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N O N F IC T IO N

WHAT’S IN A SHOE? Paved roads and short skirts popularized fashionable footwear. Through the aid of flappers, shoes now represent good taste more than social class. In a modern, consumer society, little things matter a lot. Shoes are a status symbol for people concerned with such petty things. But anyone can afford to look fashionable—that’s why vendors sell Gucci knock-offs at flea markets. Truly picky people aren’t fooled; we have a sixth sense for spotting counterfeits. But what does it matter how nice someone’s shoes are? Fashion trends come and go. Ten years ago, I strutted in Crocs, the plastic shoes with little round cutouts, not the fake ones with diamonds, and a gator on the side. The colorful waterproof shoes with holes were considered tasteful. Today, I wouldn’t be caught dead in a pair. Mainly because shoes can influence one person’s idea of another. People with worn shoes are often viewed as approachable and agreeable. Those with immaculate shoes, like me, are considered conscientious or over-anxious. Before I left a friend’s Halloween bonfire last fall, I decided to play one final game. I had gone the whole evening without stepping in mud or toasted marshmallow. I had just placed my Coke on the table in front of me when the pet dog sat by my feet, whining to be petted. The more I scratched his mangy coat, the more excited the dog became. I had just told him he was “such a good boy” when he gave his fluffy tail a giant wag that sent the Coke toppling down right onto my shoes. The next time my sister asked to borrow my shoes, I lent her those. Shoes may say something about someone’s character, but not necessarily his footing in society. My grandpa, whether he would claim to be or not, was a socialite. However, if a persnickety person studied his worn loafers, his status would have been completely misjudged. Even Michael Jordan, famous for his athletic footwear, said, “It’s not about the shoes, but what you do in them.” A GOOD SOUL Kara wears overused shoes, but she is not frumpy. In fact, she is my most trusted fashion consultant. She, more than anyone, deserves to borrow my shoes and would probably wear them better than I. She’s an artist. She is gifted and knows that her talents and resources are not meant to be wasted. Her work could have gained acceptance in the most prestigious art schools, but she has chosen to study education and work with underprivileged children. My sister sees shoes for what they are meant to be—worn. Kara doesn’t look down because she’s too busy looking out.

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Profile for Ivy Leaves Journal of Literature & Art

Ivy Leaves Journal of Literature & Art — Vol 93  

The Ivy Leaves Journal of Literature & Art is an annual student publication at Anderson University in Anderson, SC. The journal has served a...

Ivy Leaves Journal of Literature & Art — Vol 93  

The Ivy Leaves Journal of Literature & Art is an annual student publication at Anderson University in Anderson, SC. The journal has served a...

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