The College’s commitment “to make a positive contribution to the world,” as exemplified by the emergency relief trip to Thailand, is yet another reason she’s proud to be a part of Austin College.


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PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES Jeff Czajkowski, assistant professor of economics, presented the research paper “Run from the Water, Hide from the Wind: Toward a Better Understanding of the Costs of Not Evacuating from a Hurricane” in July at the 2008 Hazards and Disasters Researchers Meeting, held near Boulder, Colorado. This summer, he continued research in this area in conjunction with Emily Kennedy ’09, a math and economics major. Peter DeLisle, the Leslie B. Crane Chair in Leadership Studies and director of the College’s Posey Leadership Institute, was the principal instructor of the Leadership Development Conference this August hosted by the Texas Engineering and Technical Consortium and All Across Texas. He will lead another session in Dallas in October. Sessions include topics such as leadership effectiveness, project management, formal communication, and engineering ethics in the workplace. Approximately 60 engineering students from across the state participated in the week-long program. The state-sponsored program also promotes collaboration among engineering colleges and allows students to interact with engineering professionals and learn about various career specialties. In August, representatives on hand included those from Raytheon and Texas Instruments as well as the Texas Corp of Engineers. Will Rusinko ’09, a member of the Posey Leadership Institute who plans a career in engineering, served as a teaching assistant and facilitator at the conference. DeLisle hopes to include Austin College computer science students in future conferences. Daniel Dominick, associate professor of music, became president of the South Central Division of the College Orchestra Director’s Association in February. The Sherman Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Dominick, will perform its 200th concert, the Tchaikovsky Sixth Symphony (Pathetique), on October 25. Kirk Everist and Brett Boessen, assistant professors of communication studies, led Sherman-area aspiring filmmakers to release their creativity in Script-to-Screen workshops this summer. Each provided a workshop offered to assist individuals working on the 24-Hour Script-to-Screen Short Film Contest sponsored by the Sherman Arts Festival held September 20. In addition to exploring creativity, the faculty members offered insight on narrative story telling, script writing, and filming.

Greg Kinzer, assistant professor of English, will present a paper, “Morphology, Consilience, and Metaphor: Natural History as Poetic Method,” at the Modernist Studies Association Conference in Nashville, Tennessee, in November. The paper examines the influence of Darwin and the scientific practices of early 20th century natural historians on modernist poets, especially Marianne Moore. He also will participate in a seminar discussion on “Modernist Gene/alogies,” which asks how the understanding of evolution and genetics developed in modernist/modern culture. In addition, Kinzer will present the paper “Reiteration as Noise: Joan Retallack’s ‘The Woman in the Chinese Room’” at the annual conference of the Society for Literature, Science, and the Arts in Charlotte, North Carolina, in November. Jerry Lincecum, professor emeritus of English, and Peggy Redshaw, professor of biology, are taking their Telling Our Stories autobiography program in a little different direction this fall. They have joined with Kelly Reed, associate professor of biology, and other members of Austin College’s Relay for Life team, ’Roos Fighting Cancer, to compile and publish a thematic book of stories, Contemplating Cancer: Stories of Life, Love, Laughter, and Loss. The book will contain stories written by cancer survivors, as well as family members and friends of cancer patients. More than 55 stories have been collected, with experiences dating as far back as 1930. Several contributions have come from faculty, staff, and alumni. Publication of the book is scheduled for early November. All profits will go to the American Cancer Society for research. In June, Lincecum and Redshaw made a Gideon Lincecum Chautauqua presentation at the Botanical Research Institute of Texas in Fort Worth, Texas. They also conducted a workshop for teachers in grades 4–8 at the Star of Texas Museum in Washington County, giving free copies of Gideon’s book Science on the Texas Frontier and demonstrating ways to use original historical and scientific writing in the classroom.

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Andra Troncalli, assistant professor of physics, has received a Cottrell College Science Award from Research Corporation, providing nearly $45,000 for her project “Investigation of Vortex Pinning Anisotropy in the High Temperature Superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-8.” She received an additional $9,000 from the Austin College Priddy Grant for the work. “Columnar defects have proven to be highly effective at pinning vortices in high temperature superconductors,” Troncalli said. “However, most studies have been performed with the defects oriented either perpendicular to, or at large angles relative to, the superconducting Cu-O planes of YBa2Cu3O7-8. No study has investigated the effects of columnar defects introduced parallel to the superconducting Cu-O planes. We will perform a systematic study in which we compare the effects of columnar defects introduced parallel and perpendicular to the superconducting Cu-O planes.” The award is for two years and covers equipment, supplies, stipends for the faculty member and a student, and travel funds to conduct research at other institutions.

Andra Troncalli

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Where are they now? Dan Schores, Associate Professor Emeritus of Sociology

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f he’s not on a river cruise in Holland or Belgium or on some other excursion, Dan Schores, associate professor emeritus of sociology, is likely to be found somewhere near Austin College. He said his days leading JanTerms in the Caribbean fed his travel interest, but now that he’s footing the entire cost of travel, he doesn’t globetrot quite so often. That’s not to say Schores is sitting at home. He and his wife, Marie, keep their days full serving in numerous organizations in Sherman. Dan preaches on a regular basis in southeastern Oklahoma Presbyterian churches and serves as president of the Texoma Senior Foundation, which collects donations for senior service agencies in the area. He also leads the Austin College Elderhostel program, an informal learning opportunity for citizens older than 55; works with the Alpha Phi Omega national service fraternity, which Schores helped establish on campus; and finds time to attend plays, musical performances, and sporting events at Austin College. When he’s not serving the community, Schores enjoys woodcarving as a member of the Texoma Woodcarving Guild and keeps up with the subjects that interested him most in his 25-year academic career that started at Austin College in 1969. He often speaks to community organizations, covering topics such as the southwest American Indians or Victorian homes in north Texas. Whether on a river in Holland, in a pulpit in Oklahoma, or at a podium in Sherman, Schores hasn’t seemed to lose a step since retiring from the faculty in 1994. Contact him at 1513 Yarborough, Sherman, Texas 75092.

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PHOTO BY JASON JONES

TRONCALLI RECEIVES AWARD FOR RESEARCH PURSUIT


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Claire Balani Named Institute for International Public Policy Fellow Balani, an international relations major, is spending her junior year in China, where she will gain advanced skills in Mandarin Chinese. She eventually will pursue a Ph.D. in political science and hopes for a career with the U.S. State Department as an adviser on human rights in Asia. The IIPP is funded by the U.S. Department of Education and administered by the United Negro College Fund Special Programs Corporation to provide students from underrepresented minority groups with the education and training necessary for advancing in international affairs. COURTESY PHOTO

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laire Balani ’10 was one of 32 students from across the nation selected as Institute for International Public Policy (IIPP) Fellows for 2008. Each fellow receives scholarship and services totaling nearly $100,000 over a fiveyear period. The fellowship is a six-component program that includes the Sophomore Summer Policy Institute at Spelman College; Junior Year Study Abroad; Junior Summer Policy Institute at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy; Summer Language Institute; Master’s Degree Program in International Affairs; and an IIPP Internship. The fellowships provide funding for the summer programs and portions of the study abroad and master’s degree programs. Balani began the fellowship program in June with the seven-week Sophomore Summer Policy Institute that introduced basics of foreign affairs, international policy development, cultural competence, and career and graduate study options. Students then participated in study missions in Washington, D.C., and New York City with briefings at the Department of Education, the Department of State, and the Central Intelligence Agency, as well as the Council on Foreign Relations, the United Nations, and the World Bank.

Claire Balani

Austin College Musicians Perform in Austria Festival COURTESY PHOTO

Professor of Music Rick Duhaime and 2008 graduates Kaitlin Hampton (violist), Lindsay Brown (mezzo soprano vocalist), and Justin Duncan (bass vocalist) found themselves in a birthplace of classical music in August, performing at the 33rd annual Classical Music Festival (Eisenstädter Sommerakademie) in Austria. “During this festival, we are practicing and performing classical works often in the very venues in which they were conceived,” Duhaime said. “That cannot be duplicated.” For two and a half weeks, musicians from the United States and Europe studied, rehearsed, and performed in Vienna and surrounding concert venues. An orchestra of 50 and a chorus of 80, plus four internationally recognized vocal soloists, presented two master works of classical music: Joseph Haydn’s Lord Nelson Mass and Ludwig van Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis. Duhaime has served for 18 years as an orchestral principal and member of the festival’s continuing faculty. Participation is by audition, and as a regional coordinator, Duhaime is able to admit performers. Daily rehearsals as well as the final gala concert of the festival were held in the Schloss Musicians Kaitlin Hampton, Lindsay Brown, Rick Esterházy where Haydn, a lifelong resident of Austria, spent some 32 years of his career Duhaime, and Justin Duncan relax after a gala concert performance in Austria. composing and playing for the ruling Austrian family.

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MELLON FELLOWS SPEND SUMMER IN RESEARCH PROJECTS

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esearch is a key element of the academic process at Austin College, and students have many opportunities to work with faculty on projects. Austin College’s Mellon Summer Research Grants in the Humanities and Social Sciences allow recipients to devote several weeks of undivided time to the academic venture. Grants are extended to six Mellon Fellows each year, providing $3,000 stipends for students to pursue 10-week summer research projects. Students then spend another term or academic year preparing their research papers. Collaborative work with a faculty adviser is integral to the project. Students and faculty initially spend an intensive few weeks in design of the research plan before students work independently for seven to eight weeks. Faculty and students then reconnect to analyze materials and discuss the writing project. In 2008, a Mellon Special Projects Grant was presented in addition to the customary six grants. Recipients, their projects, and faculty advisers follow.

2008 Mellon Fellowships Devin Gonier ’09 Major: Philosophy Minor: Religious Studies “Healing, Pluralism, and Bodhisattvas in the Tibetan Region” Faculty Adviser: Ivette Vargas-O’Bryan, associate professor of religious studies Justin Harris ’09 Major: Interdisciplinary: Latin American Poverty Studies Minor: Spanish “Culture in Pill Form: Alternative Medicine in Cuzco, Peru” Faculty Adviser: Terry Hoops, associate professor of anthropology Jaisy Joseph ’09 Majors: Religion and Psychology “ Cultural Identity and the Emergence of First-Generation Syro-Malabar Catholics in America” Faculty Advisers: Lisa Brown, associate professor of psychology, and Steve Stell, associate professor of religious studies Jessica Lucas ’09 Major: Art Minor: Anthropology “The Commoditization of Culture: An Analysis of the Samoan Handcrafts Market” Faculty Adviser: David Griffith, associate professor of economics Allison Varley ’09 Major: Psychology Minor: French “The Relationship Between Religions, Beliefs, Perceived Control, and Risky Behavior” Faculty Adviser: Karen Nelson, professor of psychology Allen Wang ’10 Majors: Economics and Philosophy “Luck and Responsibility” Faculty Adviser: Karánn Durland, associate professor of philosophy

Mellon Special Projects Grant Austin Tooley, at far right, began filming this summer as preparation for the 25- to 30-minute documentary film on Emily Austin that will be the May 2009 outcome of his Mellon project. Faculty adviser Light Cummins, second from right, listens as Tooley conducts a video interview with Ralph Collins, Jr., a direct descendant of Austin.

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Austin Tooley ’09 Major: History Minor: Philosophy “Sister to an Empire: Emily Austin of Texas, 1795-1851” Faculty Adviser: Light Cummins, professor of history


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Center for Southwestern and Mexican Studies Program Provides Summer Internship Funding

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Jessica Lucas studied a variety of handcrafted items in research for her Mellon project.

Austin College’s Center for Southwestern and Mexican Studies (CSMS) offers a competitive internship program, providing $2,500 stipends for full-time summer internships dealing with Texas and its diverse cultural heritage within the context of the humanities or the social sciences. Many CSMS interns work at museums, archives, and libraries. Others may work in non-profit organizations dealing with cultural activities. Interns for 2008 are listed below with their intern sites.

Caitlin Gillis ’11 Red River Historical Museum in Sherman, Texas. Assisted in all aspects of the museum.

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Kathryn Aken ’09 Latino Cultural Center in Dallas, Texas. Worked with community programs for Spanish-speaking families. Adam Tunnell ’09 Sam Rayburn Library in Bonham, Texas. Cataloged papers from the Congressman Jack Brooks Collection. Above, Devon Gonier at Leh, Ledakh, and at right, on Mount Dzongri La in Sikkim, India, during a spring 2008 study abroad trip. His study provided materials for his Mellon fellowship research.

Aaron Flores ’09 Casa Juan Diego in Houston, Texas. Assisted in charity work among disadvantaged Spanish-speaking families at this agency operated by the Catholic Diocese in Houston. Adam Tunnell

Rachel Stevenson ’09 Boys and Girls Club in Sherman, Texas. Worked with the increasing Spanish-speaking population in Sherman. Elizabeth Elliott ’09 Austin College Archives, Sherman, Texas. Performed various projects related to cataloging of collections.

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320 Hours That Can Change a Life: Vocational Internships

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Through a VIP grant, Emily Kuo ’10 spent the summer as a community resource caseworker at the Collin County Children’s Advocacy Center. She connected families with available resources, monitored supervised visits, attended court cases, watched forensic interviews, and participated in home visits with law enforcement and Child Protective Services personnel. “I learned how passionate I am about helping children and protecting their right to lead normal lives,” said Kuo, a psychology and Spanish major with a minor in leadership studies. “My eyes have been opened to the realities of this world, and I cannot say that I will ever look at it through the same lens. We can’t turn our heads away from child abuse; it is a harsh and sadly common truth that affects all ages, races, and socioeconomic levels.” “Academically, I have seen the demands of Spanish fluency in the workplace and have been inspired to work even harder toward this goal,” Kuo said. “The work for these translators never appears to stop. Psychologically, I continue to explore ways to understand others as individuals, and every day I see the value of effective leadership. Immersion in the field of social services has been the most challenging and rewarding experience of my life — so far.”

Pictured at the Collin County Children’s Advocacy Center, are, top left, intern Alissa King ’09; Emily Kuo ’10 at top right; and Jessica Knowles ’07, a center volunteer.

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The Theological Exploration of Vocation program, begun with funding from the Lilly Endowment, has a lofty title, and the lessons learned by the 60-some Austin College students who participated in the 320-hour summer internship program in 2008 were quite grand as well. The experience students gained through the Vocational Internship Program (VIP) confirmed directions, set new paths, and inspired passions. The lofty title breaks down more simply: The program doesn’t advocate any particular religious viewpoint but focuses on the ideas of meaning and purpose often at the heart of religious tradition. The exploration aspect of the program involves examining students’ own ideas and values while investigating interests. The idea of vocation, or calling, involves a process of discernment and turning inward to discover one’s gifts, passions, values, and talents. Students receiving VIP internships in 2008 explored options from working in hospitals and clinics to an opportunity to study global cultures at the United States Mission to the European Union in Brussels, Belgium. Students explored work in communications, banking, law, advertising, government and politics, fine and performing arts, psychology, ministry, environmental concerns, medicine, business, and education. Their exploration is not over. All VIP interns take a course the fall after the internship to reflect upon their experiences and share those with one another, having further opportunity to explore their reactions and responses. The course is led by program director Mark Hebert, associate professor of philosophy.

