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PORTFOLIO

ISAAC KIM

University of Virginia | Bachelor of Science in Architecture (720) 210 4928 | imk2dd@virginia.edu


ABOUT EDUCATION Fall 2009 - Spring 2013

University of Virginia, School of Architecture | Charlottesville, VA Bachelor of Science in Architecture, with High Honors | GPA 3.85 (Studio GPA: 3.85) Minor in Architectural History

Summer 2012

UVA School of Architecture in Italy Summer Program | Vicenza, Italy

Summer 2011

Seoul National University, International Summer Institute | Seoul, South Korea Courses: Modern Korean Architecture and Urbanism, Korean Language

WORK Summer - Fall 2013, Summer 2011

Architecture Intern | Citi Design Consulting, Inc.| Aurora, CO Mizu Japanese Restaurant at 2930 Umatilla St., La Foret Bakery, Federal Heights Community Center, 400 Corona Street Shops, Korean Seventh-Day Adventist Church of Aurora -Digitally modeled and rendered projects using AutoCAD, Rhinoceros, and SketchUp for client presentations

Fall 2010 - Fall 2012

Assistant | UVa McIntire Department of Art, Visual Resources Collection | Charlottesville, VA -Prepared, compiled, scanned, and organized artwork and slides that were digitally uploaded to the national ARTstor online database

March 2012

Summer 2009

Freelance | Open Door Presbyterian Church | Herndon, VA New Horizon Learning Center (International Learning Center) -Developed and rendered a conceptual design for a proposed educational outreach center Office Assistant | Community College of Aurora Financial Aid Office | Aurora, CO -Assisted students in completing FAFSA applications, filing, and paperwork

LEADERSHIP Fall 2012 - Spring 2013

Undergraduate Teaching Assistant ARCH 1010: Lessons of the Lawn | Peter Waldman ARCH 1020: Lessons in Making | Sanda Iliescu -Prepared weekly lessons in design fundamentals and led weekly hour-long discussion sections for 12 students -Critiqued and graded weekly student projects

Fall 2011 - Spring 2013

Small Group Leader, Welcoming Team Leader | Grace Christian Fellowship | Charlottesville, VA -Led weekly Bible study group of 12 students and fellowship’s greeting team of 20 students


AWARDS Spring 2013

Edgar J. Shannon Award -Presented by the Z Society to the student in each school of the University of Virginia who has contributed the most to that school through academic excellence, leadership, and extracurricular involvement

Spring 2013

Duncan J. McCrea Memorial Award -An award presented annually to an undergraduate who has demonstrated academic achievement and concern for spiritual values, in memory of Duncan J. McCrea (BSArch ‘75)

Spring 2012

Kyle Francis Kauffman Honorary Scholarship -An award present annually to a rising fourth year architecture student nominated by his/her peers based on merit and who embodies all the outstanding qualities that typified Kyle Frances Kauffman (BSArch ‘85)

Fall 2011

Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012

Intermediate Honors -Awarded to the top 20% of all architecture students who have earned at least 60 credits of course work in their first four regular semesters Dean’s List of Distinguished Students -Full-time undergraduate students in the School of Architecture who demonstrate academic excellence by earning a GPA of 3.7 or higher while taking a minimum of 15 credits are eligible for the Dean’s List of Distinguished Students at the end of each semester

SKILLS Digital

Physical

Adobe Creative Suite (Photoshop, Illustrator, Indesign) Rhinoceros 3D Modeling Autodesk Maya AutoCAD Bentley MicroStation SketchUp Maxwell Render Revit

Design Research Free-hand Sketching Hand Drafting Physical Modeling Laser Cutter Common Shop Tools Language Spanish (intermediate) Korean (conversational)

REFERENCES Lester Yuen lester_yuen@gensler.com Design Director + Senior Associate at Gensler, Houston, TX | Lecturer, School of Architecture, University of Virginia Shiqiao Li lishiqiao@virginia.edu Weedon Professor of Architecture, School of Architecture, University of Virginia


CONTENTS

CHARLOTTESVILLE CLAYWORKS

ARCH 4020 | A Materials Research Institute

ESCAPE TO SUGAR HOLLOW

ARCH 4010 | The End of the World as We Know It

FREITAG WORKSHOP

ARCH 3020 | NYC: The Highline and the Skyline

1

7

15


RICHMOND MUSEUM OF IRON & STEEL

ARCH 2020 | The Analysis of Artifacts

SKETCHES

21

Vicenza Study Abroad Program

27

PHOTOGRAPHY

31

OTHER MEDIA

31


CHARLOTTESVILLE CLAYWORKS ARCH 4020: An Institute for Materials Research | Spring 2013 Instructor: Shiqiao Li

