Issuu on Google+

Recruiting and Serving Promising Students

office of enrollment management

|

2011 a n n u a l r e p o r t


“Our record enrollment figures across the university and at most of our campuses are just the latest evidence that more and more families are finding value in an Indiana University education.� President Michael A. McRobbie, August 2011


S

tudents who persist and graduate from IU … that is our vision for the Office of Enrollment Management (OEM) and the areas that comprise OEM at Indiana University Bloomington (IUB). In this Annual Report you will find the stories, reports, and data that highlight the outstanding work performed for our students by my colleagues in the Office of Enrollment Management. This work and the outcomes are not achieved in isolation and are the product of combined work within OEM and through partnerships with students, faculty, and staff across the campus. The following are just a few noteworthy highlights. •

The students entering IUB in the fall 2011 are members of one of the most academically promising classes in IU history with an SAT average of 1201 and a median GPA of 3.69. This class also represents the brightest group of resident students to ever enroll at IUB with an SAT average of 1186 and a median GPA of 3.73. We are working to keep IU affordable, and in a recent survey, 78% of admitted students considered IU to be a significant financial value. Additionally, merit financial aid/scholarships do not just award merit at IUB. Forty percent of the students who received merit aid also had financial need. OEM provided a report to the Educational Policies Committee (EPC) and to the Bloomington Faculty Council (BFC) which confirmed that students enrolling at IUB for fall 2011 were overwhelmingly meeting the admissions standards as set forth by the BFC in 2006. OEM staff participated in data collection and benchmarking for the IUB benchmarking project for Student Services while collaborating on the shared services initiative along with determining the best approach for a one-stop student services area for efficient and effective student services. In collaboration with the University’s emphasis to strengthen our global reach, we worked to transition the IUB Office of International Admissions to the Office of International Services to meet strategic international goals. Two significant staff members in OEM retired this year — Susan Pugh, Associate Vice Provost

This Annual Report is divided into two areas, Recruiting and Serving students.

Recruiting In the Recruitment section of the report, we look closely at the work that went into enrolling our exceptional incoming class. OEM staff members teamed with a variety of campus and external partners to make the connections that ultimately convinced these promising students to choose IU Bloomington over other schools.

Introduction

Recruiting and serving promising students ...

and Director of Financial Aid, and Roland Cote, Associate Vice Provost and Registrar. Key staff members are serving as interim directors in these offices. OEM staff collaborated with campus and university-wide partners to design and release the FLAG — Early Alert System (EAS) to track students’ class attendance, participation, performance, and to verify enrollment — all to enhance IU’s ability to provide appropriate interventions to help students persist. Additionally, through campus partnerships, OEM staff provided IUB students with campus engagement opportunities in the areas of leadership, career development, arts and culture, outdoor adventure, and service/sustainability, along with providing the appropriate transitional experience to college.

Serving In the Service section, the report details the varied efforts of OEM staff to strengthen our service to students, faculty, and staff, all developed to enhance student persistence and graduation from IUB. I’m immensely proud of what the OEM team of dedicated professionals has accomplished, and I thank those campus partners who worked with us this year. I also thank you for taking the time with me to look back and appreciate their efforts. Additionally, I’m proud of their willingness to embrace the continuing challenge of maintaining and promoting the university’s well-earned reputation for excellence. We will do all that we can to honor the commitment we all share to IU’s continued excellence. Sincerely,

David B. Johnson, Vice Provost, Office of Enrollment Management

1


Incoming Class Profile 2

Incoming class exceeds an ever-increasing standard

T

his year’s incoming class at IU Bloomington is singularly impressive — and not only because of its near-record numbers. True, at 7,424 students, this year’s total is the highest since 2008’s largest-ever incoming class of 7,564. But as Provost and Executive Vice President Karen Hanson points out, mere figures can’t capture the academic excellence and impressive diversity of this year’s first-year students.

“I am delighted to welcome another outstanding group of students to the Bloomington campus,” Hanson said. “Members of the Class of 2015 come from many different backgrounds and bring with them a remarkable range of talents, experiences and interests.” President Michael A. McRobbie echoed the sentiment. “Our record enrollment figures across the university and at most of our campuses are just the latest evidence that more and more families are finding value in an Indiana University education,’’ McRobbie said. “In addition to setting new marks for enrollment, we are welcoming one of the strongest freshmen classes in the university’s history, which includes a greater share of Indiana’s top high school graduates than ever before.” This impressive group of new students also reflects the hard work of staff members in OEM, who made it their mission to seek out, recruit, enroll, serve and support these latest members of the IU family. A few facts should serve to put OEM’s achievement in perspective — and begin to paint a picture of a truly remarkable class. •

The average SAT score for all firstyear students is 1201, the secondhighest ever and just two points shy of the record set in 2009. (These figures include scores for students who took the ACT exam, converted to the equivalent SAT score.)

