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VOL 7 ISSUE 2 OCTOBER 2017


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Internet of Things (IOT): Smarter Living in the Caribbean Making Digital Financial Inclusion a Reality in the Caribbean Promoting Diversity in ICTs Key Highlights of the ‘Annual Market Report 2016’


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Renewable Energy: Powering Future Telecommunications and Broadcasting Service A Targeted Approach to Public Education Harassment – A Criminal Offence ‘A Lovely Day for Broadcasting’ TATT’s Broadcasting Forum 2017

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A PUBLICATION OF THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS AUTHORITY OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

Seated from left: Mr. Selby Wilson, CTU; Dr. John Prince, CEO of TATT; The Honourable Catherine Hughes, Minister of Public Telecommunications, Guyana; Mr. Gilbert Peterson S.C. TATT; The Honourable Maxie Cuffie, Minister of Public Administration & Communications, The Honourable Melford Nicholas, Minister of Information, Broadcasting, Telecommunications & Information Technology, Antigua; and Ms. Bernadette Lewis, CTU

Smarter Living in the Caribbean “Think about the possibility of your alarm clock waking you up at 6:00 am, then almost simultaneously notifying the coffee maker to start brewing the morning coffee, turning on the water heater, and waking up the children as well, as you prepare to leave the house in your driverless car.” This scenario was painted by the Honourable Maxie Cuffie, Minister of Public Administration and Communications at an event titled “Internet of Things (IoT) Forum: Smarter Living in the Caribbean.” The event focused on standardisation requirements for IoT technologies and applications in smart cities and communities amongst others.

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IoT refers to the integration of networks, devices and data and involves smart machines interacting and communicating with other machines, objects, environments and infrastructure – transforming the way humans now live and contributing to improving the quality of life. Security Concerns Noting the opportunities to be derived from using ICTs, the Minister highlighted possible challenges including that of security. The guarantee of information remaining secure, said Minister Cuffie, “becomes


questionable, when billions of devices are being connected together, and this is not only about your toaster or coffee maker going rogue”. Noting that companies all over the world are subject to security threats, he said, “think of the possible implications of national security data or financial data being hacked into, because of the possibilities opened up by IoT.” Privacy This is a very relevant consideration as IoT has transformed cyberspace and thus a number of security-related issues will have to be considered, including protection of data and consumer privacy. Consideration also needs to be given to the fact that data is no longer mere “data”; it is in fact the accumulation of information on consumers’ private lives, thus escalating the need for IoT Standardisation and regulatory intervention to deal with the issue of data privacy. Once privacy requirements were acknowledged and considered, the meeting delved into the unprecedented potential and dynamics of IoT and its challenges. Specifically, discussions centred around a number of key areas including, ecosystem for IoT use and monetisation; measuring IoT usage and projecting IoT impact on development and benchmarking Caribbean IoT usage and impact. Expanding Use of IoTs For a few years, IoT has been in use in a number of new technologies such as driverless cars, bio-fitness wearable devices, drones, smart metres and home automation systems. IoT at the same time allows for the networking and internetworking of wellknown devices utilised in areas such as farming, agriculture, health, sport and finance, creating unique technological webs that support various life activities and experiences in the current era. This accounts for quite a number of devices.

Mr. Gilbert Peterson, Chairman of the Board, TATT, delivering remarks at the “Internet of Things (IOT) Forum: Smarter Living in the Caribbean”

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A PUBLICATION OF THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS AUTHORITY OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

The Honourable Maxie Cuffie, Minister of Public Administration and Communications delivering remarks at the “Internet of Things (IoT) Smarter Living in the Caribbean” Forum

Mr. Reginald Bourne, Chief Telecoms Officer, of Barbados noted that research has shown that by 2020, there will be over 20.8 billion devices that will characterise IoT and over 30 billion by 2030. Another presenter, Mr. Laz Molson, of 2operate, added that by 2020 IoT will be responsible for the generation of US$1 trillion with a growth rate of 25-30%. In his presentation, Molson illustrated how IoT and its applications in urban and nonurban environments can generate lucrative revenue streams for both private and public sector interest groups. Improving traffic control and management as well as environmental challenges within the context of disaster management were also among the discussions. Mr. Jeevan Persad, Founder/Product Designer at FaSoVe in Trinidad, explored the possibility of using IoT in flood and rain level monitoring systems as a way of empowering “individuals and communities threatened by hazards to act in sufficient time and in an appropriate manner to reduce the possibility of personal injury, loss of life and damage to property or the environment.” TATT Enabling IoT In his presentation, Mr. Kirk Sookram, Executive Officer, Technology and Engineering at Telecommunications Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (TATT) revealed this organisation’s focus