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More Summer VIP Experiences Jade Rutledge ’09 spent the summer as an environmental educator for a nature camp at Alaska’s Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge. “My job was to teach the kids about ecology and natural sciences while instilling a love and enjoyment of the natural world. The neatest part was my travel to remote villages that range in population from 30200, mainly native people. In those instances, I learned more from the kids than I taught them. I learned a great deal about the native environment, and the kids taught me a great deal about their native culture. This fit in well with my education because I think the best way to learn is through teaching others.”

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he first year of college is always memorable. The excitement, if not outright fear, of being in a new place, the sense of independence, and the anticipation of discovery hits just about every college freshman at the same time each navigates the challenges of moving into the typically cramped living space of a residence hall and deciding on a course schedule. Carlee Young ’11 experienced these emotions when she started her freshman year at Austin College in fall 2007, but her excitement has not waned. “I have made so many friends, found a great sense of independence, and I am studying the things I absolutely love,” said Carlee, who completed a 2008 Career Study Off-Campus summer internship at Frisco Eye Associates, secured through Austin College’s Career Center, to pursue her career interests in ophthalmology or optometry. “More now than even before, I feel like the students and faculty at Austin College will help me accomplish anything I want to do in the next three years.” To her credit, Carlee didn’t allow her freshman year at Austin College to intimidate her. “I started not knowing what to expect, but wanting to make a difference by being involved on campus and in the community,” she said. She attended an activities fair during her first week at the College and pursued what interested her most. Carlee is a member of the Posey Leadership Institute and is involved in Habitat for Humanity, the Student Development Board, Pre-Medical Carlee Young Society, and Big Brothers Big Sisters. She logged nearly 100 hours of service during her freshman year, including participation in the Alternative Spring Break relief trip to New Orleans. Carlee’s determination to make the most of what Austin College offers was rewarded when she received the Outstanding Freshman Award in spring 2008 in recognition of demonstrated leadership potential. She doesn’t plan to slow down any time soon. “I have wanted to study history in Italy since about seventh grade, and I now know that Austin College will help me turn that dream into an actual experience,” said Carlee, who plans to spend the fall term of her junior year in Italy. Given her fearless determination to pursue what she loves, it’s likely she will turn many more dreams into realities. COURTESY PHOTO

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by Vickie S. Kirby

Just the name Anna Laura has a melodic and uplifting lilt. In the nearly 15 years Anna Laura Page has been first lady of Austin College, many have enjoyed the song

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she brings to every day.


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Editor’s Note: As President Oscar C. Page’s announced retirement from Austin College in June 2009 draws nearer, the College community begins the process of saying farewell to Dr. Page — and to his wife, who has been very much a part of campus life. Having met the Pages in February 1994 immediately after the Board of Trustees officially elected Page as president, I’ve had many opportunities to interact with Anna Laura and offer here a glimpse into the daily life of our first lady. Those walking on the Austin College campus any afternoon might see Anna Laura Page walking her dog in front of their home just across the street. If they wave her down they will be greeted with her ready smile and a bit of southern charm. She offers no pretense or putting-on of airs; few would guess they were speaking to the wife of a college president. The encounter with her will be genuine, but perhaps brief; she’s a busy woman, both in her role as first lady of Austin College and as a sought-after composer, director, and performer of sacred organ, hand bell, piano, and choral music. Anna Laura’s career branches in many directions. She leads hand bell festivals all over the country. She composes music and lyrics or special arrangements for hand bell, organ, and piano. She co-wrote “Creation Will Be at Peace,” which has been performed at events ranging from dedication of a Holocaust museum in Arizona to a service at megachurch Coral Ridge Presbyterian in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. In addition to these projects, she was hand bell editor for Alfred Publishing Company for 11 years. She writes Easter and Christmas musicals and a variety of special commissions, including pieces for the 50th anniversary of Wynne Chapel, in memory of a child who died in an airplane crash, and in celebration of the dedication of a new church sanctuary. Many visitors to the Page home have enjoyed Anna Laura’s seemingly effortless performance of beautiful piano pieces, ranging from Christmas carols to Broadway tunes to classical compositions. When film director Peter Bogdanovich visited campus and the Page home, Anna Laura played piano and Bogdanovich sang — with Bogdanovich calling out whatever song next came to mind — and Anna Laura never missed a note. Opportunities to meet many of the people who visit Austin College are among the experiences she holds dear. “All the people have been wonderful. I’ve enjoyed them and having the chance to see their more personal side,” Anna Laura said. Though she has visited with Barbara Bush and had tea with Henry Winkler, Anna Laura is as gracious to every member of the Austin College community as to “celebrities.” “The people in Sherman and in Texas in general are wide open and friendly,” she said. “That has been wonderful. People here just accept you.” And Anna Laura has “loved, loved, loved!” living across the street from the College. ”I love to see the students, watch the activities, and hear the chimes. I so enjoy seeing the students and faculty work together and then keep up with each other through

their lives. I don’t even know where my college roommates are. It has fascinated me how the Austin College community is so connected. And, the trustees have been so wonderful to us. It’s an amazing place.” Oscar and Anna Laura’s move to Sherman was the first without at least one of their two children, Kristen and Matt. In 1994 when the Pages arrived at Austin College, Matt had completed a degree at Austin Peay State University in Tennessee and was working; Kristen was beginning doctorate work at Purdue University. Matt was married only six months after the Pages arrived in Texas. A few years later, Matt and his wife, Amy, moved to McKinney, Texas, and in 1999, their daughter Cailin — the first Page grandchild — was born. Kristen since has married and she and her husband, Rick, now are expecting their first child. And, in the continuing circle of life, Anna Laura’s dear mother, Beulah Cook, known to many at Austin College, died this July at 97 years of age. She had lived with Oscar and Anna Laura the past seven years, since becoming ill during a visit from her Kentucky home. During those years, caring for her mother took some of Anna Laura’s time as well, but it was time she gladly gave. “It was wonderful to have that time with her. I left home at 18, married a ‘vagabond,’ and never got to know her that well. It was fun having her here, but hard watching her suffer through health issues. She had always been so healthy.” As President Page’s announced retirement draws nearer, Anna Laura thinks back to her beginnings as a young girl from Kentucky and reflects on all that has come her way since then. “I don’t feel a bit different than I did back then,” she said. “Oscar and I have never forgotten our roots — first-generation college graduates who got there because our parents worked hard to make that happen. We were blessed — a lot of people don’t have that opportunity. I think we all are blessed, and some have more blessings than others, but that doesn’t make us any more special.” The Pages have lived in Sherman longer than any other place in their married lives. “This is where we’ve made friends and really feel at home,” she said. Sherman will remain home. They have purchased a house here and look forward to a little slower pace in which to enjoy their lives. Though Anna Laura said they will “stay out of sight and give the new president an opportunity to fly,” the College community hopefully has not seen the last of this beloved president or his amazing first lady. Here’s to meeting Anna Laura on the sidewalk for a quick update on life and a dose of the charm — the music — that is all her own.

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Anna Laura Page Photos: The Austin College Years

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tephen F. Austin wasn’t the only pioneering spirit in the renowned Austin family. While Stephen led groups of settlers to tame the wilds of the Texas frontier, his sister Emily Austin blazed her own path through a male-dominated era few women of her time dared. Her story will be detailed in a new biography in 2009 by Light Cummins, Austin College professor of history. This groundbreaking story reveals that the intertwining storylines of Texas’ birth and the Austin family run much deeper than Moses and Stephen F. Austin. Stephen F. Austin was named the “Father of Texas” at his funeral by Texas history icon Sam Houston and was a significant leader during the Texas Revolution and its early years as a republic. Monuments to Austin include the namesakes of the Texas state capital and two Texas higher educational institutions, as well as a 60-foot statue in Angleton, Texas. His likeness is on Austin College’s official seal. Yet, obscured by the enormous shadow cast by one of Texas’ most prominent historical figures and by the legal and societal restraints on women of the 1800s, stands Emily Austin. Cummins is one of the first historians to sort through Emily Austin’s personal papers, while researching and writing the first biography of her life. His research unveils a depth of character in Emily Austin, sole heir to her famous brother Stephen F. Austin and his Texas land holdings after his death in 1836. The biography details the political, business, and social life of this unique frontier woman, who defied 1800s-era societal norms for women and put her own stamp on history. After Stephen’s death, it was Emily Austin who wielded and magnified the considerable economic and political influence of the Austin family heritage and estate. Despite Stephen’s likeness on Austin College’s official seal, it was Emily Austin who made the donation to provide a financial foundation on which Austin College was built. It was Emily Austin, through active involvement in Texas economic and social development, who ensured that the Austin family influence on Texas history did not die with Stephen.

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THE LIFE OF EMILY AUSTIN

hough born in Virginia in 1795, Emily Austin spent most of her adolescent life in Missouri, at that time part of the western U.S. frontier, where her father Moses Austin operated a lead mining business. Emily received a quality education by frontier standards at a Lexington, Kentucky, boarding school for four years and almost two years at the Hermitage Academy, a prestigious girls’ school near New York City. It was an education that would serve her well and may have played a part in her concern for education later in life. After her schooling, Emily returned to Missouri and married a young merchant, James Bryan, who eventually joined her father in the mining business. But a series of events starting in 1819 would thrust Emily Austin into a role that defined the independent woman who would eventually settle in Texas. The Panic of 1819, a depression after the War of 1812, left the Austin family in financial ruin. In 1821, Moses Austin died after obtaining a grant to bring 300 colonists to Texas. Finishing what his father started was the beginning of Stephen F. Austin’s story in Texas. Emily Austin’s story took a different turn. One year after her father’s death, James Bryan died, leaving Emily a young widow solely responsible for four children and her aged mother. With the family wealth decimated and Stephen committed to the colonization of Texas, Emily’s frontier became providing for her family, a difficult and socially unseemly prospect for a single woman in the 1800s. “In that social construct, southern men PHOTO COURTESY OF BRAZORIA COUNTY HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION

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tended to view women of their class as delicate, submissive helpmates,” writes Cummins. “Women from Emily Austin’s social class in the South related to the world through the framework provided by the men in their lives.” By 1822, that social construct had failed Emily and no man with the ability to provide support remained in her family. “All of the Austins were strong-willed people,” Cummins said. “She was no less strong-willed than Moses or Stephen F. Austin, and her years of widowhood created a circumstance where she could no longer worry about acceptability.” Survival became Emily’s focus, and by that necessity, self-reliance was born. She took in sewing from neighborhood men, opened a small school and charged a modest tuition, and put others in her household to work on various crafts, like bonnets, to sell. Eventually, Emily remarried, to James Franklin Perry, and at Stephen’s beckoning, they moved to Texas in 1831 and established Peach Point Plantation, the place that Stephen also came to call home. Cummins is convinced the “period of constant hardship and material depravation as the sole breadwinner for her mother and her children” created the Emily Austin who would later be unafraid to manage actively the Austin estate. REAL ESTATE, RAILROADS, AND POLITICS

When Stephen F. Austin died in 1836, he left his entire estate not in James Perry’s name, nor in the names of Emily’s sons, but directly to Emily Austin. “As the sole surviving heir of Moses and Stephen F. Austin, Emily had become one of the largest individual land holders in Texas and indisputably its richest woman,” Cummins writes. While Texas law didn’t allow married women to enter into contracts in their own name, separate from their husbands, it did allow them to retain personal ownership of land inherited individually, noted Cummins. Emily’s management and enhancement of this inheritance and the Austin family political and social prominence elevated her as a woman ahead of her time. Though legal restrictions on women concerning business and contractual transactions often meant Emily had to act through the signatures of her husband or


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sons when they were grown, Cummins said the letters and records Emily kept revealed her to be very involved in the management of the Austin estate. Emily was active in urban planning and in selling land — often doing so personally as a real estate agent of sorts — to raise capital and disposable income. She was an investor in the first attempt to build a railroad in Texas. Her son Moses Austin Bryan was the secretary of the first railroad company in Texas, but Emily was the chief stockholder, Cummins explained. Emily even loaned money to Gail Borden to purchase his first herd of dairy cows. “We all know what he did,” Cummins added. Throughout Stephen’s life as a political leader, Emily entertained guests and organized parties for her unmarried brother. Later, when her son Guy M. Bryan entered politics, Emily retained the role of hostess, seemingly unabashed about sharing her views when the opportunity presented itself, Cummins said. At one point, Emily hosted eventual U.S. president Rutherford B. Hayes, a close friend of Guy Bryan’s, at Peach Point plantation. Emily also utilized the Austin family wealth and fame in social development through philanthropy. She was instrumental in founding the first Episcopal church in Texas — a denomination she had been a part of prior to marrying Perry — and recruiting its first bishop, Leonidas Polk, who became a famous Civil War general and has the military base of Fort Polk, Louisiana, named after him. She also brought one of the earliest educators to Texas in Thomas J. Pilgrim to teach her own children. Pilgrim founded the first school in Texas with Emily’s support, according to Cummins. In 1840, Reverend Daniel Baker traveled to Peach Point Plantation, having just left the founding meeting of the Presbytery of Brazos. The idea to found a Presbyterian college in Texas had formed out of that meeting, and Baker had been told to visit Emily Austin about funding. Baker’s visit was successful, as Emily and her husband, James Perry, were devout members of the Presbyterian Church and agreed to support the college. In 1849, Baker renewed his efforts to found the college and Emily honored her earlier pledge by deeding acreage in Brazoria County and all the Austin family’s claims to pension funds or monies due to

Stephen from the State of Texas to the college. It was this gift that made possible the founding of Austin College, one of the earliest colleges in Texas. Concern for her family was a driving factor in Emily’s life, evidenced by the years she alone supported her family in poverty and by her activity to preserve and grow her inheritance for the future provision of her children. “When she died in 1851, she passed on to her living children the entire Stephen F. Austin estate, which was greatly augmented in size,” said Cummins. In fact, Emily’s Last Will and Testament valued her estate at $450,000 in 1851 U.S. dollars, which would roughly equal $12 million in purchasing power by today’s terms, according to Cummins’ calculations. EMILY AUSTIN’S TEXAS?

To diminish Stephen F. Austin’s role in the birth of Texas would be preposterous, but to downplay or ignore the woman who helped raise this “child” diminishes the full legacy of the Austin family. Stephen’s place in Texas history is cemented, but Emily’s equally important role is just beginning to be revealed and understood through efforts like Cummins’ biography. “Emily Austin was very much her own woman, with strong and well-articulated personal feelings centered on a steely personality bolstered by a rock-solid resolve for action that would enable her to survive through almost six decades of frontier hardship,” writes Cummins. “She was in many ways a very modern woman. As the daughter of Moses Austin and sole heir of her brother Stephen F. Austin, she had political, economic, and social status in Texas, which made her absolutely unique and unprecedented.” In the 1800s, the fortitude required for a single woman to care for five dependents with no male assistance and later be a guiding hand in the maturation of Texas was no less impressive than the fortitude Stephen displayed in settling the Texas frontier. By shedding light on these lesser known chapters, the story of Texas, the Austin family, and women’s history gains new breadth and depth.

