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INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH–BLOOMINGTON publichealth.indiana.edu

2016–2017 FACTS


table of contents public health reimagined

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our mission, values, goals

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history

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locations & facilities

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the dean

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the faculty

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enrollment & credit hour production

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student expenses

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diversity & inclusion

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community & workforce

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international education & engagement

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research & creative activity

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centers & institutes

32

departments

34

degrees

35

leadership

37

alumni

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alumni board

44

school support

47

social media

48

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public health reimagined The health challenges of the 21st century require new ways of thinking. Curing disease is important. Preventing disease is imperative. New ways of approaching the problem of helping people stay healthy are critical. No longer are the great public health threats contained by hygiene and quarantine only. Being responsive to contemporary health challenges requires a purposeful reimagining of public health. The Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington is reshaping how parks, tourism, physical activity, fitness, recreational activities, and nutrition enhance and expand disease prevention and public health. Unique in the nation, our school’s multidisciplinary approach, history of community engagement, and strengths in epidemiology, biostatistics, and environmental health, bring new vigor and energy to the traditional concept of a school of public health. We’re built on decades of tradition, fueled by innovation, inspired by passion, and as the world changes—we’re leading the way.

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IU SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

BLOOMINGTON

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

PROMOTINGHEALTH PREVENTING DISEASE ENHANCINGQUALITY OF LIFE

community

engagement

T H E R A PY

KINESIOLOGY

PARKS EMERGING FIELDS

R E C R E AT I O N

EPIDEMIOLOGY

WHERE IT MATTERS HE ALTH COMMUNITY

PUBLIC HEALTH

BLOOMINGTON TEACHING

Bloomington

INDIANA

NUTRITION

UNIVERSITY

FRONT

LINES

RECREATION

TOURISM

ON THE

WHAT MATTERS

FITNESS

SCHOOL OF

UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

SAFETY

INDIANA

GLOBAL PARTNERSHIPS

BIOSTATISTICS

MAKING A DIFFERENCE

INDIANA

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our mission, values, goals OUR MISSION: The mission of the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington is to promote health among individuals and communities in Indiana, the nation, and the world through integrated multidisciplinary approaches to research and creative activity, teaching, and community engagement.

OUR VALUES: As the IU School of Public HealthBloomington, we value: • health and quality of life as a human right, • academic integrity, • diversity and civility, • a quality education and what it promises, research and its application, • community engagement, • the responsible stewardship of resources, and • the multidisciplinary traditions of our school.

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OUR GOALS: The goals of the IU School of Public Health-Bloomington are to: • Cultivate and sustain an integrated multidisciplinary environment that facilitates excellence in research and creative activity, teaching, service, and community engagement. • Educate and prepare the next generation of researchers, teachers, and practitioners to effectively meet the public health-related needs of individuals and communities. • Conduct, disseminate, and translate research and creative activity to advance knowledge and health worldwide. • Improve the health of people in Indiana and beyond through community-focused and participatory initiatives.

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history Stretching back into the 19th century, ideas of health and wellness began to take hold as an academic discipline at Indiana University. By the early 20th century, health-related facilities were being built on campus and a curriculum to promote physical fitness, as well as overall health, was established. This focus on health included the construction of the first part of the building that would become the School of Public Health, the Men’s Gymnasium. Built in 1917, the gym became the focal point of the evolving culture focused on health and wellness that continues to grow and evolve to this day. Eventually, additions to that building would become home to the School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. One of the first in the nation, the school adapted to the needs of the time and met those needs through robust curriculum and health-related research and practice. As health needs and challenges have evolved in the 21st-century, so too have the responses to those needs and challenges. With the creation of the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington in 2012, the continued evolution of Indiana University’s health-related curriculum, research, and community engagement has brought the mission to promote

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health, prevent disease, and enhance quality of life to new levels. Today, we continue to grow, evolve, and flourish. As a CEPH-accredited school of public health, we proudly build upon our 19th-century foundations in health and wellbeing as we take on and conquer the complex health challenges of the 21st century.