NTO

AN

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PARKING

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Location: 1st St. & Water St. Block, Charlottesville, VA

PARKING

Initial sketch of chimneys, clay pit, and studio

TRI

IDE

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1/16” = 1’

1

01. ARCH 4020 | Charlottesville Clayworks

Site Study Diagram: The program was aligned by extension and intersection of existing dining (red), performance (blue), and commercial (green) spaces surrounding the site


1. The act of shaping the earth. Following the topography, a sheltered green area is created with berms in order to accomodate a park and the famer’s market. On the other side excavations are made for the kiln and auditorium thatcan open to a gentle slope for outdoor performances and gatherings.

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2. Program is built up alongside the excavations, creating a close relationship to the earth. Multiple entrances are created, as well, from either ends of the long promenade or underneath the center in order to create multiple choices for experiencing the site.

The semester’s aim was to address three ways in which a material of our choice gains value - economically, experientially, and artistically. In addition, by merging a goods workshop, a school of craft, resident artists’ studios, and a farmer’s market into a single entity on the site of Charlottesville’s City Market, how can we treat a material in this institute that creates new value - economic, experiential, and artistic - from it? We first selected a material and built a small artifact exploring its properties. I chose clay in order to understand how and why we give value to a material as ancient and abundant as it. Its final product, ceramics, can be understood to be valuable because of the subjective, personal attachment of an artisan and layperson. If not, a clay pot would be considered nothing but fired dirt. This led to an exploration of how architecture can engender not only an economic but personal, exciting relationship to an archaic material such as clay.

3. Two large walls are built alongside the excavation in order to create drama in the process of creation and to create a threshold between the more active program adjacent to the Downtown Mall and the slower-paced park and seasonal farmer’s market.

4. A system of frames is created in order to facilitate transportation of materials and to provide ample natural daylight in otherwise cave-like spaces. These light structures contrast to the permanence of the Noborigama Kiln

5. The final layout creates a spatial dialogue between the deep foundations of the productive ceramics facility and the lightweight structures that form a space for the farmer’s market. One learns that caves as well as tents have deep connections to each other through the earth.

01. ARCH 4020 | Charlottesville Clayworks

2


Water Street

5

5 A 14 1

2

2nd Street

5 A

4

3 1. Noborigama Kiln 2. Clay Pits 3. Studio 4. Gallery 5. Artist Residences 6. Cafe 7. Farmers’ Market Stalls 8. Library 9. Media Center 10. Office 11. Classroom 12. Theater 13. Restroom 14. Entrances

13 6

7 14

First Floor Plan

14 11

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2

12 14

Second Floor Plan

4 12

14 Section A-A

3

01. ARCH 4020 | Charlottesville Clayworks

12

14


View from the park to the Claywork’s core

This project attempts to function beyond a mere pottery studio and dramatize the process of forming clay in order to renew its value. One follows the path of this under-appreciated material as it journeys out of the earth and into the kiln to become a work of art. However, the path created is not straightforward. It weaves around the central hearth of the traditional Japanese Noborigama (“stepping�) kiln, selected because the firing process is clearly evident through tongues of flame, belching, wood-fired smoke, and chimneys that create a strong presence. Artists and visitors alike thus always catching a clear, interesting glimpse of the creation whole process from beginning to end. However, in order to make this process easy and accessible to all, a conveyor system in the ceiling transports all of the material, thereby liberating the clay and making the creation process all the more evident.

Initial sketch

14 1 2

01. ARCH 4020 | Charlottesville Clayworks

4


1. Initial sketch; making ceramic-making dynamic 2. Excavating clay from deep in the earth to be formed and fired above 3. A view of the kiln, promenade, and prospects in the city

1

4. One of several entrances; from the entrance on 1st Street

2 5

01. ARCH 4020 | Charlottesville Clayworks


3

4 01. ARCH 4020 | Charlottesville Clayworks

6


ESCAPE TO SUGAR HOLLOW ARCH 4010: The End of the World as We Know It | Fall 2012 Instructor: Matthew Jull Location: Sugar Hollow Reservoir, Charlottesville, VA

This studio attempted to answer the question: What is an architectural response to uncertainty, especially in the face of the potential apocalypse? We created narratives of our own versions of the end of the world, in my case a solar storm destroying the electrical grid, and created architectural responses to them. Concept models of responses to uncertainty including: preservation, adaptation, defense, mobility, communication

7

02. ARCH 4010 | Escape to Sugar Hollow


Program

5 54 47 0

ft.

ft.