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FROM EMILY AUSTIN TO AUSTIN Significant Moments in Women’s Rights 1848 The first women’s rights convention is held in Seneca Falls, New York, resulting in a call for equal treatment under the law and voting rights for women. 1869 Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton form the National Woman Suffrage Association, seeking women’s right to vote. 1893 Colorado is the first state to grant women the right to vote. 1919 The federal woman suffrage amendment, originally written by Susan B. Anthony and introduced in 1878, is passed by the House and Senate. 1920 The 19th Amendment to the Constitution grants women the right to vote. 1960 The Food and Drug Administration approves birth control pills. 1961 President John Kennedy establishes the President’s Commission on the Status of Women and appoints Eleanor Roosevelt as chairwoman. 1963 Betty Friedan publishes The Feminine Mystique. The book becomes a best-seller and galvanizes the modern women’s rights movement. 1963 Congress passes the Equal Pay Act. 1966 The National Organization for Women is founded with the aim to end sexual discrimination by means of legislative lobbying, litigation, and civil disobedience. 1971 Ms. Magazine is first published, selling 300,000 copies in 8 days; editor Gloria Steinem is launched as an icon of the modern feminist movement. 1972 The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) is passed by Congress. Originally drafted in 1923, the amendment died in 1982 when it failed to achieve ratification by a minimum of 38 states. 1972 The Supreme Court rules that the right to privacy includes an unmarried person’s right to use contraceptives. 1972 Title IX of the Education Amendment bans sex discrimination in schools; participation of women in athletics and professional schools increases dramatically. 1973 The Supreme Court establishes a woman’s right to a safe and legal abortion. 1996 The Supreme Court rules that the all-male Virginia Military School has to admit women in order to continue to receive public funding. It holds that creating a separate, all-female school will not suffice. Excerpted from “Women’s Rights Movement in the U.S.: Timeline.” Infoplease. © 2000-2007 Pearson Education, publishing as Infoplease.

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quality for women has come a long way since the days of Emily Austin, but some successful Austin College alumnae understand that it hasn’t been too long ago that women were pressing for more individual rights — and that today’s women encounter new and different challenges. Becky Russell Sykes ’67, executive director of the Dallas Women’s Foundation, remembers a time when expectations for women were very different than those for college-aged women today. “I grew up in the ’50s and by the time I got to Austin College, the prevailing thought was that girls would marry and have a family, and that was it,” she said. “We really didn’t have any role models for professional women.” Sykes followed the plan pretty well — marrying and taking a teaching position for a few years before leaving the workforce to start a family — until an economic depression hit Texas in the mid-1980s. “I had to go back to work,” Sykes said. “I was 41 or so when this happened, and this was a great shock to my system.” So, Sykes returned to the workforce as an administrative assistant to the man who bought Greyhound Lines and relocated the company to Dallas. The company’s violent 1990 drivers strike and Chapter 11 bankruptcy gave Sykes a tough return to the work world. “It was some of the best experience I could have had because I was such a bleeding heart, and I toughened up working in this corporation,” Sykes said. Sykes later worked for a TV station, as a development director for Southern Methodist University’s Meadows School of the Arts, and as a non-profit consultant before being contacted by an organization that she had helped start 15 years before. Sykes had served as the first board president of the Dallas Women’s Foundation when the organization got its start, addressing inequality of funding between female-focused agencies and male-serving groups like YMCA and Boy Scouts of America. “At that time, less than four percent of annual foundation dollars across the nation were going to programs specifically for women and girls,” she said. Sykes was asked to serve as the interim executive director and in 1998 was hired to fill the role. She said the Dallas Women’s Foundation is a place for women to learn about philanthropy and to provide a source of funding for the community’s girls and women, who often face unique issues like the scary prospect Emily Austin faced in caring for her children and elderly mother. Sykes, who deals with women’s philanthropy on a daily basis, firmly believes that women, like Emily Austin, have been a driving force in development and progress not only for women’s issues but also for a much broader spectrum of issues. “Individual women from the early days of this country have been building America through their volunteer work and through philanthropy for social change,” Sykes said. “Women were using their wealth to open doors, and it

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always had to do with elevating people and lifting people out of their circumstances or giving them opportunities.” Catherine “Kiki” Moore McLean ’85, who had a front row seat to an important moment in women’s history this year as a senior campaign adviser for Senator Hillary Clinton, agrees. “One thing women have always been good about doing is finding a way to move themselves forward, even in the era of Emily Austin, who couldn’t work the front channels, but worked the back channels,” she said. (See The Race for Madam President in the online magazine.) Virginia Smith Volpe ’90, director for Global Transaction Services at Citi, is part of a generation of women that has had the benefit of women role models. “I am very thankful for the generation before me because they fought tooth and nail, and now I don’t have to,” she said. “You still don’t see women in all positions. It’s a work in progress, but advancement based on merit is happening.” However, she sees the progress of generations before her and today’s continuing evolution of women’s rights as slightly different. What Volpe finds “breathtaking” is that women are taking success into their own hands and going beyond “glass-ceiling” terminology. “The generation before me defined success by giving up anything necessary to get to the top,” Volpe said. “What I am seeing now, in my generation and beyond, is the ability of women to define success on their own terms. That can mean a combination of marriage, partners, kids, friends, life outside of work, and career.” Sykes and McLean hope that younger women don’t lose sight of the progress made. “Equality is still an issue and always will be until we have economic parity,” McLean said. “I think we have some generational challenges for women who are growing up not knowing some of the restrictions women ahead of them experienced.” Sykes, who as a married woman couldn’t own property in her own name by Texas law until the Marital Property Act of 1967, recognizes that the landscape for women has changed dramatically during her lifetime, but hopes the stories of the women who pushed for those changes aren’t forgotten. “Young women and girls need to hear these very inspiring stories about Emily Austin and other women in history,” Sykes said. “When I came along, there was no such thing as women’s history. The great advantage that younger women have now is role models.”

COURTESY PHOTOS

COLLEGE WOMEN OF TODAY

Becky Russell Sykes

Virginia Smith Volpe

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The Race for Madam President: Reflections from Kiki McLean

Catherine “Kiki” Moore McLean

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Carroll Pickett recorded tapes about each of 95 inmates who were executed while he was Death House chaplain.

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hat would it be like to watch 95 people be executed? What kind of solace can be provided to them in their final hours? What if those responsibilities were part of doing a job? These are the questions addressed in At the Death House Door, an Independent Film Channel (IFC) documentary on the life of Carroll Pickett ’54 and his 15 years as chaplain at the Texas State Penitentiary in Huntsville, Texas. From 1982 to 1995, Pickett walked “through the valley of the shadow of death” with 95 prisoners sentenced to death by lethal injection. They weren’t his valleys, but serving as the guide for those walks was terrifying enough. The documentary premiered on IFC May 29 and was described as “a quiet powerhouse that leaves you thinking about the central issues and character long after the lights have gone up,” by a Dallas Morning News writer. Pickett allowed camera crews into his living room and relived his experiences as Death House chaplain. He also opened his collection of cassette recordings, in

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which he had bared his soul to the recorder after each execution. “It was difficult,” said Pickett of opening the tapes to the production crew. “I had done the tapes for me alone, and they were put away for good.” He said the producers took the time to listen to the tapes and asked questions about memories he had suppressed long ago. “Several times, it really hurt to hear the things I had been through and to recall those men who I was with all day and night,” he said. The documentary chronicles Pickett’s life after graduating from Austin College. He attended Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary where he was told by one professor in 1957, “I am convinced that your ministry is destined to focus on the dying, lending comfort to those faced with death and those who are losing loved ones.” His professor’s words became very real in 1974 when several prisoners took hostages at “The Walls” unit of the Huntsville State Prison in an 11day standoff, the longest in United States history.


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At the time, Pickett was the minister of the Presbyterian Church in Huntsville. Jim Estelle, one of his church members and the director of prisons, asked Pickett to come and minister to the families of the prison employees taken hostages. Then, Pickett was told that two hostages were faithful members of his own congregation. The prisoners allowed the hostages to call their families. During one call, the women from Pickett’s church told him their wishes for their funeral services. On August 3, 1974, the hostage crisis ended violently on the front ramp of the prison during an escape attempt. Two leaders of the crisis lay dead, and two of the 11 hostages were murdered by the prisoners. Both were Pickett’s church members. That day Pickett said he would never return to the prison. GOING BACK

Five years later, Pickett did go back to the Huntsville prison, taking a job as the prison chaplain in an attempt to save a marriage strained by the time-consuming work of pastoring a church. “When I went to work there, I didn’t breathe walking up that ramp,” Pickett said of his first day. “I got to the place right there at that corner where Judy and Yvonne were shot, and went to the library and there were still bullet holes. You could still see the blood stains.” When Pickett first began as chaplain, six people attended service in the prison’s chapel, but he went to work gathering a new congregation of thieves, murderers, and other criminals. He started a choir that attracted several talented inmates, one of whom had been a backup singer for Don Ho and another who was a former Texas Supreme Court justice. In 1982, Pickett once again faced death in his ministry. The Huntsville prison was scheduled to administer the first execution by lethal injection in the United States. “Nowhere in my job description did it say anything about executions,” Pickett said in the film. Yet, the prison director assigned Pickett to minister to the condemned inmates, transferred from Death Row to the Huntsville death chamber on the day of execution. He stayed with the condemned prisoners during their final 18

D E A T H hours and was at their side when the lethal injection was administered. “It is hard to tell anybody, even the meanest person, that it’s time to go,” Pickett said. Pickett would fill this role 95 times. He even faced the personal conflict of ministering to Ignacio Cuevas, the lone surviving inmate from the 1974 hostage crisis that resulted in the deaths of his church members. At the time of Cuevas’ execution, Pickett approved of capital punishment and felt disgust that even in Cuevas’ final hours he never mentioned his role in the 1974 hostage crisis. “I wanted him to bring it up,” Pickett said. “He talked about murdering, slashing, and killing all these other people, but he didn’t bring it up. The whole idea of justice and fairness was not in his system.” The execution of another prisoner, Carlos DeLuna, changed Pickett’s stance on capital punishment. In their time together, he became convinced DeLuna was innocent. Despite his reservations about capital punishment, Pickett continued to minister in his role as Death House chaplain. “I believe that the ‘ministry of presence’ is so important for anyone who is about to die. … No one should die without a friend,” said Pickett. The story of DeLuna’s possible innocence interested two Chicago Tribune reporters in 2005. They contacted Pickett in February 2006 and were involved in the IFC documentary filming as well. The documentary gave Pickett an opportunity to speak out against the death penalty for the first time since he retired from the prison in 1995. “I have given 275 radio, TV, phone, and personal interviews and traveled over 26,000 miles to promote the film and speak after each showing,” Pickett said. He has spoken to the Texas Democratic Caucus, to church congregations, and on Capitol Hill to the Judiciary Committee of the House of Representatives. Pickett’s experiences in the Death House remain with him. “I have been there 95 times and most people will never see what it is like,” Pickett said of a practice he now sees as unfair and immoral. ”I want people, through this film, to feel something and do something about it.” magazine.austincollege.edu

At the Death House Door: Film Trailer and Information

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Sara Bernice Moseley, wife of Austin College president emeritus John D. Moseley, remembers watching from her home on Grand Avenue as a crane lifted the Sam Houston bell and steeple atop Wynne Chapel in 1958. This year, Wynne Chapel celebrates its 50th anniversary. The College’s connection to the Presbyterian Church and the Wynne Chapel’s usage have evolved dramatically since the building’s construction. Yet, its presence still serves as a reminder of the College’s Presbyterian history, an important tie to the church, and the nexus of religious and spiritual life on campus. It was a generous gift from Toddie Lee Wynne, Sr., a well-known Texas oilman, civic leader, active Presbyterian, and former chair of the Austin College Board of Trustees, that funded the construction of Wynne Chapel. Mrs. Moseley remembers the excitement on campus of having a new building with a 900person seating capacity for lectures, musical performances, and religious activities. On September 15, 1958, Sam Rayburn, Speaker of the House of Representatives, delivered the keynote address at the chapel’s dedication. Mrs. Moseley said the chapel’s construction also had great significance to President Moseley, who led Austin College from 1953 to 1978.

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I A bronze likeness of Toddie Lee Wynne hangs in the foyer of Wynne Chapel.

“It was so important in his thinking that the College had a chapel, a building that was centrally located, and the fact that it faces the Administration Building was a very significant thing,” she said. To the leaders who today enter Caruth Administration Building and make decisions concerning the College’s future, the chapel’s location provides a clear reminder of historical roots and modern ties to the church. In 1958, Wynne Chapel was an important symbol of the College’s Presbyterian history, tracing all the way back to Presbyterian missionary the Reverend Daniel Baker, who helped found the College, and to its legal ties. When the chapel was built, the College was a legal entity of the Presbyterian Church. In 1962, Dr. Moseley proposed redefining the legal link between the College and church in order to create more of a non-sectarian liberal arts college. Four years later, the Synod of Texas and Austin College severed legal ties and established a covenant relationship. According to Austin College: A Sesquicentennial History 1849-1999, President Moseley described the covenant as “revisions designed to anticipate and avoid future problems in Church-State relationships by providing a broader base and flexibility of support through trustee leadership, recognizing that the regular benevolent budget of the Church cannot provide the increased necessary funds for maintaining a pace-setting institution.” The mid-1960s also saw a broad shift in attitude from students and faculty who criticized the long-established mandatory chapel services, held in Sherman Hall prior to Wynne Chapel’s construction. The issue was hotly debated and eventually chapel service requirements were terminated, further denoting the College’s shift to a non-sectarian institution. WYNNE CHAPEL TODAY

Fifty years later, Wynne Chapel still stands watch over students and faculty as they cross the campus, a reminder of the Presbyterian Church ties and the opportunities for spiritual growth and outreach for all students. “How Great Thou Art” or some other hymn rings out from the chapel’s Carillon bells at 4:45 p.m. each day, one of many tangible ways the chapel touches modern day campus life. Despite the altered relationship with the church and changing attitudes about religious life in general over the past 50 years, Wynne Chapel remains an important fixture at Austin College. Opening Convocation, Family Weekend worship, and the annual holiday Service of Lessons and Carols are just a few College-wide events held in Wynne Chapel. The chapel is an important venue for campus music group performances, Austin College Leadership Award recipients, and special speakers such as Robert Engel, recipient of a Nobel Prize in Economics. Every year, the chapel is filled with young people who utilize the campus for Presbyterian youth events. The building’s evolution also is evidenced in the small chapel, which accommodates yoga classes, provides indoor practice space for the Aussies Dance Team when bad weather strikes, and hosts the

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Muslim Student Association prayers. “It’s a space for the whole student body, the whole college community,” said John Williams ’84, college chaplain and director of Church Relations. Though the chapel opens its doors to various activities within the student body, traditional Christian worship and activity in Wynne Chapel occurs regularly through midday prayers every Tuesday, communion and worship every Sunday night, and as a headquarters for ACtivators, a campus Presbyterian mobile youth ministry. “We’re not going to hit you over the head with the cross, nor are we going to apologize that there’s a cross on top of the steeple,” Williams said. “Our commitment as a church-related institution is to take all students and their spirituality seriously.” For 50 years, Wynne Chapel has embodied the religious underpinnings of Austin College. The activities held within its walls, from mandatory chapel service with assigned seating to belly dancing classes, exemplify the transformation of church relations, religious thought, and the enduring relevance of the building. Mrs. Moseley, who has experienced the evolution of Wynne Chapel and church relations at Austin College, still feels as excited about the chapel as she did 50 years ago. “There’s such activity coming out of the chapel,” she said. “It’s a real, live connection to the church.”

