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INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE AT IVANHOE GRAMMAR SCHOOL

An introduction to the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme for students and families 2019 - 2020


The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme can challenge, discipline and motivate you. It provides you with the tools to be best prepared for tertiary studies anywhere in the world.


Contents IB Learner Profile

4

The International Baccalaureate (IB) Organisation

5

Introduction 6 Subject Groups Should you undertake the IB? Achievement of the IB Diploma IB Diploma Model 7 Advice from Ivanhoe Grammar School IB Diploma students Theory of Knowledge (ToK)

8

Extended Essay (EE) What alumni learned from the EE experience Creativity, Activity, Service (CAS)

9

Student memories of CAS How is work assessed?

10

IB Diploma Subjects offered for 2019 - 2020

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University options and pathways

12

Class of 2017 IB Results

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Student Profiles

14-16

A Parent's Perspective

16

Frequently Asked Questions

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IB learner profile IB learner profile IB learn IB learner profi IB learner profile IB learn IB learner profile IB learner profile IB learner profile IB lear IB learner profil IB learner profile IB learner pro

file e

The aim of all IB programmes is to develop internationally minded people who, recognizing their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world. As IB learners we strive to be: We nurture our curiosity, developing skills for inquiry and research. We know how to learn independently and with others. We learn with enthusiasm and sustain our love of learning throughout life.

We critically appreciate our own cultures and personal histories, as well as the values and traditions of others. We seek and evaluate a range of points of view, and we are willing to grow from the experience.

We develop and use conceptual understanding, exploring knowledge across a range of disciplines. We engage with issues and ideas that have local and global significance.

We show empathy, compassion and respect. We have a commitment to service, and we act to make a positive difference in the lives of others and in the world around us.

We use critical and creative thinking skills to analyse and take responsible action on complex problems. We exercise initiative in making reasoned, ethical decisions.

We approach uncertainty with forethought and determination; we work independently and cooperatively to explore new ideas and innovative strategies. We are resourceful and resilient in the face of challenges and change.

We express ourselves confidently and creatively in more than one language and in many ways. We collaborate effectively, listening carefully to the perspectives of other individuals and groups. We act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness and justice, and with respect for the dignity and rights of people everywhere. We take responsibility for our actions and their consequences.

We understand the importance of balancing different aspects of our lives—intellectual, physical, and emotional—to achieve well-being for ourselves and others. We recognize our interdependence with other people and with the world in which we live. We thoughtfully consider the world and our own ideas and experience. We work to understand our strengths and weaknesses in order to support our learning and personal development.

The IB learner profile represents 10 attributes valued by IB World Schools. We believe these attributes, and others like them, can help individuals and groups become responsible members of local, national and global communities. 3

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The International Baccalaureate Organisation INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE (IB) MISSION STATEMENT

THE IB FOSTERS INTERNATIONAL MINDEDNESS BY…

The IB aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect.

Capturing a way of thinking, being and acting that is characterised by an openness to the world and a recognition of one’s deep interconnectedness to others.

To this end the organisation works with schools, governments and international organisations to develop challenging programs of international education and rigorous assessment.

Providing students with opportunities for sustained inquiry into a range of local and global issues and ideas.

Helping students reflect on their own perspective, culture and identities, and then on those of others.

Learning to appreciate different beliefs, values and experiences, and to think and collaborate across cultures and disciplines.

Gaining an understanding necessary to make progress toward a more peaceful and sustainable world.

Requiring students to study, or study in, more than one language to develop intercultural understanding and respect. This helps students appreciate that his or her own language, culture and worldview is just one of many.

Challenging students to critically consider power and privilege, and to recognise that he or she holds this planet and its resources in trust for future generations.

Moving beyond awareness and understanding to engagement, action and bringing about meaningful change.

These programs encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.

THE IB AND INTERNATIONAL-MINDEDNESS The aim of all IB programs is to develop internationally minded people who recognise their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet. Central to this aim is internationalmindedness.

