Page 1

G IN TH AT NO OKS R’ OR IN LO E BA Y F ILL TH NE AN M ISING MO AL ‘RA

An ITP Business Publication | January 2010 Vol. 05 Issue 1

Essential information for FM & strata professionals, building owners, developers & contractors

TOP TEN TIPS CHECK LIST FOR CUTTING-EDGE OFFICE INTERIOR DESIGN

SMART FACILITIES THE GROWING IMPORTANCE OF INTELLIGENT AUTOMATION

SUN DRIVEN BUILDING Building-integrated photovoltaics introduce bright vistas of energy modelling for facilities managers

Licensed by International Media Production Zone


CONTENTS

VOLUME 5 ISSUE 1 JANUARY 2010

10

02 WHAT’S ON THE WEB

The online portal for fmME keeps you up-to-date with all the trends, features and comments about Middle East construction.

10 12

07 NEWS

fmME brings you a roundup of the latest news and developments from the GCC and around the Middle East.

12 Q&A

fmME speaks to Transguard MD Mike McGeever about the acquisition of MEP contractor MACAir and the impact this will have on the group’s total service offering.

15 Feature: Smart Building

The latest trends in building automation systems, and the role such technology plays in facilities management. Building automation is becoming increasingly sophisticated, and requires careful planning and implementation from the outset in order to realise its full benefits.

15 21

21 Feature: Solar Power

The integration of photovoltaics into building structures opens up new vistas in terms of operational efficiency. Together with the increased focus on renewable energy, ‘green’ building advances such as these allow facilities managers to play a vital role in long-term sustainability.

27 Comment

Alan Millin on ‘raising the bar’ in FM by demanding 100% service in return for 100% payment ... People are quick to decry bad service, but what happens when service performance is linked directly to payment?

31 PROJECT UPDATE 27 www.constructionweekonline.com

Oman Projects Database An update of ongoing projects from Ventures Middle East

January 2010 1


XXXXXXXXX WHAT’S ON THE WEB

the online home of:

IN PICTURES

MOST POPULAR

• Exclusive: US $2.5 billion claim over Dubai Metro Nakheel to clear debt • within 14 days • US $10bn will allow indus try to breathe • Abu Dhabi to finance Dubai World debts

MEYDAN RACECOURSE ON TRACK

For breaking news, go to: www.constructionweekonline.com/news/ Stories selected December 27-31, 2009

The first phase of Dubai’s ambitious horseracing village, Meydan, has been completed and the brand new grandstand and racecourse will welcome their first visitors on January 28, when the Dubai Racing Festival kicks off. The grandstand has seating for 20,000 and a capacity for 60,000 spectators on race days. Expected 2010 attendance is 300,000.

EDITOR’S CHOICE

For more galleries, check out: www.constructionweekonline.com/in_pictures/

COLUMNS & FEATURES 10 TIPS FOR A GREEN WORKPLACE

ASSESSING DESIGNERS

2010 is almost upon us and it’s time to think about those resolutions. So why not pledge to ‘green your workplace’ in 2010, asks Mervin De le Torre, interior designer at BAFCO.

Kenneth Laidler, former president of APID wrote a paper proposing the continued assessment of interior designers. Over the next few months, CID will be publishing exclusive extracts.

WILD MIDDLE EAST

ROYAL INSIGHT

When Dubai’s deserts weren’t a well-kept secret, camels were a common site and talk of erecting skyscrapers would have risked your expulsion from the arab state, four pioneers found Arabtec.

HH Sheikh Maktoum Hasher Maktoum Al Maktoum earned a reputation last year for his restructuring strategy that resulted in strengthening the balance sheet of his company, Al Fajer Properties.

For more columns & features, go to: www.constructionweekonline.com/comments 2 January 2010

• Exclusive: US $2.5 billion claim over Dubai Metro • Moustachioed Maestros • Madrasati renovates 200 schools in Jordan • Nakheel to clear debt within 14 days • Audio solutions makes ‘building in’ easier Stories selected December 27-31, 2009

POLL: What’s your main aim for 2010? 26.9% Get paid for 2009. 30.8% Tender for more work. 26.9% Survive. 11.5% Upsize. 03.8% Downsize. To vote in spot polls, go to: www.constructionweekonline.com

www.constructionweekonline.com


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EDITOR’S LETTER

Stop talking and do what you said you’d do

W

ow, that was a hell of a year. I’m sure I’m not alone when I say it feels good to see that back of 2009. Trust me, dear readers, I tried to say positive. I probably bored you all to death with proclamations of construction grandeur in countries across the GCC. You probably became quite tired of my urging you to do more with less, stay strong and take the high road. Well, as we embark on another year together, my message this time is both simple and straightforward: In 2010, do what you said you’d do. This time, I’m urging you to remember your commitments, especially with regard to running your companies smarter, more transparent and greener. In the midst of the credit crunch, very few people could be asked to remember their green commitments because whether your field is architecture, engineering, interior design, facilities management or MEP, green technology is initially more expensive. But I don’t have to remind you that, over the lifecycle of the building, that same technology will actually save you money in terms of energy use, cooling loads, lighting, and reduced carbon footprint...not to mention, garner extra LEED points. In the midst of the credit crunch, I’m sure it was rather attractive to shop around for building products and professionals promising the same

quality at a lower cost. I’d be willing to bet that those low-cost options, as unscrupulous as they seemed, were actually considered—if only for a moment—in boardrooms and back rooms across the region. My only hope is that honesty and integrity prevailed more often than not. When I remember back to 2007—the year I first arrived on the Dubai building scene—I recall that everything was booming. There were more projects, contracts and competitions than anyone could handle and money was being made by the truckload. In the middle of all of it, came Sheikh Mohammed’s green building decree. From that moment on, every project, product and property began marketing itself as ‘green’ this and ‘sustainable’ that. Fast forward to January 2010. The prospectors are gone. The design gimmicks and fads have passed. The industry has returned to a manageable pace. Dare I say it, even the sustainability/green building rhetoric has been quieted. So, dear readers, in the most polite and unoffending way I can, I say this: It’s time to put up or shut up. If you said your company was going to be a green one before the crisis, do it. Pull the trigger. Make the necessary investment, build a properly green building and reap the benefits of cheaper energy and positive PR. Likewise, if you committed yourself to adopting ISO 9001 pre-credit crunch but never got around to it, do it now. Build quality buildings and set a regional benchmark. It’s a new year and a fresh start. Now, stop talking and do what you said you’d do.