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Ties to the Presbyterian Church Remain Strong

HAPPY 50TH IN CELEBRATION OF WYNNE CHAPEL’S 50TH ANNIVERSARY: E September 26 – November 16: Austin College Archives Display in the small chapel illustrates the 50-year history of Wynne Chapel. E September 28: Parent and Family Weekend Worship Service at 11 a.m., with a sermon by the Reverend Kary Wilshusen Rawlings ’78. E October 26: Homecoming Weekend Worship Service at 11 a.m., with a sermon provided by the Reverend Nancy Duff ’73 at 11 a.m. E November 13: Austin College A Cappella Choir Concert at 7:30 p.m., featuring the premiere of a choral work by Austin College’s first lady Anna Laura Page, commissioned for the anniversary. E November 14 – 15: Grace Presbytery Meeting, including the 2008 Cunningham Lectures by Dr. Cynthia Rigby, professor of systematic theology at Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary. E November 16: Official Worship Service in Celebration of the 50th Anniversary of Wynne Chapel’s Dedication, including an A Cappella Choir performance of the choral piece commissioned for the anniversary and composed by Anna Laura Page. The Reverend Laura Shelton Mendenhall ’69 will speak at the 11 a.m. service.

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Henry Winkler Presents Opening of School Address

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things to be done, needs to be met, and hurts to be healed, and if you do not do your part, something very important will remain undone forever,” Winkler said. Winkler remains best known as the television icon “The Fonz” on the 1970s sitcom Happy Days, though he has since added many television, film, and Broadway acting and directing projects to his credits. He also is recognized as a distinguished speaker, humanitarian, author, and advocate of young people and education. Austin College awarded Winkler an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree in 2002.

PHOTOS BY VICKIE S. KIRBY

enry Winkler presented the Opening of School address September 1 to begin the 160th year of Austin College. The well-known television icon spoke in Wynne Chapel to a full house — some 900 members of the Austin College community including the entering Class of 2012, the Class of 2009 processing in cap and gown for the first time, faculty, staff, and guests. Combining humor, wit, inspiration, and poignancy, Winkler discussed his life experiences, beginning with troubling years in school, battling undiagnosed dyslexia, low self-esteem, and a lack of emotional support from his parents. His years in higher education were a bit more promising — he was accepted into Emerson College and then earned a spot at the Yale School of Drama to begin the career in acting, directing, and producing that has made Winkler a well-known face in homes across the United States and beyond. His early years were challenging ones, but Winkler recalls them with a positive outlook. “I realize maybe I would never have been able to achieve what I achieved if I didn’t have the battle, the hill I constantly had to climb,” he said. Winkler hopes his experiences will bring inspiration to other children who may suffer from learning disabilities or other problems. He has now completed 15 books in a children’s series, Hank Zipzer, The World’s Greatest Underachiever, in which the title character, based on Winkler, finds ways to overcome his daily difficulties. Speaking particularly to the students present, Winkler encouraged them to make the most of themselves, stressing that each person has only one lifetime to live; that living to their potential will equip them to serve others; and that their very best selves are needed to assist the most vulnerable in society. “There are

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Additional Opening of School Photos

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Campus Programs Commemorate Charles Darwin Anniversaries ustin College will sponsor the event series “Darwin 200” throughout this academic year in celebration of the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin’s birth February 12, 1809, and the 150th anniversary of the publication of his widely influential book The Origin of Species (1859). The events include a lecture series, “Darwin 200: Contributions/ Controversies.” The series examines Darwin’s influence not only in the sciences but also in the social sciences and humanities, through disciplines such as psychology, economics, literature, philosophy, and religion. Lectures also will address some of the misunderstandings and controversies surrounding evolution. “Almost no one has had more scientific influence and broader cultural impact than Darwin,” said George Diggs, professor of biology, who has helped organize the events. “Few areas of thought remain untouched by Darwin’s contributions.” Fall term speakers for “Darwin 200: Contributions/Controversies” include George Diggs, Austin College professor of biology, September 11 at 11 a.m.; Piers Hale, University of Oklahoma assistant professor of the history of science, September 25 at 11 a.m.; and Steven Goldsmith, Austin College professor of biology, October 30 at 11 a.m. These lectures are scheduled for Ida Green Theatre in the Ida Green Communication Center. David Quammen, author of The Reluctant Mr. Darwin, will speak February 10, 2009, at 7 p.m. in Ida Green Theatre. Philip Gingerich, University of Michigan Case Collegiate Professor of Paleontology, will speak in March 2009, and David Buss, professor of psychology at the University of Texas, will speak April 24, but other details of these lectures are still to be determined. Additional speakers may be added to the schedule. The lecture series coordinates with two major campus programs: the summer read — The Reluctant Mr. Darwin — and the April 24–25, 2009, annual undergraduate research conference — “Darwin 200: Bridging Disciplines/Breaking Boundaries.” The undergraduate research conference, the sixth hosted by Austin College, will focus broadly on Darwin’s impact on academic disciplines and popular culture and will cover a diverse range of evolution-related topics spanning the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. David Buss, professor of psychology at the University of Texas, will provide the keynote address for the conference April 24, 2009. Faculty organizers for the Darwin celebration include George Diggs, professor of biology; Steven Goldsmith, professor of biology; Max Grober, associate professor of history; Jerry Lincecum, professor emeritus of English; Peggy Redshaw, professor of biology, who is coordinating the lecture series; and Carol Daeley, professor of English, who is coordinating the undergraduate research conference in April 2009. Event details are available online: www.austincollege.edu/darwin.

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The Reluctant Mr. Darwin Students in Austin College’s Class of 2012 had homework months before arriving on campus. Joining many colleges and universities around the nation, Austin College has instituted a “common read” program, in which all freshmen are assigned a particular book to read prior to the beginning of the fall term. President Oscar C. Page initiated the addition of the program a few years ago and sends the selected book to all freshmen each June along with a letter asking that they read the book. The 2008 selection was David Quammen’s The Reluctant Mr. Darwin: An Intimate Portrait of Charles Darwin and the Making of His Theory of Evolution. “The common read sets a tone for students and gives them an opportunity to start to focus on college,” said Mike Imhoff, vice president for Academic Affairs and dean of the faculty. “The common read book gives them something that stimulates them intellectually while providing all students a common experience.” When faculty members use the book in various aspects of their courses, students can begin to see how the book relates to various disciplines and how they can learn from a closer reading, Imhoff said. How faculty members incorporate the common read book is up to individual faculty. Since several faculty members are involved in organizing “Darwin 200” events, many opportunities to include the book in class discussions may arise. Past Austin College common read assignments include Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafisi, A Hope in the Unseen by Ron Suskind, and Tracy Kidder’s Mountains Beyond Mountains: The Quest of Dr. Paul Farmer. Suskind delivered the Opening of School address the year freshmen read his book and Paul Farmer was the 2007 speaker.

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Out of the Congo

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Art of the Kuba October 24 – November 26 Abell Library, Archives and Special Collections Suite Curated by Austin College Archivist Justin Banks Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays; 8:30 – 11:50 a.m. and 1 – 3:50 p.m. Thursdays; 8:30 – 11 a.m. Homecoming Only: Friday until 6 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Africa Symposium November 18 – 20 Keynote Speaker: David Binkley www.austincollege.edu/news

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he Austin College community will get a glimpse of the Congo and the culture of the Bakubas people this fall through an African art exhibit that will kick off the College’s annual Africa Symposium. Alumnae Elizabeth Poole Shepherd ’58 and Amelia Poole Sudderth ’59 were born into that culture as the daughters of Presbyterian medical missionaries Mark and Sara Poole. Amelia, her husband Joe Sudderth ’59, and her late sister’s husband, Don Shepherd ’58, generously made a temporary loan of Bakubas artifacts from the Belgian Congo period for the exhibit. Ceremonial masks, royal ceremonial garments, wood and stone statues, a carved ivory tusk, and ceremonial swords and spears from the Bakubas tribe will be displayed October 24 – November 26 at the exhibit, housed in the Archives and Special Collections Suite of the College’s George T. and Gladys H. Abell Library Center. Justin Banks, College archivist, said that individuals usually would have to travel to the Smithsonian or catch a traveling art exhibit from the Metropolitan Museum to see the type of artifacts that will be displayed on campus. “The willingness of the families to loan these artifacts creates a unique educational opportunity that would otherwise be impossible for Austin College to offer,” Banks said. Mark Poole and his wife, Sara Day, served as medical missionaries in the Belgian Congo from 1936 to 1962, providing medical care, surgical operations, and hygiene instruction to the Bakubas tribe. Over time, the Pooles acquired several tribal artifacts and brought them back to the United States, where they have long served as mementos of their lives and work in the African Congo. The Poole sisters finished high school in the Congo before attending Austin College. “The transition from living in Africa to living in the United States was difficult,” Amelia said. “Austin College was very supportive, and it was small enough that we could become an integral part pretty easily.” Both women met their husbands at Austin College, and in 1961, the College awarded their father an honorary degree for service to humanity. “We’ve always had a warm spot for Austin College,” she said. Amelia, who majored in art at Austin College, loaned the artifacts to the College for an exhibit in 1959 and was excited to share the artifacts again. “It seems a very appropriate thing to do and something I know my sister would have done if she were still living,” Amelia said. “We are loaning these things to honor both the culture of the Bakubas people and the dedication and service of my parents among them during those years,” Amelia said. “They went to express the love of God through their medical and surgical work. As my dad expressed it so many times, they did it so that the people could be free from fear, superstition, and witchcraft and have peace in their hearts through the love of God.”

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Faculty Member Shares Significance of Poole Collection Peter Anderson joined Austin College’s faculty as an associate professor of English in 2006. A South African writer, sculptor, and academic, he wrote the script for the slide catalogue of the Standard Bank African Art Collection housed at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg in the mid-1980s. He teaches postcolonial literature and creative writing, and this fall is offering a course on Anglophone Nigerian literature, “Palm-Wine and Purple Hibiscus.” His comments follow. African art was never meant to be put on display — hung on a wall, sealed in a glass box, isolated as an object of contemplation, a mute museum piece. In fact, even the concept of “art” is little short of a Eurocentric imposition. African art (continuing to use the term for convenience sake), always was dynamically integrated as a signifying cultural practice, productive of the meanings by which different communities comprehended and connected with the world around them. Masks, for instance, were often inspirited, filled with the overflowing presence of the numinous, the sacred, and therefore as capable of striking terror into the heart of the people as they might be of uplifting them, filling them with power, with love. The Poole collection is among the few such collections to have been made in a way that can today be endorsed as ethically acceptable. In gratitude for being cured, people would bestow gifts upon the good doctor — “art” works, which we now acknowledge as priceless, but that in early 20th century Europe and America simply were considered as “primitive,” “bizarre,” “barbaric,” and so on. It is no small achievement to have an ethically sound collection of indigenous art from Congo of the early 20th century. And what a collection. Kuba art is among the most spectacular ever to emerge from central Africa, one of the most powerful founts of great art in world history. Kuba masks, figurative sculptures, carvings in and on ivory, raffia work, to name only those items that come first to mind, are exemplary of the vitality and awe-inspiring profundity of African art. It is no secret today that the impact of African art, its incomparably powerful sculpture in particular, perhaps, on European high modernism, was decisive. We could point to Picasso and the development of cubism, Brancusi and the turn away from “beefsteak” realism, Modigliani and the elongation and simplification of form, for the ramifications are almost endless. Austin College is truly honored, even blessed, to place on exhibition a range of pieces from the Poole collection. The Africa Symposium will feature the keynote address “Stop the Sun: The Art of Masquerade in Southern Kuba Culture” by David Binkley at 11 a.m. November 20 in Hoxie Thompson Auditorium of Sherman Hall. Binkley’s lecture will include a discussion of Kuba history as well as the system of titleholding and the relationship of art making to the political hierarchy, including textile production and masquerade performance. Binkley is an art historian who has lived in the Congo among the Kuba, and according to Anderson, is “perhaps the foremost U.S. expert on Kuba art.” Binkley was the senior curator for research and interpretation at the National Museum of African Art at the Smithsonian Institution and has been involved in many exhibitions and art programs. He earned a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in art history before completing a Ph.D. in African art history in 1987. A student panel discussion, “Active Participants: Volunteer Insights into Development and Humanitarian Efforts in Africa,” on November 19 features students who spent the summer as Global Outreach Fellows, working with children in Ghana and Ethiopia. Student panelists are Cara Barnes ’09, Holly Boerner ’09, Rebeca Kim ’10, Anne Engelhart ’10, and Monica Martinez ’09.

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Washington, D.C., Becomes Summer Classroom

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A Summer of Two-Way Learning A group of students at Jefferson Elementary School in Sherman experienced international learning this summer — from right in their own classrooms. Approximately 45 first through fourth grade students learned about the land, people, and culture of India through the sixth annual summer enrichment program offered by students and faculty of Austin College’s Austin Teacher Program (ATP). The two-week session, 8:30 a.m. to noon daily, was funded by the ATP. The collaborative camp was coordinated by Julia Shahid, associate professor of education in the Austin Teacher Program. She and Jefferson School staff realized several years ago that such a camp could meet the need for a summer program for children as well as offer teaching opportunities for students in the ATP’s summer course on science and social studies teaching methodologies. The College students prepared the summer curriculum, collected resources, and coordinated each days’ lessons. Shahid and select Jefferson teachers provided feedback to the student teachers each day. Shahid participated in a month-long

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Fulbright-Hays Program that included travel to India in 2007 and gathered materials there used in the classes. Jaisy Joseph ‘09 visited the camp one morning to demonstrate and teach traditional Indian dances to the children. Summer Institute for Foreign Language Teachers Texas high school teachers of French, Latin, and Spanish arrived on campus in July to participate in a one-week residential language immersion program designed to enhance teaching skills. The teachers stayed in Jordan Family Language House and spoke their target languages at all times. Members of the College’s Classical and Modern Languages Department led a number of sessions each day that allowed the teachers to refresh language skills and develop new cultural and technological resources to advance teaching in their own classrooms. All costs for the teachers, including room and board, were funded by a grant from the Sid W. Richardson Foundation. The summer program has been offered for several years.