Their average high school gradepoint average is 3.69 on a 4-point scale.

The number of high-school valedictorians rose to 157, the highest total ever.

The incoming class includes 84 Provost Karen Hanson, IU Senior Coronna Lewis, and Vice Provost for National Merit Scholars, our largest Enrollment Management David Johnson at the graduation celebration for total ever. These students — who the first class of 21st Century Scholarship Covenant recipients. come from Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, Texas, Kentucky, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York and Tennessee — have an average GPA of 3.97 and an average SAT score of 1490.

12.8 percent of this year’s class are members of U.S. minority groups (African American, Asian American, Hispanic or Native American). When we include the 3.0 percent of students who reported two or more races, tthe share for U.S. minority is 15.8 percent — a total of 1,175 members of the incoming class.


A record 10.2 percent of the members of this first-year class are international students; that’s 754 new students from around the globe.

Applications to IU Bloomington 40,000 40,000

36,719*

37,500 37,500

The average SAT score for Indiana residents in the incoming class is 1186, up five points from last year and the highest ever for in-state students.

35,000 35,000

The average high school grade-point average for in-state students is 3.73.

22,500 22,500

35,219 33,011 31,177

32,500 32,500

29,059

30,000 30,000 27,500 27,500

24,169

25,000 25,000

21,132

21,974

20,000 20,000 17,500 17,500

40.7 percent of new in-state students were in the top 10 percent of their high-school class, the second straight year the figure has topped 40 percent. The share of Indiana students who completed the state’s academic honors diploma was 86.7 percent, making this the fourth straight year that this percentage has increased.

15,000 15,000

2004

2005

2006

2007

For example, five years ago, the campus provided $1.2 million for the 21st Century Scholars Covenant program and $1.16 million for the Pell Promise program. This year’s expenditures are projected to be $8.7 million for 21st Century Scholars Covenant and $1.8 million for Pell Promise for all cohorts. This represents a 345 percent increase in funding for the programs, which combine with state and federal funds to meet low-income students’ full cost of attending IU.

2010

2011

Applications Undergraduate Beginners 7,800 7,564 7,564

7,253 7,253 7,200

7,198 7,198

7,020 7,020

6,949 6,949

7,000

7,424 7,424

7,327 7,327

7,400

6,800

6,600

6,400

6,352 6,352

6,200

6,000

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Beginner & Total Enrollment Total Undergraduate and Campus Enrollment (Campus includes Undergraduate, Graduate, Professional and NonDegree) Undergraduate

Total Campus

45,000 42,347

42,464

42,731

40,354 40,000

In sum, this year’s group of beginning students is truly a class of distinction — recruited and served by a distinctive group of enrollment-management professionals.

2009

 

7,600

These numbers, impressive as they are, only tell part of the story. The story becomes clearer when one considers how much IU Bloomington did to ease the financial burdens of families during these difficult economic times. Even while enrolling one of the most academically talented and diverse classes of in-state students in the University’s history, we are also provided a record amount of needbased aid.

2008

*For*For FallFall 2010, the increase in applications was the of ‘College Go Week’ wherewhere Indiana students could apply Indiana collegescolleges 2010, the increase in applications wasresult the result of "College Go Week' Indiana students couldtoapply to Indiana of charge. freefree of charge.