Registered at Dubai Media City PO Box 500024, Dubai, UAE Tel: 00 971 4 210 8000, Fax: 00 971 4 210 8080 Web: www.itp.com Offices in Dubai & London ITP Business Publishing CEO Walid Akawi Managing Director Neil Davies Deputy Managing Director Matthew Southwell Editorial Director David Ingham VP Sales Wayne Lowery Publishing Director Jason Bowman Editorial Senior Group Editor Stuart Matthews Group Editor Jeff Roberts Contributing Editor Gerhard Hope Tel: +971 4 435 6252 email: gerhard.hope@itp.com Contributor: Alan Millin Advertising Commercial Director, Construction Raz Islam Tel: +971 4 435 6371 email: raz.Islam@itp.com Sales Manager Shishir Desai Tel: +971 4 435 6375 email: shishir.desai@itp.com Studio Group Art Editor Daniel Prescott Designer Angela Ravi Photography Director of Photography Sevag Davidian Chief Photographer Khatuna Khutsishvili Senior Photographer Efraim Evidor, Thanos Lazopoulos Staff Photographers Isidora Bojovic, George Dipin, Lyubov Galushko, Jovana Obradovic, Ruel Pableo, Rajesh Raghavo Production & Distribution Group Production Manager Kyle Smith Production Manager Eleanor Zwanepoel Production Coordinator Louise Schreiber Managing Picture Editor Patrick Littlejohn Image Retoucher Emmalyn Robles Distribution Manager Karima Ashwell Distribution Executive Nada Al Alami Circulation Head of Circulation & Database Gaurav Gulati Marketing Head of Marketing Daniel Fewtrell Deputy Marketing Manager Annie Chinoy ITP Digital Director Peter Conmy ITP Group Chairman Andrew Neil Managing Director Robert Serafin Finance Director Toby Jay Spencer-Davies Board of Directors K.M. Jamieson, Mike Bayman, Walid Akawi, Neil Davies, Rob Corder, Mary Serafin Circulation Customer Service Tel: +971 4 435 6000

Certain images in this issue are available for purchase. Please contact itpimages@itp.com for further details or visit www.itpimages.com. Printed by Color Lines Press Subscribe online at www.itp.com/subscriptions The publishers regret that they cannot accept liability for error or omissions contained in this publication, however caused. The opinions and views contained in this publication are not necessarily those of the publishers. Readers are advised to seek specialist advice before acting on information contained in this publication which is provided for general use and may not be appropriate for the reader’s particular circumstances. The ownership of trademarks is acknowledged. No part of this publication or any part of the contents thereof may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form without the permission of the publishers in writing. An exemption is hereby granted for extracts used for the purpose of fair review.

THIS MONTH’S COVER: BIPVs in buildings mean new challenges for FMs

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NEWS

US firm signs deal with chiller specialist The exclusive agreement will see distribution of an energy-saving module in the UAE and Bahrain BAHRIAN, UAE // Smartcool Systems Inc. has signed an exclusive agreement with the largest chiller services specialist in the Middle East to distribute its energy savings module (ESM) in the UAE and Bahrain. In addition US Chiller Services will also market Smartcool’s ECO3 on a non-exclusive basis. As well as having offices in Dubai, UAE and Manama in the Kingdom of Bahrain, it also has locations in California and Florida.

The ESM from Smartcool Inc.

“Our firm conclusion is that Smartcool is a powerful energy-saving technology on single or multiple chiller installations.” – Dan Mizesko

Readings were then recorded for a 14-day period with the ESM activated. To further verify testing results, these readings were compared to a 14-day period whereby readings were recorded with the ESM turned on and off on alternate days. The results from the testing period indicated energy savings

As part of its due diligence process, US Chillers installed the ESM on a large-tonnage centrifugal chiller at a location managed by Palm District Cooling in Dubai. The test began in July 2009 and required 14 days of operation, whereby readings were taken prior to activation of the ESM.

of 13.16% when comparing the 14 day on-andoff period, and 16.63% energy savings for the alternate day period. On average, the ESM provided savings of 2,925 kWh a day, an average savings of 14.89%. This equates to about US$95 000 a year on this single chiller application.

Real operational conditions “The test was conducted throughout real operational conditions during 42 days under the peak Dubai summer period when midday temperatures can reach 50°C, yet Smart-

26 000 THE NUMBER OF SMARTCOOL EMS UNITS INSTALLED WORLDWIDE

cool’s technology provided very impressive results,” said Dan Mizesko, president of US Chiller Services. Not only did the ESM save substantial kWh input power to the chiller, it was also able to slightly improve the chiller’s kW per ton efficiency. “We were also able to confirm that the technology can be integrated to multiple chillers, allowing chillers to share the common load equally and save energy equally. Our conclusion is Smartcool is a powerful energy-saving technology on single or multiple chiller installations,” said Mizesko. “We are very pleased to be working with US Chiller Services,” said George Burnes, president and CEO of Smartcool Systems Inc. “US Chillers has an award-winning reputation, and we feel very comfortable that our energy-savings technology will be represented to a wide array of clients in a very important marketplace for our company. The test has only endorsed what we at Smartcool already know, and that is that we have a technology that can provide energy reduction resulting in significant cost savings,” concluded Burnes.

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January 2010 7


NEWS

Atkins inks Kuwait Ministry deal The international consultancy was awarded a multi-million dollar contract in partnership with SSH KUWAIT CITY, KUWAIT // Atkins Kuwait has signed a major sanitary masterplan contract with the Kuwait Ministry of Public Works. The international consultancy was awarded this multi-million dollar contract in partnership with the local company SSH. The official signing ceremony took place in the offices of the Kuwaiti Ministry of Public Works, and was attended by the country’s Deputy Prime Minister Shaikh Ahmed Al Fahed, Minister for Public Works Dr Fadel Safar and Atkins Kuwait

GM in Kuwait Bryan Willey. Atkins project director Graham Warder commended the Ministry for its holistic approach, saying “Kuwait is a great example of a state actively improving its infrastructure network. We are delighted that the municipality recognises our partnership approach and our ability to deliver technically demanding projects.” The masterplan will develop a national strategy for the upgrade of the current sanitation system for the State of Kuwait, covering an area of 17 818

km². Delivery of the study and proposals is scheduled for December 2011. The Ministry of Public Works sees the masterplan as a key strategy document for the future development and growth of the country. “Through our local presence and previous work on the study, Atkins and our local partner SSH are well-placed to assist the Ministry in resolving their local issues in water supply, environment and sanitation issues,” concludes Warder. Alongside the Kuwait Public Transport Masterplan, Atkins

has a growing portfolio of politically important and strategic projects that will guide the development and growth of Kuwait over the next 20 years. Atkins’ current projects include design and programme management of the civil works for the Dubai Metro Red and Green lines, resort developments such as Durrat Al Bahrain, architectural landmarks such as the Bahrain World Trade Centre and industry enterprises such as Manama’s Tabreed district cooling plant.