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Olivia Leyden (Class of 2016 IB Dux) speaking at the 2017 IB Awards Ceremony

Introduction The IB Diploma is a two-year program to be completed in the final years of secondary schooling, and aims to prepare students for university study and global citizenship better than any other certificate. The curriculum consists of six subject groups and the three elements of the IB Diploma Program core.

SHOULD YOU UNDERTAKE THE IB DIPLOMA AT IVANHOE GRAMMAR SCHOOL? If you wish to study at a university and you are interested in: • Being prepared in the best possible way for success in your university course • A sound comprehensive curriculum

IB DIPLOMA PROGRAM SUBJECT GROUPS: • Group 1: Studies in Language and Literature

• A curriculum recognised locally, nationally and throughout the world for both breadth and depth in academic studies

• Group 2: Language Acquisition

• Reading and writing and can do both to a high standard

• Group 3: Individuals and Society

• Activities that encourage a sense of adventure, selfdiscipline and social responsibility

• Group 4: Sciences • Group 5: Mathematics • Group 6: The Arts IB Diploma Program core: • Theory of Knowledge • Extended Essay • Creativity, Activity, Service The IB Diploma Program is a broad and balanced, yet academically demanding, programme of study that promotes the development of: • Critical-thinking and reflective skills • Research skills • Independent learning skills • Intercultural understanding Students who are awarded the IB Diploma have demonstrated a strong commitment to learning, both in terms of the mastery of the subject content and in the development of the skills and discipline necessary for success in a competitive world.

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…then the answer to the question is YES, the IB Diploma at Ivanhoe Grammar School is for you!

ACHIEVEMENT OF THE IB DIPLOMA To be eligible for the award of the IB Diploma, students have to: • Choose one subject from each of the five groups (1 to 5) to ensure breadth of knowledge and understanding in Studies in Language & Literature (Group 1), Language Acquisition, (Group 2), Individuals & Societies (Group 3), Sciences (Group 4) and Mathematics (Group 5). Students may choose either a subject from The Arts (Group 6) or a second subject; IGS students usually choose another subject from Group 3 or Group 4. • Complete at least three of these at Higher Level, and the remainder at Standard Level • Satisfactorily complete the following Core requirements: OO Theory of Knowledge OO Extended Essay OO Creativity, Activity, Service Continued page 8.


Figure 1: IB Diploma Model The IB Diploma model is a visual representation of the IB’s approach to education. At the centre of the model is the IB learner profile; this logo denotes IB learners as: inquirers, knowledgeable, thinkers, communicators, principled, openminded, caring, risk-takers, balanced and reflective. This logo is surrounded by the IB’s commitment to quality learning and teaching; followed by the next layer which emphasizes the importance of the IB Diploma’s core components: Theory of Knowledge, Extended Essay and Creativity, Activity, Service. The six subject areas are then presented; these are encircled by the headings ‘IB Diploma Programme’ and ‘InternationalMindedness’ as a reminder of the IB Diploma's key principle. The model is set against a watermark of the world as a reminder of the IB’s objective to “develop internationally-minded people who recognise their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet.” Source: International Baccalaureate Organisation www.ibo.org

Advice from Ivanhoe Grammar School IB alumni to prospective IB Diploma students: “If you're interested in studying a broad range of

“Definitely give it a go because it really helps your

in the work required to succeed, then the IB is a very

Jack Brenton (Class of 2017)

subjects with a more global focus, and are willing to put rewarding course.”

organisational and academic skills in the long run.”

Olivia Leyden (Class of 2016)

“The IB is a great program that prepares you for

“Definitely choose the IB! Although it may seem

to put in the work, but the rewards are more than

daunting, trust me that nothing else will better prepare you for university than the IB. It was such a rewarding

university in a way that VCE can’t. You have to be willing worth it.”

Will Smith (Class of 2017)

experience as not only did I learn a breadth of knowledge and get a chance to explore ideas and activities outside the classroom, but I also became close friends with the

entire IB cohort due to the immense support we shared throughout Year 11 and 12.” Aleah Kink (Class of 2017)

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THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (TOK) TOK is a course about critical thinking and inquiring into the process of knowing, rather than about learning a specific body of knowledge. It is a core element which all IB Diploma students undertake and to which all schools are required to devote at least 100 hours of class time. TOK and the IB Diploma subjects should support each other in the sense that they reference each other and share some common goals. The TOK course examines how we know what we claim to know. It does this by encouraging students to analyse knowledge claims and explore knowledge questions.