37,821

37,958

38,247

38,990

35,000

30,000

25,000

20,000

15,000

10,000

5,000

-

29,062

29,120

29,258

29,734

31,087

32,000

31,892

32,041

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

3


4,500

4,233

4,145 4,000

Undergraduate Beginners 4,000

65.3%

3,500

65.3%

3,500

58.8%

60.6%

65.7%

58.8%

60.6%

65.7%

Share in Top 10% and Top 25% of High School Class 3,000

3,000

2,860

Top 10%2,500 Top 25% 80.0%

63.7%

63.7%

2,885

2,818 2,661

2,661

56.8% 56.8% 56.0% 56.0%

Undergraduate Beginners by Residency

Resident

Nonresident

Resident Nonresident

5,000

4,567 4,567 4,500

2,000 61.3% 61.3% 1,500

2,599 2,818

2,599

74.2% 74.2% 73.8% 73.8% 71.8% 71.8%

2,207

2,000

62.0% Share

2,885

2,382

68.8% 68.8% 67.6% 67.6%

62.0% Share

63.0%

63.0%

2,207 2,382

2,500

70.0%

60.0%

2,965

2,860 2,965

61.9%

61.9%

1,500

4,145 4,145

4,679 4,679 4,393 4,393

1,000

65.3% 65.3%

3,500

65.7% 65.7%

60.6%

60.6%

58.8%

61.9%

2,860

2,965

2,965

2,885

500 3,000

500 40.0%

-

30.0%

22.7% 22.7%

25.1% 25.1%

27.1% 27.1%

4,421 4,421

4,606 4,606

4,000

1,000

50.0%

4,666 4,666

4,233 4,233

2004

2004

2005

2005

31.3% 31.3% 30.6% 30.6%

35.6% 2006 35.6%

2,860

58.8%

61.9%

63.7%

63.7%

2,885

2,661

2,661

2006 38.1% 38.1% 2007

2007 37.0% 37.0% 2008

2008

2009

2009

2,500 2010

2010

2011

2,207

2011 2,207

2,382

63.0% 63.0%

62.0% Share 62.0%

2,818Resident

2,818

2,599

2,599

Nonresident

2,382

2,000

1,500

20.0%

1,000 10.0%

500

0.0%

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

-

2011

2004

2005

2006

Top 10% and 25%

2007

2008

1199 1199

3.75

3.67 3.67

1201 1201

1174 1174

3.69 3.69

2010

2011

3.59 3.59

3.55

1164 1164

3.69 3.69

3.63 3.63

3.65

3.60

1180

2011

Undergraduate Beginner Median High School GPA

3.70

1220 1203 1203

2010

Residency

Undergraduate Beginner SAT Average (includes ACT Converted)

1200

2009

3.52 3.52

3.50

1160 3.45

1133 1133

1140

1120

1112 1112

3.40

1118 1118

3.38 3.38

3.39 3.39

3.35

3.30

1100 3.25

1080

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

3.20

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Student Profile US Minority Enrollment (Beginner)

Undergraduate Beginner International Students

(includes African American, Asian, Hispanic, Hawaiian/ Pacific Islander, Native American, and 2 or more races) 1,200 1,140 1,140

1,175 1,175

800

754 754

700

1,100

971 971

1,000

640 640

600

923 923

500

900 814 814

808 808

389 389

400

818 818

800 300

700

11.1%

600

500

4

232 232

704 704

11.1%

11.7%

11.7%

11.1%

11.1%

11.4%

11.4%

12.2%

12.2%

13.3%

13.3%

16.2%

16.2%

200

179 179

100

2.8% 2.8%

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

249 249

220 220

15.8%

15.8%

-

2004

217 217

2011

2004

3.3% 3.3%

2005

3.0% 3.0%

2006

Diverse and International Class

3.5% 3.5%

2007

2.9%

5.3%

2.9%

5.3%

2008

2009

9.1% 9.7%

2010

10.2% 10.2%

2011


Indiana Residents New Beginner Students Fall 2011 none from 1 to 50 from 51 to 100 from 101 to 200 more than 200

Median High School GPA for Undergraduate Beginner Residents

SAT Average (includes ACT Converted) for Resident Students – Undergraduate Beginners 1220

3.75

1200

3.73 3.73

3.69 3.69

3.7

1178 1178

1180

1181 1181

3.71 3.71

1186 1186 3.65 3.62 3.62

1160

3.59 3.59

3.6

1147 1147 1134 1134

1140

1120

3.55

3.5

1110 1110 1099 1099

1100

3.53 3.53

3.45

3.44 3.44

1087 1087 1080

3.4

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2005

Resident Beginners

2007

2008

2009

70.8% 70.8% 70.0%

60.0%

59.5% 59.5% 58.4% 58.4%

73.3% 73.3%

2011

90.0%

Top 25%

86.0% 86.0%

90.0%

80.0%

2010

Share of Indiana Resident Beginners with Academic Honors Diplomas

Share in Top 10% and 25% of High School Class Top 10%

2006

77.0% 77.0%

79.7% 79.4% 78.4% 78.4%

85.0%

82.2% 82.2%

86.7% 86.7% 86.2% 86.2%

82.3% 82.3%

80.0%

65.0% 65.0%

73.5% 73.5%

75.0%

50.0%

40.0%

30.0%

24.1% 24.1%

26.3% 26.3%

30.7% 30.7%

34.4% 34.4% 33.3% 33.3%

41.2% 41.2% 39.8% 39.8%

40.7% 40.7%

70.0%

65.0% 60.9% 60.9%

63.0% 63.0%

60.0%

20.0%

55.0%

10.0%

0.0%

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

50.0%

2004

2005

2006

2007

Incoming Resident Class Profile

2008

2009

2010

2011

5


6


Resident 62%

Domestic Nonresident 28%

International Nonresident 10%

New Beginner Students Fall 2011 none from 1 to 10 from 11 to 100 from 101 to 1,000 more than 1,000