Huge call for disinfectants in light of H1N1 scare DUBAI, UAE //

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8 January 2010

According to information released by a leading group of UAE pharmacies, there has been an unprecedented demand in the UAE for sanitisers and disinfectants to safeguard from H1N1 as people believe strict personal hygeine is the most effective way to avoid catching the virus. The Pharmacy Group, which handles five million customers per year through its 30 branches across the UAE, has reported a significant increase in the sale of sanitary disinfection products and face and hand sanitisers. Ayman Hanbali, marketing manager at BinSina Pharmacy, claimed the increase was due to the large-scale public awareness campaign which reminded people about the most effective ways of protecting oneself from the virus. BinSina Group has also reported high demand for medical masks, especially for

school-age children. Hanbali said the pharmacy had started to place new orders for such products to cater to the increasing demand, and to prevent any shortfall. “Customers buying these products believe firmly that they hold the key to prevent catching the virus. It is also the result of the extensive community outreach campaigns done by the Ministry of Health in public places,” noted Hanbai. The Ministry of Health has run an awareness campaign across public spaces — including shopping malls, convention centres and grocery stores — highlighting the importance of sterilising hands after touching communal or public items, which is the most common way of spreading the virus. The Ministry’s campaign has targeted all social classes and student communities — teachers and supervisors at schools from nursery to universities — as well as labourers.

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NEWS

Global body adopts UAE technology New technology can reduce utility costs by up to 20% and, at the same time, reduce CO2 emissions DUBAI, UAE // Green Globe International, which recently announced a five-year licensing agreement with Farnek Avireal to use the Green Globe brand, has adopted ‘Hotel Optimizer’ technology, which can produce savings of up to 20% in energy, water and waste costs. Hotel Optimizer was developed by Farnek Avireal, a leading UAE and Swiss joint venture which advises companies on how to dramatically cut utility bills. “Hotel Optimizer was designed for the hotel industry, and has achieved remarkable results for companies in the UAE. It deserves a worldwide audience,” said Guido Bauer,

Green Globe is the only recognised certification of its type in the tourism and hospitality industry. More than 800 businesses in 50 countries have so far received Green Globe certification. Twenty tourism properties in the Middle East are currently covered.

Branding Green Globe is branding Farnek Avireal’s Hotel Optimizer as GreenRevMax (Green Revenue Management) and promoting the product worldwide. Farnek Avireal GM Marcus Oberlin said he was delighted that Green Globe had adopted technology developed in the Middle East for worldwide pro-

“Hotel operators and owners, as well as other businesses, have increased profits by saving on bottom-line costs.” – Marcus Oberlin

CEO: certification for Green Globe. “It is a powerful online system that identifies potential saving in energy, water and waste, and can reduce the related costs by 15% to 20% on a sustainable basis.”

6,500 T/Y CO2 EMISSIONS EMITTED BY THE AVERAGE HOTEL IN DUBAI

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motion. “Hotel operators and owners, as well as other businesses, have increased profits by saving on bottom-line costs with this technology, which also substantially reduces their impact on the environment.” The Hotel Optimizer system tracks and analyses energy use, provides year-on-year comparisons, energy costs per occupied room, a reduction forecast and seasonal impacts of energy, water and waste. “With the key readings generated by Hotel Optimizer, managements have a simple method of setting challenging, but realistic, annual targets in the areas of energy, water and waste,” said Oberlin.

Farnek Avireal GM Marcus Oberlin

Potential water shortages are top of most government agendas throughout the Middle East. “Water is the Middle East’s most vulnerable resource, and will become dangerously scarce within decades unless it is radically managed better,” the World Bank said in its latest development and climate change study. In the Middle East and North Africa, the world’s driest region, “per capita water availability is predicted to halve by 2050 even without the effects of climate change.”

Lagging behind Middle East hotels lag well behind Europe in terms of energy efficiency and their impact on the environment. For example, in Europe the average hotel produces 3,000 tons of carbon dioxide emissions per annum compared with 6,500 tons in Dubai. “Initially, when we first introduced Hotel Optimizer, some hotel managers were con-

cerned about the costs,” said Oberlin. “But those that have introduced the system have achieved a return on investment in less than two years. With the current climate in the industry, supporting sustainability and reducing energy demands in this way makes sound business sense, as well as helping the environment.” The Green Globe programme traces its roots to the UN Rio de Janeiro Earth Summit in 1992, and has mainly been used in the travel and tourism industry, but is now being expanded to include environmentally responsible businesses in other market sectors. “Green Globe’s mission is to make sure that travellers recognise exceptional efforts by hotels and other travel businesses that certify with Green Globe and its partners,” said Bauer. “These efforts are reducing pollution, creating wealth and improving the travel experience for all.”

January 2010 9


NEWS

Top ten tips for a ‘green’ workplace In the spirit of New Year’s resolutions, fmME takes a look at some leading office interior solutions for 2010 ESSENTIAL LIGHTING

DUBAI, UAE \\ For many, New Year is the time for personal resolutions of varying degrees of difficulty, ranging from beginning a diet, to stopping smoking, moking, or even just being nicer cer to friends and family. Howowever, Mervin De le Torre, orre, interior designer at leading eading UAE-based corporate e interior solutions specialecialist BAFCO, explains why our resolutions needn’t n’t be restricted to the home. me. “Most of us spend so much of our lives in the office that we should consider choosing some resolutions for the workplace that can help the envi-

IT’S COOL TO BE A LITTLE WARMER

1

Once you’ve adjusted your air-con, turn it back up by just 2° or 3°. You’ll hardly notice, but it’ll make a big difference to your energy consumption. This few degrees difference can save the company over AED500 a year. Also remember to turn your AC off when you leave the office.

BE BRIGHT

2

Energy-saving lightbulbs are much more efficient than the traditional version. and last up to ten times longer. Next time your company needs to replace a lightbulb, recommend this option. The average office can save AED806 over the year by making this switch.

10 January 2010

ronment and even save our company some money along the way. As office specialists, we had a brainstorm among our team and have come up with ten of the best tips to consider as office resolutions for 2010,” says De le Torre.

FLEXIBLE FURNITURE

3

Always consider products with highly flexible options as offices adapt to newer technology, manpower and market conditions. Demountable partitions, open plan workstations, glass partitions, heavy duty ergonomic chairs are a must.

5

Allow natural outdoor light to illuminate the office. Turn off non-essential and decorative lighting, particularly in unoccupied areas. Use ‘task’ lighting, such as angle-poise lamps, to directly illuminate specific work areas instead of brighter ‘area’ lighting.

LOOK FOR ENERGY STAR

DON’T STANDBY - SWITCH OFF AND UNPLUG

4

If you leave your computer on standby overnight, it uses almost as much electricity as it does when switched on. Remember to turn it off and unplug. You should also consider switching off monitors, printers, fax machines and copiers during lengthy breaks away from your desk.

6

Most office appliances these days have an energyefficiency rating. When purchasing PCs, monitors, printers, fax machines and copiers, consider Energy Star models that automatically power down after a period of inactivity.

GOING OUT? THEN TURN IT OFF!

7

Get into the simple habit of switching lights off whenever you leave a room.

‘Greening’ the modern office environment.

DETECT OFFICE MOTION

8

Install motion detectors or dimmers to control lighting in restrooms. It is also a simple job to re-wire restroom fans to operate with the lights.

AUTOMATE LIGHTING SIGNAGES

9

Install time clocks or photoelectric cells to control exterior lighting, advertising sign lighting and some interior lighting.