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on planning for spectrum allocation to protect future investments. He highlighted that spectrum is not something the average consumer associates with IoT applications and devices, but as a finite resource, its management is “critical”. The event was hosted by TATT, in partnership with the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), the Caribbean Telecommunications Union (CTU) and The University of the West Indies (The UWI).


Making Digital Financial Inclusion a Reality in the Caribbean ‘Digital Financial Services use ICTs and non-bank retail channels to extend the delivery of financial services to the unbanked.’

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igital financial services (DFS) is expanding the delivery of basic financial services to the unbanked population globally, through innovative technologies like mobile-phone-enabled solutions, electronic money models and digital payment platforms. DFS is instrumental in opening doors to those persons referred to as the “unbanked population” (they don’t have a bank account) in some countries, allowing them to move away from a cash-only existence, to access services such as payments, transfer of cash, loans, savings, insurance and securities. What exactly is DFS? DFS use ICTs and non-bank retail channels to extend the delivery of financial services to the unbanked. There is no need for a bank account or for the use of cash. Instead, you use your mobile handset and other digital means for transactions. DFS is all about financial inclusion. Through its network of agents, it allows unbanked individuals to trade electronically even at vegetable stalls in the market and among a range of other things, offers uncomplicated methods for young professionals living and working in cities of developing or underdeveloped nations, to provide finances to less fortunate relatives residing in rural areas. DFS reduces risks that normally occur with cash-based transactions, such as theft and fraud, and provides a convenient and affordable way to do business.

In the Caribbean, whilst most persons have easy access to the services of banks and other financial institutions, there remains substantial numbers of persons without access to bank accounts. This is particularly so in countries such as Haiti where mobile money became the main method of payment after the earthquake of 2010. In Jamaica, mobile payments are becoming more important and licences have been granted by the government to commence services. In Trinidad and Tobago, it is estimated that 20% of the population remains unbanked. DFS offers the option of digital financial inclusion to fill this gap. International Telecommunications Union (ITU) Area Representative, Mr. Cleveland Thomas speaking at the opening of a DFS Workshop, “Exploring Innovation in Transactions and Financing in the Caribbean,” hosted in Trinidad and Tobago highlighted some of the issues challenging the adoption of DFS. Mr. Thomas noted that while there has been some DFS development in the region in more recent years, wider deployment is stymied by challenges such as the lack

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A PUBLICATION OF THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS AUTHORITY OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

From left: Mr. Peter Nicholls, ECLAC; Mr. Shiva Pinaka, Pinaka Technology Solutions; The Honourable Darcy Boyce, Minister of Energy, Immigration, Telecommunications and Invest Barbados; Mr. Cleveland Thomas, ITU; The Honourable Melford Nicholas, Minister of Information, Broadcasting, Telecommunications & Information Technology, Antigua; and Mr. Sylvester Cadette, ITU

of clear policies; limited or no regulations, relevant security and fraud prevention methods; limited cooperation among financial and international institutions and law enforcement. Speaking in favour of providing avenues for increased access to financial facilities through DFS, Mr. Thomas pointed out that DFS providers, both banks and nonbanks “can offer financial services profitably in areas where bank branches and automated teller machines (ATMs) are not available to consumers who have historically been unprofitable to serve.” He alluded to the lower costs — as much as 90% — compared with similar transactions conducted in physical branches of financial service providers. Strong Regulatory Environment In her opening remarks, Dr. Kim Mallalieu, Deputy Chairman of the Board of TATT, pointed to the inextricable link between the success of digital finance and a number of enabling factors, including but not limited to a healthy, vibrant telecommunications sector

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with considerable investment in infrastructure, as well as with high penetration rates and affordable access. DFS is facilitated by reliable telecommunications infrastructure and a facilitative regulatory environment, she added. The reliability of Trinidad and Tobago’s telecommunications infrastructure was highlighted by Dr. Mallalieu citing growth from TT$3.3 billion in revenues in 2006 to an estimated TT$5.51 billion in 2016, the latter 3.8% of GDP. She said, “During this period, mobile and Internet services experienced double-digit growth. Mobile voice subscriptions rose from 1.5 million subscribers in 2006 to 2.2 million in 2016. The demand for fixed Internet services increased from 82,000 in 2006 to an estimated 255,000 in 2016. Of particular note is the increase in mobile Internet subscribers from 10,000 in 2007 to 707,000 in 2016. With approximately 63% of mobile voice subscriptions using mobile Internet, digital financial services could potentially meet a considerable market, immediately on introduction.”


