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USA: + 1 800 237 1236 or email: reservations@oeh.com Rest of the world: +51 1 610 8300 or email: perures.fits@orient-express.com or contact your local travel professional. For packages and special offers, please go to orient-express.com

LIMA | CUSCO | SACRED VALLEY | MACHU PICCHU

CONTACT RESERVATIONS :

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EXPERIENCE PERU & ITS LIVING HISTORY

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WE INVITE YOU ON AN UNFORGETTABLE ADVENTURE

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PICTURE PERFECT

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PLANNING YOUR TRIP TO PERU

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LIMA, COSMOPOLITAN “CITY OF KINGS”

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MIRAFLORES PARK HOTEL A LUXURY RETREAT IN LIMA

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CUSCO, SPLENDOR OF THE ANCIENT INCA CAPITAL

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HOTEL MONASTERIO MORE THAN 400 YEARS OF HISTORY

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PALACIO NAZARENAS A UNIQUE WAY TO EXPERIENCE CUSCO

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THE SACRED VALLEY DISCOVER THE TREASURES OF THE INCAS

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HOTEL RIO SAGRADO WHERE ONLY THE RIVER RUSHES

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MACHU PICCHU EXPLORE THE MAJESTY OF THE LOST CITY OF THE INCAS

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MACHU PICCHU SANCTUARY LODGE UNRIVALLED LOCATION, EXCLUSIVE PRIVILEGE

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ALL ABOARD! FINE DINING, LIVE MUSIC—AND THE MOST SYLISH WAY TO REACH MACHU PICCHU

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MORE MAGNIFICENT TRAIN JOURNEYS

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TIPS FOR TRAVEL

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DISCOVER OUR WORLD

PERU IS ONE of a select few places on earth where the present resonates with rich, vibrant history. Its past is powerfully evident in evocative Inca hilltop ruins, enigmatic lines carved into the desert, and museums filled with sophisticated pre-Columbian ceramics. Long-held traditions live on: in hand-woven alpaca textiles sold by highland artisans in village markets; in Inca trails etched into the mountains, now thrilling ecotourism routes; and in Andean customs and festivals that reveal the deeply held beliefs of a spiritual people. Visitors to Peru will discover a country respectful of the past but on the move, embracing a future of new possibilities.

PERU IS A LAND OF SECRET TREASURES AND UNEXPECTED ADVENTURES, ALL WAITING TO BE DISCOVERED. WE INVITE YOU TO UNEARTH AND EXPLORE, CREATING MEMORIES THAT WILL LAST A LIFETIME. LAURENT CARRASSET REGIONAL MANAGING DIRECTOR, PERU ORIENT-EXPRESS HOTELS LTD

Temple of the Sun, Machu Picchu

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VENEZUELA

South America

COLOMBIA ECUADOR

Perú

BRAZIL LIMA

CUSCO BOLIVIA

PACIFIC OCEAN CHILE

PARAGUAY

ARGENTINA

ATLANTIC OCEAN

WE INVITE YOU ON AN UNFORGETTABLE ADVENTURE A VARIETY OF INSPIRING EXPERIENCES AWAIT WITH ORIENT-EXPRESS HOTELS. TRAVEL WITH US AND DISCOVER MORE. Immerse yourself in a journey like no other, with stays in our spectacular luxury hotels in Peru’s most exciting destinations. Lima’s sleek Miraflores Park Hotel surveys the Pacific Ocean from its spectacular coastal location. Hotel Monasterio and Palacio Nazarenas evoke the colonial splendor of old Cusco in sumptuous mansions in the historic quarter. Along the banks of the Urubamba River, Hotel Rio Sagrado embraces the pastoral beauty of the Sacred Valley, while Machu Picchu Sanctuary Lodge is the only hotel situated at the gate to the Incas’ fabled lost city, perched high in Andean cloud forests. If part of the adventure is getting there, PeruRail will exceed all expectations. These stylish trains traverse some of the country’s most scenic routes. Dine in elegance on the Hiram Bingham as you travel from Cusco to Machu Picchu; gaze out through massive panoramic windows on the Vistadome, which winds through the Sacred Valley en route to the Inca ruins; or board the Andean Explorer at Cusco for a magnificent adventure to evocative Lake Titicaca.

Terraced slopes of Machu Picchu

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Astounding architecture

Amazing flora

PICTURE PERFECT

Animal magic

FROM ANCIENT CITIES TO EXOTIC WILDLIFE, PERU IS ENDOWED WITH SOME OF THE WORLD’S GREATEST NATURAL AND MAN-MADE WONDERS. Peru comprises costa, sierra and selva: a 2,000-mile Pacific coastline; highlands including the Andes—the continent’s longest mountain range; and jungle—Amazon rainforest covering twothirds of the country. South America’s third largest country, Peru is bordered by Ecuador and Colombia to the north, Brazil and Bolivia to the east, and Chile to the south. Peru’s 30 million people are mostly Mestizo (mixed Spanish/native) and Amerindian, but Afro-Peruvians and Japanese, Chinese, and European immigrants make Peru a true ethnic melting pot. Spanish is the national language and Peruvians are predominantly Roman Catholic, but many highlanders still speak Quechua and Aymara, and the influence of pre-Columbian religions remains strong.

LIMA, CULINARY DESTINATION

Folkloric festivals that take place throughout the country are exuberant celebrations of Peruvian tradition and revelry. Most are a blend of pre-Columbian indigenous culture and Catholic rituals; though infused with deep sentiment, they’re also about having a seriously good time, with wild dancing and costumes, local music and spirited drinking. Puno and Cusco lead the way, but unique celebrations are found almost weekly across Peru. Peruvian cuisine, a rich fusion of different cultural influences, is one of the world’s most distinguished. Over the last decade it has become globally popular. Lima is the dining capital of Peru and South America, although Arequipa, Cusco and Lambayeque are also earning accolades for their distinctive regional cuisines. Peru’s principal regions are: Central Desert Coast (including the capital, Lima, the Nazca Lines and Paracas Nature Reserve); Cusco and the Sacred Valley (including Machu Picchu); Southern Peru (Lake Titicaca, Colca Canyon and Arequipa); Amazonia (divided between northern, beyond Iquitos, and the southern reserves of Manu and Tambopata); and Northern Peru (beach resorts, colonial cities, pre-Columbian archaeological sites like Chan Chan, and the Cordillera Blanca mountain range).

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Clockwise from top left: Peru is renowned for its beautiful and rare orchids; camelid species such as vicuñas, and miraculously intact Inca architecture. The splendid Basilica Cathedral of Lima dates from 1535. Sample world-class cuisine, including dishes crafted by the acclaimed chef at Palacio Nazarenas, Virgilio Martinez. The expansive parkland by Miraflores Park Hotel is perfect for romantic, oceanfront strolls.