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locations & facilities The School of Public Health-Bloomington is located on the campus of Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. Founded in 1820, IU Bloomington is the flagship campus of Indiana University’s eight campuses statewide. The campus has been named one of the five most beautiful. The nearly 2,000 acre campus features Dunn Woods, the Arboretum, and the Jordan River, all providing breathtaking scenery.

Chicago

Cincinnati

Louisville

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ARBORETUM

TENTH STREET

WOODLAWN FIELD

IU SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

TENNIS COURTS

WILDERMUTH

PARKING

NORTH FORREST

WOODLAWN

WILDERMUTH

N

EAST SEVENTH STREET

FACILITIES Programs associated with the School of Public Health-Bloomington are located in multiple facilities on campus and some sites off campus. Most academic programs and administrative offices are located centrally in the School of Public Health Building, part of a larger complex that also houses the Wildermuth Intramural Center. The other major facility associated with the school is the Student Recreational Sports Center, operated by the school’s Division of Campus Recreational Sports. A premier off-site location, Bradford Woods boasts 2,400 acres of outdoor education facilities. Satellite facilities exist in other locations.

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the dean MOHAMMAD R. TORABI, PH.D., M.P.H., F.A.A.H.B. Dr. Mohammad R. Torabi was named founding dean of the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington on January 1, 2013. Torabi served as interim dean as the School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation transitioned into the IU School of Public Health-Bloomington. Before that, Torabi, a noted health behavior, education and public health expert, chaired the Department of Applied Health Science. The IU Public Health Initiative, launched in 2009 to address pressing public health needs across Indiana, called for establishing the state’s only schools of public health, one at Indiana UniversityPurdue University Indianapolis and the other on the Bloomington campus. The third largest school on the IU Bloomington campus, the school provides untold opportunities for

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addressing the public health needs of Hoosiers, particularly those living in rural communities as well as national and global communities. Torabi’s research focus is in the area of measurement and evaluation of school and public health programs and factors associated with health behavior. His research extends into health promotion and key factors related to individuals’ decisions in the prevention of tobacco use, drug abuse, cancer, and HIV/AIDS infection. He has received numerous honors for his research and teaching, both from professional associations and Indiana University. Torabi is the former president and a fellow of the American Academy of Health Behavior, which is a premier academy dedicated to advancing research in this field. He is a fellow and charter member of the North American Society of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport, and Dance Professionals; charter fellow of the American Association of Health Education; fellow of the American School Health Association; and fellow of the Research Committee of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance.

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the faculty TOTAL FACULTY: 175+

•Tenure /Tenure-Track 71 •Non Tenure-Track (Instructional) 34 •Non Tenure-Track (Non-Instructional) 17 •Scientist/Research Ranks 41 •Visiting /Temporary Ranks 15 •Endowed Chairs & Professorships 8

Today’s full time School of Public HealthBloomington faculty numbers 175+ accompanied by dozens of part-time instructors, and a full-time professional staff. These committed and acclaimed faculty and staff members provide core capabilities that closely align with the Indiana University Bloomington focus on health promotion and disease prevention in rural areas. The school’s structure of five academic departments–the Department of Kinesiology; the Department of Applied Health Science; the Department of Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies; the Department of Environmental Health; and the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics–provide a substantial variety of programs and services. Each department offers numerous majors, minors, and opportunities for graduate and undergraduate studies.

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enrollment & credit hour production ENROLLMENT: Undergraduate majors: 2,340 Graduate majors: 398 Total: 2,738

CREDIT HOUR PRODUCTION: Undergraduate Credit Hours: 85,117 Graduate Credit Hours: 7,102 Total: 92,219 ALL

431

392

406

413

436

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

FY2016

FY2017

500 400 300 200 100 0

GRADUATE STUDENT ENROLLMENT

ALL

2128

2225

2367

2377

2309

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

FY2016

FY2017

2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT ENROLLMENT

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student expenses Tuition is based on the student’s residence classification, school, and class standing. Indiana University undergraduates pay a flat fee for tuition, which entitles them to register for 12 to 18 credit hours per semester. Most degree programs require students to average 15.5 credit hours per semester in order to graduate in the traditional eight semesters.