Dr. Kim Mallalieu also highlighted progress made between ICT and finance within the region where a Memorandum of Understanding was signed

She also highlighted progress made between ICT and finance within the region where a Memorandum of Understanding was signed between Mr. Oliver Gale, President and CFO of the Barbados based e-payment firm, Bitt Inc, and Mr. Selby Wilson of the CTU at the 15th Ministerial Strategic ICT Seminar in Antigua to establish a framework for collaboration and cooperation. Keynote speaker, Senator the Honourable Darcy Boyce, Minister with responsibility for Telecommunications, Energy, Immigration and Investment, Barbados examined the benefits of DFS. Senator Boyce noted, “Firstly, there is the benefit of having access to formal financial services such as payments, transfers, savings credit, insurance and securities. Migration to account-based services typical expands over time as customers gain familiarity with, and trust in the Digital Transactional Platform. Government-to-person payments, such as conditional cash transfers, that can enable digital stored-value accounts, may provide a path for the financially excluded into the financial system.” Mr. Boyce noted, “The costs that Digital Transactional Platforms present to the provider and consequently to the customer are typically lower: these allow the customers to transact locally in irregular, tiny amounts thereby helping them to manage their characteristically uneven income and expenses.” He added, “additional financial services tailored to customers’ needs and financial circumstances are

made possible by the payment, transfer and value storage services embedded in the Digital Transactional Platform itself, and the data generated within it.” He traced the growth of the enabling factors, which allowed for the development of Digital Financial Systems along with the benefits, challenges and concerns inherent to the Caribbean Financial Sector. Some of these challenges and concerns mentioned were interoperability, the reliability of network and security, account functionality, consumer protection, consumer education and literacy, merchant payment acceptance and gender issues. This workshop was co-hosted by the Telecommunications Authority of Trinidad and Tobago with the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), the Economic Commission for Latin American Countries (ECLAC) and the Caribbean Telecommunications Union (CTU). The event created a platform for digital financial services stakeholders such as telecommunications regulators, financial services regulators, DFS providers, payment providers and mobile network operators within the region to share knowledge and thoughts on the implementation of DFS usage within the Caribbean region. This meeting followed discussions on this very topic one year prior. At that time, the emphasis was placed on awareness building, dialogue, collaboration and facilitation in the areas of financial technology (FinTech) and DFS. This year’s topics examined: • Caribbean challenges and the need for new payment solutions; • Getting the regulatory environment right; • Mobile Money implementations in the Caribbean Region: Consumer Protection Focus; • Digital Currency – Caribbean Landscape; • Next generation funding models for emerging market start-ups and SMEs and; • Encouraging participation in the Digital Economy.

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A PUBLICATION OF THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS AUTHORITY OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

Promoting Diversity in ICTs

Fifteen (15) female Information Technology students from secondary shools within the San Juan and Barataria communities had the opportunity to build robotic devices mechanically from LEGO bricks and then utilise programming language to activate the robots. This workshop was in celebration of Girls in ICT Day 2017. The aim of this year’s event was to educate and empower young women to pursue studies and careers in the growing Information and Communications Technology (ICT) sector. Currently, artificial intelligence (AI), robotics and coding are strong influencers within the ICT sphere.

At right: Facilitators Mr. Nervene Bhangwandass and Mr. James Khan, NIHERST; Devaki Supersad, TATT; students enrolled in secondary schools within the San Juan and Barataria communities

Two members of the Innovation Department at the National Institute of Higher Education, Research, Science and Technology (NIHERST), Mr. Nervene Bhangwandass and Mr. James Khan facilitated the workshop. Having not received training on robotics prior to this event, the girls were challenged to develop intelligent robots under the guidance of the NIHERST instructors. These robots performed movement tasks based on motion sensors, such as turning left, right, moving forward, reversing and spinning without touching nearby objects, as well as speaking on command. Building the robots reinforced for these young ladies that ICT is not a field for males only. This is just one of TATT’s many initiatives over the years to help young women see themselves working in the World of ICT and to dispel any stigma that the ICT industry is for males only.