KEY LIVING

HEALING ROOM

WORKSHOP

PERFORMANCE

LIVING MACHINE

COMMUNAL

GREENHOUSE

MEDITATION

DINING

STORAGE

2. A series of plants and animals ihnabit specially constructed micro-ecosystems in the living machine cells. The cells are alternately flooded and drained to create multiple tidal cycles each day, resulting in non-potable water.

Systems

LIVING MACHINES 1. Gray and blackwater from the greenhouses and the community enter a septic tank and is pumped into the living machine.

GREENHOUSES

Residences are dug partway into the ground in order to passively maintain temperatures throughout the year.

3. The community uses the non-potable water for hygene, for irrigation of the greenhouses, etc., producing gray and blackwater Interventions are made in the stream in order to control water flow, raise fish, and create areas of rest and play.

Concept Circulation Paths

THIS OR THAT?

The exponential growth of energy demand has severely strained the national grid - demand is quickly out-pacing supply. In times of disaster, such as the recent Superstorm Sandy, communities can become crippled for weeks, even months, without electricity. Even more disconcerting is the sun will reach the peak of its solar activity cycle in 2013, creating a very real threat of a solar storm that can destroy the power grid. Therefore, a group of 100 people who grow more uncertain about their dependence on the artificial grid agree to unplug from it and plug into the natural grid. 02. ARCH 4010 | Escape to Sugar Hollow

8


SUGAR HOLLOW RESERVOIR

B SITE PLAN

A

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8

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11 1

6

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B 2

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2 1. Living Machine 2. Greenhouse 3. Cultivated Land 4. Dining Hall 5. Healing Rooms 6. Meditation Space (below grade) 7. Amphitheater 8. Workshop 9. Communal Space 10. Living Spaces (below grade) 11. Living Spaces

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02. ARCH 4010 | Escape to Sugar Hollow

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3 A

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They hope to retreat to Sugar Hollow Reservoir and remind themselves of what it means to live off the land, albeit comfortably. A series of self-enclosed systems, such as the Living Machine, will address the practical aspects of everyday living by naturally recycling wastewater to provide clean, non-potable water. Greenhouses and cultivated land provide will provide food. However, this settlement also creates a rich sense of place by containing a range of living experiences to cater to the diverse residents. One extreme is that people can choose to live further upslope in the forest, experiencing the change of light and the seasons as the trees bloom and shed their leaves. The other extreme is for people to live downslope underwater and experience the shifting colors of light as the water freezes and thaws through the year. Interspersed among these residences are also a variety of public spaces such as a healing center, an amphitheater, and lounges to provide points of gathering. The ultimate goal is for these residents not to depend on the cycle of charging their smartphones but instead tune themselves to the rhythms of the landscape they now inhabit.

The private refuge of a room tuning into an ever-changing seasonal landscape 10

02. ARCH 4010 | Escape to Sugar Hollow 10


Section A-A

Re-connection; Experiencing the depth of the earth and the height of the sky within a corridor

11 02. ARCH 4010 | Escape to Sugar Hollow


Section B-B

Viewing a lakeside performance in the amphitheater

02. ARCH 4010 | Escape to Sugar Hollow 12


MODEL Materials 1/16” Chipboard 1/32” Plastic Sheet Matte White Spray Paint

Methods Hand-cut Laser-cut

13 02. ARCH 4010 | Escape to Sugar Hollow


02. ARCH 4010 | Escape to Sugar Hollow 14


FREITAG WORKSHOP

ARCH 3010: The High Line and the Skyline | Fall 2011 Instructor: Lester Yuen Location: Near 19th St. & 10th Ave., New York City

FREITAG POP-UP STORE | Gansevoort Steps at the High Line

+ Services

=

Products

Constraints

15 03. ARCH 3010 | Freitag Workshop

+

Visibility

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Pop-Up!


Extrusion The maximum extents of the site are extruded in order to accodomate program and to adhere to the NYC grid.

Deformation to North-South The building envelope is rotated to the direction of north-south in order to break from pre-conceived notions of the monotonous grid, to have a sweeping view down the High Line, and to emulate Freitag’s rebellious, free-thinking spirit.