KEEP COOL AND INSTALL BLINDS

10

Not only will it enhance the design of your office but adding blinds, solar screens or shades will actually help to cool it down.

www.constructionweekonline.com


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Q&A

On

Guard

Transguard MD Mike McGeever talks about the group’s latest sterling results and its acquisition of MEP contractor MACAir.

fmME: Your latest figures record an increase in turnover of 57% to AED607 million, and doubling profit to AED75 million, during the last financial year? The dramatic increase in profits last year was because we effectively went wholeheartedly into hospitality and then our FM business, so we grew from nowhere the soft services and FM part. The business is split into three divisions: outsourced services, FM and cash-handling services. The FM business saw a significant increase. I expect 2009, certainly in our outsourced services division, to be lower, simple because of the downturn in terms of the construction industry and business in Dubai generally – and, of course, worldwide. Everything we expect, I am sure, will happen – it is just going to take a bit longer. fmME: How has the downturn affected Transguard? Yes, to a certain degree the current situation has impacted Transguard. As I say, on the outsourced services we have not been so busy. Growth, while it has been impressive historically, has slowed this

12 January 2010

year simply because the size of the marketplace has decreased, and people are taking a little longer to make decisions in terms of their contracting. Our outlook for the future is positive. The acquisition is a strong vote of confidence in Dubai and the UAE. We are bullish about the future. The infrastructure being set up here in Dubai and the UAE in particular includes such notable achievements as the Dubai Metro, and the F1 at Yas Island in in Abu Dhabi, which was superb. So we have every confidence we will be continuing our growth into the future. fmME: What was the reasoning behind the acquisition? MACAir is a considered strategic move. What we have done in FM is decided that, as well as having the soft services, we want to offer the full package – proper FM, self-performing, so we can control quality, efficiency and the expediency. We are very, very keen on making sure that when we have a client we can provide and anticipate everything that they will require. I think it is an ideal time for people to be thinking about and

anticipating what the future will hold, very much as we are doing within our training division at the moment. There are some very exciting developments on this front. We are putting together some significant packages that will be available in the marketplace within four to five months. So I think now is an excellent opportunity for people to think and plan. At the moment we do training for security guards in Dubai, but are looking more broadly at APL security training. fmME: The acquisition has expanded your market and customer reach? Clearly it gives us a whole new client base. There is the dichotomy between contracting and maintenance. We are very supportive of the contracting side of MACAir. We have a significant forward order book of about AED550 million on the contracting side. We are

bringing in Mike Callender as MD of MACAir. As well as the contracting side, his remit is to be build the maintenance side, where he has been very successful running a maintenance company for the last ten years, an MEP company in the UK. Geoff Frost [the former MD of MACAir] will be very much involved with the company in a business development role, and helping to foster and nur-

57% TO AED607 MILLION TRANSGUARD’S INCREASE IN TURNOVER DURING THE LAST FINANCIAL YEAR

Mike McGeever, MD of the Transguard Group.

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Q&A

ture the relationships he has built up over the last ten years. The day-to-day management of the business will be with Callender. fmME: FM and MEP are essentially two sides of the same coin? I think MEP maintenance is a sub-set of FM. I do not think you can be an FM company if you are not able to provide the full package. What we are doing is making ourselves a supplier of choice. Many MEP companies have aspired to, and some have managed to become, FM companies, particularly in Europe. Similarly, you have single-trick ponies – catering and cleaning companies – moving up the value chain to FM. I think MEP is just another example of this. I do not think we are in the business of compromising on quality. I do not think you can, particularly with MEP, as health and safety issues are wrapped around it. I do not think we can cut corners. Short-termism is inimical to long-term quality. We are looking at bringing operating lease type of ideas to the market. We are very keen on off balance sheet solutions. My intention is ultimately to be able to talk to developers about equipment supply, whereby we would be able to put equipment in at our own cost in return for a long-term operating lease. If you like, a quasi-EFI type deal. So I think our differentiator will be that, because we are a government-owned company, and because we have the quality brand of Emirates associated with our name as well, people know exactly what they are buying when they buy Transguard. They know exactly what they are getting; they know who we are and where we are; they know we

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will be here tomorrow. And clearly we are in a position to stand by what we promise and deliver on it. fmME: Transguard will retain the MACAir name? The MACAir name is currently being retained. We see an intrinsic value in the name at this moment in time, simply because of the association it has had with quality in the MEP business over the last ten years. It will be the fourth division within Transguard. We have already put our mobilisa-

tion and transition team into play to allow MACAir and its staff to bridge, hopefully bumpfree, into Transguard. So we have mapped across things like HR, finance, IT, estimating, quality control, health and safety and security. These things are quite easy to do; we are already an established organisation. MACAir will be a very important part of the business, and it will certainly be very important in terms of its relationship with our overall FM service offering.

“We will be moving internationally, and we will be selecting somewhere within the GCC to open first and foremost … We are in discussions with several organisations about taking on a Transguard franchise.” Mike McGeever

fmME: What is your overall growth strategy? We have been asked by customers in Oman, Bahrain, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and many African countries, as well as India, Pakistan and four European countries, to go and open Transguard internationally. We

have not done so because the marketplace in Dubai, and the extraordinary growth we have had since our inception seven years ago, has suggested we are much better off to build on what we have and know, and that is across the UAE. We will be moving internationally, and we will be selecting somewhere within the GCC to open first and foremost. Internationally, outside of the GCC, we are in discussions with several organisations about taking on a Transguard franchise. We will supply the knowledge, know-how and, in some instances, the opportunities and leads for the business; they will supply in-country knowledge and infrastructure. So that is very exciting for us. fmME: Any final message? I would like to extend a sincere thank you to the historic customers of MACAir and the Transguard group. All of you will understand that change sometimes brings uncertainty – that is not our intention at all in this instance. We would like the customers of MACAir to acknowledge and understand the benefits of the deal. We look forward to servicing them in the future, and introducing MEP to our existing customer base.

Transguard’s FM division

Park Inn, Yas Island, where Transguard has

Transguard’s FM division delivers carefully-tailored and bespoke FM solutions built upon a solid foundation of global best practice. The division’s operational service delivery is designed along the FM continuum or whole lifecycle of a building or facility. Its FM consultancy team ensures that, from conceptual design through to construction phase, the principles of cost-efficient, sustainable buildings are delivered to the client. The operational team then ensures that the assets, infrastructure and appearance of the building are maintained to the highest standards and in compliance with the client’s and constructor’s guidelines, municipality instructions and globally-recognised standards.

clinched a cleaning-service contract.

January 2010 13


LIGHTING

Showrooms in Jeddah and Riyadh

and

JEDDAH (HEAD OFFICE) Rawada Street Omnia Center P.O. Box 12679 Jeddah 21483 Saudi Arabia Tel. +966 2 669 3241 Fax +966 2 668 3069

CONTRACT FURNITURE

aralazem@technolight-ksa.com

RIYADH Tahlia Street Olaya P.O. Box 17420 Riyadh 11484 Saudi Arabia Tel. +966 1 462 1150 Fax +966 1 465 5406 www.technolight-ksa.com

Technolight was established in 1980. Over 30 years, Technolight has become one of Saudi Arabia’s leading suppliers of lighting fixtures, lighting control systems, wiring devices, contract furniture and security systems with branches in Jeddah, Riyadh and Khobar. We take pride in being the first lighting company to enter the Saudi market and to offer a professional lighting concept solution, marking a landmark in the right direction. Not only did we introduce some of the most prestigious lighting brands and lighting solutions to the Saudi market, but we have also set a professional lighting standard in the Saudi Market.