Students from St. George’s College, Barataria

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TATT remains steadfast in its commitment to promoting gender diversity in the telecommunications and broadcasting sectors. TATT will continue to encourage women and girls to pursue ICT studies and careers to foster a more dynamic technology sector by continuing to pursuing initiatives targeted at young women. Girls in ICT Day is an initiative led by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) that aims to educate and empower girls and young women to pursue studies and careers in the growing ICT sector. Students from Barataria North Secondary School

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A PUBLICATION OF THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS AUTHORITY OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

Key Highlights of the ‘Annual Market Report 2016’

The Annual Market Report (AMR), a TATT publication, presents a comprehensive compilation of statistics on the performance of the telecommunications and broadcasting sectors in Trinidad and Tobago. This includes data on the uptake of telecommunications and broadcasting services, gross revenues generated by the sectors, and consumption patterns related to the number of calls and minutes as well as the level of concentration in the relevant markets. The latest edition shows the telecommunications and broadcasting sectors performed relatively well in 2016 with total revenue experiencing a minor decline. Total revenue generated was approximately TT$5.6 billion in 2016, which as a percentage of GDP equates to 3.8%. This represented a 0.3% decrease in total revenue generated by this industry when compared to 2015. One of the standout areas for 2016 was the growing demand for mobile Internet services, increasing by 9% to record over 700,000 subscriptions.

INTERNET MARKET (MOBILE)

707,300 SUBSCRIPTIONS

INCREASE OF 9.6% OVER 2015

52% INTERNET PENETRATION

OF POPULATION

TT$601.4m REVENUE

INCREASE OF 3.9% OVER 2015

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INTERNET MARKET (FIXED)

255,600 FIXED SUBSCRIPTIONS

DECREASE OF 9.5% OVER 2015

19% 60% TT$884.1m INTERNET PENETRATION

OF POPULATION

OF HOUSEHOLDS

REVENUE

INCREASE OF 15.1% OVER 2015

MOBILE MARKET

2.17m SUBSCRIPTIONS

PROPORTION OF SUBSCRIPTIONS

INCREASE OF 2.0% OVER 2015

20% POSTPAID SUBSCRIPTIONS

MOBILE VOICE PENETRATION

80%

POPULATION

PREPAID SUBSCRIPTIONS

TT$1,890m REVENUES

DECREASE OF 5.1% OVER 2015

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A PUBLICATION OF THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS AUTHORITY OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

INTERNATIONAL VOICE MARKET

$331.4m $216.8m $110.1m TOTAL INTERNATIONAL REVENUE

INCREASE OF 44.0% OVER 2015

INCOMING AND INTERNATIONAL VOICE REVENUES

INCREASE BY 47.1% OVER 2015

OUTGOING INTERNATIONAL VOICE REVENUES

INCREASE OF 13.2% OVER 2015

170.9m

INCOMING INTERNATIONAL CALLS DECREASE BY 30.9% OVER 2015

NUMBER OF MINUTES

202.7m

OUTGOING INTERNATIONAL MINUTES DECREASE BY 1.8% OVER 2015

FIXED VOICE MARKET

271,900

54% 20% PENETRATION

SUBSCRIPTIONS

INCREASE OF 0.8% OVER 2015

TT$723.5m REVENUES

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OF POPULATION

OF HOUSEHOLDS

DECREASE OF 3.8% OVER 2015


BROADCASTING MARKET

206,700 PAY TV SUBSCRIPTIONS

PAY TV PENETRATION

DECREASE OF 11.2% OVER 2015

15% 50% OF POPULATION

REVENUES

$167.0m FREE TO AIR RADIO

$718.4m $98.2m PAY TV

FREE TO AIR TV

DECREASE OF16.4% OVER2015

OF HOUSEHOLDS

DECREASE OF1.6% OVER2015

DECREASE OF36.4% OVER2015

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A PUBLICATION OF THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS AUTHORITY OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

Renewable Energy:

Powering Future Telecommunications and Broadcasting Service The global ICT ecosystem is growing exponentially, leaving in its wake a huge carbon footprint, by consuming large amounts of electricity generated by fossil fuel energy resources, such as oil, gas and coal. This phenomenon is being driven by the seemingly insatiable pursuit of access to information, real-time communication with friends and family, along with a wide range of entertainment opportunities. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) use will increase even further with the full onset of the Internet of Things (IOT), which will see the connection of a plethora of devices, appliances and machinery via the Internet.