The word is out: Lima is one of the world’s great gourmet cities. Its cosmopolitan dining scene is like a culinary laboratory, where an explosive fusion of diverse ethnic influences, equal doses of creativity and tradition, and spectacular local ingredients have produced a truly innovative cuisine. The mix of Spanish, native criollo, and vibrant African, Chinese and Japanese influences has been key to the development of surprising and exciting modern Limeño cooking. Travelers have begun making gastronomic pilgrimages to Peru, armed with lists of chic restaurants by star chefs, food markets, cevicherías and huariques (inexpensive neighborhood joints). Add pisco, a white-grape brandy that’s the basis for cocktails such as pisco sour, and up-and-coming Peruvian wines, and you’ve got not just a

fine dinner, but the ingredients for a whole culinary extravaganza. To dive into Limeño cuisine, you’ve got to know the basics. Ají amarillo is the hot chili pepper par excellence, generally yellow; the renowned chef Gastón Acurio has called it the single most important ingredient in Peruvian cuisine. Anticuchos are roasted beef heart skewers. Causa is a classic Limeño dish: mashed yellow potato pie with tomato and ají and stuffed with tuna, chicken, avocado, shrimp or crab. Ceviche is the single dish most identified with Peru and exported across the world: fresh, raw fish and seafood mixed with red onions, lemon juice and salt, and marinated in lime juice (to “cook” the fish), purple onions and ají amarillo, and served with camote (sweet potato) and choclo (white,

large-kernel corn). Peru’s Chinese immigrant community—one of the largest in the world—created chifa, or Chinese-Peruvian fusion. Classic dishes are chaufa (fried rice) and chi jau kay (chicken with vegetables in a salty brown sauce). Nikkei is named after the Japanese diaspora; it’s JapanesePeruvian cooking that, like chifa, is an immigrant cuisine. Tacu-tacu is a classic criollo/Afro-Peruvian dish of (traditionally day-old) rice and beans seasoned with ají amarillo and fried to create a crunchy crust, served with purple onions, fried banana, and spicy salsa criolla. Tiradito, originally a Nikkei dish, is freshly caught, raw, marinated fish that is delicately sliced and topped with a variety of tangy and spicy sauces made from ají peppers or rocoto chilies.

Inspiring cuisine

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Great shopping

PLANNING YOUR TRIP TO PERU

1. Clockwise from far left: an Inca building in Machu Picchu, featuring trapezoidal windows. The mountainous Sacred Valley of the Incas, through which the Urubamba River flows. The buzzing Larcomar entertainment and shopping center in Miraflores, Lima. At the Peruvian Paso Horse Festival you can admire these fine specimens, known for their four-beat, lateral gait. Many buildings in Cusco are founded on Inca walls.

Festival spirit

Colombia WHERE TO GO AND WHAT TO SEE: FROM LEGENDARY INCA RUINS TO THE ANDES AND THE AMAZON With a name derived from a Quechua word meaning “land of abundance,” Peru certainly lives up to its advertising. It’s blessed with an enormous variety of attractions, from historic and natural to contemporary. Whether your interest is exploring ancient ruins, colonial towns and art museums; mountain climbing and trekking Inca trails; indulging in the hottest urban dining and nightlife; delving deep into the jungle; or filling your suitcase with incredible handmade alpaca sweaters and silver, Peru is a continuously surprising destination with something for everyone. Getting around is an important consideration: Peru is a large country, with many natural barriers and diverse mountain terrain, making domestic air travel the best choice for convenient transport. Train services cover several principal tourist routes, and the four passenger trains operated by PeruRail (from Cusco to Machu Picchu and to Puno) run on incredibly scenic journeys.

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Ecuador

SELECTED FESTIVALS IN PERU JANUARY Festival of Lima. Marking the founding of the capital in 1535.

Brazil

FEBRUARY Pisco Sour Day. A day of celebrating Peru’s national cocktail. Lima Carnival. Colourful pre-Lenten processions and festivities, including dancing, partying and water fights. Lunahuaná Adventure Sports Festival. Rafting, kayaking and more. Virgin of the Candelaria Festival. One of Peru’s wildest parties, honoring Puno’s patron saint.

PACIFIC OCEAN

Machu Picchu Lima Sacred Valley

Cusco Bolivia Puno

MARCH Vendimia de Surco Festival. Celebrating the art of traditional winemaking and pisco. Semana Santa (Holy Week). Feted throughout the country with religious processions and spectacular pageantry. APRIL Peruvian Jazz Festival. Top jazz and blues acts play Lima’s clubs. Peruvian Paso Horse Festival. See Peru’s famed, elegant Paso horses in action in Pachacámac, just south of Lima.

Topping everyone’s list of must-sees is Machu Picchu—the greatest attraction in South America. Other sights can be equally rewarding, maybe even more so for some travelers. Cusco retains its essential Andean colonial character, and is always buzzing with energy, filled with students and outdoor enthusiasts on their way to the mountains or jungle. The relaxed Sacred Valley, much lower in altitude than Cusco, is now a draw in its own right, with peaceful villages, markets and some of the Incas’ finest ruins. The capital Lima has exploded with its revitalized colonial quarter; world-class dining, nightlife, and museums; and the emergence of hip seaside barrios like Barranco. Lake Titicaca, with its stunning high-altitude vistas, island cultures and popular festivals, is legendary, while beyond lies the mysterious, mesmerizing beauty of the Amazon rainforest, as well as handsome colonial cities and off-the-beaten-track archaeological sights. Peru’s list of “must-sees” is continually growing! Peru is fast becoming one of the world’s great outdoor destinations, a mecca for true adrenaline junkies. Get your blood racing at eco-lodges and jungle expeditions deep into the Amazon; on high-altitude treks and mountain climbing in the Andes; and white-water rafting and mountain biking in the Sacred Valley and Colca Canyon. But adventure travel doesn’t always have to push the limits: slower-paced walks and river cruises on Amazon tributaries are just as great a way to experience Peru’s spectacular countryside.

MAY Festival of the Cross. Folk music and dance, including mesmerizing “scissor dancers”, and religious processions, in several cities. Corpus Christi. A deeply felt religious procession, the most impressive in Cusco. JUNE Inti Raymi (Inca Festival of the Sun). The most important pre-Columbian festival, celebrating the winter solstice with a spectacle of dance and parades in Cusco. JULY Virgin of Carmen. Costumed revelers and wild dancing in the remote village of Paucartambo, at the edge of the rainforest in Cusco. AUGUST Santa Rosa de Lima. Devotional processions honouring Lima’s patron saint, including family-friendly entertainment. SEPTEMBER Festival of Pisco. Country fairs and parades in Ica. OCTOBER The Lord of the Miracle. South America’s largest procession, with purple-clad revelers in Lima paying homage to a Christ figure that survived the 1746 earthquake. NOVEMBER Puno week. A powerful celebration of music and dance, marking the founding of Puno and the birth of the Inca Empire.

DECEMBER Battle of Ayacucho. Re-enactments of the famous 1824 battle of Pampa de Quinua, in which Peruvian troops defeated the Spanish. 9


City of art

Delectable dining

Clockwise from far left: Lima is an exciting mix of ancient and modern. Among its attractions are contemporary art galleries; splendid structures such as the Bridge of Sighs in Barranco, and a vibrant dining scene.