Our outstanding performance could not have been realized without the family team of Technolight. In fact, our family consists of 57 highly trained sales engineers and installation staff. In addition, we have two showrooms in Jeddah and one in Riyadh all of which are superbly located right in the heart of the city.

Technolight is run by a management team. The managing director and five managers representing different administrative areas of expertise who convene periodically. They run analysis with never-ending improvement cycle. Technolight has several departments. There are lighting design dept, sales dept, marketing dept, financial dept. pricing dept, and other various activities. Technolight sales stock policy is to keep running items always in stock. We have about $4 million in stock which gets updated on regular basis.

Some companies we represent exclusively in KSA are as follows: ERCO (Interior & Exterior Lighting) • WE-EF (Exterior Lighting) • BTICINO (Wiring Devices) VITRA (Office & Home Furniture) • CLIPSAL ( Diming Systems) • COOPER CONTROLS (Diming Systems)


SMART BUILDING

Cutting

edge

Can old and dated buildings be made ‘smart’ in keeping with the latest trend of green building and sustainability? A cutting-edge innovation in wireless networking has fascinating implications for facilities management.

irst of all, what is a ‘green’ building? This is best defined as the outcome of a design process predicated on resource maximisation in terms of energy, water and construction materials, while simultaneously reducing such a building’s impact on both human health and the environment during its lifecycle. It is evident from such a simple definition that a ‘green’ building is much more than the actual physical structure of the building itself. However, people pay lip-service to sustainability without fully understanding its implementation, argues Martin Leith, contracts manager at

F

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Rotary Humm (M&E) Services Middle East. MEP consultants and contractors play a major role in bringing the green building trend to fruition in Dubai, but are hampered by the differing interpretations of the concept of ‘sustainability’ and the role it plays in the construction industry. “Traditionally what tends to happen, especially in the Middle East, was that architects design buildings remotely without consultation with the MEP consultants, thus missing out on many real opportunities to decrease the lifecycle cost of buildings,” argues Leith. “Then, typically upon appointing the contract, the

MEP people are asked how could they obtain further LEED points to the completed design? This usually means proposing expensive technologies such as PV/thermal solar energy panels, but this invariably increases the total cost for the developer, who would normally not even consider such proposals due to tight budgetary constraints.”

MISCONCEPTION There is a misconception that green buildings are more expensive than traditional buildings. For example, a study sponsored by investment firm Good Energies on 150 green building projects around the

world shows that, on average, they cost only around 2% more than traditional buildings, and yielded 33% savings on energy. This is contrary to the idea that green building is more costly. It is estimated that buildings consume about 39% of all of the energy in the US in terms of operating costs. This refers to keeping lights on and running HVAC systems. Another 12% of total energy consumption in the US goes to construction and the building products sector. In total, more than half of the US’s energy consumption is accounted for by overall construction and its ancillary industries. Meanwhile, the cost of

January 2010 15


SMART BUILDING

ZigBee is a wireless standards-based technology.

building structures to LEED standards is coming down, with owners reporting on increasingly lucrative payoffs in lower utility bills and higher rents. Leith says that new technological advances are also making it easier for developers to go the green route and start reaping the benefits of building smart. Rotary Humm sees a potentially massive market in retrofitting existing buildings to ramp up their operational efficiencies and bring down their running costs significantly.

VITAL ROLE “This is where technology plays such a vital role, but the perception is that any new technology is invariably expensive. What people fail to

16 January 2010

“A cabling investment requires indepth consideration, as it is a 15- to 20-year investment.” Andrew Sedman, R&M Middle East

understand is that investing in energy-efficient systems upfront will herald exponential long-term benefits at the end of the day,” argues Leith. Rotary Humm is in the process of rolling out new products to the Middle East that will give existing building owners and developers the leading edge in keeping up with the green building trend. Before we look at one of these products in detail, it is

important to highlight what makes a green building ‘smart’. Andrew Sedman, technical director at R&M, defines it as follows: “Any building has numerous systems, such as HVAC, lighting, audio/visual, video distribution, access control, voice and data networks, power management and life safety systems, to name a few of the most important ones. When any of these systems provides some form of report-

ing or alarming to a central location, we tend to regard them as being intelligent. “In using ‘smart’ or ‘intelligent’ systems, the main focus is to reduce the overall operational and maintenance costs, while at the same time reducing demands on the environment and energy consumption. The facilities maintenance associated with smart buildings no longer requires on-site personnel, as everything is plugged into the Internet.

CENTRAL LOCATION “Multiple smart buildings can now be managed remotely from one central location, or any number of secure locations, via the Internet, thereby allowing maintenance

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SMART BUILDING

companies to be proactive rather than reactive, save on operation costs and, at the same time, contribute towards green initiatives by removing the majority of the control cables and providing a more environmentfriendly habitat. To ensure this is done effectively, a reliable network is essential; a cabling investment requires in-depth consideration, as it is a 15- to 20-year investment, and in most instances would be restrictive for expansion and upgradability,” comments Sedman. This is where Rotary Humm has teamed up with Varis Energy to offer a full suite of solutions based around ZigBee technology, which is expected to play a critical role in the

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future, particularly in older buildings, where the cost of a complete cabling retrofit is prohibitively expensive and, in most cases, impractical. “ZigBee is the only wireless standards-based technology that addresses the unique needs of remote monitoring, control and sensory network applications. It enables broad-based deployment of wireless networks with low-cost, low-power solutions,” explains Leith. ZigBee-enabled products have been adapted worldwide, with the exception of the Middle East. It is defined as the ‘wireless mesh networking protocol of the future’. “What this means essentially is that ZigBee is not as susceptible to the typical interference issues associated with WiFi, Bluetooth or most other competing type of wireless technology,” alleges Leith. “With ZigBee, every single device connected to the network can act as a transmitter/ receiver and/or repeater. Be it a light switch, a thermostat, an occupancy sensor or a HVAC controller, the signal always has multiple paths of communication through the building to get where it is needed. “In essence, it is three-dimensional. It is a self-creating, self-healing network that can frequency hop and physically reroute itself, which is a particular feature of its robustness.”