Successful completion: There are two assessment tasks in the TOK course: an essay and a presentation. • The essay is externally assessed by the IB, and must be on any one of the six prescribed titles issued by the IB for each examination session. The maximum word limit for the essay is 1,600 words. • The presentation can be done individually or in a group, with a maximum group size of three. Approximately 10 minutes per presenter should be allowed, up to a maximum of approximately 30 minutes per group.

EXTENDED ESSAY (EE) The extended essay is an in-depth study of a focused topic normally chosen from one of the student’s six chosen subjects, or a subject that a student has a background in. It is intended to promote academic research and writing skills, providing students with an opportunity to engage in personal research in a topic of their own choice, under the guidance of a supervisor. This leads to a major piece of formally presented, structured writing, in which ideas and findings are communicated in a reasoned and coherent manner, appropriate to the subject chosen. It is mandatory that all students undertake three reflection sessions with their supervisor, which includes a short, concluding interview, or viva voce, with their supervisor following the completion of the extended essay.

Successful completion: The Extended Essay is externally assessed by the IB and can be up to 4000 words.

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CREATIVITY, ACTIVITY, SERVICE (CAS) CAS is at the heart of the Diploma Programme. With its holistic approach, CAS is designed to strengthen and extend students’ personal and interpersonal learning. CAS is organised around the three strands of creativity, activity and service defined as follows:

FAVOURITE CREATIVITY, ACTIVITY, SERVICE (CAS) MEMORIES FROM IVANHOE GRAMMAR SCHOOL IB ALUMNI: “A favourite memory was going to the finals in DAV Debating as well as being a key leader in Cadets.” Aleah Kink (Class of 2017)

• Creativity – exploring and extending ideas leading to an original or interpretive product or performance.

“I was lucky enough to participate in the 2015 Ivanhoe

• A ctivity – physical exertion contributing to a healthy lifestyle.

involved in community service projects, teaching English

• S ervice – collaborative and reciprocal engagement with the community in response to an authentic need.

Successful completion: • T he CAS program formally begins at the start of the IB Diploma and continues regularly for at least 18 months with a reasonable balance between creativity, activity, and service. • All CAS students are expected to maintain and complete a CAS portfolio as evidence of their engagement with CAS. • A chievement of the seven CAS learning outcomes (this should be evident in their CAS portfolio). • E ngage in CAS experiences involving one or more of the three CAS strands. A CAS experience can be a single event or may be an extended series of events. • F urther, students undertake a CAS project of at least one month’s duration that challenges students to show initiative, demonstrate perseverance, and develop skills such as collaboration, problem-solving, and decisionmaking. The CAS project can address any single strand of CAS, or combine two or all three strands.

Grammar School Service Project in Cambodia. We were

and engaging with members of the Peak Sneng village. It was a life changing experience that opened my eyes to a number of global issues, and I am very thankful to have been a part of it.”

Olivia Leyden (Class of 2016) “A favourite memory was selling weekly pizzas to support the School’s Cambodia Project.” Jack Brenton (Class of 2017) “The time spent around the camp fire during each and every Cadet camp is a fond memory that I relish even today.”

Kevin Wu (Class of 2016) “The final CAS interview stands out as an important memory where I discussed my CAS experience with

the CAS coordinator (Mr Daniel Symons) and how the

activities I undertook helped me to balance my final two years at school.”

Will Smith (Class of 2017)

• T here are three formal documented interviews students must have with their CAS coordinator.