2016-2017 TUITION COST PER CREDIT HOUR RESIDENT

NONRESIDENT

BACHELORS

$283.92

$1,029.54

MASTERS

$376.77

$1,097.38

DOCTORATES

$376.78

$1,097.37

ONLINE UNDERGRADUATES $283.92

$391.47

ONLINE GRADUATES

$509.82

$424.94

SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID The School of Public HealthBloomington has a wide variety of prestigious scholarships available to declared School of Public HealthBloomington majors.

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diversity & inclusion Where there’s an equal playing field for every student, there are opportunities down every path. The Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington is dedicated to keeping that dream alive now and for future generations. Our commitment to diversity goes far beyond opening doors for access and success. Everything about our academic mission—teaching, learning, scholarship, research, engagement, and creative activity—is made better by the exchange of ideas and diverse experiences and perspectives of our students, faculty, and staff. We value the contributions and inherent worth of all individuals, and treat others with mutual respect and understanding. And when we’re in the field as professionals, we are devoted to understanding the varied historical and social contexts where we work. We celebrate and seek diversity in all its forms: ethnicity, ability, age, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, race, religious beliefs, place of origin, political persuasion, values—the list goes on. Because little separates us there’s a lot we can learn from each other.

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UNDERGRAD STUDENTS:

African American: 161 Hispanic American: 129 Native American: 2 Caucasian: 1,844 Asian American: 52 Other: 189

GRADUATE STUDENTS:

African American: 35 Hispanic American: 10 Native American: 1 Caucasian: 256 Asian American: 14 Other: 94

TOTAL ENROLLMENT:

African American: 196 Hispanic American: 139 Native American: 3 Caucasian: 2,100 Asian American: 66 Other: 283

GENDER DIVERSITY Undergraduate Enrollment by Gender Male: 846 Female: 1,494 Graduate Enrollment by Gender Male: 169 Female: 229

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community & workforce The school’s Office of Global and Community Health Partnerships spearheads efforts in community engagement and workforce development. Hundreds of continuing education events are delivered annually to thousands of members of the public health workforce. Over 700 professionals in Indiana work directly with faculty on School of Public HealthBloomington partnership initiatives. A newly-launched series of nocost online courses designed for professionals and practitioners whose work impacts the health of the public has filled a critical fissure in Indiana’s public health landscape. The courses, known as Public Health & YOU (available at publichealthandyou.indiana. edu), ensure that Indiana’s front-line public health care workers are armed with the latest tools and information to help them in their professional lives.

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international education & engagement Indiana University has set international and global engagement as a clear university priority. The School of Public Health-Bloomington remains at the forefront of this effort, continuing to develop international programs and foster relationships with a wide variety of overseas partners across several continents. More than half of the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington’s full-time faculty members are actively engaged in international initiatives, and the school offers a range of internationally focused academic opportunities including study abroad, an undergraduate minor in global health promotion, a doctoral minor in international and global health, and joint master’s programs that allow students to obtain dual degrees in public health and area studies such as African Studies, European Studies, and Latin American and Caribbean Studies. With close to 100 separate international IU School of Public Health-Bloomington initiatives underway involving research, service, teaching, and workforce development, the school is pioneering new approaches to global health challenges.

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In addition, the school is a draw for international students as well, coming from around the world and from divergent traditions. Undergrad Enrollment International: 55 Graduate Enrollment International: 72 Total Enrollment International: 127 Nearly 200 School of Public HealthBloomington students are studying in international locations.