Fascinating sights

LIMA COSMOPOLITAN “CITY OF KINGS”

A historic, bustling capital of 8 million people, Lima thrives with a revitalized colonial core and surging local dining scene. The city hugs the coast of the Pacific Ocean and is blessed with pockets of refuge, like seaside Barranco, an artsy barrio and nightlife haunt. Peru’s ancient history lives on in Lima’s archaeological museums and the truly surprising 1,500-year-old, pre-Inca adobe pyramids that rise up from among urban residential towers. Lima is composed of very distinct neighborhoods. The best area for a stay is Miraflores, an upscale residential district that is home to the city’s greatest number of restaurants, shops and nightlife options. San Isidro is equal parts business headquarters, luxury apartments overlooking parks, and fine restaurants. The historic heart of the city, Lima Centro, evokes an era when it was the richest settlement in the Americas. There you’ll find the grand Plaza de Armas, baroque and Renaissance churches (especially Convento de San Francisco), and splendid colonial palaces with long carvedwood balconies. The Larco Museum, home to the world’s largest private collection of preColumbian art, delves into Peru’s complex web of ancient civilizations. The museum’s

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Sala Erótica raises eyebrows with its X-rated ceramics of the Moche people. Cosmopolitan Limeños are passionate about the beach, criolla music and dance and, above all, eating and drinking. The capital’s dining scene has rocketed to fame, drawing pilgrims on gastronomic tours. Adventurous diners can sample cool cevicherías and industrial-chic restaurants, as well as nikkei and chifa eateries, where Japanese and Chinese traditions collide with Peruvian customs. Duck out of Lima’s bustle and head to Barranco, once an independent summer retreat, for art galleries and cool breezes off the ocean; or hit the trail of the perfect pisco sour at chic Bar Huaringas or historic Taberna Bar Queirolo. Lima gets its groove on at legendary peñas like Brisas del Titicaca, where folkloric and Afro-Peruvian music has the locals up out of their seats. Shoppers will delight in Lima’s astounding variety of fine regional handicrafts, including handmade alpaca textiles, silver and gold jewelry, and colonial antiques. If you’re in the market for artesanía, don’t miss Dédalo and Las Pallas, in Barranco; both are colorful art galleries and shops of handmade folk art.

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It’s no secret why discerning business travelers have made Miraflores Park Hotel their first port of call. The hotel offers unrivaled personal attention, services and facilities aimed specifically at business travelers, ranging from a business center to seven meeting and conference rooms with all the amenities executives require. Relax after a long day with a massage or treatment at the Zest Spa or request the Bath Butler service in your room—the height of indulgence for both romantic couples and business travelers. Miraflores, Lima’s most exclusive neighborhood for dining, nightlife and shopping, is home to or close by most of the capital’s main business addresses as well as its top attractions. Welcome to Miraflores Park Hotel: a home away from home and personal headquarters away from the office. For more information, please visit miraflorespark.com.

MIRAFLORES PARK HOTEL A LUXURY RETREAT IN LIMA

Planning your trip! ESSENTIAL PERU 4 Nights: Lima, Cusco, Sacred Valley and Machu Picchu ESSENTIAL PERU IS A DISTILLATION OF THE COUNTRY’S RICHNESS AND DIVERSITY. CHOOSE THIS ORIENTEXPRESS HOTELS ITINERARY AND WE’LL TAKE CARE OF EVERYTHING AND ESCORT YOU TO ALL THE BEST SIGHTS.

Day 1 Lima Miraflores Park Hotel Arrive in Lima, where you’ll spend the night at the Miraflores Park Hotel. Take some time to explore the city; from museums, galleries and archaeological sites to its colorful markets and cutting-edge restaurants.

Day 2 Cusco Hotel Monasterio Fly to Cusco where you’ll stay at Hotel Monasterio. Enjoy a half-day tour of the city, including the cathedral, the fortress of Sacsayhuaman, the amphitheatre, the Inca baths and other impressive religious sites.

Day 3 Sacred Valley Hotel Monasterio Enjoy a scenic drive through a stunning landscape to the Sacred Valley of the Incas. We arrive at the town of Pisac, renowned for its huge, colorful market. Continue to the charming Hacienda Huayoccari where you will enjoy a delicious lunch. Your next stop will be the town of Ollantaytambo, one of the oldest continuously occupied settlements in the Americas.

RISING HIGH ABOVE THE CITY’S MOST FASHIONABLE DISTRICT AND THE COSTA VERDE, MIRAFLORES PARK HOTEL HAS LONG SHONE OUT AS A BEACON OF LUXURY AND EXCELLENCE IN LIMA.

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Step from the oceanfront park setting into the sleek glass tower and you retreat from the capital’s hectic pace. Miraflores Park Hotel cocoons visitors in elegant style, from its spacious, richly appointed suites complete with marble and granite bathrooms to a book-lined library and clubby, English-style bar. The elegant suites and rooftop heated pool survey the Pacific Ocean, affording panoramic views that are unsurpassed in Lima. Dine in contemporary style and an airy garden setting at Mesa 18 by Toshiro, created by the masterful chef who pioneered Japanese cuisine in Peru. Toshiro Konishi’s artful interpretations of Peruvian and Japanese cooking, his tiraditos and the most succulent sushi direct from the Pacific, have made him a chef of international renown. Each morning you can welcome the day with a buffet breakfast overlooking the coast from the glass-enclosed, 11th-floor Observatory Restaurant.

Day 4 Machu Picchu

Clockwise from top left: the infinity pool overlooking the Pacific Ocean; a Deluxe Suite with a view; breakfast in the Observatory Restaurant; the cozy yet refined library; treat your palate to unforgettable cuisine; Mesa 18 by Toshiro offers a divine Japanese-Peruvian menu; Miraflores Park Hotel’s spectacular oceanfront location.

Hiram Bingham Travel on board the luxurious Hiram Bingham train to Machu Picchu. A late morning arrival enables you to explore this breathtaking Inca citadel when most other visitors are starting to leave. Enjoy a guided tour of the citadel and then take time to explore on your own at leisure.

Day 5 Lima Departure Fly to Lima and, on your way to your hotel, enjoy a panoramic tour of the bustling city. Visit the historic center around the Plaza Mayor, a UNESCO World Heritage site. Pass by the cathedral, with its splendid carved stalls, the Government Palace, City Hall and the Archbishop’s Palace.

MORE DETAILS AND RESERVATIONS USA: +1 800 237 1236 reservations@oeh.com REST OF THE WORLD: +51 1 6108300 Or contact your local travel professional. 13


Relaxing days

From left to right: the Cathedral of Santo Domingo took almost 100 years to build. It holds an impressive collection of colonial art and archaeological relics. A cafe in the artistic hub of San Blas; giant stones at Sacsayhuaman; sublime views from Hotel Monasterio’s suites.