ICT’s Power Consumption The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers has stated that ICT usage is accountable for 2-4% of worldwide carbon emissions and 4-10% of global power consumption, as a tremendous amount of power is consumed by ICT processes. This information was shared by Mrs. Trevonne ClarkeFerguson, Economist at the Telecommunications Authority of Trinidad and Tobago’s (TATT) 26th ICT Open Forum titled, “Renewable Energy: Powering Future Telecommunications and Broadcasting”. Such fora provide a platform for public discussion on current ICT issues. Mrs. Clarke-Ferguson highlighted that devices consume about 34% of global ICT power while telecommunications and broadcasting networks consume 29% and Data Centres 21%. Life Cycle Assessments, which is the assessment of power usage in the production of ICT devices, use 16% of global ICT power.

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Quoting McKinsey & Co. 2008, Mrs. Clarke-Ferguson told the audience, “Data centres are forecasted to surpass the airline industry in the production of CO2 emissions by 2020 due to the volume of energy consumed in that area.” Putting the spotlight on Trinidad and Tobago’s power usage scenario in relation to the country’s ICT sector, was Dr. Kim Mallalieu, Deputy Chairman of the Board of TATT, delivering opening remarks at the event. Dr. Mallalieu stated that locally the“telecommunications and broadcasting sectors are significant consumers of electrical power and by extension our natural oil and gas resources.” She stressed, “Domestically, the use of electrical power forms a key component of the operational cost of telecommunications and broadcasting services and as a result, influences both wholesale and retail services’ prices.” Statistics compiled by TATT demonstrate the extent to which ICTs, in particular, the Internet, is utilised in this country. In 2016, this country’s mobile Internet penetration rate stood at 52%, while fixed Internet penetration in households was at 60% in that same year. Dr. Mallalieu noted that the predominant power source for these sectors in Trinidad and Tobago is electricity generated using natural gas. In addition to telecommunications and broadcasting, the local energy sector is a major consumer of power along with this country’s huge manufacturing sector. Dr. Mallalieu noted it is not surprising that the United Nations Statistics Division ranks Trinidad and Tobago 4th in the global CO2 emissions per capita. She advised that in response, the Government of Trinidad and Tobago (GOTT) has pledged to the United Nations (UN) to reduce this country’s overall CO2 emissions by 15% by 2030. In his presentation titled, “Energy Efficiency in the Power Generation Sector in Trinidad and Tobago”, Dr. Thackwray Driver, President, and CEO of Energy Chamber of Trinidad and Tobago highlighted the significantly low price of electricity in Trinidad and Tobago, as opposed to other countries in the region.

Dr. Driver provided comparative figures for energy consumption in the region that show Trinidad and Tobago’s rate per capita — way above that of countries like Barbados, The Bahamas and Jamaica. This is attributable to activities in the energy and manufacturing sectors, which primarily utilise natural gas. Natural gas and oil are finite, non-renewable energy sources, thus, taking into consideration the anticipated growing ICT usage in the future, Trinidad and Tobago’s depleting natural resource reserves are certain to be significantly impacted. The Conundrum and Solutions Trinidad and Tobago is therefore faced with an interesting, but solvable conundrum. The solution - pursue the utilisation of renewable energy resources such as solar, wind and sea. Ms. Anita M. Hankey, Senior Planning Officer, Team Lead, Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency, Energy Research and Planning Division, Ministry of Energy and Energy Industries (MEEI) shared some of the initiatives from the GOTT’s Sustainable Energy agenda: 1.