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Rachel Dodd ’11 and Erin Bailey ’10 spent most of the summer in Washington, D.C., but it wasn’t for sightseeing. The two completed an intensive four-week program in Arabic, meeting four hours each weekday in July. The introductory Arabic course emphasized development of speaking and listening skills through intensive drills, exposure to basic structural patterns of the language, and functional vocabulary. The course — led by Yasmine Hasnaoui who taught Arabic in a one-year program at Austin College in 2004 – 2005 — included introduction to cultural components in the Middle East and North Africa. In August, Bailey attended the Summer Symposium on U.S. Foreign Policy, joining students from around the world in Washington, D.C., to hear economists, analysts, journalists, government officials, and educators provide insight on the state of politics around the globe. The students also visited the embassies of China, Israel, and Egypt during the conference. Other Austin College participants were Laura Gallardo ’10, Wes Johnston ’10, Adnan Merchant ’11, Kerry Van Zant ’08, and Nathan Withers ’09. Both events, offered through the Osgood Center for International Studies, were directed by Shelly Williams, president of the Osgood Center and Austin College professor emeritus of political science. Alvaro Escorcia ’10 and Wes Johnston ’10 were Osgood Center interns for the summer. Escorcia worked with a non-governmental agency on sustainable development and Johnston was assigned to TASH, an international association working in disability advocacy.

High School Students Experience College Life Twelve students participated in the Center for Southwestern and Mexican Studies (CSMS) Summer Institute for Talented High School Students in 2008. The program allows high school rising juniors and seniors to attend, tuition-free, two full-credit Austin College summer courses relating to the interests of the center. All students selected for the institute take the same two courses, which also may include regularly enrolled Austin College students. Course offering in 2008 were “Introduction to Cultural Anthropology” and beginning or intermediate Spanish. Terry Hoops, associate professor of anthropology, and Patrick Duffey, professor of Spanish, taught the courses. Light Cummins, Guy M. Bryan professor of history, is director of the CSMS. The program is open to high school students who live in Grayson, Fannin, Collin, or Cooke counties in Texas or in Bryan County in Oklahoma and have completed two full years of high school.


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Five Join College Board of Trustees Five individuals recently joined the Austin College Board of Trustees: E John M. Andersen ’66 of Dallas, professor of pediatrics and director of pediatric gastroenterology at University of Texas Southwestern Medical School and Children’s Medical Center in Dallas E Laura Dies Campbell ’73 of Austin, community volunteer active in Lay Missionaries of Charity and Mobile Loaves and Fishes E Kelly Hiser of Sherman, owner of Kelly Oil Company E Wes Moffett ’82 of Dallas, chief operating officer of Avelo Mortgage in Irving, a subsidiary of Archon Group E John Serhant of Denison, Texas, and Steamboat Springs, Colorado, retired vice chair of State Street Global Advisors and advisor to

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Goldentree Asset Management.

John M. Andersen

Laura Campbell

Davis Provides Professional Leadership Nan Davis, vice president for Institutional Enrollment, will serve as co-director for the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) Chief Enrollment Officers Forum in September in Seattle, Washington. She serves on the Program Planning Committee and is co-chair of the Local Arrangements Committee for the National College Board Forum 2008, to be held in Houston this November. Davis again served as a resident faculty member for the College Board/Texas Association for College Admission Counseling (TACAC) Summer Institute held in San Antonio, Texas, in July. She continues service on the College Board National College Scholarship Service Assembly Council and the Southwestern College Board Regional Council. Summer Days Are Busy Ones at Austin College Each summer, several thousand individuals visit Austin College as participants in various summer conferences. Many are youth camps of church and school groups, as well as the annual Young Leaders Conference of the National Hispanic Institute.

Kelly Hiser

Japan/U.S. Educators Compare Notes Back-to-school time took on new meaning in August for a group of educators from Japan visiting the U.S. to compare the educational system to that of their own nation. Their agenda included an afternoon of discussion with the faculty of the Austin Teacher Program and a local school administrator. The trip for the 13 high school and college teachers, principals, and administrators from Japan was arranged through the Japan Fulbright Memorial Fund (JFMF) Teacher Program, sponsored by the government of Japan, and designed to increase understanding between the people of Japan and the United States. The Japanese visitors’ educational specialties range from homemaking to physics. Their homes and schools are in Aichi, Osaka, Hokkaido, and Hiroshima, Japan. Brandon McInnis ’09 served as language interpreter for the gathering.

Wes Moffett

John Serhant

research directors from across the nation invited to serve on the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Technical Review Panel (TRP) for the Department of Education. The TRP met in Washington, D.C., July 9–10 to review possible changes to the IPEDS Graduation Rate Survey. French Teachers, Students Learn Together French students and teachers from Keller High School. Klein Oak High School, Sherman High School, and James Bowie High School in Arlington, Texas, were selected by Austin College French faculty to participate in a campus program in July. The group spent three days in the College’s Jordan Family Language House, and Austin College French Department faculty led sessions designed to develop students’ listening and speaking fluency through an immersion program. News Briefs photos available in the online magazine.

Wheaton Selected for Research Panel Judy Wheaton, director of Institutional Research and Assessment, was one of fewer than 15 institutional

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Austin College Is a Great Place to Work Austin College was named one of the “2008 Great Colleges to Work For” in the July 18 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education, scoring in the top five in 17 of 27 categories. “I am proud of the faculty and staff of Austin College who make this a great place to work,” said Oscar C. Page, Austin College president. “Each person contributes to a positive environment characterized by respect and support for one another.” ModernThink, a human resources consulting firm, administered surveys to 15,000 randomly selected employees of 89 public and private colleges and universities. Austin College was included in the “small” category, for institutions with 499 or fewer employees and ranked among the top five institutions in categories including healthy facultyadministration relations, collaborative governance, professional/career development, teaching environment, confidence in senior leadership, connections to institution and pride, respect and appreciation, and post-retirement benefits. “Independent surveys are important because responses are generally honest and sincere,” said Heidi Ellis, vice president for Business Affairs at Austin College. “I believe this is a terrific place to work, and this survey confirms that many others feel that way as well.”

Renowned Shakespearean Scholar to Visit Campus for Lecture

PHOTO BY BACHRACH

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Stephen Greenblatt

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orld-renowned Shakespearean and English literature scholar Stephen Greenblatt will visit Austin College October 20 to present a lecture on Shakespeare and Cervantes, “The Strange Case of Cardenio.” The lecture will be held at 7 p.m. in Hoxie Thompson Auditorium of Sherman Hall. A reception and booksigning will follow. “Stephen Greenblatt’s visit to Austin College is a major event for us,” said Carol Daeley, professor of English and chair of the English Department. “He is a groundbreaking figure in literary studies who has recently launched two truly unique projects born out of his interest in ‘what happens when things cross borders.’ His Harvard course on global exchange along ocean routes in the 17th century has, like much of his work, profound relevance to today’s world. His play, Cardenio, co-written with Charles Mee and inspired by Shakespeare and Cervantes, has been adapted for performance in Japan and India. Who better to bring here as the faculty begins its ‘Global Learning for Cultural Awareness’ Quality Enhancement Plan?” Greenblatt is the John Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard University, one of 19 Harvard University Professors, the school’s highest professorial distinction. Before joining the Harvard faculty in 1997, Greenblatt was a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, where he taught for 28 years. He has been a visiting professor and lecturer at universities around the world, including the universities of Oxford, London, Kyoto, Bologna, Florence, Berlin, and Peking. He is the author of dozens of scholarly articles and of 10 books, including Hamlet in Purgatory. He also has served as editor of 10 major volumes, including the seventh edition of The Norton Anthology of English Literature. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the recipient of many honors and awards.


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Austin College’s Posey Leadership Institute will host its annual Leadership Forum November 7, featuring Howard Prince, director of the LBJ School’s Center for Ethical Leadership and retired Brigadier General of the U.S. Army. Prince will offer a 9:30 a.m. session and speak at a luncheon after the morning session. From 1990 to 1996, Prince served as founding dean and professor in the University of Richmond’s Jepson School of Leadership Studies, where he was responsible for development of the first undergraduate leadership degree program in the world. From 1978 to 1990, Prince was professor and head of the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. An honor graduate of West Point, Prince holds a master’s degree in international relations from American University, studied at the University of Bonn in Germany as an Olmsted Scholar, and earned a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Texas at Austin. A clinical psychologist, he is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. For information about the event, contact the Posey Leadership Institute staff at (903) 813-2015 or see www.austincollege.edu/news.

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Leadership Forum Scheduled for November 7

Howard Prince

Page Signs Climate Commitment

Addendum: Spring 2008 Music Recitals

Austin College President Oscar C. Page signed the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment July 24, pledging to eliminate campus greenhouse gas emissions over time. The commitment will require Austin College to complete an emissions inventory, set a target date and milestones to become “climate neutral,” reduce greenhouse gas emissions, integrate sustainability into the curriculum and into the College’s education experience, and make an action plan, inventory, and progress reports publicly available, according to the Presidents Climate Commitment Web site. “The college has been serious about various aspects of environmental issues in the past, but I’m delighted to see the highest level administrative support for a more comprehensive approach,” said Peter Schulze, professor of biology and environmental science and director of Austin College’s Center for Environmental Studies. “Joining the Presidents Climate Commitment is a recognition that these sorts of efforts are in the best interest of the College and larger community in the long run and are compatible with the mission of the College.” One of the first steps Austin College will take during Fall Term 2008 is to form a committee that will evaluate how to best meet the goals of the commitment. In signing the commitment, Austin College joined more than 560 colleges and universities committed to address the issue of global warming through reducing campus impact on the environment.

A listing of senior recitals performed by Austin College music majors that was included in the June magazine inadvertently omitted Michael Brahce, vocalist. Since graduation he has been involved with the Berkshire Theatre Festival (BTF) in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. As one of five Artists in Residence, Brahce performs once a week in a touring production, A Tour of Mount Olympus, written by BTF’s E. Gray Simons III and Tara M. Franklin. He also teaches children at area schools about various aspects of theatre and will perform in the company’s annual holiday production of A Christmas Carol.

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Fall Theatre Season Chapter Two by Neil Simon September 25–27, 7:30 p.m.; and 2:30 p.m., September 27 Directed by Greg Hernandez ’09 Beardsley Arena Theatre

Hamlet by William Shakespeare October 23–25, 7 p.m. Directed by Kathleen Campbell, professor of communication studies Ida Green Theatre

Festival of One-Act Plays November 21–22, 7 p.m. Directed by students of Kirk Everist, assistant professor of communication studies Ida Green Theatre

All performances in Ida Green Communication Center. Tickets are $8, but free to all Austin College students. See www.austincollege.edu for updates. Art Exhibit October 20 – November 14 Artist: Susie Fowler Ida Green Gallery, Ida Green Communication Center

Fall Music Season October 25 Sherman Symphony Orchestra 7:30 p.m., Kidd Key Auditorium, Sherman 26 Faculty Trio Recital 3 p.m., Craig Recital Hall November 13 Choral Concert 7:30 p.m., Wynne Chapel 19 Concert Band Performance 7:30 p.m., Wynne Chapel 20 Student Recital 7:30 p.m., Wynne Chapel 24 Chamber Music and Jazz Concert 7:30 p.m., Wynne Chapel 25 Student Recital 7:30 p.m., Craig Recital Hall December 4 Service of Lessons and Carols featuring Austin College Choirs 7 p.m., Wynne Chapel 6 Christmas Pops with the Sherman Symphony Orchestra 7:30 p.m., Mason Complex, Sid Richardson Center 7 Christmas Pops with the Sherman Symphony Orchestra 3 p.m., Mason Complex, Sid Richardson Center See www.austincollege.edu for details, updates, and ticket information.

Grant Enhances Computer Science Study through Robotics

Freshmen Kristyn Weaver and Andrew Jaremski work on programming as faculty member Shellene Kelley, center, examines one of the book-sized robots used by her C/I class.

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“It’s much more fun to teach a robot to navigate around obstacles, perform a dance, or travel the halls taking pictures than to write a program to solve a mathematical equation or search for information in a file,” Kelley said. “But the same logic and problem solving skills are needed to accomplish all these tasks. Students learn not only to program robots but also to program computers to solve real-world problems.”

PHOTO BY VICKIE S. KIRBY

“Implementing robotics into computer science and other sciences makes the curriculum more interesting and interactive,” said Shellene Kelley, Austin College associate professor of computer science. Austin College was one of 28 high schools, colleges, and universities in the nation to receive a grant this summer to enhance computer science curriculum with robotics technology. The grant was provided by the Institute for Personal Robots in Education (IPRE) and a gift from Microsoft Research. The schools share $250,000 and received book-sized robots, called Scribblers, enhanced with special hardware technology and software. “IPRE’s efforts in developing this technology over the past two years make it possible to put a robot in the hands of every student in the class for about the same price as a textbook,” said Kelley. “This is key to encouraging experimentation and learning, both in and out of the classroom environment.” Kelley is implementing the technology this fall during her Communication/Inquiry (C/I) course, “Computing with Robots: It’s all a BOT science,” with each student exploring ways to automate robot behavior through computer programming using their own personal robot. Kelley also will use the robotic technology in 2009 January and spring term courses.


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BREAKING ALL THE RULES by Jeff Kelly n unspoken rule in sports is that it takes time to build a winner. When a program is created, odds are it will struggle before it turns the corner toward success. Apparently, no one ever told that to Paul Burns, the first and only coach the Austin College women’s soccer program has known since its 1996 beginning. He brought winning to women’s soccer in a hurry. In the team’s second year, the Kangaroos posted a winning record of 11-7-1, and have not been under .500 since. They won 12 games in their third season, and within just five years of the inception of the program, they won a program-record 16 games and the first of two conference championships.

PHOTO BY JOSH BOWERMAN

A

In all, Burns has led his teams to 11 consecutive winning seasons, with 10 seasons of double figures in the win column and plans to add to the streak this fall. “My goal when I started the program was to compete every year for a conference championship,” said Burns. He attributes the success to strong recruiting and developing a pool of committed and competitive student-athletes. “Lots of sacrifice is needed,” Burns said. “I push the players outside their comfort zone. We want players that understand this dynamic and have a passion to improve, compete, win — and combine this with succeeding academically and enjoying student life.” Burns said his coaching philosophy is simple. “Practices always are thoroughly organized, supervised, and intense,” he said. “I provide the student-athletes with challenging year-round training programs that improve players’ game, development, and understanding. I believe a successful coach is part technician, part mentor, and part entrepreneur. He must know his game thoroughly and instinctively, be sensitive to the needs of his players, and employ the business skills of a successful manager with zest and flair.” The hard work is necessary to achieve and maintain success, but as Burns says, “Nothing is free and nothing is easy. You get out what you put in.” At the same time, Burns teaches his players that there is no room for placing blame or reacting poorly when something doesn’t go their way. “I believe a team must come to play no matter the adversity,” said Burns. “The athletes must be prepared, motivated, competitive, and always gracious in victory or defeat. They must take responsibility for their own actions and always strive for excellence on the field and in the classroom. I believe each player has talent, and through physical, mental, and spiritual enhancement, each student-athlete has the ability to reach maximum potential.” For now, Burns is focused on the 2008 season, and as always the goal is to challenge for a conference championship. With a plethora of talented returners and yet another strong recruiting class, it seems a goal well within reach.

