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PORTFOLIO IVAN EFREMOV RYERSON UNIVERSITY

VOL I


IVAN EFREMOV

(647)-330-5404 ivanefremov1996@gmail.com 155 Dalhousie St., Toronto, ON, M5B 2R2


OBJECTIVE Meticulous, highly-efficient Bachelor of Architectural Science Candidate aims to gain unique professional experience and knowledge through practical collaboration and work as an Intern. The Applicant targets to develop and raise valuable skills for future career development in the Architectural Field through a part time job or an internship. Resourceful quick study promptly masters the knowledge and skills to be a high impact contributor.

CORE STRENGTHS - Driven to accomplish tasks - Thorough - Team player - Experienced with computers - Proficient at time management - Proactive problem solver - Commitment to excellence

EDUCATION 2014 Present

09/2012 05/2014

RYERSON UNIVERSITY

Bachelor of Architectural Science 325 Church Street, Toronto, ON, M5B 2K3 1 (416) 979-5000 x5360

TORONTO PREP SCHOOL

High School Diploma 250 Davisville Ave, Toronto, ON, M4S 1H2 (416) 545-1020

PROFESSIONAL SKILLS VISUALIZATION

-Revit -Google SketchUp -Layout for SketchUp -Rhinoceros 3D

DRAFTING -AutoCAD -Rhino

ADOBE

-Photoshop -Indesign -Illustrator -Acrobat

RENDERING -Vray for Rhino -Vray for SketchUp -Revit

MICROSOFT -Word -Excel -Powerpoint

ADDITIONAL SKILLS -Proficient in both Macintosh and Microsoft platforms -Fluent in Russian and English -Familiar with both construction and office environments

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

REFERENCES

Summer of KEYSTONE GROUP 2012/2013 Construction Laborer, Toronto, ON Custom housing

ANDRIY DONCHENKO Contractor, Keystone Group +1 (416) 786-7417 andriy.keystone@gmail.com

05/2015 08/2015

RAW DESIGN

05/2016 06/2016

RYERSON UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURAL SCIENCE

Architectural internship 317 Adelaide St W, Toronto, ON M5V 1P9 (416) 599-9729

Research Assistant for Professor Leila Marie Farah Research into crop typologies and their impact on communities 325 Church St, Toronto, ON 1-(416)-979-5360 07/2016 09/2016

LEVETTO RESTAURANT

10/2016 Present

RYERSON UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURAL SCIENCE

Pasta Chef 68 Sudbury St, Toronto, ON M6J 3S7 (647) 350-3933

Research Assistant for Professor Jennifer McArthur Research into BIM based 3D modeling and energy conservation 325 Church St, Toronto, ON 1-(416)-979-5360

LEILA MARIE FARAH / M.Arch / PhD / DPLG Professor, Ryerson University, Department of Architectural Science 416 979 5000, ext. 6490 leila.farah@ryerson.ca JENNIFER McARTHUR / B.A.Sc. / M.A.Sc. / P.Eng / PMP / CEM / LEED GA Professor, Ryerson University, Department of Architectural Science 416-979-5000, ext.4082 jennifer.mcarthur@ryerson.ca NAZRIL NASSER General Manager, Levetto +1 (647) 466-6041


TABLE OF CONTENTS

01 02 03 04

H+C PHASE I

06/17

H+C PHASE II

18/27

FLUX

28/37

58 POWER

38/49

05


01

THIRD YEAR / 1ST SEMESTER

H+C / PHASE I The Heritage and Culture Community Center serves as a hybrid typology between private functions and public interactions. The dominant ideology behind the design relied on the movement through the means of circulation on the interior as well as through a creation of a dynamic facade on the exterior. The overall shape was born out of a need for a contrasting design in comparison to the surrounding urban context as well as the ever changing height requirements for the interior program. The center's layout can be separated into a 3-part system created through a column grid. The western part predominantly consists of spaces dedicated to exhibitions as well as public interactions. The central part is dedicated to the two light wells located to the north and the south which allow natural light into the building. The part column serves as a backbone of the building housing most of the private functions.

06

REVIT

/

AUTOCAD

/

ADOBE


07


01.MAXIMUM ENVELOPE

The first step consisted of taking a look into all the legal aspects of the site to determine the setbacks and a potential maximum envelope. A feasibility study was also conducted to analyze the potential cost of the land and the hard costs of construction for a project of this scale. Subsequently a number of amendments to the zoning was proposed to allow more freedom with the project design.

TITLE

T 02.GREEN SPACE

Being bound by Front St. to the south, the site lacked public circulation and interaction. A decision was made to push back the maximum envelope to allow a creation of a green space to the south which would dilute the vehicular dominated Front St.

03.VIEW

The north end of the building was raised to allow direct views to the Victoria Memorial park into some of the private meeting spaces located on the second floor of the center. The resulting split allowed a creation of a private patio condition connected to the general meeting spaces on the second storey.

04.LIGHT WELLS

Due to the depth of 27 meters the central areas of the building were not receiving ample amount of natural sunlight. To counteract the issue, two light wells were run through the building. The southern well runs all the way to the basement while the northern one stops at the second floor creating an outdoor green space.

08


05.CIRCULATION

The internal program of the project was structured around a primary circulation path which wrapped throughout the entire building allowing the users to experience multiple different exhibitions and the supporting spaces all while learning about Canadian culture and heritage.

TITLE 06.HEIGHT

To accentuate the different geometries of the overall shape of the project, the contrasting height requirements for public and privet spaces were showcased by sloping the roof into different direction in accordance to whenever the program required more or less height. This allowed to bring further contrast between the project and the site as well as a creation of a drainage system.

