Page 10

{our town interview}

SNAPshot written & photographed by Beth Seliga

Felicia Correa Resident Care Director, Nurse & Volunteer Youth Coach

A woman who lives by few rules, with one of them being “to never do anything to flaw your reputation and your resume,” Felicia Correa strives for a full life. A full-time mother to seven children, she is also the Resident Care Director at Commonwealth Senior Living at Charlottesville, a part-time nurse at Family Medicine of Albemarle, a full-time volunteer with the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, and a volunteer youth basketball and football coach. For her, it’s about helping people in every aspect of all that she does. How did you end up getting your job? Honestly, through faith and a prayer, and well, lots coffee, too! I went to nursing school in Richmond while living in Ruckersville with five kids and a restaurant job. Nursing is a field where you can do just about anything. How have you grown and changed over the years? I’ve actually been on my own since I was 15 years old. I have learned to be patient and that I can control only myself. I am not judged on how people treat me, just on how I treat others. What are your hopes for the future? That’s such a vague question. Would world peace be too vague of an answer? I am a mother of seven children. I want them all to grow up and live in a world that isn’t bothered by people or situations that are different. I just want everyone around me to find his or her own sense of happiness. What advice do you have for parents and their young aspiring to help others through their careers? Please, parents, foster the unique dreams and wishes of your kids.

8

November 2017

As parents, we often want to nudge our children into the direction that we want them to be in. I, myself, was guilty of just that. There isn’t a field out there where you couldn’t help others. Start small by thinking about something that matters to you. I have Multiple Sclerosis (MS), I have a son with Epilepsy, two cousins with Down syndrome, and I was a victim of sexual abuse as a child. All of those issues matter to me in a huge way. What is one practice you’ve put in place to get quality time with your family/ friends? I still have cuddle time with my youngest four, and I take them all on private dates when time permits. My significant other, Charles and I, dedicate at least 30 minutes to conversation a day. What is one thing your parents did well that you try to incorporate into your parenting? I took something different from all of them. I cannot say I have any memories of my mom not going to work. It was ingrained in me that not going to work is not an option. My dad who raised me passed away from Sickle Cell Anemia when I was 16 years old. He lived a life of pain and never complained. My maternal grandfather taught me at a very young age that being complaisant and stagnant aren’t an option, but rather always strive to be a better you tomorrow than you are today. I needed that firm foundation from all of them to navigate life as a mom with seven kids, to live with MS, and manage and enjoy a career and multiple volunteer commitments.

Before switching to capturing the look of love and the inner beauty of her subjects, Beth was a sports photographer with her work appearing in Sports Illustrated, USA Today and Pro Cycling, among other publications. See her work at 3catsphoto.com.

CharlottesvilleFamily's BLOOM November 2017  

Volume 18 Issue 11

CharlottesvilleFamily's BLOOM November 2017  

Volume 18 Issue 11