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research & creative activity The School of Public HealthBloomington offers a rich and multidisciplinary environment for research and creative activity. More than 175 full-time faculty are situated across the school’s five academic departments and twenty centers, institutes, laboratories, and working groups. These internationally recognized faculty and our school’s staff and students are engaged in research and creative activities focused on improving the health and well-being of communities in Indiana and beyond. While the expertise of those within the school spans the continuum of healthrelated research and creative activity, there are five broad constructs that are of priority for the school and our academic and community partners. These five areas, with examples of the unique work possible within our academic departments, are illustrative of the multidisciplinary approaches to some of the world’s leading public health challenges:

OBESITY, HEALTHY EATING, AND EXERCISE Work related to these issues is a top priority for the School of Public Health-Bloomington. Our academic departments and our Division of Recreational Sports offer

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an unparalleled environment for pursuing exciting and impacting work. Examples of departmental efforts in this area include: Applied Health Science: research focused on social and behavioral interventions to prevent obesity and/ or maintaining healthy weight, clinical and applied research on nutrition and dietetics, policy-related research, and relational and familial aspects of varying body size. Environmental Health: research focused on understanding the influence of environmental, nutritional, and genetic factors on body size and weight, and laboratory and applied studies aimed at exploring how nutritional and dietary factors modify chronic disease risk. Epidemiology and Biostatistics: research interests involve diet and nutrients in relation to chronic diseases and identifying individuals who have an elevated risk for stroke, thus providing important data identifying whether stroke risk can be reduced by dietary, supplemental, lifestyle, or environmental changes to modify trace element patterns.

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Kinesiology: research focused on fitness interventions, communitybased efforts to enhance physical activity, and laboratory and applied studies related to human movement and body composition. Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies: research related to recreational and built environments, human engagement within natural environments (e.g., public parks), factors associated with local food systems, and therapeutic recreation.

ALCOHOL, TOBACCO & OTHER DRUGS (ATOD) The School of Public HealthBloomington has a long history of work in this area, and through work in centers such as our Indiana Prevention Resource Center, continues to be the leading authority on this topic within the state. Examples of departmental efforts in this area include: Applied Health Science: research focused on interventions to prevent the use of ATOD among adolescents, understanding relations between ATOD and other health-risk behaviors, and policy-related research.

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Environmental Health: laboratory and applied research focused on examining the contribution of ATOD in chronic diseases (i.e. liver diseases and cancers), and exploring genetic factors that modify risk for chronic diseases following exposure to ATOD. Research aimed at the prevention or reversal of ATOD-related diseases is also being conducted. Epidemiology and Biostatistics: developmental epidemiology in conjunction with theoretical constructs of health behavior focus on substance use risks in adolescents. Geo-spatial studies of sex workers have focused on the relationships between addictive behaviors and risky sexual behaviors. Social epidemiology methods are applied to improving our understanding of the causes and prevalence of ATOD. Kinesiology: examples of research include the study of the relations between the use of performanceenhancing substances and impacts on human performance. Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies: research focused on ATOD use and outcomes across tourismand recreation-related outcomes.

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SEXUAL AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH Indiana University and the School of Public Health-Bloomington have an international reputation for work in this area via the Center for Sexual Health Promotion and the Rural Center for AIDS/STD Prevention. Work includes both behavioral assessments, applied intervention research, and laboratory research. Examples include: Applied Health Science: research focused on nationally representative studies to understand human sexual behaviors, condom use, and contraceptive decision making, community-based strategies to improve access to HIV and STD testing and care, and studies related to the understanding of the mental health aspects of HIV and STD infection and the economic impact of HIV, STD, unintended pregnancy, and sexual dysfunction. Environmental Health: research focused on examining genetic influences on reproductive health, and laboratory-based assessments of the impact of exposure to chemicals contained within sexual health products (e.g., lubricants), and in the environment (e.g. endocrine disrupting chemicals) on reproductive health.

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Epidemiology and Biostatistics: longitudinal designs and advanced statistical modeling to understand human sexual interactions, laboratory-based efforts to develop new and innovative diagnostic techniques, and work focused on sexual health in international settings. Studies related to reproductive health and HIV risk are being conducted in sub-Saharan Africa. Kinesiology: recent work includes the examination of sexual health among elite athletes at the college and professional level. Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies: recent work has included the study of sex tourism and its healthrelated outcomes.