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How is work assessed? The International Baccalaureate assesses student work as direct evidence of achievement against the stated goals of the IB Diploma courses. IB Diploma assessment procedures measure the extent to which students have mastered advanced academic skills in fulfilling these goals, for example: • Analysing and presenting information

Figure 2: The IB Diploma Points Matrix TOK/ EE

A

B

C

D

A

3

3

2

2

B

3

2

2

1

C

2

2

1

0

D

2

1

0

0

E

• Evaluating and constructing arguments • Solving problems creatively Basic skills are also assessed, including: • Retaining knowledge • Understanding key concepts

E

FAILING CONDITION

• Applying standard methods In addition to academic skills, IB Diploma assessment encourages an international outlook and intercultural skills, where appropriate. All subjects have an internal component and an external component. The internal component varies from subject to subject and could involve the development of portfolios, essays, oral presentations, etc. The external assessment component in most subjects are the November examinations at the end of Year 12, unless a student anticipates a subject, in which case the final examination would be in November of Year 11 or May of Year 12. Criterion-based assessment is used for all subjects and each subject is graded on a scale of 1 (minimum) to 7 (maximum). Each grade represents a range of marks that varies slightly from subject to subject and year to year. Up to three additional points can be gained on the performance in the Extended Essay (EE) and Theory of Knowledge (ToK), while Creativity, Activity, Service (CAS) must be completed satisfactorily. The award of the IB Diploma requires a minimum of 24 points (with a maximum of 45 points).

The following failing conditions apply to IB Diploma students: • CAS requirements have not been met. • Student’s total points are fewer than 24. • An “N” has been given for Theory of Knowledge, Extended Essay or for a contributing subject. • An “E” grade has been awarded for one or both of Theory of Knowledge and the Extended Essay. • There is a grade 1 awarded in a subject/level. • Grade 2 has been awarded three or more times (HL or SL). • Grade 3 or below has been awarded four or more times (HL or SL). • Student has gained fewer than 12 points on HL subjects (for candidates who register for four HL subjects, the three highest grades count). • Student has gained fewer than 9 points on SL subjects (candidates who register for two SL subjects must gain at least 5 points at SL). • Student has received a penalty for academic misconduct from the final award committee.

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IB Diploma Subjects OFFERED AT IVANHOE GRAMMAR SCHOOL FOR 2019 – 2020 Group 1

Studies in Language & Literature

English A Literature

Nominate 1 subject here:

Chinese A Literature

Language A (First Language)

Group 2

Language Acquisition

English B

Nominate 1 subject here:

French B Language B & ab initio

Japanese B Indonesian ab initio SL

Group 3

Individuals and Society

Business Management

Nominate 1st and 2nd preference here:

Economics History

1

Psychology 2

Group 4

Sciences

Biology

Nominate 1st and 2nd preference here:

Chemistry Physics

1

Sports, Exercise & Health Science

Group 5

Mathematics

2

Mathematical Studies SL

Nominate 1 subject here:

Mathematics Standard Level Mathematics Higher Level

Group 6

The Arts

Visual Arts

(or an elective)

Music

Nominate 1st and 2nd preference here:

Or another subject from a different group (Ivanhoe students usually choose from Groups 3 or 4)

1

2

Subjects offered at Standard Level (SL) only, have SL next to the subject. All other subjects are offered at Higher or Standard Level. *Actual subjects taught in a particular year will depend on demand and resources.

 

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University options and pathways WHY DO UNIVERSITIES VALUE IB STUDENTS? • IB students are prepared for academic success. • IB students are more likely than others to enrol in and graduate from selective higher education institutions. • Based on their experiences, IB students possess a broader range of skills that enhance their ability to adapt and contribute to university life. • IB students demonstrate a level of emotional and intellectual maturity for managing the demands of challenging coursework and making meaningful contributions. • They have extensive experience in undertaking independent research and presenting what they have learned through presentations, papers and other projects.

• Participation in the IB Diploma shows that students have excelled in multiple and diverse academic challenges, which is a strong predictor for success in university. Although most Ivanhoe Grammar School IB Diploma graduates choose Australian universities, they can gain admission to universities throughout the world. Some colleges and universities offer advanced standing or course credits to students with strong IB results. In Victoria, IB students are assigned a Notional Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) score awarded on the basis of their Diploma results. This is the same ATAR that VCE students achieve. The ATAR equivalents are presented by a Conversion Table produced each year.