Superb city views

Lima Sacred Valley

Machu Picchu

Cusco

CUSCO SPLENDOR OF THE ANCIENT INCA CAPITAL

PACIFIC OCEAN

Puno

Amazing Inca ruins

Nestled high in the mountains, the ancient capital of the Inca Empire and gateway to Machu Picchu revels in its Andean character. Yet this beguiling city is much more than a historical set piece. It’s a lively place, where Cusqueños share their city with visitors from around the globe. Cultural encounters have characterized Cusco ever since the Spanish conquistadors toppled the Incas in 1533. The Inca legacy lives on, in masterful stonemasonry that still lines cobblestoned streets and in the deeply held customs that permeate life here. The Plaza de Armas is the city’s energetic hub. It is dominated by the Renaissance cathedral, shimmering with gold leaf and home to a painting of the Last Supper—with the disciples dining on the local delicacy of guinea pig, no less. Yet Cusco’s most dramatic place of worship is Qoricancha (Temple of the Sun). In this most holy place, the Incas’ finest stonework coexists side by side with Santo Domingo Convent. The streets of Cusco’s old quarter are famed for other spectacular displays of Inca masonry, including the 12-Angled Stone (stones representing a puma, the basis for the original Inca layout of the city), and the oldest surviving Inca wall on Calle Loreto. The hilly district San Blas teems with art 14

Bolivia

galleries and stunning views of Cusco’s redtiled rooftops at every turn. Higher still, and overlooking the city, is Sacsayhuaman, an Inca military fortress of 300-ton stones and zigzagged ramparts. Cusco hosts some of Peru’s greatest festivals, worth planning a trip around. Inti Raymi (June 24) is the country’s most glorious pageant and is full of historic ritual, while Easter and Carnival bring explosions of color and faith. The Plaza de Armas is ringed by bars, but just a couple of blocks away, in a quieter area, you’ll discover a perfectly mixed pisco concoction at El Pisquerito. Cusco is second only to Lima for shopping, and few can resist the city’s small, inviting boutiques, where creative alpaca fashions, handcrafted silver jewelry and folk art are the star attractions. Cusco’s Old Quarter throbs with energy, though a stroll will take you to tiny alleyways and serene plazas. Its historical attractions, dining, nightlife and shopping are all within walking distance of the Plaza de Armas. Inca ruins encircle the city, and the Sacred Valley and Machu Picchu await—but don’t be in too much of a hurry to move on from this enchanting city. 15


Clockwise from far left: at the heart of the hotel is the beautiful cloistered courtyard, featuring a tranquil fountain and 300-year-old cedar tree. Enjoy breathtaking views from our oxygenenriched Junior Suites. Illariy Restaurant offers a beautiful setting for a refined culinary experience. Sample a traditional pisco sour with canapés in the charming Lobby Bar. Weddings can be held in the hotel’s dazzling Chapel of San Antonio Abad, built four centuries ago.

HOTEL MONASTERIO MORE THAN 400 YEARS OF HISTORY

HOTEL MONASTERIO A GLORIOUS PAST

BEHIND AN IMMENSE STONE PORTAL, A THICK WOODEN DOOR OPENS TO REVEAL A CLOISTER, THE FIRST OF FOUR INTERIOR COURTYARDS AND THE HUSHED CONFINES OF A SACRED SPACE. Named for its origins as a 16th-century monastery, Hotel Monasterio is an embodiment of Cusco’s illustrious history. Rising from Inca stone foundations, it occupies nearly an entire city block on a serene small square in the heart of the city. Though just paces away from the buzz of the Plaza de Armas and the bustling neighborhood of San Blas, it welcomes guests with the tranquil air of a country estate. Here you can discover the Monasterio’s collection of 17th- and 18th-century Cusco School canvases and its magnificent gilded chapel. Rooms in the old cloisters reflect the hotel’s monastic and Spanish colonial past; all 126 are individually decorated, with unique religious art, warm, earthy colors and antique furnishings. The two-level junior suites are distinguished by soaring peaked ceilings and upstairs bedrooms. Hotel Monasterio

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was the first hotel in the world to offer oxygen-enriched rooms; oxygen pumped directly through the ventilation system effectively reduces atmospheric pressure and symptoms of altitude sickness. Dine at the elegant El Tupay restaurant in the original vaulted refectory of the monastery (accompanied in the evening by opera singers), or lunch by the fountain on the main patio, in the shade of a 300-yearold cedar tree. In the evenings, sip a pisco or coca sour to the relaxing sounds of live jazz in the Lobby Bar. And after a day taking in the Andean character and steep hills of Cusco, retire to your room for a massage or a scented bath selected from one of our customized Bath Butler services. Find out more about Hotel Monasterio at monasteriohotel.com

Few hotels in the world can compete with Hotel Monasterio’s illustrious backstory. Constructed in 1592 on the site of the palace of Inca Amaru Qhala (the original foundation of which is still visible), it was converted into the San Antonio Abad monastery, founded to train Catholic priests. The massive stone portal on Plazoleta Las Nazarenas still bears the original Spanish coat of arms. A massive earthquake in 1650 leveled much of Cusco, leaving the monastery seriously damaged. As part of its restoration, the Order added the singular baroque chapel that survives to this day. Replete with gold leaf and Cusco School paintings depicting the life of Saint Anthony of Abad, it is one of the secret jewels of the city. At the end of the 17th century, the monastery was transformed into the Royal Pontifical University, according to a papal edict from Pope Innocent II and a Royal Letters Patent issued by King Charles II. A decree by the King of Spain in 1816 renounced this authority, reverting it back to a seminary. It remained so until 1965, when it was converted into a hotel by the Peruvian state. Peru’s National Institute of Culture (INC) named Hotel Monasterio a National Historic Landmark, recognizing it as one of Cusco’s finest examples of colonial Renaissance architecture. 17


Clockwise from far left: cool drinks can be enjoyed around the only open-air heated pool in Cusco. The deluxe suites in our Z Collection boast original Inca and colonial features and beautiful balconies. Sample Chef Virgilio Martínez’s innovative Andean dishes, and refreshing pisco-based cocktails, at Senzo Restaurant and Bar. All of our suites provide the utmost comfort while paying homage to the hotel’s unique history.

PALACIO NAZARENAS A UNIQUE WAY TO EXPERIENCE CUSCO

Cocktail hour

Planning your trip! EMERGING FROM A DECADE OF ARCHITECTURAL RESTORATION, CUSCO’S MOST SPECTACULAR NEW HOTEL SHARES THE SAME TRANQUIL SQUARE WITH ITS SISTER PROPERTY, HOTEL MONASTERIO.

A former 17th-century manor house and convent, Palacio Nazarenas features a magnificent colonnaded courtyard and stone fountain. Yet the hotel’s historic appeal has been updated with unrivalled contemporary amenities: Cusco’s first heated open-air swimming pool, a sumptuous modern spa, and personalized butler service (complete with iPad and custom app). Here, high tech meets high Andean style. The hotel has the feel of an urban boutique hotel, yet with the luxuries and amenities of a larger property. Its 55 oxygen-enriched suites, stylishly outfitted with period furnishings, gaze over the pool; over red-tiled roofs toward the cathedral; or across the hilltops to Sacsayhuaman. In a stunning pavilion opening onto the pool, Senzo Restaurant is helmed by Chef Virgilio Martínez, also chef and owner of Central, chosen as one of the 2013 World’s 50 Best Restaurants by S Pellegrino & Acqua Panna. Hypnôze Spa opens onto a private patio, surrounded by four single treatment rooms and one particularly designed for couples. Some of them feature areas of glass floors that expose the ancient Inca stone foundations beneath. Whether it’s the history underfoot or the limitless Andean sky above, reflected in the still courtyard pool, the charms of Palacio Nazarenas are abundantly clear. Visit palacionazarenas.com for more information about this amazing hotel.