07.DOUBLE SKIN FACADE

To counteract the amount of glazing utilized in the project, a second skin facade was created. The facade acts as a shading device as well as a means of framing components both on the exterior and internally. The facade is composed of wooden components and sits on a steel frame made of HSS which connects to the slabs.

08.MOVEMENT

To further promote the ideology of movement implemented on the interior, the facade was broken down into parts which were then rotated at different angles.

09


WELLINGTON ST W

DRAPER ST PORTLAND ST

12

FRONT ST W


Having performed a site analysis, the on-site density was mapped out to determine a) the potential attractions on site and b) the best location for a main entrance. Determining these two conditions allowed to further begin experimenting with where the density could potentially be dispersed in the future.

01.ON-SITE DENSITY 489 KING STREET WEST

THE WELL

RAIL DECK PARK

WELLINGTON HOUSE

458 WELLINGTON STREET WEST

02.FUTURE DEVELOPMENT

MINTO WESTSIDE 13


PORTLAND ST.

1

14 GROUND FLOOR

2

3

4


15


WEST ELEVATION

16

EAST ELEVATION


17


02

THIRD YEAR / PRESENT

H + C / PHASE II

Present Project The second phase focused on fluidity of spaces as well as alterations to the facade conditions. Through the removal of certain program aspects as well as utilization of cores instead of columns as the primary structural system, the project was able to achieve a much more open feel as well as further develope the sculptural ideology of phase one. The overall envelope of the building utilizes predominantly zinc paneling in conjunction with a number of wooden fins. The wooden fins formulate a pattern which from the exterior can be perceived as moving waves. The zinc paneling itself has been strategically chosen to be black to bring out the more natural palate of the wooden fins.

18

REVIT

/

AUTOCAD

/

ADOBE


19

19


WEST ELEVATION 22 GROUND FLOOR PLAN


23


WEST ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

24

SECTION


25


SECTION PERSPECTIVE

26


27


03

SECOND YEAR / 1ST SEMESTER

FLUX The primary task of the project was to provide both fabrication and exhibition as well as living spaces for artists. The museum features three different exhibition spaces all custom tailored for the needs of their respective artists. Because all three artists require different amounts of light, the idea to create a spectrum circulation from a bright exhibition space to a dark one was created. The museum also features a number of outdoor spaces to encourage public interactions.

28

RHINO

/

SKETCHUP

/

AUTOCAD

/

ADOBE


29


01.MAXIMUM ENVELOPE

The first step was to figure out the overall max envelope and determine the potential important views on site.

02.PROGRAM

Once the maximum envelope has been determined it was important to split the building into the required programs. The main central components serves as a artist workshop with all the other programs circulating around it.

03.ANGLE

The lobby on the ground floor has been angled towards interior to avoid blocking the views on the streets level towards the church located to the west.

04.ANGLE 2

The second storey exhibition space is angled towards the Toronto downtown core to frame the view of the skyline as well as extenuate the cantilever created in the previous step.

30


05.GREEN ROOFS

Development of green roofs to accommodate the lack of greenery in the area as well as further push sustainable practices.

06.RESIDENCES

Further development of the program saw the development of the residential units for the artists who showcase their work within the museum.

07.FINAL

The fully developed project acts as a living, exhibition and a workshop space for the artists.

31


32


33


SHUTER ST

SITE PLAN

34 DALHOUSIE ST

CHURCH ST


GROUND FLOOR 35


SECOND FLOOR

THIRD FLOOR 36


SECTION BB

37


04

SECOND YEAR / 2ND SEMESTER

58 POWER 58 Power seeks to bring a form of a close knit community into a co-op development. The project sough to create a circulatory path carved out of a solid form which would represent a metaphorical street. Aligned with a variety of different public services, the "street" allowed a creation of a self sustained entity. The ideology for the coop consisted in the idea that the residents can both work and live within the building passing down skills or knowledge to their neighbors. Due to the idea that the path will be carved from the overall form, the project faced a number of structural challenges in the form of cantilevers. These were resolved through the means of cross bracing which was further utilized as a design component through its exposure into the units.

38

REVIT

/

RHINO

/

AUTOCAD

/

ADOBE


39


26 ONE BEDROOM UNITS + 14 TWO BEDROOM UNITS + 3 THREE BEDROOM UNITS = 43 UNITS

42


LAUNDRY ROOM

WALK-IN CLOSET KITCHEN

BEDROOM

1B

WASHROOM

ED OM RO

.

T. AP

q 5s

64

WASHROOM

m.

LIVING/DINNING BEDROOM BEDROOM

KITCHEN LIVING/DINNING

WASHROOM

2B RO

ED

LAUNDRY

OM

.

AP

5

T.

91

.m sq

WASHROOM WALK-IN CLOSET

WASHROOM BEDROOM KITCHEN LAUNDRY ROOM BEDROOM WASHROOM

3B RO

ED

LIVING/DINNING

OM

.

T. AP

5

118

.m sq

BEDROOM

43


POWER ST

LA

ADE

44 GROUND FLOOR

TE

S IDE


SECOND FLOOR

THIRD FLOOR

FOURTH FLOOR

5TH/6TH FLOOR

SEVENTH FLOOR

ROOF PLAN

45


WEST ELEVATION

46


47


48


The minimum required parking ramp height forced the circulation ramp to take on the current shape to allow enough distance for a car to pass while complying to OBC standards. The intricate shape allowed for creation of green space as well seating areas.

The main ramp is cladded in wooden planks in conjunction with grass. The arrangement and rotations of the planks allows the grass to be integrated more organically into the structure while still allowing solid areas for circulation during the winter season.

49


THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME.

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