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Baseball Team Can’t Repeat SCAC Championship

Austin College Magazine

Women’s soccer coach Paul Burns and several members of his team traveled to the United Kingdom this summer for a training tour in the coach’s home country. The women played three games against teams from England and Wales and took in the sights along the way, traveling to Manchester, Peterborough, Abergavenny, and London. The trip was immensely enjoyable for the players as well as successful — as the team went 3-0 in competition. Fourteen of this fall’s 22 returning players, as well as Nicole Christy ’00 and Kim Frazier, father of a current player, took part in this road trip of a lifetime.

Soccer travelers stopping for a Big Ben photo are, left to right, first row: Allison Wurmbrand ’10, Paige Rutherford ’09, Ashleigh Johnson ’11, Amy Holman ’10, Holly Messamore ’09; second row: Caitlin Sperry ’11, Sarah Fennewald ’09, Bahar Abbassi ’10, Brooke Adams ’09, Katie Hudson ’11, Faren Frazier ’09; and third row: Helen Heres ’09, Mackenzie Lund ’11, and Kaitlin Elledge ’11.

FIND THE LATEST ’ROO SPORTS SCHEDULES AND RESULTS ONLINE: WWW.AUSTINCOLLEGE.EDU/ATHLETICS

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Soccer Women Discover Magical Kingdom

COURTESY PHOTO

The Kangaroo baseball team came up short in defending its Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference title, falling in a best-of-three series to No. 15-ranked DePauw University in the SCAC Divisional Tournament to end the season with a record of 18-24. The ’Roos also had a 7-9 regular season mark against conference opponents. Shortstop Andy White ’10, first baseman and pitcher Bobby Schleizer ’08, and third baseman Bennett Herrick ’11 were honored in the postseason for their outstanding play during the year. White was named All-Conference after batting .355 with 12 doubles, four triples, four home runs, and 29 RBIs, and also provided perhaps the biggest highlight of the season when he turned a rare unassisted triple play. White also was named the SCAC Player of the Week during the season. Schleizer finished the season ranked second in the conference with 10 home runs and added nine doubles and 42 RBIs while hitting .336 with a .603 slugging percentage. Herrick hit .296 with a team-best 14 doubles, along with three triples, three homers, and 29 RBIs. Also posting strong seasons were catcher Patrick Ray ’10, who batted .349 with three homers and 17 RBIs, and outfielder Jordan Robison ’10, who hit .357 with four triples and three home runs on the year. Scooter Merritt ’11 acclimated to college ball quickly, hitting .318 with five doubles and 21 RBIs during his first season. Cory Stevens ’09 put together a solid season on the mound for the ’Roos, posting a team-best five wins in nine starts while striking out 58 batters. Will Chermak ’10 added four wins on the year and led the team with 63 strikeouts. Tyler Steed ’11 had a strong first season for the ’Roos, earning three wins and two saves while striking out 26 batters and walking just 12 on the year. With the ’Roos losing just one senior from the 2008 team and boasting so much young talent, there will be plenty of firepower in place for coach Carl Iwasaki and his team to once again be near the top of the SCAC in 2009.

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Softball Team Shows Signs of Growth, Makes Donation for Cancer Research raise money for St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital. Every 'Roo homerun of the season resulted in donations, totaling $3,213 for the charity. Hart presented the check on behalf of the Kangaroo softball team during the team’s April trip to play Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee. COURTESY PHOTO

The Austin College softball team saw a huge improvement in its second year as an NCAA varsity sport, finishing third in the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC) tournament, posting a 17-23 overall record and an 11-5 mark against conference opponents. The 11 conference wins alone top the team’s win total from last season. The ’Roos finished the regular season in second place in the SCAC West, and were the only SCAC team to defeat Trinity prior to the postseason, splitting their series 2-2. Leading the way for the ’Roos were first baseman Stefanie Faith ’11, outfielder Laci Hart ’08, and utility player Sam Smith ’11. Faith made an incredible impact in her first collegiate season, named to the Louisville Slugger/National Fastpitch Coaches Association Division III All-South Region Third Team and the SCAC All-Conference First Team. Hart, who joined the team for her senior season after excelling for the volleyball team for four years, joined Faith on the SCAC First Team, as well as the SCAC All-Tournament Team. Smith, who played catcher, third base, first base, and outfield at various points in the year, was named Honorable Mention All-SCAC for her work at third. It wasn’t just the ’Roos who were scoring whenever a ball went over the outfield fence. At the suggestion of head coach Edie Fletcher, a two-time cancer survivor, the ’Roos created Home Runs for Hope to

Softball players visiting St. Jude’s Hospital are, front row, left to right, Brittany Gaertner ’11, Ashely Johnson ’11, Sam Smith ’11, Abbey Hayes ’11, Carolyn Stone ’11; and second row, Kali Gossett ’11, Stefanie Faith ’11, Lauren Harrison, ’11, Laci Hart ’08, Whitney Bodine ’11, and Bobbi Schulle ’10.

Women’s Tennis Team Finishes Strong; Navey Recognized for Men The Austin College women’s tennis team had a solid year, winning two matches in the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC) Tournament and finishing the year with an 8-9 record. The men’s team finished 2-13, with wins coming against the University of the Ozarks and Concordia University of Texas. The two teams debuted the new Russell Tennis Complex in the 2008 season, with both the men and the women winning their first matches at the new facility in an April 11 match against the Ozarks. Both the men and the women won by scores of 5-4 over the Tigers. The women were led by a pair of first-year players in Minnie Satyavada ’11 and Kelly Lewis ’11, who were strong throughout the season, and each was named to the SCAC All-Tournament Team, with

Satyavada earning the honor for both singles and doubles. Lewis, who was Satyavada’s doubles partner during the tournament, was selected for outstanding performance in doubles competition. Both Satyavada and Lewis went undefeated at the event. Satyavada also was named Honorable Mention All-SCAC after excelling in number two, three, and four singles, as well as being paired with Lewis in number one doubles. Satyavada was the women’s Carroll Pickett Award winner as the most outstanding player. On the men’s side, Nate Navey ’09 was named the men’s Carroll Pickett winner for the second straight season. Navey played well all season in both number one singles and number one doubles.

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Alumni Honored at 2008 Legends The annual Legends Celebration July 19– 21 attracted record numbers for the Sunday awards dinner as well as large numbers for the Saturday receptions and a full course for the annual McCord Golf Tournament.

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ATHLETIC HALL OF HONOR INDUCTEES

Jim Baird ’93 Coppell, Texas Football, baseball Captain, Coppell Fire Department

W.K. “Bo” Brown ’75 Dallas, Texas Football Owner, Brown Fryar, and Long Law Firm

Allison McKinney Tarpley ’99 Frisco, Texas Basketball Account vice president, UBS Financial

Kenneth D. Tatum ’89 San Antonio, Texas Football Senior consultant, Travelers Insurance

Kenneth W. Street Sherman, Texas Honorary Inductee Professor Emeritus, Austin College

AUSTIN COLLEGE KEDRIC COUCH ALUMNI COACH OF THE YEAR Larry Uland ’61 Farmersville, Texas Athletic director and football coach at Greenville Christian School

COACH JOE SPENCER AWARD FOR MERITORIOUS SERVICE AND LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT IN COACHING Butch Worley ’76 Austin, Texas Senior associate athletics director, University of Texas

PHOTO BY AARON FLORES

Continued Excellence Expected from 2007-2008 Outstanding Freshman Athlete Coach Ronnie Gage is looking for strong play from this fall from 2008 Tim Jubela Freshman Athlete of the Year Chris Hickson ’11. Hickson made an immediate impact on the ’Roos football team in 2007, starting all 10 games of the season. The defensive back finished among the team leaders with 35 tackles, including 22 solo tackles. Gage described Hickson as a gifted athlete with an incredible work ethic and competitive spirit. In addition to praising Hickson’s diligence and dedication to his team, Gage also called the young star defensive back a person of great moral character.

Chris Hickson

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alumni board

He could have added fortune to fame, but caring for neither, he found happiness and honor in being helpful to the world.

This epitaph of George Washington Carver resonates with me as a new school year begins. A lot has changed since my first days at Austin College — my wild oats have surely turned to bran cereal, and I hear my favorite songs only on office elevators — but the lasting values we gained at Austin College remain the same. Your Alumni Board carries on that “helping” tradition by connecting alumni to Austin College and to each other. Recent activities of the board include: Beverly Benthul Barry ’67 greeted 325 new members to the Alumni Association at Commencement for the Class of 2008 in May. I met future alumni of the Class of 2012 and presented their class flag on behalf of the Alumni Board at the Opening of School Convocation. Sarah Gunderson ’81 and Craig Florence ’84 were elected to the board’s new positions of first and second vice president, respectively. The Alumni College Committee organized programs with outstanding professors for September 21 in Denver; October 2, Houston; October 5, San Antonio; October 7, Dallas; and October 12, Washington, D.C. Will we see you there? See acalumni.org for details. The Homecoming Committee planned another outstanding Homecoming October 24–26, with all reunion groups meeting Saturday evening in one location. The gathering should be even better than last year’s great event! The Annual Fund Committee raised a concern that only 29.42 percent of our nearly 14,000 alumni made a gift of any size to the Annual Fund campaign that ended June 30. Thank you to those who gave, and I hope you will continue to give. This is one measure of the alumni’s confidence in their alma mater and its future. Let’s work to raise that percentage this year. Forget Facebook and MySpace, have you signed up for Austin College’s new online community? It’s a great way to network and connect with your classmates. Go to acalumni.org and use the code on your magazine mailing label to sign in. Starting with this issue, I want to expand on some key components of the Alumni Board. I asked Giselle Finne Gafford ’00, president of the Greek Alumni Council, to tell you about this group’s purpose, goals, and recent accomplishments. I hope to see many of you on campus during Homecoming. Happy Trails,

PHOTO BY VICKIE S. KIRBY

Fellow alumni:

Greek Alumni Council Supports Austin College Greek Organizations The Austin College Greek Alumni Council (GAC) was formed in 2004 to provide a connection between current students and alumni members of Greek organizations and ensure cooperation and communication between and among the College and the Greek community. The GAC offers counsel and assistance to Greek organizations, with goals of strengthening and promoting each group; providing a historical reference; improving the overall Greek program; assisting in effective governance, including conflict resolution; and serving as outreach and connection points between Greek alumni, their organizations, and the College. The GAC recently participated in the charter review process for three Greek organizations with charters up for renewal. In addition, the council established a “listserve” that facilitates communication among Council members and created a Web site. Additionally, the GAC has expanded its role with a voting seat (represented by the council president) on the Austin College Alumni Board. How can you represent your Greek organization? Each chartered Greek organization may be represented on the GAC by up to three alumni members. The GAC seeks diversity and inclusion of alumni from various decades. There is room for all organizations to expand their alumni representation. The GAC holds two meetings a year — one during Homecoming weekend and the other in the spring or summer. Interested alumni may write Gafford at gisellegafford@sbcglobal.net or Alumni and Parent Relations staff at alumni@austincollege.edu.

Mike Nurre Alumni Board President Mike Nurre

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PHOTO BY VICKIE S. KIRBY

Class of 2012 Includes Several Continuing a Family Tradition

The 319 members of the Austin College freshman class include 64 students with some previous family tie to the College. Freshman Thomas Clayton has the most legacy connections, with six family alumni, including his grandparents Alfred Clayton ’44 and Bettye (Green) Clayton ’48; his parents Mark Clayton ’77 and Cathy Bryant Clayton ’76; his sister Catherine “Cate” Clayton ’03; and his brother Stephen Clayton ’06. Other students and alumni gathering for the photo are listed here, in an attempt at left to right identification by row. Front, Bianca Banek, sister of Jeremiah Banek ’00; Caitlin Tabor, daughter of Nancy Lazarine Tabor ’83, and sister of Cayce Tabor ’10; Anne Deming, sister of Katie Deming ’04; Erin Slade sister of Leslie Slade ’09; Kaitlin McCoy, daughter of Michelle McCoy ’87; Thomas Clayton and family listed above; Mackenzie Mayer, cousin of Stacy Austin ’85; Margaret Edwards, daughter of David ’83 and Sara Mullin ’85 Edwards; Hillary Gregory-Allen, daughter of Victoria Reeder ’84 and Roger Gregory-Allen ’84, and niece of Richard Gregory-Allen ’78; Wajiha Khan, cousin of Haroon Samar ’02; Second row, Devanie Emms, daughter of Thomas Emms ’82; Kallison and Kellan Pope, sisters of Krisandra Pope ’08; Bridgette Deem, granddaughter of Don and Marion Bean ’64; Umair Karim, brother of Mariya Karim ’08; Suzanne Beltran, great niece of William and Nancy Sizer Oelfke, both ’66, and cousins of William and Melanie Brown Oelfke, both ’84; Alyssa Rangel, sister of Javier Rangel, Jr. ’05; Tyler Brannen, brother of Thomas “Bucky” Brannen ’08; Madeleine Levin, daughter of Jeffrey ’79 and Ginny Harleston Levin ’79; Neema Dad, sister of Jeema Dad ’10; back row, Chelsea Freeland, daughter of Charles ’90 and Lisa New ’89 Freeland; Kevin Kurian, brother of Joseph Kurian ’08; Will Navey, son of Allen Navey ’73, brother of Nate Navey ’09, and nephew of Cornelius Nau, Jr. ’73; Frank McStay, brother of Kira McStay ’10; Hannah Alexander, daughter of Gerald Alexander ’76; Graham Schneider, brother of Jordan Schneider ’08; George Foote Clark IV, son of George F. Clark III ’77; Kayla Cook, niece of Byron Cook ’71; Katelin McKee, sister of Zach McKee ’07; and Ellen Wehner, sister of Brooks Wehner ’01.

Alumni News

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Campus Room Bears Name of Master Teacher Nona Bishop Wood Sansom ’66 was surprised during a visit to campus in April by a gift from her husband, Andy Sansom ’68, whose funding named the Nona Sansom Room in the Temple Learning Center at Thompson House in her honor. Nona taught many years before retiring from the Austin Independent School District. “Honoring my wife in this way was a great privilege for me and I am grateful to Austin College for allowing me to do so,” Andy said. “More than anything else, she is a fine example to students studying to be educators because she is a consummate professional. She is recognized as a Master Teacher who will be an inspiration to all who use the Nona Sansom Room.” Andy, a conservationist and former executive director of Texas Parks and Wildlife, has written four books, including Water in Texas, published this summer by UT Press. He also is the author of Scout, The Christmas Dog. Although not written or marketed as a children’s book, it often is found in children’s book sections and has been used as a text in children’s literature classes at the University of Texas. Nona Sansom in the Temple Learning Center at Thompson House

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The work of Carroll Pickett as Death House chaplain at the Huntsville prison is the subject of the documentary At the Death House Door. See page 20.

Marlene Llopiz has been named regional director for Latin America for Venn Life Sciences Clinical Research in Mexico City. She is in charge of opening offices throughout Latin America. She made a presentation at the Drug Information Association forum in July, representing the entire Latin American region. She has two children.

Israel Suster has been elected president of the Plano Bar Association. His law firm is engaged in the practice of commercial and property litigation throughout north Texas. He lives in Plano with his wife and their two children.