INSIDERS’PERU 6 Nights: Lima, Cusco, Sacred Valley and Machu Picchu EXPERIENCE CUSCO CLOSE UP BEFORE HEADING TO THE SACRED VALLEY AND MACHU PICCHU. EXPERT GUIDES ACCOMPANY YOU, BRINGING FASCINATING ANCIENT CULTURES TO LIFE.

Continue on to the formidable Inca fortress of Sacsayhuaman, with its wonderful panoramic views of Cusco. Lunch today is at the innovative MAP Café at the Pre-Columbian Art Museum, where you can enjoy the institute’s excellent displays. Explore the streets of Cusco, dominated by dramatic Inca walls.

Travel to Machu Picchu on board the luxurious Hiram Bingham train. Explore Machu Picchu in unrivalled depth with your host, Alfredo Mormontoy Atayupanqui, the site’s former resident archaeologist. Tonight you will stay at the Machu Picchu Sanctuary Lodge, located beside the citadel.

Day 4 Sacred Valley

Day 6 Machu Picchu - Cusco

Palacio Nazarenas Enjoy a full-day tour of the Sacred Valley. Travel to Chinchero and visit the textile workshop of Nilda Callañaupa. Discover traditional weaving techniques and the role of textiles in contemporary Andean culture. Continue to Hotel Rio Sagrado, where you’ll enjoy a delicious lunch and take part in a shaman ceremony beside the river.

Palacio Nazarenas Rise early and enjoy a walk through Machu Picchu at sunrise. Then choose to take one of two hikes with your guide, or just relax and continue exploring this magnificent citadel on your own. In the late afternoon, you return to Cusco aboard the Hiram Bingham.

Day 1 Lima Miraflores Park Hotel—overnight stay.

Day 2 & 3 Cusco Palacio Nazarenas Fly to Cusco and enjoy an afternoon sightseeing tour with Jorge Escobar Medrano, Cusco Cathedral’s curator and Chair Professor of History at the local university. The next day, visit Tambomachay, an ancient religious Inca site, and the remains of Qenqo, a labyrinth of staircases and channels carved into a rocky hilltop.

OPTION 1: OLLANTAYTAMBO Climb the steep stone steps to admire the view down the valley and the huge, pink-granite monoliths that form the Temple of the Sun. OPTION 2: FOR SHOPPERS Shop for world-class pottery at the Pablo Seminario workshop in the town of Urubamba. Return to Palacio Nazarenas.

Day 5 Machu Picchu Machu Picchu Sanctuary Lodge

Day 7 Cusco - Lima Departure Prepare for your morning transfer to the airport and your flight to Lima. Upon arrival, you will be met and assisted with your connection for your international flight home.

MORE DETAILS AND RESERVATIONS USA: +1 800 237 1236 reservations@oeh.com REST OF THE WORLD: +51 1 6108300 Or contact your local travel professional.

Sensational flavours 18

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Miraculous masonry

Dazzling salt pans

Local crafts

THE SACRED VALLEY DISCOVER THE TREASURES OF THE INCAS

Left to right: the naturally verdant valley proved irresistible to the Incas. Attractions here include the salt pans at Maras; vibrant Pisac market, and the giant Inca stones at Ollantaytambo.

Surrounded by the snowcapped Andes, the Sacred Valley of the Incas is a gentle expanse of villages with pre-Columbian roots. Tumbling through the valley, on the way to Machu Picchu, is the river the Incas believed was the earthly reflection of the Milky Way; on its banks you see ancient agricultural terraces—evidence that the Valley was the Incas’ bread basket. Formerly a quick stopover en route to Machu Picchu, the Sacred Valley has become a destination in own right, with superb artisans’ markets, magnificent Inca ruins, and infinite possibilities for communing with nature—or Pachamama, as locals might say. The Pisac craft market (Sundays, Tuesdays & Thursdays) is the valley’s biggest draw, especially on lively Sunday mornings when village elders lead processions through town after a Quechua mass. The ruins of the Incas’ largest fortress perch high on a cliff above the town, treating visitors to astounding panoramic views. Other spectacular ruins are found in Ollantaytambo, including some of the Incas’ most accomplished stonemasonry. Don’t miss the village’s perfect grid of 15thcentury canchas (city blocks), part of an ingenious urban plan. Lining Ollantaytambo’s stone streets are canals that still carry cold water rushing down from the mountains.

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Unexpected pleasures await those with more time to explore. The enigmatic ringed terraces carved into the earth by the Incas at Moray were most likely an agricultural lab, though many visitors remark upon the site’s uncommon spiritual energy. Chinchero, a rustic village high in the mountains, hosts a market considered even more authentic than Pisac’s; here the fine ponchos and blankets are sold by highland artisans themselves. Though the region is known for arduous treks up into the Andes, the Sacred Valley countryside is ideal for leisurely walks, such as the route from Moray to the ancient Salineras salt mines. Adrenaline junkies are drawn to the region’s burgeoning roster of adventure sports, including whitewater rafting, mountain biking and hot-air ballooning. Situated at a lower altitude than Cusco, the Sacred Valley makes a more relaxing base for those who want a rest before spurring themselves into action. Getting here from Cusco is simple: by taxi or hotel transport direct from Cusco’s airport it takes just an hour, while PeruRail trains comfortably take you from Cusco to Ollantaytambo and Urubamba, halfway along the route to Machu Picchu.

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HOTEL RIO SAGRADO WHERE ONLY THE RIVER RUSHES

Andean mystique

Spa heaven

Planning your trip! NAMED FOR THE INCAS’ SACRED URUBAMBA RIVER, WHOSE BANKS IT GRACES, HOTEL RIO SAGRADO IS DESIGNED LIKE A SMALL ANDEAN VILLAGE.

Hidden between the trees and green fields of the valley lies Hotel Rio Sagrado, where the beauty of the natural setting takes center stage. Terraces are framed by lush flowering gardens and rooms open to stunning views of the Andes and the mighty river. A sense of calm and peace pervades the property.

Top, left to right: Hotel Rio Sagrado offers worldclass facilities in unspoilt surroundings. The serene but vibrantly decorated rooms overlook the picturesque valley. Dine on inspired Peruvian cuisine at El Huerto restaurant; swim in the cool pool; take part in an ancient shaman ceremony in the grounds; feel rejuvenated at Spa Mayu Wilka. Left, relax in the lush gardens beside the Urubamba River.