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND HUMAN ENVIRONMENTS The School of Public HealthBloomington pursues laboratory-based research related to human exposure to environmental hazards, interventions to reduce negative outcomes associated with human-environment interactions, and remains a leader in research exploring the intersections between public health and natural and built environments. Examples of departmental efforts in this area include:

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Applied Health Science: studies related to the built environment, exposure to risks in the workplace, the management of safety risk and occupational health, and policyrelated research related to exposure to toxic substances (e.g., tobacco smoke). Environmental Health: laboratory and applied research evaluating the contribution of environmental and occupational exposures to adverse human health outcomes, including the contribution of geneenvironment interactions in human diseases. Research on intervention and preventative strategies to mitigate adverse health outcomes is also studied. Epidemiology and Biostatistics: Nutritional epidemiology focusing on trace elements that are associated with disease is highly integrated into environmental epidemiology as the source of these trace elements. The role that ingested elements play in chronic diseases, including cardiovascular diseases and stroke, is currently under investigation. Kinesiology: recent work includes that related to the impact of the physical environment on physical activity.

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Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies: this department is a leader in the area of human environments and the manner in which humans engage within environmental settings.

RURAL AND OTHER HEALTH DISPARITIES The School of Public HealthBloomington provides opportunities for both research and service efforts related to the unique needs of state and federal health disparities, with a particular emphasis on the capacity of Indiana’s public health and health-related workforce. Alignment of this research area within school departments: Applied Health Science: studies related to health outcomes among ethnic minority populations and aging communities, sexual minorities, and intervention research to increase access to care and prevention services among rural and other underserved communities. Environmental Health: research associated with the assessment of factors and outcomes associated with environmental risks unique in rural areas (e.g. pesticides and agricultural factors) and among under-served or low socio-economic status communities.

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Epidemiology and Biostatistics: Social epidemiologic and environmental epidemiologic methodologies are being applied to the study of health issues among rural and under-served communities, particularly longitudinal designs to assess access to care and prevention services. Current work includes longitudinal studies to assess sexual and reproductive health outcomes among ethnic and behavioral minority populations. Studies performed in rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa are providing data that may be applicable to under-served populations in local settings. Kinesiology: research related to the elderly, psychologically challenged, and rural communities, both in the form of basic behavioral research and intervention-based research and practice. Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies: research related to the use of recreational areas in rural communities and by those from under-served communities, and recreational and therapeutic characteristics of minority communities.

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RESEARCH FUNDING SUPPORT $7,785,039

FY16 Extramural Fund Expenditures $7,961,500

FY15 Extramural Fund Awards $25,000

FY16 Internal Funds Provided to Support Student Research and Creative Activity $50,000

FY16 Research for IU Health Partnership Seed Money $375,000

FY16 Internal Funds Provided to Support Faculty and Staff Research and Creative Activity

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centers & institutes The school’s centers and institutes contribute to the interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research, teaching, and community service activities. These centers and institutes help to advance its mission to protect and improve the health of the people of Indiana, the nation, and the world.

CENTERS • Aquatics Institute • Bradford Woods Outdoor and Leadership Center • Center for Research on Health Disparities • Center for Sexual Health Promotion • Center for Sport Policy and Conduct • Counsilman Center for the Science of Swimming • Indiana Prevention Resource Center • National Center on Accessibility • Public Health Study Design and Data Analysis Center • Rural Center for AIDS/STD Prevention • Updyke Center for Physical Activity INSTITUTES & WORKING GROUPS • Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands • Institute for Research on Addictive Behavior • IU Aquatics Institute

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• Leisure Research Institute • Tobacco Control and Wellness Research Working Group

LABORATORIES • Adapted Physical Education Lab • Applied Health Behavior Research Laboratory • Biomechanics Lab • Human Performance Lab • Industrial Hygiene Laboratory • Nutrition Science Laboratories • Oxidative Stress Environmental Analysis Core Laboratory • Underwater Science Lab • Environmental Health Lab

AFFILIATED PROGRAMS • Academic Diving Program • Dick Enberg Classroom • Executive Development Program • Great Lakes Park Training Institute • Counsilman Center Indiana Swim Team (CCiST) • IU Outdoor Aquatic Center • Institute for Outdoor Leadership and Education • Sports Medicine Facilities • Tennis Center • Tourism Research and Education Consortium (TREC)

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departments Our departments and centers support our faculty’s diverse research interests and community engagement practices, yielding thought-provoking findings and real world public health solutions. The academic programs and faculty within the School of Public Health-Bloomington are organized into five departments headed by chairs appointed by the Dean. Each department offers numerous majors, minors, and some departments offer opportunities for both graduate and undergraduate studies.