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A son, Ryan Sterling, was born August 7, 2007, to Anna and Michael Clark (11). Ryan joins big sister Jordan, 3. The family lives in Dallas. ■ Mary KellySwafford and Judson Crowder (4) met up with one another in Reno, Nevada, at the National Association of Professional Organizers conference in April. Both are professional organizers; Mary in New Orleans and Judson in Houston. ■ Christopher Thompson (24), a partner in the litigation and bankruptcy sections of the Dallas offices of the Jackson Walker law firm, was named a Rising Star for 2008. Rising Stars must be no older than 40 and practicing law for 10 years or less. The award is based on a survey of Texas attorneys to determine the top 2.5 percent of the state’s up-and-coming lawyers. Texas Monthly staff members then conduct independent research of the nominees’ credentials and publish those selected in the April 2008 magazine.

60 Dan Page received a Manhattan Association of Cabarets (MAC) Award in the category of Special Musical Material as a writer of the song “One Stop Shopping,” co-written and performed by New York jazz and blues artist Sue Matsuki. Dan is a songwriter and playwright living in Harvard, Massachusetts.

65 Dr. John C. Landolt (12) retired in August from the teaching faculty of Shepherd University in Shepherdstown, West Virginia, after a tenure of 38 years. Landolt joined the Shepherd faculty after receiving a doctorate in zoology from the University of Oklahoma. While at Shepherd, Landolt taught classes in general biology, general zoology, developmental biology, and comparative anatomy, as well as serving a rotation as chair of the Biology Department. Landolt has been engaged in research on the natural history of cellular slime molds for a number of years. He has authored or coauthored over 30 refereed journal articles; made presentations at many regional, national, and international meetings; and is listed as an authority for the formal description of more than 20 new species of cellular slime molds. Landolt will continue a relationship with Shepherd University as research professor of biology emeritus and will remain in Shepherdstown with Melinda, his wife of 28 years.

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Leah Clemmons Lane and her family — husband John and their son and daughter — moved to New Zealand in 2005. Their son, Joseph, already plans to be in Austin College’s Class of 2016. Leah wrote in belatedly to identify participants in the photo included in the Every Picture Tells a Story feature in the December 2007 Austin College Magazine. Of the photo, she recalled that during the trip to China led by Jim Ware, now professor emeritus of philosophy and religion, the Austin College men took on a Chinese basketball team and the locals were surprised that Dr. Ware spoke Shanghai Chinese (he was born there to missionary parents). She also recalled that her suitcase broke and Trev Teel ’78 gave her $40 to get a new one. Ah, memories …

85 Rachel McCollough Matthews graduated from Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary in Chicago with a Doctor of Ministry degree in pastoral counseling and psychotherapy. Her doctoral paper was “Using Ritual and Spiritual Practices in Pastoral Counseling and Psychotherapy: The Role of Pastoral Counselor as Ritual Leader.” ■ Denyse Seaman was married May 31 to David Rodgers. She continues to work at Baylor University in the Electronic Library as head of Library Information Systems.

78 Thomas Luck (22) received a Master of Liberal Arts in Religion degree from Harvard University. His thesis, “Breaking Bread: the Gospels and the End of Poverty,” makes the case for a biblical mandate to end poverty. Luck continues to serve as dean of St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral in Syracuse, New York, and as a chaplain to the Clergy Leadership Project, a program of Trinity Church/St. Paul’s Chapel in New York.

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Rock Stanley successfully defended his doctoral dissertation “Current Mathematical Concepts Critical To Student Success in College Algebra” in May at Texas A&M-Commerce. The graduation ceremony was in August.

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93 (21) A son, Daniel Murray Lee II, was born June 22, 2007, to Sydney and Erica (Jebs Holder) Lee. The family lives in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area.

95 A son, Samuel Michael, was born May 25 to Mike and Jill Harter Teagarden (15). Big brother Max, 2, welcomed Sam home. Jill is a senior director of

Alicia Van Borssum ’82 has taught Montessori and English as a Second Language (ESL) for the past 25 years. This fall, for the first time since the 1970s when she assisted Cynthia Manley of Austin College’s faculty, she is teaching French as well as ESL at a middle school near Rochester, New York. She also is beginning doctoral studies at the Warner School of the University of Rochester, with interest in literacy. She is a volunteer with Ethiopia Reads and last summer spent a month in Ethiopia doing teacher training and volunteering in the first free public library for children in Addis Ababa. She returned to Ethiopia in December 2007 and plans to travel there again in summer 2009 to help set up a training center for teachers. Van Borssum, at center, with teachers in Ethiopia

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’ r o o research and development for VHA, Inc., in Irving, Texas, and Mike manages analytics for McAfee in Frisco, Texas. The family lives in Dallas. ■ Kim Terry and Benjamin Winbery (19) were married February 16 in San Antonio, Texas. They live in Georgia where Kim works as a private practitioner outpatient counselor in Warner Robins.

96 Cullen and Amy Aubrey Chandler (7) , along with their daughter Cate, 5, traveled to the Midwest in June to combine business with pleasure. Amy attended various events at Purdue University where she continues to telecommute as writer/editor of alumni publications for the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences while Cullen conducted research at the library on campus. Cullen, assistant professor of history at Lycoming College, was awarded a $6,000 summer stipend from the National Endowment for the Humanities in support

of his research project “Carolingian Catalonia: politics and culture in the Spanish March.” After the stop at Purdue and visiting friends in Michigan and Chicago, the family returned home to Williamsport, Pennsylvania — home of the Little League World Series. A visit to the Card Wildlife Education Museum at Ferris State University in Michigan gave Cate a chance to learn more about kangaroos — and pose for a photo. ■ Max Hawsey was named head football coach for Grinnell College in Iowa in January. Offensive coordinator and line coach at Colorado College since 2003, Max helped the team break 15 offensive school records while averaging over 400 yards and 30 points per game. He recently finished production for American Football Monthly, where he writes and creates football videos and articles for coaches nationwide. He and his wife, Sara Townsend-Hawsey, have three children, Marion, 5; Hunter, 3; and Natalie, 1. ■ A daughter, Natalia Elyse, was born May 29, 2007, to Sean and

notes

Isabel Lerma Hedger. They are happy to be back in Texas after nine years in New Mexico. ■ Greg Koch is adjunct professor at the California School of Professional Psychology at Alliant International University, where he teaches a doctoral course on lesbian and gay couples, families, and children. He contracts with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to assess and treat inmates at Centinela State Prison in El Centro and maintains a part-time private practice in San Diego. He is the current chair of the San Diego Psychological Association’s Committee on Gay and Lesbian Concerns. In October 2007, Greg was a part of the volunteer Disaster Mental Health Team at Qualcomm Stadium, where 11,000 evacuees were housed during the San Diego wildfires.

97 Melinda Massie has begun an events planning business, Melinda Massie Events and Consulting.

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Tanishia Choice ’04 was a co-recipient of the 2008 North Texas Society of Psychiatric Physicians Award for the Outstanding Medical Student in Psychiatry at University of Texas Southwestern Medical School. The award is given to a graduating medical student for “stellar clinical work, strong leadership on campus regarding psychiatry education, and commitment to community involvement in the service of the mentally ill.” This spring, Dr. Choice undertook a research project in genetics, studying causes of lung, breast, and colon cancer while waiting for the July start of her residency in psychiatry at UT Southwestern Medical School. The intern year of the four-year residency includes six months of Tanishia Choice general medicine and six months of psychiatry so the months ahead will include rotations in adult medicine, pediatrics, neurology, and emergency room medicine as well as psychiatry. Following completion of the psychiatry residency, Dr. Choice plans to seek a fellowship to

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complete the additional two years necessary for work in child psychiatry. With training completed, Dr. Choice wants to establish her own practice in the Dallas area and/or participate in academic medicine with UT Southwestern. She chose the field of child psychiatry because during her rotation through adult psychiatry, she found that many of the adults’ illnesses and problems were rooted in childhood. “I see child psychiatry as preventive medicine to stop these illnesses from compounding,” Dr. Choice said. A passion of Dr. Choice is continuing efforts toward establishment of a residency outreach program at UT Southwestern. She hopes that when residents can volunteer in the community to educate people about mental illness and reduce the stigma associated, people will not be opposed to seeking care. “We need to reduce the morbidity of mental illness — which comes from a lack of adequate care,” she said. “Dr. Choice has a very rare combination of gifts — excelling in the practice of science and remaining passionately rooted in the problems of the communities she was raised within,” said Dr. Adam Brenner, assistant professor of psychiatry and director of medical student education. “I look forward to watching Tanishia continue to pursue both these missions — for research and for activism — with great success during her residency.”

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00 A son, Mason William, was born November 30, 2007, to Brad and Stephanie Palmer Bierman (8). The family lives in Frisco, Texas. Stephanie is a director of admission, working regionally in Dallas, for Austin College, where she has worked for six years. Brad is a benefits and risk consultant for Homes Murphy Associates in Dallas. ■ A daughter, Lainey Cathryn, was born April 24 to Ben and Abby Hagan Harris (16). The family lives in Plano, Texas. ■ Tricia Holland and John Williams (10) were married September 2, 2007, at the Umlauf Sculpture Garden and Museum in Austin, Texas. The wedding party included Andi Taylor ’01, Leigh Wisner ’01 and Aron Bautista ’01. Tricia and John live in Houston, Texas, where Tricia is a special agent with the U.S. Secret Service and John is a superintendent for Brighton Homes. ■ Gary Howell has completed a doctorate in clinical psychology at the Adler School of Professional Psychology in Chicago, Illinois, and received a certificate in clinical hypnosis and assessment. His dissertation was on assessing the need for adjustments in scoring on the Rorschach Inkblot Test with gay men He is clinical director of a private, psychologist-run psychiatric practice. ■ A son, Daniel Patrick, was born February 28, 2007, to Daniel and Kelly Klotz Diaz (5). The family lives in Carrollton, Texas. ■ A daughter, Hazel Jennie, was born March 8 to Stephen and Allison Davis Stamatis (13). Big sister Lillian welcomed Hazel home. The family lives in Weatherford, Texas. Allison completed her doctorate in environmental science in December 2007.

01 A son, Rhett Blake, was born February 19 to Trey and Amanda Smith Traweek (17).

02 Chaney Leigh Brown and Michael Scott Curran (9) were married April 26 at Wynne Chapel with Chet Haney of Parkside Baptist Church in Denison officiating. The couple, who honeymooned in Playa de Carmen, Mexico, lives in Sherman. Chaney is employed by Sherman Independent School District and began doctoral studies in supervision, curriculum, and instruction in August. Scott is head boys basketball coach at Denison High School. ■ Naomi “Omi” Kathryn Boggus and Robert L. Ford (6) were married January 19 at Preston Hollow Presbyterian Church in Dallas. Officiating pastors were Steve Jester ’79 of St. Philip Presbyterian

Church and Blair Monie, senior pastor at Preston Hollow Presbyterian Church. The wedding party included Britton Travis Varn ’03 and Stephanie Allaire Flores ’02. Attendees included Paula Jonse ’02, Heather Graham ’02, Susan Brantley ’02, Jennifer Frye ’02, Brandie Gould Means ’02, Jason Means ’02, Stacy Smith ’02, Sarah Walker Kinard ’02, Matt Kinard ’02, Sarah Beatty Snyder ’04, David Snyder ’02, Melinda Veatch ’85, John Williams ’84, and Courtney Mullins ’10. The new couple lives in Houston, Texas, where Omi teaches third grade in the Spring Branch Independent School District and Robert works as a recruiter for TEK Systems. ■ Geanna Day and Ryan Tubbs (18) were married October 20, 2007, in Lubbock Texas. Alumni Leslie McCrary Siebenhausen, Kayla Smiley ’05, Chris Siebenhausen, and Amanda Smith Traweek ’01 attended and are pictured with the bride.

03 Courtney Paige O’Neal is a public services librarian at the School of Public Health Library at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center at Houston. ■ Sarah Steward-Lindsey graduated with honors from the University of Texas School of Law in May. Following completion of the Texas Bar Examination, Sarah will join the Houston office of Liskow & Lewis as a litigation associate. She and her husband, Colin Lindsey ’01, celebrated their first wedding anniversary May 26. ■ Beth Marie Terpolilli and Conor M. Teegarden (25) were married June 9, 2007, at the United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Beth is a third-year medical student at University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, and Conor is a captain in the United States Air Force. He is stationed in Lakenheath, United Kingdom, where he is a weapons system officer in a F-15E Strike Eagle. The couple lives in Brandon, England.

04 Megan Desalee Brentzel and Leonard Mitchell Joyner II (3) were married May 24 in a garden ceremony at the ranch home of the bride’s parents. Zach Heath served as a groomsman. Following a honeymoon to Hawaii, the bride and groom make their home in DuPont, Washington. Meg earned a Doctor of Pharmacy from the University of Texas at Austin, College of Pharmacy, in May 2008. Leo is a first lieutenant in the United States Army,

stationed at Ft. Lewis, Washington. ■ Kathryn Kincaid and James Paul “JP” Goldsmith (20) were married September 22, 2007 in Fort Worth. Kathryn is the daughter of Robert Kincaid ’74 and JP is the son of Glen Goldsmith ’74. The wedding party included Emily Kincaid Youngblood ’97, Kristin Orsak ’03, and David Meacham ’04. The new couple lives in Fort Worth. JP is an architecture student at University of Texas at Arlington and a mechanical, electrical, and plumbing designer for Class One Solutions, Inc. Kathryn is the membership and communications coordinator for the Fort Worth Chapter of the Texas Society of CPAs. ■ Cory McDowell (2) graduated with honors May 12 from Texas Tech School of Law with a doctorate of jurisprudence and a Master’s in Financial Planning degree. Cory and his wife, Jennifer (Whetsel), live in Midland, Texas, where Cory is an attorney with Cotton Bledsoe Tighe & Dawson and Jennifer teaches first grade at Burnett Elementary. ■ Sean D. Sweat graduated from MIT in April and began work for Intel Corporation in Phoenix, Arizona, as a capital supply chain engineer. ■ Happy Rahman is a firstyear associate at Austin law firm Scanlan, Buckle & Young, where she is a general civil litigator. She enrolled at Tulane University Law School and was very active there, then transferred to the University of Texas Law School, where she earned her J.D. in 2007. She was published in and served as editorin-Chief of the Texas Environmental Law Journal, the official publication of the State Bar of Texas, Environmental and Natural Resources Section. Happy did bilingual work as a student attorney in both the Children’s Rights Law Clinic and the Community Development Law Clinic. ■ Sarah Russell and Jason Duff (14) were married August 18, 2007, at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church in Dallas, Texas, and were honored with a dinner dance at Old Red Courthouse. Sarah is the daughter of Gary and Catherine Theall Russell ’77. The wedding party included Meghan Cardwell-Wilson, Lindsay Arnott ’03, Josh George, and Travis Redman. Many other Austin College alumni attended. The couple honeymooned in Hawaii and now lives in McKinney, Texas. Sarah graduated from Texas Tech University School of Law in May 2007 and is an associate attorney with Wolfe, Tidwell, & McCoy of Frisco, Texas. Jason graduated in May 2007 from Oklahoma City University School of Law and practices law in the Dallas area.