National and Global Presence

Educating students from the United States and around the world

7


Erika Hall | Avon, IN | Senior | Political Science and English | Cox Scholar

Ashley Yu | Columbus, IN | Junior | Marketing, Management and International Business | Kelley Scholar Research

8

Wyatt Ferber | Concord, MA | Senior | Journalism | Internship at ESPN


T

his year’s exceptional incoming class was no accident. IU’s great classes never are. Such classes don’t simply happen. Rather, they are the product of a concerted, coordinated effort to meet several enrollment goals, including quality, diversity, international breadth and affordability. The ongoing work of class-building is guided by a plan that takes all of these competing and complementary goals into account and balances them in such a way that the whole — the prospective class as a unit — is truly greater than the sum of its parts. Our plan for student recruitment is constantly updated and strengthened through the use of research, data modeling and predictive analytics — vital work that is carried out by the Enrollment Planning and Research staff, using cutting-edge tools and techniques.

begin to explain how an exceptional class makes its way here to Bloomington.

Making connections When all is said and done, student recruitment rests on the idea of “ensuring the fit,” making certain that IU somehow feels right for a particular student and that the student is right for the University. OEM begins this process early on — often in a student’s early high school years — with events and outreach efforts meant to create a strong connection to IU. Those connections continue through the student’s years in Bloomington and even beyond graduation from IU. This year, those important connections were forged in a number of ways:

Recruitment

A multifaceted approach in seeking the best and the brightest

FACT

The Office of Admissions made 550 high school visits and participated in 80 College Fairs. They also processed more than 35,200 applications.

It’s a huge and complex task — one that never ends, really, as OEM always looks well beyond the upcoming year as it establishes its recruitment goals and formulates its plan to reach them. And with those goals in mind, all members of OEM staff set to work on a wide range of recruitment efforts. Some of these efforts are geared toward making connections with prospective students, often years before a final college choice is made. Some aim to identify and attract high-ability students to IU, those with impressive academic records or special talents. Other recruitment efforts focus on ensuring that affordability is a central tenet of recruitment and that traditionally underrepresented students are actively encouraged to attend IU. Still other initiatives are designed to ensure that the incoming class demonstrates the type of geographic range that marks a truly exceptional class. By sharing a few specific recruitment efforts under each of the five general areas, we hope to at least

• Admissions developed and implemented three major recruitment campaigns: the Apply Now Campaign; the Academic Campaign: Discover Your Intellectual Adventure; and the Deposit Campaign.

• Admission staff members traveled to more than 550 high schools for visits and participated in 80 college fairs around the nation.

Alumni Student Recruiters working on behalf of Admissions attended approximately 115 college fairs in 20 states and Japan.

Admissions’ Marketing and Communications team launched a number of new communication streams, including dynamic and date- or event-driven emails and postcards. This year, approximately 65 different email communications and 10 postcards were sent to several different groups, including prospective students in the sophomore, junior and senior classes of high school; applicants to IU; admitted IU students; and parents of admitted students.

9


• Marketing and Communications also redesigned the electronic newsletter aimed at high school guidance counselors, renaming it the B-Town Bulletin. • Digital outreach also played an important role in many OEM efforts aimed directly at prospective students. For instance, Interactive Communication created the IU Bloomington YouTube channel The work described in this report is the product of and used it to dozens of dedicated professionals and encompasses present several eight discrete departments at Indiana University Student Experience Bloomington. They are: videos created by members of a newly • Office of Admissions formed Student Advisory • Office of Admissions Operations Team. Also, the staff in • Office of Enrollment Planning and Research Scholarships launched • Office of First Year Experience Programs a robust social media • Office of Interactive Communication strategy incorporating • Office of the Registrar Facebook, Twitter and • Office of Scholarships QR (Quick Response) • Office of Student Financial Assistance codes in its effort to recruit students. Each of these areas plays a vital role in making the student experience special at IU, and staff members • Finally, connections in each area naturally have particular areas of were also made by expertise and experience. bringing prospective