TYPICAL WIRED CONTROL SYSTEM A typical wired control system comprises a line of devices often wired in parallel or in series. When a cable breaks, you tend to lose everything after the break. With ZigBee acting as a communication arbiter between two devices, “it can go down a floor and then up again, or left and right, irrelevant of the type

“We can take window-box airconditioners, add a ZigBee module to make them smart, and have them controlled as a building-wide system.” Martin Leith, Rotary Humm

of device you have.” Existing buildings that traditionally lack any sort of modern technology such as occupancy sensors cannot be retrofitted with smart controls without incurring major expense and disruption. However, Rotary Humm can deploy ZigBee-enabled devices like a proverbial magic wand and retrofit such a building “in a matter of days” once a building analysis has been completed, claims Leith. “For example, a ZigBeeenabled battery-operated occupancy sensor can be placed freely in a room. Should the room usage change in future, it is easy to reposition devices, which offers great flexibility, while also allowing for systems to be fine-tuned, ensuring optimum placement and efficiency. “The same goes for HVAC controls or thermostats. For example, we can take window-box air-conditioners, add a ZigBee module to make them ‘smart’, and have them controlled as a building-wide control system.”

15-20 YEAR INVESTMENT IN A RELIABLE CABLING NETWORK, WHICH MEANS PLANNING FOR ANY CONTINGENCIES IS CRITICAL

Leith foresees this system being particularly beneficial in Dubai, where commercial and residential property owners and tenants who failed to take energy-saving measures a year ago will have seen their monthly electricity bills soar by up to 66% since March 2008. “Such a system can give you a very advanced view as to what is happening inside an existing building. For example, the building’s HVAC system will now be able to self-optimise, based on real-time occupancy, down to an individual room level. This leads to increased comfort for the occupants, while providing humidity/ heat protection to the building fabric, and maximising the efficiency of the previously limited capacity of the HVAC system.” An example of the added benefits from an FM point of view is that a standard ZigBeeenabled thermostat can ‘learn’ the heat profile of every individually-controlled room. It learns how long it typically takes the air-conditioning to get the room to the required temperature. If there is a temperature fluctuation greater than 10% either way during the cooling operation, it will generate a maintenance SMS or e-mail automatically to alert staff to a problem. In a new build scenario, ZigBee resolves many of the common snagging, cabling, containment and interface issues, and also speeds up the entire MEP installation works, is Leith’s concluding remark.

January 2010 17


SMART BUILDING

Smart facilities Building management systems (BMS and building automation are used widely in the Middle East. But what is the future for this technology? A f bout 40% of the world’s energy is consumed by buildings. With energy resources at a premium, and developers looking for ways to cut costs, facilities managers are turning to BMS to control and monitor the energy expenditure in a building, and make life for the occupant a little easier in the process. Siemens head of building technologies division Patrick Guedel says “a BMS is a tool that enables a building operator to control and drive each and every function of a building: HVAC, lighting or window blinds.” The cables for the system are

installed at the end of the preliminary building works in either cable trail or pipes. Stefan Ries, vice president, private networks, R&M, which produces the cables required to install the systems, comments: “It is becoming more commonplace in to install BMS and building automation systems as developers realise the benefits and rewards of having them.” BMS systems are used quite regularly in the Middle East, although some industry experts believe more awareness would help get the best from them. Johnson Controls regional marketing lead, controls, Sanjay Tendulkar, reports: “Awareness at the moment is not up to the expected levels … BMS is quite common,

only the consultants and the contractors are going for lowspec, and are not looking at the technologies available.” Guedel believes the construction market has now fully accepted BMS: “BMS are used widely in the Middle East, because building owners and operators identify potential benefits very well. For example, if you are checking-in at my hotel, and need a room just slightly cooler, I can do this from a click on a front-desk computer. “I do not need housekeeping to set the air-con, and I do not need to cool down the whole hotel or a whole floor. I can do it just for you. By the time the lift takes you to your room floor, the right temperature is set. Siemens has installed such systems in such five-star hotels as Emirates Palace in Abu Dhabi.” Implementing the systems into buildings is relatively stress-free, argues Ries: “There aren’t any big challenges as such, beyond the normal one faced when implementing an IT infrastructure. The developers install a LAN, which acts as the backbone of the cabling.” This is a view shared by Guedel: “Implementing BMS

“Everyone wi will want the benefits provided by a proper building mana management system. With tim time, developers will max maximise their projects.” Patrick Guedel, Siemens

systems in this region is not so difficult; what is a real challenge, though, is for building operators to cope with increasing costs of electricity.” One example of how BMS integrates itself within a building’s systems is through lighting, where it can have

18 January 2010

complete control. Leviton MD Ramzi Nassif reveals: “Leviton lighting management systems have the capability to integrate with BMS through different open protocols; Leviton lighting control panels speak native BACnet protocol. Also, it can communicate with the BMS through MODBUS and LonTalk communication protocols with an optional field server card. “This integration gives the BMS complete monitoring and controls of Leviton lighting management systems, which gives the BMS the capability to generate reports and alarms, and it will have the capability to control Leviton lighting management system based on time and date.” BMS systems and building automation may use electricity to operate, but through sensible management of buildings, they can save energy in the long run, although Ries is keen to stress they are not the only solution: “Building automation is not the only and greatest answer to a green building. It is becoming a matter of lifestyle demanded by owners. It also plays an integral role in how architects design buildings, meaning more systems can be integrated with an IP-based network and cabling infrastructure than before.” While the cabled solutions currently in use seem to operate efficiently, it has been suggested that wireless is the next breakthrough. However, Tendulkar explains: “Wireless is one area where it depends on the environment, application and budget. “I am not really excited on the wireless front, except for places like a lobby, where you want to raise the temperature and provide the right cooling, with maybe more than 100 people there. In this case, wireless could work.”

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SOLAR POWER

The sun

shineson BIPV

A worker at the 10 MW Masdar solar plant in Abu Dhabi.

The integration of photovoltaics into building structures means that facilities managers are increasingly having to look at energy modelling and resource utilisation issues. fmME takes a closer look at this latest trend. www.constructionweekonline.com

nergy modelling is a critical component of building design at the concept stage. MEP engineers are playing an increasingly vital role in determining the energy efficiency of new building projects, which is necessary to ensure their compliance with the soon-tobe-regulated ‘green’ building ethos, as well as promoting their long-term sustainability. Apart from the regulatory perspective, many think such an

E

approach also encompasses an ethical or moral responsibility, meaning the ‘feel good’ factor of renewable energy. PV installations throughput the world reached a record high of 5,95 GW in 2008, representing a staggering growth of 110% over the previous year, according to market research from Solarbuzz of the US. A total of 81 countries contributed to this total market, lead by Europe, Spain, Germany and Korea. On the supply side,

January 2010 21


SOLAR POWER

world solar cell production achieved a consolidated figure of 6,85 GW in 2008, up significantly from 3,44 GW a year earlier. Overall capacity utilisation rose to 67% in 2008, while thin-film production (the latest efficiency advance in PV panel technology) rose a phenomenal 123% increase in 2008. When it comes to solar power in the region, many think of vast solar energy ‘farms’ spread across the deserts of the UAE, taking advantage of both the region’s high insolation factor and its availability of large tracts of open space. This is quite removed from the normal electro-mechanical and plumbing ambit of a typical MEP contractor. But there is an aspect of PV technology dovetailing with the construction industry that offers huge scope for the MEP sector.