Built of indigenous materials, including hardwoods, stone, and terracotta, Río Sagrado is a luxury country boutique hotel that invites guests to slow down and appreciate the Sacred Valley. Rooms are elegantly but minimally decorated, with a dash of local color. Deluxe rooms and Junior Suites open to the outdoors with private flagstone terraces, while two villa residences afford the utmost in privacy and comfort for families and friends. El Huerto (indoor) and El Jardin (outdoor) restaurants take pride in serving organic, locally sourced ingredients (including many grown on the property). Spa Mayu Wilka offers rejuvenating massages and treatments from native local plants, as well as a variety of holistic programs and yoga classes. Try a cooking class, or explore the countryside by horseback riding, biking, or white-water rafting. There are many ways to be transported in this valley that the Incas held so sacred. For further inspiration visit riosagrado.com

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UNMISSABLE PERU 7 Nights: Lima, Cusco, Sacred Valley and Machu Picchu EXPLORE ALL THE HIGHLIGHTS, FROM LIMA THROUGH TO MACHU PICCHU, PLUS SPECIAL EXPERIENCES OFF THE BEATEN TRACK. CHOOSE THIS ORIENTEXPRESS HOTELS ITINERARY AND WE’LL TAKE CARE OF EVERYTHING SCORT YOU TO ALL THE BEST SIGHTS.

Day 3 & 4 Sacred Valley Hotel Rio Sagrado Fly to Cusco, and enjoy a one-and-a-half-hour scenic drive through stunning landscapes to the Sacred Valley of the Incas. On the way you’ll stop in the town of Pisac, renowned for its colorful market. You will then continue to Hotel Rio Sagrado. During your stay in the Sacred Valley you’ll visit the town of Ollantaytambo, one of the oldest continuously occupied settlements in the Americas, and Chinchero, a small Andean village located high on windswept plains.

either to Inti Punku or up Huayna Picchu, the highest mountain on the site. Or continue exploring this magnificent citadel on your own. Return to Cusco aboard the luxurious Hiram Bingham train.

Day 7 Cusco Hotel Monasterio Begin your day with a visit to Cusco’s central market, a wonderful way to discover Andean culture and daily life. Continue to the cathedral, Koricancha complex, fortress of Sacsayhuaman and other impressive sites.

Day 1 & 2 Lima Miraflores Park Hotel Arrive in Lima where a representative of Orient-Express Hotels will be waiting to escort you to Miraflores Park Hotel. Spend your first day exploring this vibrant city at your leisure or relaxing by the rooftop pool. The next day, join a special tour of Lima. Visit the historic center, cathedral, Government Palace, and many other fascinating sites. Continue on the Barranco District Shopping Tour and visit stylish stores and boutiques showcasing items by Peruvian artists and artisans.

You’ll also explore Hacienda Huayoccari and its superb collection of colonial and folk art. The hotel also offers a variety of activities, such as hiking, ATV driving, mountain bike or horseback riding.

Day 8 Lima Departure Transfer to the airport for your flight to Lima, where you will be met and assisted with your connecting flight home.

Day 5 & 6 Machu Picchu Machu Picchu Sanctuary Lodge Board the Vistadome train to Machu Picchu. Visit the unique Inca citadel and its surrounding area by private guided tour. You will spend the night at Machu Picchu Sanctuary Lodge, the only hotel located beside the citadel. You may choose one of two hikes;

MORE DETAILS AND RESERVATIONS USA: +1 800 237 1236 reservations@oeh.com REST OF THE WORLD: +51 1 6108300 Or contact your local travel professional.

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Triumphant terraces

Magical discoveries

MACHU PICCHU EXPLORE THE MAJESTY OF THE LOST CITY OF THE INCAS

Clockwise from far left: the sanctuary of Machu Picchu, a UNESCO World Heritage site, sits almost 2,500 metres above sea level. Discover amazing Andean agricultural terraces; beautifully preserved ruins, and spot rare orchids—Peru is home to more than 3,000 known species.

Hidden from view on a mountaintop veiled in cloud forest for more than four centuries—first from Spanish conquerors and then subsequent generations—Machu Picchu resonates with mystery. Rediscovered by a Yale archaeologist in 1911 and regarded as one of the “New Seven Wonders of the World,” the Incas’ royal retreat is one of South America’s most emblematic sights.

steep—but eminently worth it for the panoramic bird’s-eye view of the ruins from the top. A lush trail through cloud forest leads to the Temple of the Moon, a mysterious sanctuary made up of caverns. For the classic postcard view of Machu Picchu, trek up to Intipunku (Sun Gate), where the Incas once entered the royal city after long days on the Inca Trail.

Machu Picchu’s majestic setting, shrouded in thick vegetation and mist and surrounded on all sides by towering mountains, speaks of the Incas’ reverence for the natural world. Yet the architectural details seen up close are equally impressive. The Temple of the Sun, a smoothly rounded tower, showcases the ruins’ most accomplished stonework; the Temple of the Three Windows perfectly frames views of the Andes across the Urubamba gorge; and the Intihuatana, an ingenious sundial, was used to view constellations and gauge the seasons.

There’s a lot to see, and a quick visit can hardly do Machu Picchu justice; better to spend the night and experience the ruins before and after the tour groups. Machu Picchu continues to grow in popularity (admission is limited to 2,500 people per day), and the most crowded times are during Peruvian holidays in early August and on solstice days (June 21 and December 21). Tickets, including for the select hike to Huayna Picchu, should be reserved as far in advance as possible.

For those with the time and energy, Machu Picchu’s lesser-visited sections are highlights. The hour-long climb to Huayna Picchu, the peak behind Machu Picchu, is imposingly 24

Whether you zip to the ruins on a highspeed train or do as the Incas did, trekking the four-day Camino Inca, Machu Picchu is an experience that’s hard to rival. For sure it is an adventure you cannot miss. 25


Planning your trip! ADVENTUROUS PERU

7 Nights: Lima, Cusco, Sacred Valley and Machu Picchu HIKE INCA TRAILS, RIDE PASO HORSES, RAFT ALONG THE URUBAMBA RIVER. ENJOY ALL OF PERU’S KEY EXPERIENCES, PLUS HIGH ENERGY THRILLS. CHOOSE THIS ORIENT-EXPRESS HOTELS ITINERARY AND WE’LL TAKE CARE OF EVERYTHING AND ESCORT YOU TO ALL THE BEST SIGHTS.

MACHU PICCHU SANCTUARY LODGE UNRIVALLED LOCATION, EXCLUSIVE PRIVILEGE DISCOVER THE SECRETS OF LIMA CITY

Day 1 Lima Miraflores Park Hotel Arrive in Lima where you will be escorted by an Orient-Express Hotels representative to Miraflores Park Hotel. Explore Lima’s exceptional museums, galleries and archaeological sites or simply relax by the hotel’s rooftop pool.

Day 2-4 Sacred Valley Hotel Rio Sagrado Fly to Cusco and continue on a one-and-a-half hour scenic drive through stunning landscapes to the Sacred Valley of the Incas. Settle in at Hotel Rio Sagrado and then transfer to your next adventure, a half-day tour by ATV (all terrain vehicle). From river rafting down the mighty Urubamba to riding on a Peruvian Paso, the world’s smoothest horse, the days ahead are guaranteed to be action-packed. During your stay in the Sacred Valley you will also explore the fascinating culture of the area. Enjoy visits to Chinchero, an Andean village of weavers, and the little town of Maras, from where you will hike to the ruins of the Inca “agricultural laboratory” at Moray..