The offices of OEM

students and their families to IU for a variety of campus visits. In total the Bloomington campus welcomed some 30,000 visitors, There’s really no effective way for any individual including those who or department in OEM to work completely attended 21st Century independently of the others. Scholars Day (500 visitors), Experience IU By working together we achieve more. Day (an event designed for Indiana high school sophomores that attracted nearly 400 visitors), Red Carpet Days, (events for admitted students and their families that drew more than 3,000 people this spring), and Discover IU Days (the daily visit option that drew nearly 21,000 visitors to campus). Still, to make sure that students remain at the center of all we do, the staff of these various offices often work in partnership and networks that ignore departmental lines and boundaries.

High-ability students Clearly, in building an exceptional incoming class, finding and recruiting high-achieving students is a priority concern. And in today’s ultra-connected, highly competitive environment, academically talented students enjoy a wealth of options when it comes to higher education. This year, as in every year, the Office of Scholarships and other OEM departments took a

10

An admitted IU student and his parents on campus for Red Carpet Day.

variety of innovative steps to bring record numbers of these high-achieving students to IU. For example: •

Scholarships and Admissions partnered for Academic Excellence Overview — a campus-visit program targeting high school juniors in Indiana and surrounding states —which drew nearly 350 high-achieving students to the IU campus from all over the Midwest.

Scholarships and Interactive Communication partnered to create and launch a Live Video Chat, a Web-enabled effort that allowed current IU student scholars to interact with prospective, high-achieving high school students.

Scholarships and Systems Design & Development joined forces to create the Brain Campaign — a multimedia recruitment campaign for highachieving high school juniors. The campaign — informed by focus groups and direct student feedback about what matters most when it comes to college choice — included print, email, an interactive website and social media.

Not surprisingly, staff members in the Office of Scholarships were the most intensely involved in the recruitment of academically gifted students. Here are just a few of the efforts they undertook this year: — Employing a robust e-communication plan, and working in partnership with nine different campus entities, Scholarships increased the


— Produced and launched the Achieve Video, a new scholar recruitment video that was posted to the Scholarships website.

estimate the net cost to attend IU Bloomington. To receive a net price estimate, a student submits details about himself/herself and his or her family similar to the data provided on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). In return, the student learns the cost of attendance, an estimated amount of grants and scholarships, and the resulting net cost.

FACT

31,078 students were packaged with financial aid last year for a packaged total of $512,934,416.

— Launched the full family of Cox Scholarship programs on the Bloomington campus by adding three new programs: Cox Engagement Scholars, Cox Exploratory Scholars and Cox Access Scholars. These, with the two existing programs (Cox Legacy Scholars and Cox Research Scholars), bring the total to five Cox Scholarships at IU Bloomington.

• The OSFA training team created a podcast specifically focused on financial aid information for new students and their parents. This six-minute podcast focuses on the aid application process, the financial aid budget, the awarding of aid, supplemental loan options, and maintaining aid eligibility.

• Financial aid personnel participated in a number of community-outreach events and programs designed to increase awareness of aid opportunities and to provide valuable information about how students and families can

Recruitment

completion rate for the Selective Scholarship Application by 23 percent. Applications for the University’s Selective Scholarships were the highest ever.

— Continued the popular Game Days program in which scholarshipeligible students are brought to campus to enjoy a football game.

Affordability We recognize that the increasing cost of higher education poses real problems for many students and their families. But we are committed to doing all Larry Gonzalez (third from left) greets a family at Game Days. we can to make sure that financial concerns don’t prevent deserving students from enrolling and take advantage of those opportunities. Those succeeding at IU. This year’s list of activities and events included: the Monroe County College programs — particularly those implemented by the Fair, the Welcome Week Finances Session, the Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) — proves that 21st Century Scholars Reception, 21st Century commitment. Scholars Day, and College Goal Sunday. •

OSFA teamed with staff members from both Admissions and Scholarships to launch the Net Price Calculator, an innovative online tool that helps prospective students and their families

Underrepresented students In OEM, our mission is to maximize the educational experience for IU’s students by helping create a

11


student body that truly reflects the nation as a whole. Our recruitment efforts for this year’s class illustrate our commitment to that mission.