FACING THE CHANGE Known as Building-Integrated Photovoltaics (BIPV), pundits claim this is poised to change the face of construction, energy and urban planning in the coming decade. The Department of Energy in the US, for example, has estimated that BIPV technology has the potential to generate half of its electricity needs. This goal seems increasingly achievable, as solar energy is expected to attain ‘grid parity’ by 2015, meaning it will be able to supply electricity as cost-effectively, or even more cheaply, than electricity produced by conventional means such as coal-fired power stations. What better way then to capitalise on the utility potential of solar energy by applying it to the building industry, which is struggling to reduce its own carbon footprint in order to save precious natural resources?

22 January 2010

Masdar City has the first grid-connected solar power plant in the UAE.

“In one day, the sun provides more energy than the world’s population could consume in 27 years” International Energy Agency

80% CONSIDERED A GOOD SOLAR YIELD BY THE IEA AND ESSENTIAL TO ACHIEVING A USEFUL LEVEL OF POWER PRODUCTION.

Kyocera Solar, one of the world’s largest vertically-integrated producers and suppliers of solar energy products, comments that BIPV represents the combination of proven renewable power-generating technology and the building exterior or façade, using tried-and-tested construction methodology. (Kyocera solar modules are distributed in the UAE by Green Energy LLC).

The main implication is that solar panels are taken into account with the structure itself being built. This immediately offers a plethora of benefits: • Financial appeal – costs are combined for a building material and power generation; • Distributed power generation – greater independence and less reliance on centralised fossil fuel power sources; • Economies of scale – leverages a large inventory of constructed surface area for renewable power production; • Improved real estate values – capitalise on short- and long-term property investment; • Easy integration to standard construction practice – can be retrofitted to existing construction or installed new;

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SOLAR POWER

BIPV allows the construction industry to ‘harness the sun’.

GLOBAL LEADER Scheuten is a global leader in solar power systems, with a module manufacturing facility in Germany. Scheuten Middle East MD Reza Shaybani commented that incorporating PV technology into the building envelope itself is not nearly as esoteric as it sounds. Instead it represents a natural convergence of various trends. These are the large unused surfaces of a typical high-rise building (especially in a place like Dubai), combined with the unlimited power of the sun and the current ‘green’ trend. “Let us use this potential!” is Shaybani’s simple, yet forceful, message. “Why integrate PV in façades and roofs? It reduces the dependency on grid-supplied power, especially during peak hours, while simultaneously functioning as a façade material. Thus not only does it look modern and innovative, but it produces power as well,” said Shaybani. • No independent support structures – minimise system cost; • Hassle-free operation – low to no maintenance, with no moving parts; and • Improved aesthetics – avoids the look of being an afterthought or add-on. “Interest in BIPV, where the PV panels actually become an integral part of the building, has been growing worldwide in the energy and construction industry. Solar panels can be integrated into many types of exterior materials, including roofs, walls, shadings, or windows. BIPV not only creates environmentally-friendly solar power, but enhances co-existence with nature and visual harmony,” argues Kyocera. Put simply,

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SEAMLESS INTEGRATION The company’s Multisol modules can be integrated seamlessly into the architecture of any building, or even retrofitted without any major problems. They are available in three different sizes and various

“Why integrate PV? It reduces the dependency on grid power, especially in peak hours, while functioning as a façade material. ” Reza Shaybani

performance classes, meaning optimal flexibility for customised requirements. Features include a sturdy aluminium frame for straightforward installation, together with a patented pluggable connection system. The frame has a wide glass insertion depth to be able to withstand winds, while the plug system at the edges ensures solid interconnection of all frame components. The modules boast such attention to detail as an internal groove providing rapid drainage for any condensation. The International Energy Agency (IEA) comments that, “in order to assess the potential of BIPV, an analysis of the building stock with respect to suitability of the building skin for PV deployment is required. Some building surfaces will have technical limitations; others will have limited capabilities to generate PV power due to inadequate orientation, inclination or shading effects.” The IEA defines such suitability in two main categories:

• Architectural suitability includes corrections for limitation due to construction (HVAC installations, elevators, terraces, etc.), historical considerations, shading effects and use of the available surfaces for other purposes; while • Solar suitability takes into account the relative amount of irradiation for the surfaces, depending on their orientation, inclination and location, as well as the potential performance of the PV system integrated into the building. The IEA concludes that, with a good solar yield assumed to be 80%, the achievable level of solar-power production by PV roofs and façades varies from 15% to 60% (the ratio used is BIPV solar-power production potential over current electricity consumption). The achievable level depends ultimately on the building area available, as well as on solar radiation levels and electricity consumption. All these factors imply that BIPV could have a massive potential in the UAE, where major play-

Examples of integrating PV into a building envelope • Solar cells can be incorporated into the façade of a building, complementing or replacing traditional view or spandrel glass. These installations are often vertical, reducing access to available solar resources, but the large surface area of buildings can help compensate for the reduced power; • PV can be incorporated into awnings and saw-tooth designs on a building façade.

These increase access to direct sunlight, while providing additional architectural benefits such as passive shading; • The use of PV in roofing systems can provide a direct replacement for batten and seam metal roofing and traditional three-tab asphalt shingles; and • Using PV for skylight systems can be both economical and an exciting design feature.

January 2010 23


SOLAR POWER

ers like Scheuten are positioning themselves carefully to take advantage of the ‘desert renewables boom’.

FUTURE POTENTIAL So let us look a bit closer at what BIPV entails, as well as its future potential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) notes that “the integration of PV panels into buildings during construction is one of the fastest-growing segments of the solar industry.” Steven Strong from Solar Design Associates, described as North America’s oldest and most respected renewable-energy design firm, says there is burgeoning international interest in using PV elements as an ‘exterior weather skin.’ He says that PV specialists and innovative designers in Europe, Japan and the US are now exploring ‘creative’ ways of incorporating solar power into their work. “A whole new vernacular of solar energy architecture is beginning to emerge,” comments Strong. This is good news for the MEP sector, because where there are architects, there is a need for MEP contractors and consultants … A complete BIPV system comprises the following elements: • PV modules (thin-film or crystalline, transparent, semitransparent or opaque); • A charge controller to regulate the power into and out of the battery storage bank (in standalone systems); • A power-storage system; • Power-conversion equipment (including an inverter to convert the DC output from the PV modules into compatible AC current); • Back-up power supplies (such as diesel gensets); and •Appropriate support and

24 January 2010

“The integration of solar panels into buildings during construction is one of the fastest-growing segments of the solar industry.” National Renewable Energy Laboratory

mounting hardware (wiring and safety disconnects). Below are some important design considerations associated with BIPV systems. • Shift the peak: If the peak building loads do not match the power output of the PV array, batteries can be incorporated to offset the most costly load periods. This system can also serve a dual function as an UPS; • Ensure adequate ventilation: High operating temperatures have a detrimental effect on PV conversion efficiencies. This means allowing appropriate ventilation behind modules in order to dissipate the heat;

• Integrated daylighting and PV collection: By using semitransparent thin-film modules, or crystalline modules with custom-spaced cells between two layers of glass, designers can use PV to create unique daylighting features in façade, roofing or skylight PV systems. The BIPV can also mitigate the additional cooling load and glare associated with large expanses of architectural glazing; • Shading devices: Conceiving PV arrays as awnings over viewing-glass areas of a building can provide the necessary passive solar shading. When sunshades are taken into

account as part of an integrated design approach, chiller capacity can be reduced, while perimeter cooling distribution may even be totally obviated.