• They think critically and draw on diverse perspectives that reflect an international outlook.

Figure 3: 2017 IB Scores (Source: IB Schools Australaisa)

2017 Passing IB Diploma Score

Combined Rank (Notional ATAR)

(including core points)

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2017 Passing IB Diploma Score

Combined Rank (Notional ATAR)

(including core points)

45

99.95

35

93.45

44

99.85

34

92.25

43

99.70

33

90.90

42

99.40

32

89.20

41

98.85

31

87.35

40

98.30

30

84.60

39

97.60

29

82.15

38

96.75

28

80.15

37

95.85

27

77.95

36

94.60

26

75.50

35

93.45

25

72.45

34

92.25

24

69.05

IVANHOE GRAMMAR SCHOOL


Class of 2017 IB Results • T he average IB score at Ivanhoe Grammar School in 2017 was 34 (this equates to an ATAR of 92.25)

• 4 2% of Ivanhoe Grammar School’s 2017 IB graduates attained an ATAR above 95

• 7 2% of Ivanhoe Grammar School’s 2017 IB graduates attained an ATAR above 90

8% 42% 34% 2016

42%

72%

56%

2017

92%

of subject grades were 6 or 7.

Percentage of our IB students who achieved 95+ ATAR equivalent scores.

student %

99+ 95+ 90+ 80+ ATAR

IB ATAR EQUIVALENT IB scores have converted to impressive ATAR equivalents.

2017 ROUND 1 TERTIARY OFFERS BY INSTITUTION (VTAC AND SATAC)

University of Melbourne Monash University

28

RMIT

1

6

Swinburne University

4

Flinders University

2

University of South Australia

University of Adelaide

2

Deakin

La Trobe University

1 1 1

ROUND 1 TERTIARY OFFERS BY COURSE (VTAC AND SATAC) 15

Society and Culture

16

Natural and Physical Sciences

5

Management and Commerce

2

Information Technology

4

Health

0

Food/Hospitality

4

Engineering Education

0

Creative Arts

1 5

Architecture and Building

2

Agriculture/Environmental Studies 0

5

10

15

20

Number of offers

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Student Profiles ALEAH KINK

KEVIN WU

Class of 2017

Class of 2016

Subject Scores: Subject Group #

Subject Scores:

Score

Group 1

English A Literature (HL)

6

Group 2

Indonesian ab initio

5

Group 3

Psychology (HL)

6

Group 4

Chemistry (HL)

6

Group 5

Mathematics (SL)

7

6

Group 6 or an elective

Physics (SL)

6

History (SL)

6

Core Points

TOK and EE

2

TOK and EE

2

Subject Group #

Subject and Level

Group 1

English A Literature (SL)

7

Group 2

French B (SL)

7

Group 3

Economics (HL)

7

Group 4

Chemistry (HL)

7

Group 5

Mathematics (HL)

Group 6 or an elective Core Points

Score

Theory of Knowledge oral presentation: What is the relationship between ‘ethics’ and ‘justice’? To what extent can ethical conclusions deliver justice?

Extended Essay subject and question: Economics; To what extent do refugees have a positive economic impact on rural Victorian towns?

Where to next? Aleah is currently studying a Bachelor of Biomedicine at the University of Melbourne.

How did the IB prepare you for University?

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Subject and Level

IVANHOE GRAMMAR SCHOOL

Theory of Knowledge oral presentation: Ways of knowing through martial arts.

Extended Essay subject and question: Psychology; How do emoticons affect the perception of emotions across computer mediated communication?

Where to next? Kevin is currently studying a Bachelor of Pharmacy at Monash University.

How did the IB prepare you for University?