Waste to Energy (WtE) Facility at the Beetham Estate Landfill 2. Wind Resource Assessment Programme (WRAP) 3. Renewable Energy (RE) and Energy Efficiency (EE) in Secondary Schools & Community Centres Project 4. LED Lighting in Recreational Grounds Ms. Hankey outlined some of the country’s RE and EE roadmap for 2021-2030 which includes achieving targets of: I. Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions reduction of 15% by 2030 as outlined in T&T’s Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC) II. Renewable energy power generation of 10% by 2021 as outlined in the 2015-2016 National Budget. Additionally, Ms Hankey pointed out that the GOTT has offered a number of energy-saving incentives such as: a) Removal of the existing 20% customs duty

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A PUBLICATION OF THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS AUTHORITY OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

payable on Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs): 2016-2018 b) Exemption of certain goods from import duties and VAT (with conditions) such as: i. Solar water heaters when imported from a CARICOM source. ii. Solar photovoltaic (PV) cells whether or not assembled into modules or panels. Solar PV cells convert sunlight into electricity. iii. Wind Turbines and related equipment. Ms. Hankey informed that Trinidad and Tobago is a signatory to the December 2015 Paris Agreement. Among the key elements of that agreement aimed at reducing emissions are “a long-term goal of keeping the increase in global average temperature to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels” and “to aim to limit the increase to 1.5°C, since this would significantly reduce risks and the impact of climate change.” In the area of product and technical standards, Ms. Hankey explained that the Trinidad and Tobago Bureau of Standards (TTBS), the MEEI and other stakeholders, have already developed several product and technical standards related to RE technologies. These include standards for solar water heaters and PV modules. Currently, she added, the MEEI is part of a Technical Working Group to assist and advise the TTBS in the development of a Regional Energy Efficiency Building Code (REEBC). The aim is to help Trinidad and Tobago achieve energy efficiency in the design and construction phase, thus reducing the energy consumption in commercial and residential buildings. This initiative will translate to natural gas savings in power production.

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Mr. Andre Escalante Managing Director, Energy Dynamics Limited, in his presentation, showed the audience some RE technologies and provided an idea of the kinds of RE technologies being used in some Caribbean countries including wind, solar, hydro and biomass. Like the other presenters, Escalante threw out a number of RE options for consideration including bagasse, hydro, wind and waste to energy. Escalante also spoke about utility-scale solar facilities. These facilities generate solar power and feed it into a grid supplying a utility with energy. One member of the audience contributing to the discussion, suggested because Trinidad and Tobago is an island there should be efforts to explore energy generated by sea water, called “wave power”. Wave power is the transport of energy by wind waves. The energy captured in this manner can be used to generate electricity. Presentations and discussions at the forum made the following very clear: 1.

In Trinidad and Tobago, there is currently almost total reliance on non-renewable resources to power ICT use. 2. A significant increase in the use of ICTs is on the horizon for this country and indeed, so too, the world. 3. Renewable energy options have to be pursued with speed throughout all sectors of our twinisland economy. Mrs. Clarke-Ferguson informed the audience that TATT will carefully consider all the renewable energy information generated at the forum to guide its development of policies with regard to reducing the carbon footprint of the Telecommunications and Broadcasting sectors.


A Targeted Approach to Public Education TATT offers targeted consumer education sessions to communities, schools and other social interest groups. All sessions are free and can be requested via letter, email or our website. During our financial year October 2016 to September 2017, TATT conducted 22 sessions throughout the country in Brazil, Cedros, Guayaguayare, Laventille, Matelot, Roxborough and Speyside, as well as many secondary schools. These sessions educate stakeholders about our operations and the many benefits to them. TATT also educates the public on current trending topics within the sector such as cyber safety, careers in ICTs and number portability. Sessions are interactive, providing both information to TATT and responding to the concerns of consumers.

Devaki Supersad, TATT, at Roxborough Secondary School, Tobago

High amongst these concerns are the safe use of ICTs, particularly among children. Additionally, it is a forum for receiving consumer complaints about service quality. Interested in a session? Drop us a line at info@tatt.org.tt Call our toll-free Hotline 800-TATT or 800-8288 Visit our website www.tatt.org.tt for more information.