Public C

Subtraction Although Freitag is free-spirited, a rigorous system is still established to create high quality products. A rigorous system is applied to the building envelope, based on subtracting halves, in order to create outdoor space, increase light, and to create views.

Functions

1

2

3

Applying lessons from the scale of a pop-up to a headquarters

What does a Swiss bag manufacturer and an elevated park in New York have in common? Both Freitag and the High line share the goal of re-contextualizing different elements from separate bodies - used truck tarps or an old elevated railway, respectively - and crafting a new whole from them (i.e., hand-crafted bags or a public park). This project aims to construct a physical relationship between Freitag and the High Line from their shared principles. First developing a small pop-up store under the park, the project then expanded to a larger regional headquarters for the company.

Retail and its related corporate functions engage 19th Street as a typical commerical type, while the private spaces of the studios engage the Highline and the city in back of house. Inbetween these two are the public spaces, breaking from the monotony of the city grid in order to reflect the creativity and free spirit of the program within.

Deformation to the Street and the High Line The central block is lifted in order to create a public entrance and to create a visual connection between the lobby and the street. The workshop space is also extruded up to the High Line in order to create a visual connection to this natural corridor and to allow the public to see inside the building.

03. ARCH 3010 | Freitag Workshop 16


Kitchen

UP

UP

6

Restroom

Cafe

1

Restroom

UP

Retail

3 1st Floor

3 3

DN UP

UP

3 12 8

1. Lobby 2. Workshop 3. Studio 4. Gallery 5. Lounge 6. Cafe

Retail DN

2nd Floor

7. Theater 8. Retail 9. Office 10. Meeting Room 11. Apartment 12. High Line

2

6

DN UP

UP

DN

2

Workshop

5

Lounge

9

Office

3rd Floor

DN UP

3

UP

Studio

5

Patio

Lounge

Patio

DN

7

Auditorium

5th Floor DN UP

3

Studio

UP

DN

4

Gallery

7th Floor

3

DN

Studio DN

11

Apartment

11

Apartment

8th Floor

The processes of production and distribution of Freitag merchandise – retail, offices, and meeting rooms – strictly follow the direction of the city grid because they are corporate and economic. They adhere to the existing economic landscape of New York in order to thrive. However, the more free creative and communal processes – theater, exhibition, studios, workshop, and residences – do not, by nature, adhere to these constraints. Although they do not conform, these programs are still tied to the city through direct lines of sight to the High Line. The interior spaces become places of public spectacle and visual consumption. Both of these main programmatic groupings are held together by a hinge of circulation where a person will be able to weave through both freely. At the same time they will be reminded that these groupings are not independent of each other. By creating vertical shifts in floors plates, an artist will be able to view a manager or an outsider on the High Line will able to view an inhabitant of the building. The processes of the building and the processes of Freitag become visible for all to see.

17 03. ARCH 3010 | Freitag Workshop

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View from the corner of 19th St. and 10th Ave.

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03. ARCH 3010 | Freitag Workshop 18


Study Models

3. Studio 4. Gallery

1. Lobby 2. Workshop

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5. Lounge 6. Cafe

7. Theater 8. Retail

9. Office 10. Meeting Room

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11. Apartment 12. High Line

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4

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Transverse Sections

19 03. ARCH 3010 | Freitag Workshop


Work and play; view of office lounge, meeting room, lobby, and retail

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Longitudinal Sections

03. ARCH 3010 | Freitag Workshop 20


RICHMOND MUSEUM OF IRON & STEEL ARCH 2020: The Analysis of Artifacts | Spring 2011 Instructor: Zaneta Hong Location: Near Main St. & 20th St., Richmond, VA

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1. Tape Measure Axon | Modeled in Rhino 2. Diagram of Distribution of World’s Largest Steel Producers and Consumers 3. Mapping Civic, Commercial, and Industrial Nodes in Richmond, 1878 & Present-Day