Day 5-6 Machu Picchu

NESTLED HIGH IN THE ANDES, AT THE GATES OF THE CITADEL, MACHU PICCHU SANCTUARY LODGE BOASTS A DRAMATIC SETTING FEW HOTELS CAN CLAIM.

Rare blooms

Machu Picchu Sanctuary Lodge Board the Vistadome train and travel 104km on the Cusco– Machu Picchu railway, where you disembark to begin trekking along the short Inca Trail. Savour the magnificent views of the Urubamba River valley. You will stay at Machu Picchu Sanctuary Lodge, the only hotel located next to the citadel. Rise early the next morning and enjoy a walk through Machu Picchu at sunrise, a truly unforgettable experience. In the afternoon board the bus to Aguas Calientes station for your Vistadome train to Cusco.

Day 7 Cusco Hotel Monasterio Enjoy a half-day tour of Cusco, which includes a visit to the cathedral, the Koricancha complex and the impressive fortress of Sacsayhuaman. Continue to the Awana Kancha centre, where llamas, alpacas, guanacos and vicuñas laze in the fields.

In harmony with nature For most visitors, Machu Picchu is more than memorable; it’s a mystical and sacred place. The privilege of drifting off to sleep and waking up mere steps away from the ruins—seeing the sun slowly rise over the Andes and stargazing at an elevation of 2,400m (7,870 ft)—is a traveler’s dream. Machu Picchu Sanctuary Lodge has been the only modern addition to this isolated hilltop setting in the five centuries since it was engineered by the Incas. The Lodge has been respectfully designed in an environmentally harmonious style, wholly in keeping with the surrounding Historic National Sanctuary and World Heritage site.

The Sanctuary Lodge’s 29 rooms and two suites are intimate, contemporary and suffused with Peruvian character. Deluxe twin rooms feature terraces that open onto flowering gardens, with commanding views of the surrounding mountains. Enjoy Andean-inspired menus at airy Tampu Restaurant Bar, exclusive for hotel guests; or try the assorted buffet lunch in Tinkuy Restaurant if you are a day visitor. Make sure to take advantage of the Lodge’s guided treks and tours within the ruins themselves—to the Temple of the Moon, Sun Gate, Huayna Picchu and Inca Bridge—as well as within the protected environs of the Sanctuary. Want to know more? Go to sanctuarylodgehotel.com

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Clockwise from top left: Machu Picchu Sanctuary Lodge is surrounded by tropical forest, towering mountains and ancient secrets. Wake up to inspiring vistas from your own personal terrace. Rooms are elegantly furnished in materials that harmonise with the surroundings. The hotel garden blooms with beautiful orchids. A romantic dinner overlooking the mystical mountains. Practice yoga in serene surroundings.

Day 8 Lima Departure This morning you will be taken to Cusco airport for your flight to Lima. On your way to the Miraflores Park Hotel enjoy a tour of the vibrant capital. We will schedule an evening transfer to the airport for your international flight home.

MORE DETAILS AND RESERVATIONS USA: +1 800 237 1236 reservations@oeh.com REST OF THE WORLD: +51 1 6108300 Or contact your local travel professional. 27


MORE MAGNIFICENT TRAIN JOURNEYS PeruRail’s tourist trains from Cusco to Machu Picchu and Lake Titicaca are among the most spectacular rail journeys on earth. They carry passengers to two of the most legendary destinations in South America, but the journeys themselves are great attractions. VISTADOME TO MACHU PICCHU Only the Inca Trail takes in more jawdropping scenery on the way to Machu Picchu—and that’s over four arduous days, not three action-packed hours. Take in all the beauty of the lush Sacred Valley and towering Andes from the huge panoramic windows on the first-class Vistadome, which features comfortable leather seats and air conditioning. Trains on the 112km (70-mile) route depart from Poroy station at regularly scheduled times (beginning just after 6am), ensuring that visitors have a full day to explore the citadel. Trains stop in the town of Ollantaytambo, where travelers can either continue on to Machu Picchu or disembark and explore the Sacred Valley before resuming their trip.

DISCOVER THE ALL ABOARD! SECRETS OF LIVE MUSIC—AND FINE DINING, LIMA THE CITY MOST STYLISH WAY TO REACH MACHU PICCHU

HIRAM BINGHAM Named after the American academic who rediscovered Machu Picchu for the world in 1911, and operated by PeruRail, the Hiram Bingham luxury train transports guests to the great Inca ruins—and back to an era of old-world elegance and romance. The palatial, 1920s-style Pullman carriages course through breathtaking scenery, crossing the Andes, wending their way through the Sacred Valley, and tracing the bend of the Urubamba River. Their destination: the Lost City of the Incas. Departing from Poroy station, just outside Cusco, you may feel as though you should dress in black tie. Yet most travelers are decked out in hiking gear, ready for their Machu Picchu adventure. Dining tables are beautifully set with crystal and polished cutlery, and a team of white-gloved waiters attends to your every need. The blue and

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ANDEAN EXPLORER TO LAKE TITICACA PeruRail’s Titicaca train route is the most scenic and luxurious way to travel from Cusco to Puno—the folklore capital of Peru—and Lake Titicaca, the world’s highest navigable lake. Rail aficionados consider this one of the world’s great long-distance train journeys. The 10-hour route crosses thrilling landscapes of Andean mountains and rolling plains, past gorges and highland lakes,

remote communities and pre-Columbian ruins. At La Raya, the railway reaches an elevation of 4,321m (14,176 ft) above sea level, making it one of the world’s highest standard-gauge routes. Elegant 1920s-style Pullman coaches are equipped with dining cars (serving an included three-course lunch) and a glass-enclosed observatory/bar car to take in the spectacular views.

Journey for your senses

Sparkling service

gold Hiram Bingham passenger wagons are resplendent with polished wood, shining brass and luxurious upholstery. As you pass through the Sacred Valley, you dine on a three-course brunch on the way to Machu Picchu, and a four-course Andeaninspired dinner (roasted alpaca or river trout, perhaps) on the return. Only the freshest regional and seasonal ingredients are used, and menus are accompanied by premium South American wines. In the bar car, passengers can enjoy a pisco sour to the folkloric pan flutes of live Andean music.

From top: the elegant Hiram Bingham carriages are distinguished by their blue and gold color scheme; enjoy fine dining and personal service on board; soak up amazing views of the lush valley during the exhilarating journey to and from Machu Picchu.

From top: the Vistadome carries you in air-conditioned comfort to Machu Picchu; the Andean Explorer offers a thrilling 10-hour journey ending at Lake Titicaca; large, panoramic windows enable you to capture amazing photographs of the incomparable vistas.

A journey on the Hiram Bingham includes a tour guide, tickets and transportation to Machu Picchu, and afternoon tea at Machu Picchu Sanctuary Lodge. The Hiram Bingham train: a journey worthy of its destination.