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A PUBLICATION OF THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS AUTHORITY OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

Harassment – A Criminal Offence If you have received a threatening/harassing telephone call or text message you should: 1) Record the date, time and telephone number (if visible) of the phone call. Text messages should be kept and saved. For safekeeping, you may consider forwarding the message to a trusted person. 2) Visit the police station nearest to you and report the matter. Harassment is a crime! According to Section 30A (1) (a) of Chap. 11:08 of the Offences Against the Person Act, harassment of a person includes “alarming the person or causing the person distress by engaging in a course of conduct such as ... making contact with the person, whether by gesture, directly, verbally by telephone, computer post or in any other way” … on at least two occasions. Was your mobile phone lost or stolen? If lost: Immediately contact your mobile service provider and request suspension of your service. If stolen: 1. Immediately contact your mobile service provider and request suspension of your service. 2. Make a report to the nearest police station. If you are a postpaid customer, you are responsible for all charges incurred before your service is suspended. If you are a prepaid customer, you will lose any credit used before your service is suspended. Smartphone customers may have options for tracking, locking and wiping devices remotely. These options can assist the service provider and the police with their investigations into retrieving the device. For further information, contact your mobile service provider.

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‘A Lovely Day for Broadcasting’

TATT’S BROADCASTERS’ FORUM (TBF) 2017

“It is the start of a conversation on our freedom of expression on the airways — a right that must be jealously guarded — the exercise of which, however, should not encroach upon the fundamental rights of others.” Mr. Kirk Sookram, Executive Officer Technology and Engineering addressing the opening of TATT’s first Annual Broadcasters’ Forum (TBF) on September 9, 2017. Mr. Sookram advised that the workshop was organised by TATT in collaboration with the Trinidad and Tobago Publishers Broadcasters Association (TTPBA) in response to a request from broadcasters and talk show hosts for TATT to facilitate an annual activity to improve the quality of broadcasting.

to get beyond the news and to get a sampling of people’s opinions about the things that are happening and how they are affecting their lives. Mr. Rogers looked at the types of talk shows based on time of day, ways of delivering content and the use of language. He urged talk show hosts to speak the Queen’s English; which according to him, is the only English he knows. Noting that there was a place for colloquial speech, idiomatic expressions and dialect, he stressed that even these followed the same rules of grammar etc.

He said TATT remains committed to contributing to the evolutionary process of talk shows — a powerful tool that can serve as a conduit to safeguarding, enriching and strengthening the national, cultural and economic well-being of our society.

Batting in second wicket, Attorney-at-Law Mrs. Michelle Solomon-Baksh, engaged participants in a lively discussion on the law and ethics in the media, including the Trinidad and Tobago constitution in relation to the freedom of speech. She also examined the laws relative to defamation of character – libel, slander and sedition — using case law to guide her discussions.

Opening batsman at the workshop was Mr. Julien Rogers whose presentation, “Talk Show Showdown” spoke to the fundamentals of the talk show. To Mr. Rogers, the talk show presents an opportunity

Mr. Wesley Gibbings and Mr. Rogers took to the field together to engage participants in how best the media can ensure the protection of children in the media. That panel discussion examined a selection

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A PUBLICATION OF THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS AUTHORITY OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

of themes e.g. violence, sex and nudity; appropriate time scheduling; and the participation of children in programmes. Once again, case studies were used to provide lively and graphic, hands-on discussion. Not willing to sit on the bench, US investigative journalist and editor, Mr. Adam L. Penenberg eagerly joined the batting via video conferencing to discuss fact checking and accuracy in media – both the need for ensuring the reliability of sources and the benefits and perils of using social media as an information source. Closing batsman, Ms. Kiran Maharaj, representing the TTPBA, engaged in some spirited batting on “Broadcasting in the Digital Age”. Capturing some winning runs, Ms. Maharaj examined the increased impact of threats and opportunities to the broadcaster due to the information age.

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This intense, exciting, and informative one-day workshop allowed participants the opportunity to engage with local and international industry leaders to enhance effectiveness whilst putting consumers first. Talk show hosts, their producers, programme directors and other electronic media personalities examined ways to improve the quality of broadcasting in Trinidad and Tobago. For TATT, it was a winning match on all sides; the sharing of knowledge from professionals in the broadcast industry and academia on these burgeoning topics and the positive reception from the broadcast players as the organisation continues its efforts towards its positive development of the broadcasting sector. If you would like to receive notifications about subsequent TBF sessions or any other TATT-related events and consumer education information, you can ask to be placed on our mailing list. Just drop us a line at info@tatt.org.tt.


Profile for iuGO Digital

Tatt bytes vol7 issue2 oct2017  

Internet of Things: Smart Living in the Caribbean

Tatt bytes vol7 issue2 oct2017  

Internet of Things: Smart Living in the Caribbean