21 04. ARCH 2020 | Richmond Museum of Iron & Steel


Gallery Partitions

Floor Plates

Circulation

Structure

First examining an artifact of our choice and mapping its materials and production at a global scale, we applied our discoveries to the scale of a museum in the city of Richmond. Choosing the tape measure, the steel used in the tape inspired the creation of a museum of the history of iron and steel in the region. The project focuses on tracing the industrial history of Shockoe Bottom and other industrial areas along the James River. Inspired by the exactitude of producing a tape measure, the process of steel production, and the tumultuous history of Richmond and the Industrial Revolution, the museum focuses on depicting the transition of dark going to the light. “Dark” refers to the harsh, often crude processes of early industry, its negative effects on the environment and laborers, and the general cynicism of this past. “Light” refers to the industry’s aid in increasing Richmond’s prosperity, its importance as the industrial heart of the South, being sensitive to history and the environment while sustaining the area’s growth, and the light that lies in gaining new knowledge. 04. ARCH 2020 | Richmond Museum of Iron & Steel 22


5

5

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4

3

3

1

1

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6

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Section A-A

1. Entry Hall 2. Cafe B

Section B-B

3. Gallery: The Industrial Revolution 4. Gallery: 20th Century Growth

5. Gallery: The 21st Century& Beyond 6. Storage & Mechanical

7. Office 8. Classroom

A

DN

4th Floor UP

5

DN

3rd Floor UP

4

DN

2nd Floor UP

3

C

1st Floor

2

DN

UP

C

1

6

DN

UP

Basement

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Section C-C 8 6

B

A

23 04. ARCH 2020 | Richmond Museum of Iron & Steel


View down through the exhibition space

The darkness of the past is communicated through a winding circulation route that reflects having to physically and figuratively navigate the edge of the James River and through a rough material palette that preserves elements like the un-refinement of the brick walls adjacent our site. The light will be revealed above through greater transparency, views of sites throughout the city, and through a more polished material palette such as polished concrete, plaster, and steel. By journeying through the transition of these juxtapositions, visitors will gain greater insight and a new appreciation of the hidden histories of Shockoe Bottom, Richmond, and the steel industry.

5

4

3

1 2

6

04. ARCH 2020 | Richmond Museum of Iron & Steel 24


From Tape Measure to Museum | Concept Model The dissection and researching of the components of a tape measure inspired three concepts - precision, repetition, and interlocking - that lead to the creation of an abstract concept model embodying these ideas. Several uniform basswood units were notched to produce an interlocking system that has a sense of direction, measurement, rhythm, and a degree of porosity that later informed the nature of the exhibition spaces.

25 04. ARCH 2020 | Richmond Museum of Iron & Steel


Exhibition Space

Entrance Hall

04. ARCH 2020 | Richmond Museum of Iron & Steel 26


SKETCHES

Vicenza Study Abroad Program | Summer 2012 Location: Veneto and Tuscany, Italy

Villa Capra | Vicenza

Chiesa di San Vincenzo | Vicenza

27 05. Sketches

The Frari | Venice


Palazzo Vecchio from the Campanile of the Duomo | Florence

Palazzo Vecchio from the Uffizi | Florence 05. Sketches 28


Teatro Olimpico Axonometric | Vicenza 29 05. Sketches


Palazzo del Capitaniato | Vicenza

Baptistery | Florence 05. Sketches 30


PHOTOGRAPHY

Traditional photography and manipulations in Photoshop

Denver Art Museum | Denver, CO

Day and Night | Las Vegas, NV

31 06. Photography


Reflecting Absence | New York City, NY

06. Photography 32


Ewha Women’s University | Seoul, South Korea

33 06. Photography


Clyfford Still Museum | Denver, CO

Colorization of the University of Virginia Rotunda Fire, Oct. 27, 1895 | Charlottesville, VA

06. Photography 34


OTHER MEDIA

Various forms of representation in other media

Website Design | Study concept for the UVa Community Design & Research Center

35 07. Other Media


Energy Flow Diagram | Mapping the flow of energy in Aurora, CO during a typical morning routine

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

Revit Exercise | Reconstructing W.G. Clark’s East Addition at the UVa School of Architecture

SARC 555 BIM AND RE

1 A101

Level 5 55' - 0"

Level 5 55' - 0"

Level 4 36' - 0"

Level 4 36' - 0"

SPRING 201

Level 2 12' - 0"

Level 2 12' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

1

Campbell Hall Addition

Section 1 1/8" = 1'-0"

South 4 1/8" = 1'-0"

1 A101

DRAWN BY: Isaac Kim

3

Level 3 1/8" = 1'-0"

2

{3D}

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

Level 3 24' - 0"

07. Other Media

36

A101


ISAAC KIM

University of Virginia | Bachelor of Science in Architecture (720) 210 4928 | imk2dd@virginia.edu


Isaac Kim Portfolio 2013