DEPARTMENTS: Applied Health Science David Lohrmann, Chair Environmental Health Alan Ewert, Chair Epidemiology and Biostatistics Ka He, Chair Kinesiology David Koceja, Chair Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies Lynn Jamison, Interim Chair

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degrees BACHELOR’S DEGREES • B.S.P.H. in Community Health • B.S.P.H. in Environmental Health • B.S.P.H. in Epidemiology • B.S. in Applied Health Science • B.S. in Kinesiology • B.S. in Recreation

MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH • Behavioral, Social, and Community Health • Biostatistics • Environmental Health • Epidemiology • Physical Activity • Professional Health Education • Public Health Administration

MS IN APPLIED HEALTH SCIENCE • Nutrition Science • Safety Management • School & College Health Education

MS IN KINESIOLOGY

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• Applied Sport Science • Athletic Administration/Sport Management • Biomechanics • Ergonomics • Exercise Physiology • Motor Learning/Control • Physical Activity, Fitness, & Wellness

MS IN RECREATION • Outdoor Recreation • Park and Public Lands Management • Recreation Administration • Recreational Therapy • Tourism Management

PHD • Environmental Health • Epidemiology • Health Behavior • Human Performance • Leisure Behavior

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leadership The school’s address is: Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington 1025 East Seventh Street Bloomington, IN 47405 Exceptional people drive the work that we do. We invite you to get to know the dedicated individuals behind the success of the school.

ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION Mohammad R. Torabi Founding Dean Suite 111 torabi@indiana.edu (812) 855-1250 Shawn Gibbs Executive Associate Dean Suite 111 gibbss@indiana.edu (812) 855-1090 Carrie Docherty Interim Associate Dean for Community and Global Engagement PH 121A cdochert@indiana.edu (812) 855-1562

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David Skirvin Assistant Dean for Management Suite 115 dskirvin@indiana.edu (812) 855-1243 John Schrader Assistant Dean for Student Academic Affairs Suite 121 schrade@indiana.edu (812) 856-4905 Kathy Bayless Assistant Dean Director Campus Recreational Sports Suite 290 kbayless@indiana.edu
 (812) 855-6432

PROFESSIONAL ADMINISTRATION Bernadette de Leon Director Information Technology Services Suite 190 deleon@indiana.edu (812) 855-1562 Jim Gibson Director of Advising PH C015 jadgibso@indiana.edu (812) 856-1591

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Kathleen Sobiech Special Assistant to the Dean for Strategic Engagement and Events Suite 179I ksobiech@indiana.edu (812) 855-3686 Lesa Huber Director of Online Education Suite 116 lehuber@indiana.edu (812) 855-1733 Rory James Director of Student Diversity and Inclusion PH C019 rorjames@indiana.edu (812) 856-4510 Brian Kearney Executive Director of Development Suite 179 bkearney@indiana.edu (812) 855-9201 Natalie Kubat Director of Donor & Alumni Relations Suite 179 nkubat@indiana.edu (812) 855-7891

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Margi Lockhart Director of Human Resources Suite 115 malockha@indiana.edu (812) 856-1956 Nelda Montemayor Director of Graduate Admissions and Enrollment Suite 121 nmontema@indiana.edu (812) 855-5132 Rick Morron Director of Contract & Research PH 011 A rmorron@indiana.edu (812) 856-6934 Robert O’Loughlin Director of Academic Degree Administration Suite 123 roloughl@indiana.edu (812) 855-8509 Justin Otten Director of Global Health Affairs Sycamore Hall jotten@indiana.edu (812) 856-3380