• The Scholarships office partnered with DEMA [Diversity, Equity and Multicultural Affairs) and Admissions to bring the IU message to fans at the Circle City Classic high school football game. Booths were set up to provide scholarship information to interested students and families, and Indianapolis students were honored at a halftime ceremony when IU officials awarded them their scholarships.

In collaboration with the IU Alumni Association (IUAA), the staff in the Office of Admissions and the Office of Scholarships staged We Are IU events in key markets that otherwise would have been overlooked in the recruitment effort. With IU alums acting as ambassadors on our behalf, prospective students got the IU message in South Florida, Washington, D.C., and in Texas’ two largest cities, Houston and Dallas.

• Staff members in Admissions and Scholarships partnered with the Hudson and Holland Scholars Program to increase the number of Hudson and Holland Scholars on the Bloomington campus. •

OEM produced a "student success" campaign that featured various minority students in their experiences at IU.

Geographic range Ensuring that our students develop a worldwide perspective is critically important in this increasingly global society, and one of the most effective ways of fostering that perspective is to bring as much of the world here to Bloomington as possible. In OEM, we do that by making sure our classes reflect geographic diversity, with students coming from every corner of Indiana, from across the US and from 66 countries. Again, this diversity can’t simply happen. It’s the result of intensive and varied efforts on many fronts, including the following: •

12

In the spring, the Marketing and Communication team in Admissions launched the Hoosier Hub website as a means of targeting students in key geographical markets. The aim of the site was to feature students from specific geographical areas so new students could “meet” students from their home states (or other international students) and learn what makes IU feel like a “home away from home.”

Read more about Michael, other students, and how they thrive at IU: admit.indiana.edu/succeed.

Scholarships staff members also hosted special Scholar Receptions for scholarship recipients in seven key IU markets in the state and around the country. By revamping the event held in Chicago (IU’s No. 1 non-resident market), staff effectively doubled attendance at the Scholar Reception there.

Scholar Dinners were also launched this year — intimate meals involving small groups of scholarship recipients and their parents in secondary markets in the West. Scholarships staff members hosted these unique dinners in Denver and in Seattle.

OEM partnered with the IUAA and the Office of the Vice President for International Affairs (OVPIA) to host key recruitment events in South Korea and Taiwan.


D

espite what the term may imply, effective enrollment management involves far more than mere management and extends well beyond simply enrolling students. OEM believes that recruiting and enrolling the best mix of students, though critical, is just the first step. To truly fulfill our mission the students who enroll at IU must succeed, graduate, go on to outstanding career opportunities, and become engaged members of Indiana University's alumni family. The key to that process is service, giving our students the information, support, encouragement and assistance they need to reach their goals and exceed their own expectations. We work hard — in every OEM office and department, through the effort of every staff member — to make the IU experience one that is truly exceptional. Lives are changed here, and we’re proud and humbled to be agents of that change.

OEM office. By offering a few examples from each of the three broad areas, this report will show that professionalism at work.

Service

Helping our students — and colleagues — truly shine

Transition Though all OEM departments assist in the effort to smooth students’ transition to college life, the Office of First Year Experience Programs (FYE) makes this task its first priority. This year, with the help of many campus partners, FYE offered a wide range of programs and services to assist new students, including the following:

FACT

9,136 students were served by FYE during Orientation (fall and spring semesters) and Welcome Week, and 58 collaborated campus partner events helped students transition to IU.

The process starts early — well before classes even begin — with a series of special events designed to help students transition to college life and the campus environment. And once students are more acclimated to life at IU, they can also count on OEM to provide ongoing service and support aimed at ensuring their continued success. Finally, we make sure that our definition of service extends beyond our direct interaction with students to include collaboration with other campus departments and staff members. By serving our colleagues well, we actually extend our service to students.

­ A new Finances — session attended jointly by students and parents. This session, developed in partnership with OSFA and the Office of the Bursar, focused on financial aid and fee payment.

— A Health Services session presented by the IU Health Center in both the student and parent programs. — A Safety at IU session was presented by the IU Police Department, also offered in both student and parent programs. •

Again, these three broad areas of service — transition, retention, and collaboration — encompass hundreds of discrete efforts and reflect the dedication and professionalism of each OEM staff member and every

• The New Student Orientation program featured three new sessions this fall:

New Student Orientation also made news when the Hoosier Hills Food Bank honored the program with its “Hunger Action Award” for the collection and

New Student Orientation food drive.