OLIVIA LEYDEN

WILL SMITH

Class of 2016

Class of 2017

Subject Scores: Subject Scores: Score

Subject Group #

Subject and Level

Score

Group 1

English A Literature (SL)

7

Group 2

French B (SL)

6

Group 3

Psychology (HL)

7

Group 4

Physics (HL)

7

Group 5

Mathematics (SL)

7

Subject Group #

Subject and Level

Group 1

English A Literature (HL)

7

Group 2

French B (SL)

7

Group 3

History (HL)

7

Group 4

Biology (HL)

7

Group 5

Mathematics (SL)

7

Group 6 or an elective

Chemistry (HL)

7

Group 6 or an elective

Chemistry (SL)

7

Core Points

TOK and EE

2

Core Points

TOK and EE

3

Theory of Knowledge oral presentation:

Theory of Knowledge oral presentation:

The NASA Juno mission to Jupiter in regards to funding the discovery of new knowledge for knowledge’s sake.

How does the language we speak influence our understanding of the world?

Extended Essay subject and question:

Extended Essay subject and question:

Physics; How lift generated by a helicopter is related to the frequency of its blades rotating.

History; How significant was the intervention of the United States in shaping the outcome of the 1948 Italian election?

Where to next?

Where to next? Olivia is currently studying Medicine at Monash University.

Will is currently studying a Bachelor of Science at the University of Melbourne.

How did the IB prepare you for University?

How did the IB prepare you for University?

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Student Profiles (continued)

JACK BRENTON Class of 2017

Subject Scores: Subject Group #

Subject and Level

Score

Group 1

English A Literature (HL)

6

Group 2

Indonesian ab initio

6

Group 3

History (HL)

6

Group 4

Biology (SL)

6

Group 5

Mathematics (SL)

4

Group 6 or an elective

Psychology (HL)

6

Core Points

TOK and EE

3

Theory of Knowledge oral presentation: To what extent do emotions influence our decision-making as a connected society?

Extended Essay subject and question: Literature; Pride and Prejudice explores the intricacies and etiquette of marriage in Regency England. How does Jane Austen’s characterisation present her views regarding marriage?

Where to next? Jack is currently studying a Bachelor of Arts at the University of Melbourne.

How did the IB prepare you for University?

A Parent’s Perspective... SUE O’CALLAGHAN Mother of Amelia Upperton (Class of 2017): “As a parent of an IB student – I have to admit that I was sceptical, at first, of the benefits of a program that appeared complex and, in many ways, more demanding than the VCE. As my daughter seemed very keen to “tackle” the IB, I became more acquainted with the aims of the program and the broad range of subjects on offer. It soon became apparent that the IB aims to avoid a student having a narrow education – ensuring that maths, languages, sciences and humanities are studied by all students. My daughter was at pains to emphasise that her IB cohort were not in competition with one another and, as such, became very supportive of each other throughout the two years. The IB lived up to its reputation of being academically rigorous and labour intensive. Many of the subject requirements were decidedly “undergraduate” in both content and work requirements. I feel that the 2017 IB cohort were so well-supported and prepared by their teachers that they indeed “rose to the occasion” and performed at a level that they initially felt was not attainable when they first embarked on the course at the beginning of Year 11. This, I feel, is the absolute strength of the IB. It demands a level of excellence of the participants and they, in turn, attain that same level of excellence. I feel that the transition to tertiary study is relatively easy for those who have successfully completed the IB.

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My daughter learned to be a thorough scholar with a truly world view on the many subjects she studied. She learned to read widely and critically before forming an opinion. Importantly for tertiary study, she learned the value of referencing her opinions and adhering to an evidence-based approach to her studies. I would not hesitate in recommending the IB Diploma to any serious scholar who is prepared to work consistently and diligently. It is a program that rewards hard work and encourages a love of learning.”

PARENT OF A PAST IB DIPLOMA GRADUATE: “I remain a strong supporter of the IB Diploma generally and as an option at Ivanhoe Grammar School. In my professional judgement, it remains the optimum senior schooling curriculum option. The requirement to study a range of disciplines (2nd languages, maths, science, humanities et al) along with mandated tertiary foundation skills and disciplines (ToK/ EE/ CAS) taught my son and all IB Diploma graduates that a ‘broad liberal education’ requires fundamental and explicit components that provide the basis of western educational tradition. With these components, he has learned pre-requisite skills of successful tertiary study alongside the capacity and resilience to study not only subjects he ‘likes’ or at which he is ‘good’ at – as a 16/17 year old – but also skills that do not come easily but must be learned. It is upon these learned behaviours that the older adolescent and adult, who finds success at university and in life-long learning, often depends.