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TIPS FOR TRAVEL

DISCOVER OUR WORLD

PRACTICAL ADVICE FOR YOUR VISIT TO PERU: FROM VISA REQUIREMENTS TO MONEY MATTERS.

TIMES TO VISIT Travelers can visit Peru any time of the year, but because of the country’s geographical diversity, local weather patterns can vary greatly. Peru experiences two very distinct seasons, wet and dry (rather than summer and winter). In the highlands and mountain areas, such as Cusco and Machu Picchu, the dry season runs from May to November and is marked by sunny days, cold nights and lack of rain. During the wet season (December to April), there are frequent showers, but the benefits are greener hillsides, blooming wildflowers and fewer crowds. The tropical Amazon is hot, humid and wet year round, with average daytime temperatures of 3032ºC. The desert coast, meanwhile, is dry, and the best time to hit the beach is from January to March, when the sky is clear and the sea warm. This is also when surfers take to the waves. LANGUAGE & CULTURE Peru is a nation of two official languages, Spanish and Quechua, but there are also several regional languages. The population is a mix of European descendants, Mestizos, Amerindians, Afro-Peruvians and Asian immigrants and their descendants. The largest group, Amerindians, consist primarily of Quechuas and Aymaras, indigenous peoples with long-held traditions. While no one expects foreigners to be able to converse in native languages such as Quechua or Aymara, a few words in Spanish will be very well received.

TIME ZONES Local time is GMT -5 hours. Peru does not observe daylight saving time.

withdrawals (most ATMs allow customers to receive money in Peruvian soles or US dollars, and screen instructions are in English and Spanish). Travelers’ cheques are not widely accepted.

PASSPORTS & VISAS A valid passport is required to enter and leave Peru. Visitors are normally allowed to stay for up to 180 days and require a passport with at least six months’ remaining validity at the time of entry. Currently, British and American citizens do not require a visa to enter Peru as tourists. Other nationalities are advised to check with the Peruvian Embassy in their home country for pertinent visa information. Entry requirements are subject to change, so make sure you have the latest information before you travel.

SHOPPING Peru is celebrated for its expertly handmade goods, which include ceramics, alpaca and vicuña textiles and knitwear, silver, leather and gold. In major cities and rural artisans’ markets, the offer of goods is difficult to resist—the biggest problem most travelers have is how to get it all back! However, visitors are not allowed to take original artifacts or antiques, including pre-Columbian ceramics, textiles and paintings, out of Peru.

INSURANCE Passengers are strongly advised to take out travel and luggage insurance when booking holidays. CURRENCY Peru’s official currency is the Nuevo Sol (S/.), which is divided into 100 cents (céntimos). The US dollar is the effective second currency and is accepted in many shops, restaurants and other businesses (at the current rate of exchange). Some hotels post rates in dollars. Major credit cards can be used, most frequently in cities and larger restaurants, hotels and shops; Visa is the most widely accepted credit card. ATMs are available in larger towns and cities for local currency

RECOMMENDED READING The Conquest of the Incas by John Hemming is a classic narrative of Inca history and the Spanish conquistadors. Hiram Bingham is the famous Yale archaeologist who brought the Incas’ “lost city” to the world’s attention in 1911; his book Lost City of the Incas is an engaging travelogue and incredible adventure story. The Peru Reader: History, Culture, Politics (edited by Orin Starn) is one of the best overviews of recent Peru, a “cross-disciplinary anthology” with essays by Mario Vargas Llosa and other notable writers. Vargas Llosa is Peru’s great contemporary literary figure; the 2010 Nobel Prize-winner (who ran for president in 1990) has amassed a long list of great works, including The Green

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WE ARE PART OF ORIENT-EXPRESS HOTELS LTD., A COLLECTION OF ICONIC HOTELS, RAIL ADVENTURES AND RIVER VOYAGES WORLDWIDE.

House, Conversation in the Cathedral, Death in the Andes, The War of the End of the World, and The Feast of the Goat. Among younger novelists are Alonso Cueto, who has earned international awards for The Blue Hour and The Whisper of the Whale Woman, and Santiago Roncagliolo, whose Red April is an entertaining political thriller about Shining Path, the Peruvian terrorist group. A good reference work for naturalists is Peru: The Ecotravellers’ Wildlife Guide, by the biologists David Pearson and Les Beletsky, a thick and nicely illustrated handbook of Peruvian flora and fauna, including information about conservation, habitats, national parks, and nature reserves.

HEALTH Peru does not require immunizations for entry, although vaccination against yellow fever is advised if you plan to travel to the Amazon region, in which case you should also take a course of malaria tables and carry insect repellent. Visitors to high-altitude destinations (including Cusco, Machu Picchu, Lake Titicaca/Puno and Colca Canyon) may find that it takes two or three days for some to acclimatize; check with a doctor in advance if you have any health concerns.

Hotel Cipriani in Venice; Machu Picchu, Peru; New York’s ‘21’ restaurant; Afloat in France luxury barge cruises.

As a curator of sophisticated travel adventures across the globe, Orient-Express Hotels Ltd. creates memorable experiences that excite, entertain and enrich the soul. Choose a grand city hotel such as Venice’s Hotel Cipriani, Rio’s Copacabana Palace or Hotel Ritz, Madrid. Or a safari in Botswana, a two-centre holiday in Bali or a river voyage along the remote Ayeyarwady River in Myanmar. All are perfect places to discover new cultures, celebrate with family and friends, learn fresh skills and embark on memorable journeys. View our travel calendar and join us to experience well-known destinations in a fresh light or head off the beaten track and into a new world.

FIND OUT MORE

Visit our website for news, films and reviews.

orient-express.com Email us for further information: discover@orient-express.com

SELECTED TRAVEL EXPERIENCES CELEBRATIONS & GIFTS

FAMILY & FRIENDS

Celebrate aboard the romantic Venice SimplonOrient-Express luxury train and stay at Venice’s Hotel Cipriani, or immerse yourself in Russian theatre, ballet and music at Grand Hotel Europe in St Petersburg.

Party on down to New York’s ‘21’ restaurant where fun and fine dining have reigned since 1929. Or escape with all the family to Mexico’s Maroma Resort and Spa where jungle meets spectacular white sands.

JOURNEYS

LEARNING & DISCOVERY

A beautiful new hotel, Palacio Nazarenas, forms the focus of a thrilling Orient-Express journey— Insiders’ Peru—which offers unparalleled access to Cusco, the Sacred Valley and Machu Picchu.

Savour amazing local food and wine at our six Italian hotels with classes led by great chefs and sommeliers, or cruise through 33 grands crus vineyards on an Afloat in France barge.

© 2013, Orient-Express Management Services S.à.r.l. Words and images in this publication may be reproduced only with permission from OrientExpress Management Services S.à.r.l. which accepts no responsibility for any views or statements made herein. “Orient-Express” is a trademark of SNCF protected globally and used under licence by Orient-Express Hotels Ltd. and its subsidiaries.

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Invitation to peru 2013