13


Students on an IUBeginnings Adventure Trip taking part in a high rope course at Bradford Woods.

donation of more than 12,700 pounds of food during the past few years. • Social media had a real impact this year on the time-honored tradition of Welcome Week, as events were communicated through FYE Facebook and via a special IU Welcome Week hashtag on Twitter. • In the IUBeginnings program, students participated in 17 trips geared to five different areas of interest: outdoor adventure, leadership, career development, arts and culture, and service/ sustainability. Two of those trips were new this year: a sustainability-focused trip in and around Bloomington, and a career-development excursion that took students behind the scenes at various major firms in Chicago. (Campus partnerships for IUBeginnings included the IU Office of Sustainability, College of Arts & Sciences Career Development Center, IU Outdoor Adventures, Indiana University Bradford Woods, and the Office of Student Life & Learning.) •

New Student Service Day gave approximately 250 first-year students the opportunity to volunteer for a morning of service with one of 14 local Bloomington agencies, including the Boys & Girls Club, Bloomington Playwrights Project and Campus Community Garden. Twenty facilitators led groups of 12 to 25 students through a service project and guided reflective activities at day’s end to deepen the meaning of the experience.

speakers were Fred Glass, Vice President and Director of Intercollegiate Athletics, and J T. Forbes, Executive Director of the IU Alumni Association. •

This year, FYE implemented two ongoing communication streams — one for first-year students, the other for their parents — to keep both groups connected and informed. For students, the “FYEngage” newsletter is sent at the beginning of the month. Each issue includes narratives about transitional issues the student may experience that month, information on campus support services and resources, a monthly career and internship spotlight section, and a timely list of campus/community events (with links for more information). Students also receive mid-month emails designed to highlight major events scheduled for the second half of the month. For parents, the monthly “FYI by FYE” newsletter provides student-support information similar to that in “FYEngage” and also includes a quick survey to help FYE staff develop future content to aid parents and family members.

The Office of the Registrar was instrumental in the recent rollout of a new version of IU Mobile, which featured a total site redesign and rewritten mobile applications. The new version, tested extensively by Registrar staff prior to its launch, introduced Oncourse Mobile and a studentcentered calendar app.

Working with campus partners, Registrar staff also implemented a new waitlist system that helps students immensely in securing their optimal course schedule each semester.

The Office of the Registrar also participated in IU’s eTexts Initiative. This initiative, launched as a pilot in March 2011, enhances the student experience by providing electronic copies of textbooks and allowing students to participate in online dialogues with classmates about the course material.

The Office of the Registrar was also deeply involved in helping to develop the new all-campus initiative, IU FLAG-Early Alert System (EAS), which is designed specifically to facilitate the success of IU students. A vital part of EAS is the Student Performance Roster, which Registrar staff helped to design and launch in Fall 2011. The Student Performance Roster will help IU improve student retention by giving faculty a unified means of recording and assessing students’ attendance, participation and performance, making it possible to notice and address academic problems early on.

Retention Once the early-semester programs have helped put new students on firm footing, the emphasis in OEM shifts to ensuring their success for the long haul. Streamlined systems, special events and high-tech tools combine to help students smoothly navigate processes such as registration and course selection. All of these supports, many of them provided by the Office of the Registrar, simplify students’ lives and help them stay focused on the academic task at hand. This year, as in every year, student retention efforts were many and varied. Here are a few examples: •

14

FYE sponsored a First Year Experience Conference for faculty and staff, a one-day conference that allowed faculty and staff from some 50 IU departments to participate in a full range of educational sessions focusing on freshman retention and success. The keynote


Also this year, Registrar staff implemented a new digital method for providing expedited transcripts. The electronically delivered secure PDF document with a digital signature has been popular among students, in recent months accounting for as much as 21 percent of all transcript requests.

Collaboration OEM’s commitment to service doesn't end with students; it also extends to our colleagues in other departments on the IU campus. In short, we try to provide tools and talents that can help other departments do their best work. At the same time, we tap into the deep and varied expertise of many on-campus partners to make our own work more effective. It’s simple, really: We assist their efforts, they add to ours, and students reap the ultimate benefit. This year’s list of supportive or collaborative projects is long and wide-ranging. Here are just a few examples: •

This year OEM made a special effort to support student privacy and confidentiality through a FERPA outreach to faculty. Responding to a joint request from the Vice Provost for Faculty and Academic Affairs and the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, the Office of the Registrar developed a new FERPA tutorial for faculty and launched a new web presence for faculty issues. These efforts gave faculty insight on holding conversations with students’ parents, handling classroom activities with confidentiality, advising, or writing letters of recommendation. The Office of the Registrar provides information to the campus units to support their operational needs, as they develop programs, seek accreditation, secure grants, or perform retention efforts. This year, Registrar staff responded to more than 200 specific requests for information, provided training for 50 individuals across the Bloomington campus and provided ongoing consultation and support through our websites. Schedule Builder is an Office of the Registrar system that is designed to help campus departments create the course schedule each semester. Schedule Builder has been open to the entire campus for several years, but its reliability

and effectiveness have made it the sole data entry mechanism for the summer 2012 schedule of classes. •

This year, OSFA provided 10 financial aid training sessions to various departments responsible for awarding departmental scholarships.