Numbers in color after alumni names correspond with photos on pages 44 and 45. September 2008

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’ r o o

05 Ana Guzman received her Master of Business Administration degree from Texas Woman’s University in May 2008. ■ Kimberly Lang and Elizabeth Sanberg (23) were married June 7 at St. Paul’s Anglican Church in Vancouver, British Columbia. They honeymooned in Lake Louise and Banff, Canada. Kimberly and Elizabeth live in Washington, D.C., where Kimberly develops online communications and marketing strategies for a nonprofit environmental organization, and Elizabeth does research on policing issues. ■ Emily Richardson

Owen graduated from Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary in May and received the Donald Capps Award for pastoral care. ■ Megan Wald presented at the 2008 National Student Research Forum in Galveston, Texas. Her research also received third place honors at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) Medical Student Research Day in August 2007. Megan examined the effects of peripheral thermal injury on brain architecture under the auspice of the UTHSCSA Department of Neurosurgery. She is a medical student at UTHSCSA.

notes

06 Alicia Heller and Charles “Ahren” Simmons (1) were married March 1 in Houston, Texas. Colleen Walsh ‘07, Christin Stinson ‘07, Melissa Levine ‘07, Lisa Hoffman Loftice, and Jenni Pilsbury Johnson, former Austin College residence life area coordinator, attended. The couple lives in Manvel, Texas. ■ Sara C. Mitchell received a master’s degree in computer science June 15 from the College of Engineering at The Leland Stanford Junior University in Palo Alto, California. She works with Adobe, a software engineering firm in San Jose, and lives in Santa Clara.

Numbers in color after alumni names correspond with photos on pages 44 and 45. 1 ’06

5 ’00

2 ’04 6 ’02

4 ’92

3 ’04

Brandon Willard ’05, a 2005 graduate of the MBA in Entrepreneurship program at the Acton School of Business in Austin, Texas, was named Acton Alumnus of the Year in May. The Brandon Willard Fellowship awarded this fall allows an Acton student to attend tuition-free. Brandon said the one-year, 100-hour-per-week program at Acton has three learning goals for participants: how to learn, how to make money, and how to live a life of meaning. “Austin College sent me to Acton with an outstanding head start,” Brandon said. After completing his MBA at Acton, Brandon worked in marketing in the high-end network security industry. After a year, he and three partners launched DisplayPoints, an interactive advertising media product that delivers content at casual restaurants. He has other plans that lean more toward social entrepreneurship — starting for-profit companies with the specific mission of serving an area of society in need on a long-term basis. Brandon arrived at Austin College planning a career in law, though he had an early start in business — selling his drawings and lemonade in his yard at age 5, among other ventures. Involved with Young Life since high school, his work with the group while at Austin College started him toward an MBA program because of a need he saw in the group’s business model. During a January Term course on Global Offshoring, taught by Rebecca

Treuhaft Judis ’92, he met Zach Lynde ’90 at an alumni reception. Lynde, an Acton alumnus suggested Brandon look into the school’s entrepreneurial program, taught by real entrepreneurs in a case study setting, as a means to pursue his concerns for Young Life. The rest, as they say, is history. Today, the new business takes much of his time, but Brandon makes time to mentor a student at Acton and still seeks ways to help Young Life, “an enormous passion in my life.” He and his fiancé plan to marry in October 2009 and are considering ways they will work together in support of their community. “My family and close friends are the biggest influence on my life,” Brandon said. “I have grown up with several business owners in my family, and I have watched them run their businesses while making their faith, family, and friends their highest priority.”

Brandon Willard

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COURTESY PHOTO

Brandon Willard Honored in Business Study


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7 ’96

8 ’00

9 ’02

10 ’00

11 ’92

13 ’00

14 ’04

12 ’65

16 ’00 15 ’95

18 ’02

19 ’95

20 ’04

17 ’01

24 ’92

21 ’93

22 ’78

25 ’03

23 ’05

September 2008

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K Austin College Mourns Loss of Senior Trustees

46

Austin College Magazine

September 2008

IN MEMORIAM Austin College has received word of the deaths of the following alumni.

COURTESY PHOTOS

Philip Coldwell of Dallas, Texas, died May 26. A graduate of the University of Illinois, he earned a Ph.D. in economics and finance at the University of Wisconsin. His education was interrupted by service during World War II as a U.S. Navy F65 Hellcat pilot in the Pacific. Coldwell taught at universities in Wisconsin, Illinois, Montana, and Louisiana before beginning a career with the Federal Reserve System. He held several positions before becoming president of the Dallas Federal Reserve Bank in 1968. He was nominated in 1974 by President Gerald Ford to serve on the seven-member Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. Confirmed by the U.S. Senate, Coldwell spent the next 18 years in Washington, D.C. Upon retiring from the Board, he formed an international consulting firm, Coldwell Financial Consultants, and was a frequent speaker within the banking industry. Philip Coldwell Coldwell and his wife, Norma Abels Coldwell, returned to Dallas in 1992. He was an active member of Park Cities Presbyterian Church. He and his wife celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary in June 2007. Coldwell joined the Austin College Board of Trustees in June 1977. He served as a member of the Senior Board until his death. William Wheat Collins Jr., 95, of Fort Worth, Texas, died June 29. A graduate of the University of North Texas, he later studied at Johns Hopkins University and earned degrees at the Maxwell School of Public Administration at Syracuse University and the Southwest School of Banking at SMU. His career included public school teaching and band direction, military service, and government service, culminating in his appointment as regional administrator of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. After retiring from federal service, Collins pursued interests in banking, oil and gas, real estate, and ranching. He was a member of University Christian Church. Collins served on the Board of Trustees at Austin College from 1981 to 1993 and on the Senior Board until his death. His involvement with Austin College began through his wife, Margaret Binkley Collins ’36, and ranged from William Wheat Collins, Jr. board service to philanthropy to Dixie Land band performances for Homecoming. He and Margaret, married 55 years before her death in 2002, were awarded Austin College’s Toddie Lee Wynne Award in 1996 for significant contributions to advancement of the College.

’35 ’41 ’42 ’44 ’45 ’45 ’47 ’47 ’49 ’50 ’53 ’54 ’54 ’57 ’57 ’57 ’61 ’61 ’66 ’69 ’72 ’83

John L. Faulkinberry Lawrence E. Gilbert LeNoir Moore Betty Bernice Lee Culy Carol Ivy Dawson Hayden Pittman Anna Elsie Scott Joy Devault Sory Robert H. Lang James L. Jackson William A. Hodges Jorge Lara-Braud Joan McDonald Haile Joseph Halstead Dwinnell John Jacob Egbert Carol Dozier Sprinkel Fritze Virginia Rene Perdue Hinkley Carl E. Snider Phoebe Anne Lester Corry Jo Ann Evans Pamela Elley Colley Dylan Paul Thomas

June 9, 2008 August 8, 2008 May 30, 2008 May 31, 2008 April 14, 2008 July 25, 2008 April 20, 2008 August 20, 2008 July 14, 2008 July 12, 2008 May 10, 2008 June 22, 2008 June 20, 2008 June 16, 2008 July 12, 2008 July 5, 2008 June 30, 2008 July 27, 2008 June 14, 2008 June 7, 2008 August 14, 2008 April 8, 2008

Friends We Will Miss Longtime Austin College supporter Charlotte Russell Spears of Sherman died June 20, 2008.

A scholarship has been established in the name of Eric Sorenson ’11 who died in April. The Eric Sorenson Memorial Scholarship will be awarded each spring to a student at Austin College or an area high school. Contributions may be made to the fund through American Bank of Texas.


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K

m e e t

t h e

trustee

CHAIR: Robert M. Johnson ’53, McLean, Virginia

VICE CHAIR: Richard J. Agnich, Dallas, Texas

TRUSTEES: John Q. Adams, Jr. ’84, Southlake, Texas

Sharon S. King, Richardson, Texas

Margaret Allison, San Antonio, Texas

Jeffrey Landsberg ’81, Dallas, Texas

John M. Anderson ’66, Dallas, Texas

Luan Beaty Mendel ’75, Palo Verdes, California

Jerry E. Apple ’60, Irving, Texas

Steven M. Mobley, Austin, Texas

Lee Dean Ardell ’74, Houston, Texas

Wes Moffett ’82, Dallas, Texas

James D. Baskin III ’75, Austin, Texas

Samuel S. Moore ’64, Dallas, Texas

Laura Dies Campbell ’73, Austin, Texas

Jo Ann Geurin Pettus, Graham, Texas

Jacqueline R. Cooper ’73, Oakton, Virginia

Davis B. Price ’67, Lubbock, Texas

Linda Morris Elsey, Fort Worth, Texas

Fazlur Rahman, San Angelo, Texas

F. R. “Buck” Files ’60, Tyler, Texas

Annadele H. Ross ’66, Dallas, Texas

Georgina Fisher ’69, Severna Park, Maryland

John Serhant, Denison, Texas

Rebecca Moseley Gafford ’72, Dallas, Texas

Caroline Elbert Taylor ’66, Wyalusing, Pennsylvania

Donald Gibson ’75, Houston, Texas

Jesse R. Thomas ’74, Sherman, Texas

Dennis E. Gonier ’83, Fredericksburg, Virginia

Linda Plummer Ward ’78, Nashville, Tennessee

Thomas Hall, Jr. ’78, Colleyville, Texas

William E. Warren ’74, Plano, Texas

Mary Ann Stell Harris ’70, Fort Worth, Texas

Todd A. Williams ’82, Dallas, Texas

Charles Hendricks ’61, The Woodlands, Texas

Stanley M. Woodward, Dallas, Texas

Kelly Hiser, Sherman, Texas

Michael G. Wright, Dallas, Texas

M. Steve Jones, Sherman, Texas

Robert J. Wright, Dallas, Texas

The parallels between Annadele “Ann” Holm Ross ’66 and one of her ancestors run deeper than bloodlines. Ann is a sixth generation Texas native descended from the famous Texas pioneering Austin family. (Emily would be her great-great-great-great grandmother.) Emily and Ann have walked ironically similar paths: both facing the challenges of young widowhood, managing their family’s estates, investing their time and resources into education and community philanthropy, and being supportive of Austin College. Ann graduated from Austin College in 1966 and moved to Dallas to work for the Dallas Public Library. She met and married Daniel Ross in Dallas, but when she was 30, he died. “I had new duties after my husband died,” said Ross, who decided to obtain a master’s of business administration degree from Southern Methodist University to assist her in performing these new tasks. Her career path included work in the banking industry and helping establish the Dallas Women’s Foundation — serving as its president in the ‘90s — until she decided to manage her own property, a timber operation on her Ann Ross late husband’s East Texas farm and real estate in Dallas. Ann’s work with the Dallas Women’s Foundation was a special interest in her life. “The Dallas Women’s Foundation was attempting to educate women about their money and money management, which I think is really important for women’s ability to be independent,” she said. Ann expanded her already active involvement in civic service when accepting the invitation to join the Austin College Board of Trustees and maintain formal family ties to the institution. “My education concerns are similar to Emily Margaret’s in the sense that I believe we need critical thinkers for the challenges in the state and nation,” Ann said. “I believe Austin College is ideally suited to educate people with those interdisciplinary critical thinking skills as it has for generations.” Ann believes the Austin College Board of Trustees may need a little of Emily’s pioneer spirit to face challenges close to home like building a new science building and finding a new college president, not to mention meeting the broader challenges in the world. “We must continue to move the College to an excellent future most of us may not fully understand at present,” she said. “We have to employ everyone’s abilities. We all have to be visionaries like Emily Margaret Austin was to get Austin College where it needs to be.”

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COURTESY PHOTO

BOARD OF TRUSTEES


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS October 2008 18

Math and Sciences Admission Preview

20

Steven Greenblatt Lecture

23–25

Homecoming

26

Faculty Trio Recital

30

Darwin 200 Lecture: Steve Goldsmith

November 2008 7

Leadership Forum

13

Choral Concert

14 –15

Cunningham Lectures

16

Wynne Chapel 50th Anniversary Celebration

18–20

Africa Symposium

19

Concert Band Performance

21–22

Festival of One-Act Plays

22

Social Sciences Admission Preview

24

Chamber Music and Jazz Concert

December 2008 1

World AIDS Day Service

4

Service of Lessons and Carols

12

Fall Term Ends

See the Austin College Master Calendar for details, updates, and a full schedule of events: www.austincollege.edu/calendar

D I S C O V E R T H E

R E A S O N S 1 | 1 | 0 9

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PHOTO FROM THE AUSTIN COLLEGE ARCHIVES

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E V E R Y

P I C T U R E

T E L L S

A

S T O R Y

A boat full of women and a giant whale in Sherman? This photo is bound to bring some memories to those on campus at the time. Recognize classmates or remember other particulars of this shot? Share your stories at the address below.

Alumni: Share YOUR Austin College photos for possible inclusion in Every Picture Tells A Story. Send to Editor, Austin College, 900 N. Grand Ave., Suite 6H, Sherman, Texas 75090 or editor@austincollege.edu.

S T O R Y

B E H I N D

T H E

P H O T O

Dorot hy K e ll e y Gre en ’59, Ches te r S tor y ’59, M a ri l y n Sl a te Mc K nig ht ’53, and J oh n St or ey ’70 wrote that this photo was likely from the late 1950s and though many faces were familiar, a few brought particular memories. Dorothy and Chester recognized E lm e r F la c c u s at the front of the line, who Chester said “brought many phases of history to life for all of us.” Marilyn identified Cec i l M cL a u ghl i n next in line. Dorothy recognized, fifth from left, Professor “Tee -H ee ” M il l er , who taught a course on the Romantic poets. “She had a little laugh when the content of poems was even remotely suggestive of sex and a becoming blush seldom seen today,” Dorothy wrote. Marilyn thought the same person might be Ma rg a re t M il l er ? Several recognized, eighth and near the end of those pictured, Dr. Cly d e Ha l l who taught “slide rule” and who “never changes.” John identified his father, J a m e s St ore y to the left of Hall. John wrote that his family lived a block from campus until John was age 12; he later returned to the college as a student.

▼ PHOTO FROM THE AUSTIN COLLEGE ARCHIVES

T H E


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PHOTO BY VICKIE S. KIRBY

“There are things to be done, needs to be met, and hurts to be healed. If you do not do your part, something very important will remain undone forever.” — Henry Winkler

OPENING AUSTIN COLLEGE’S 160TH ACADEMIC YEAR

learning|leadership|lasting values

Austin College Of fice of College Relations 900 Nor th Grand Avenue, Suite 6H Sherman, Texas 75090-4400 CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

30% recycled stock

NONPROFIT ORG. U S P O S TA G E PA I D AUSTIN, TX PERMIT NO. 110

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FRONTIER WOMAN FOR MODERN TIMES 50 YEARS OF WYNNE CHAPEL | WINKLER PRESENTS OPENING ADDRESS | ANNA LAURA PAGE TRIBUTE Magazine September 200...

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