The IB Diploma remains the optimum senior secondary qualification, of those of which I am aware, for Australian secondary graduates intending to attend university in Australia or overseas. This is because it requires students to develop skills and learning which the VCE and other State certificates does not require or do not require to the same extent. The top one or two percent of academic students will achieve success regardless of the certificate they study; however, I believe the IB Diploma particularly maximises or amplifies the ATAR outcomes of those students in the 75.00 - 95.00 range, in particular.”

DR KATHLEEN RYAN Mother of Sinead Kershaw-Ryan (Class of 2016):  “I think the IB is for motivated students, who start researching their Extended Essay before the start of Term 1 and know how not to fall behind. The extended essay, on any topic whatsoever, says a great deal about the overall intention of the IB. That is: “you are the learner, what do you want to know more about?” This also applies to the student generated topics within history, maths and chemistry. The range of topics students came up with was amazing! I think the research angle of the IB and the self-motivation requirement gels very well with university expectations. The number of oral presentations are a bonus too as the students become very familiar with public speaking and that is a real asset.”

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Frequently Asked Questions WILL STUDYING THE IB BE AN ADVANTAGE TO ME AT UNIVERSITY? Yes, absolutely. The IB will help prepare you for university. For example, the experience of the Extended Essay is excellent grounding for tertiary studies.

ARE SOME SUBJECTS SCALED UP OR DOWN LIKE IN THE VCE? No. Every subject in the IB is regarded as equal. It doesn’t matter whether you get a 6 in Higher Level Physics or a 6 in Indonesian ab initio – the grades are treated as equal. This means you don’t have to choose subjects because you think it will be scaled up. You can choose subjects because you’re interested in them.

DOES A GRADE OF 7 MEAN YOU GET A PERFECT SCORE? Remember that a grade of ‘7’ does not mean that you got a perfect score. It means that you scored in the highest grade boundary for that subject.

CAN I STUDY THE IB IF I DIDN’T STUDY A LANGUAGE IN YEAR 9 OR YEAR 10? Yes. You can study a beginner’s language. Indonesian ab initio is for students who have not studied Indonesian before. Everyone in the class is essentially a beginner with the language.

WHEN DO I HAVE TO CHOOSE MY HIGHER LEVEL SUBJECTS? You don’t need to make this decision until midway through Year 11, with the exception of Mathematics. If students wish to study Mathematics HL, they must start studying this at the beginning of Year 11.

CAN YOU FAIL THE IB DIPLOMA? Yes, it is possible to fail an IB Diploma. For example, if you get less than 24 points you do not get your Diploma. You will, however, be awarded an IB Certificate. There are a number of other failing conditions (refer to the failing conditions previously outlined in this booklet). You should speak to Mr Sean Johnson (IB Coordinator) if you are worried about this.

CAN I GET INTO UNIVERSITY IF I FAIL TO GET THE IB DIPLOMA? Few fail the IB Diploma. If you do, it is still possible to get into a tertiary course. If you have questions about the IB and tertiary pathways, be sure to arrange a meeting with Mr Justin Peat (Director of Student Futures) to explore your options.

Sources: CAS guide (for students graduating in 2017 and thereafter) Diploma Programme Assessment procedure (2018) Extended Essay (first assessment 2018) Theory of Knowledge guide (first assessment 2015) What is an IB education? International Baccalaureate Organisation, 2017

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Mr Sean Johnson IB Coordinator, Ivanhoe Grammar School e sean.johnson@ivanhoe.com.au ph +61 3 9490 1848 www.ivanhoe.com.au/ib Further information can be found at: www.ibo.org Be sure the information you’re reading relates to the Diploma Programme (Years 11 & 12).

International Baccalaureate Parent Handbook  

An introduction to the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme for students and families 2019 - 2020.

International Baccalaureate Parent Handbook  

An introduction to the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme for students and families 2019 - 2020.