Staff in Enrollment Planning and Research developed several studies to assess the effectiveness of various on-campus programs and practices. For instance, they conducted evaluations of the IU Pell Promise and 21st Century Covenant programs and conducted a detailed survey of admitted students to glean information about how to improve the recruitment process.

Service

• Members of the Interactive Communication staff offered their expertise to many other departments to help those offices improve their interactions with current and prospective students. This year, the list of partners included the University Division, the Dean of Students, the Office of the Bursar and the School of Education. • FYE staff joined other departments in launching two special events this year: The INCrowd and Paint the U-Gym Red. — The INCrowd — a diversity-education program conducted in collaboration with Residential Programs & Services, Community Educators and faculty in Social Justice —is a five-week seminar series on diversity, identity and inclusion designed for firstyear students. This pilot program will be implemented this spring in many freshman residence centers. — In collaboration with IU Athletics, FYE coordinated Paint the U-Gym Red for the IU women’s volleyball game with Purdue. The event was a sellout, drawing more than 500 students. Free shuttle bus service was provided from the residence halls, and a New Student Pre-Game Tailgate party featured pizza and free IU T-shirts for all. Again, this list of collaborative and supportive efforts provides just a few examples of OEM’s commitment to service. All of this work — in fact, all of our efforts in every aspect of service and in recruitment — stem from our commitment to ensure that Indiana University maintains and improves its commitment to excellence. It’s an ongoing effort, one that involves every department and every staff member in the Office of Enrollment Management, and many faculty, staff, and students in collaboration across IUB.

15


Staff Milestones 16

Name Department Years Doug Anderson Treena Bennett Ellen Bolinger Candace Brown Mike Carroll Jolene Ferguson Jennifer Galey Joyce Hays Sara Jackson Karon Jamison Al Jimenez Dot Kemp Terry Knaus Sally Knight Vernon Lintermuth Ron McFall Cynthia Neidhart Anne Palmer Russell Parker Amy Patrick Melanie Payne Liz Pruett Misty Pursley Easwaran Ramalingam Myra Riggs Robert Robbins Susan Russell Linda Shepard Tana Sorrells Stephanie Stephenson

OEM OSFA Admissions Registrar Registrar Registrar Admissions Admissions Registrar OSFA Admissions Registrar Admissions Registrar Admissions Scholarships Admissions OEM Registrar Admissions FYE Admissions OEM Registrar Registrar Registrar Registrar Registrar OEM Admissions

10 years 25 years 25 years 30 years 15 years 5 years 5 years 10 years 20 years 35 years 10 years 25 years 10 years 25 years 10 years 5 years 5 years 30 years 10 years 10 years 20 years 10 years 10 years 10 years 10 years 5 years 20 years 25 years 30 years 5 years


Recruiting and serving promising students who persist and graduate from IU.

Mission Enrollment Management works through an integrated and collaborative approach to serve our students and the academic community through Admissions, Registration, Financial Assistance, Scholarships, and through the First Year Experience while also providing the appropriate enrollment analysis and research, communications to prospective and current students, and by working to be good fiscal stewards of our resources.

Goals for 2011-2012 1. Create a “Shared Services” model to improve efficiencies and reduce costs. 2. Create a “One-Stop Service” model to improve service to students. 3. Implement electronic document imaging and document workflow to enhance processes.

Vision | Mission | Goals

Vision

4. Establish the appropriate work space for OEM offices and the “One-Stop Service” model. 5. Collaborate with campus partners, faculty and staff to provide the ongoing services of OEM while continuing to increase quality, diversity, international breadth and affordability.

17


www.indiana.edu/~oem

Photo: IUBeginnings The Office of Enrollment Management chose to publish this report online in an effort to support Indiana University’s message of sustainability.

Indiana University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity institution. Design and Production | Natasha Swingley | RSN, Ltd. December 2011


2011 OEM Annual Report