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Charles Rondot Director of Marketing & Communications Suite 179 crondot@indiana.edu (812) 855-1354 Susan Simmons Director of Career Services Room C003 suscrowe@indiana.edu (812) 855-5523 Jody Vaught Director of Business Affairs & Budget Suite 115 joavaugh@indiana.edu (812) 855-3319

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alumni Our alumni represent the best of the best. Thanks to them, our school has earned an enviable reputation for excellence both at home and abroad. As the school and its programs have grown to encompass a broad spectrum of academic interests and professional fields, so too, has the base of alumni and friends. Our school is known for one of the most active and influential alumni groups in the United States. The school’s graduates continue to provide a loyal support network for current programs and students. The school is dedicated to cultivating its ongoing relationships with more than 24,000 alumni living worldwide. Our network of School of Public HealthBloomington alumni spans across 50 states, includes Washington DC, Puerto Rico, Guam, and an impressive 41 countries. Our ongoing efforts are to secure private support, organize alumni programming,

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and communicate with alumni, donors, and friends through special events, newsletters, and Public Health Dimensions Magazine. Many alumni and friends give back by financially supporting the school, attending events, assisting with alumni engagement activities, or connecting with current students who are seeking mentors or assistance with finding internships or employment. Such involvement by alumni and friends help ensure the school’s continued growth and success.

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alumni board PRESIDENT Julie Warren, BS’05 julie@visitbloomington.com

PRESIDENT ELECT William Knox, BS’00 wknox@hamiltoncountysports.com

PAST PRESIDENT Timber Tucker, MS’06 tim.tucker@expresspros.com

TREASURER Alyssa Dunn, BS ‘10 ahinnefeld@gmail.com

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVE Terese McAninch, BS ‘03, MS ‘05 tmcaninc@butler.edu

LIFE MEMBERS Mildred Ball, BS ‘60 mmbal4840@comcast.net David Gallahue, BS ‘64 gallahue@indiana.edu Hugh Jessop, HSD ’85 jessoph@indiana.edu

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Tony Mobley, MS ‘62, ReD ‘65 mobley@indiana.edu

EX-OFFICIO Natalie Kubat, BAJ ’98 nkubat@indiana.edu Mohammad Torabi, MPH ‘84 torabi@indiana.edu

BOARD MEMBERS Courtney Anderson, BS ‘12 courtney.anderson@pepsico.com Kathleen Cordes, BS’72 kcordes@roadrunner.com Anne Cornett, BS’09, MS’11 anmcorne@umail.iu.edu Patricia Crouch, MS’04 pcrouch@indiana.edu Aliana Cutler, BS ‘11 alainacutler@gmail.com Ashley Fluger, BS’08 ashleyfluger@gmail.com Teal Strabbing, BS’10 tealbetz@gmail.com

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Cameron Troxell, BS’07, MS’09 ctroxell@spd.in.gov Monica Wight, BS’99 monicawight@gmail.com Kelli Zimmerman, BS’09, MPH’12 k.d.zimmerman3@gmail.com

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school support As state funding declines, the School of Public Health-Bloomington looks to other resources to provide funding for critical needs. Renewed interest in the school and its vital mission has led to a dramatic increase in the success of our fundraising efforts over the last two years. The School of Public HealthBloomington is fortunate and grateful for the many and widespread supporters of its programs and efforts.

$423,615

$1,334,415 $1,825,193

$2,305,701

$1,495,000

$2,500,000 $2,000,000 $1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 0

FY 12

FY 13

FY 14

FY 15

FY16

TOTAL ANNUAL PRIVATE GIVING

Gifts to the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington support critical public health research, teaching, and community engagement. Thank you for your support!

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Produced by the Indiana University School of Public Health–Bloomington Office of Marketing and Communications.

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INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH–BLOOMINGTON

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The Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington is reimagining public health with a bold approach that enhances and expands disease prevention. Unique in the nation, our multidisciplinary programs, history of engagement, and emerging strengths bring new energy to the traditional concept of a school of public health. With nearly 3,000 undergraduate and graduate students and more than 140 faculty

publichealth.indiana.edu | 812.855.1561 | iusph@indiana.edu

Facts at a Glance 2016-2017  
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