RELATIVELY NEW Finally, the Research Institute for Sustainable Energy (RISE) cautions that the use of BIPV is still relatively new. “Ensure that the design, installation and maintenance professionals involved with the project are properly trained, licensed, certified and experienced in PV systems work,” it urges contractors. While there are numerous companies in the UAE supplying solar-energy products and systems, the relative newness of the technology means there is a potential dearth of installation and maintenance experience. This is one arena where the MEP sector can stand the construction industry in good stead by filling this gap.

An example of PV integrated into a building envelope.

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COMMENT

Money for nothing

Alan Millin (MSc. CEng FIHEEM) urges FMs to ‘raise the bar’ by guaranteeing 100% performance for 100% payment.

www.constructionweekonline.com

ow many times have you been at the car wash, waiting patiently for your turn, only to find yourself stuck behind someone who demands that his car have every little blemish cleaned or polished, and all for a few dirhams? Have you ever thought: “What does this guy expect for 15 Dirhams, blood”? Perhaps you have used the services of a car-washer at home or at the office and

H

then thought that he had not cleaned the car very well. Next time you see him you tell him to make sure he cleans the wheels or the windscreen properly, or you won’t pay him. When we look at this in more detail though, the customer has paid money, however much or little that may be, to have his car cleaned, and that iss just what he expects to get. Why should he pay the full price if the cleaners are not going to do the full work?

In a management meeting of a major company we were once discussing personnel performance and annual bonus payments. One person suggested that, if a member of staff had achieved 95% or more of his annual target, that person should receive 100% bonus. If he achieved less than 95%, the bonus would be reduced, and if he achieved more than 100% of his target, the bonus would increase. Sound familiar? The Vice President of the

January 2010 27


COMMENT

company pounced immediately. He flatly refused to consider paying 100% bonus to someone who only delivered 95% of his target. Only if someone achieved 100% of his annual target would he get 100% bonus. Anything less than 100% success reduced the bonus, while over-achievers would take home more. So what does this have to do with facilities management, you may ask … Quite a lot, it would seem. Let us say you have engaged a cleaning company to service your office facility, and part of the scope requires that all the waste bins be emptied daily. You find that not all the waste bins are being emptied daily. Would you be happy paying the cleaning company 100% of its invoice value for reduced service, or would you take action to resolve the issue and get the value you required? What about engaging a contractor to fulfill your operation and maintenance requirements? You might identify a percentage of completed Planned Preventative Maintenance (PPM) tasks as a Key Performance Indicator (KPI). You may well have signed a contract agreeing that 95% PPM tasks completed

28 January 2010

is regarded rded as excellent, ent, so the contractor ctor gets paid in full if he hits this is mark. Let us put it another way though. ough. You have just ust paid 100% of the fee for only 95% of the work that should have been completed. Our friends the auditors are going to love you now, aren’t they? But do we also deliver less than we get paid for? I have

it is actually worth paying 100% of the fee for this service. Maybe there is another way though. What about if we agree to 100% service delivery as the requirement for 100% payment? I can almost hear the groans now, but why? All we have to

“What about if [FMs] agree to 100% service delivery as the requirement for 100% payment? I can almost hear the groans now, but why? All we have to do is deliver what we say we will.” seen several contracts where the FM provider can deliver something less than 100% while expecting to be paid in full. Why should our customers receive less than they pay for when we demand compliance from our own providers? Of course, it is nice work if you can get it. Submit a proposal, negotiate with the client and convince them that 95% delivery is the norm and that

do is deliver what we say we will. Guaranteeing 100% delivery in return for 100% payment sounds realistic, does it not? The bins would be emptied, the facility cleaned, the PPM tasks completed, the monthly reports would be on the client’s desk at the required time each month. Remember that the client is not paying us to empty most of the bins or to complete most of the maintenance tasks

or to submit a report late or only 95% complete. In the world of air conditioning, purchasing companies have been specifying ‘zero tolerance’ on chiller performance for several years now. Zero tolerance is not strictly the case though. The buyer will accept better performance than specified, although as he does not need it, he won’t pay for it, but not poorer performance. The buyers will get what they are paying for as a minimum or the provider pays a penalty. We often hear of ‘raising the bar’ with regard to FM service delivery. Perhaps raising the bar might be to guarantee 100% compliance or the client pays less than the full amount. If we exceed our obligations we could get paid even more, assuming we remember to negotiate this at the outset. Would giving such a guarantee be a good selling point in your proposal when others are content to operate at 95%? Are you ready to guarantee 100% performance? If so, prepare to reap the rewards. If not, why not?

www.constructionweekonline.com


Design Antonio

Assistant Toan


PROJECT TRACKER

PROJECT FOCUS OMAN PROJECTS DATABASE - BUILDING PROJECTS FOCUS PROJECT TITLE

CLIENT

CONSULTANT

MAIN CONTRACTOR

MEP CONTRACTOR

VALUE / VALUE RANGE (US$ MN)

PROJECT STATUS

TYPE OF PROJECT

Buraimi University College Building

Buraimi University College

Gulf Engineering Consultancy

Not Appointed

Not Appointed

31 - 100

project under design

Educational Facilities

Renovation of Intercontinental Hotel in Muscat

Omran Office

Pentago Spowers International

Not Appointed

Not Appointed

16 - 30

project under design

Hotel

Dhofar University in Salalah - Pack 1

Dhofar University

National Engineering Office

Al-Hashemi & Al-Rawas Company

In House

21

project under construction

Educational Facilities

New Television Studio Complex

Ministry of Information

Austro Consult

Bahwan Contracting Company

Bahwan Engineering Co.

33

project under construction

Others

Headquarters Building for Bank of Muscat

Bank of Muscat

Atkins

Galfar Engineering & Contracting

In House

71

project under construction

Commercial Buildings

Development of Jabal Al Akhdar Resort Hotel

Omran Office

AW2

Not Appointed

Not Appointed

31 - 100

project under design

Hotel

Fairmont Hotel

Fairmont Hotel & Resorts/ The Wave Muscat

Echo Designer Consultants

Not Appointed

Not Appointed

101 - 250

project under design

Hotel

Crowne Plaza Duqum Resort

Omran Office/Inter Continental Hotel Group

KEO International

Not Appointed

Not Appointed

251 - 500

project under design

Hotel

Hospital in South Salalah

Ministry of Defence

Ibn Khaldun

International Contractors Company

Satrikap Fanniya Oman

16 - 30

project under construction

Hospital

Psychiatric Hospital at Al Amerat

Ministry of Health

Khatib and Alami

Bahwan Contracting Company

Bahwan Engineering Co.

107

project under construction

Hospital

Renovation of Sheraton Oman Hotel

Al Hasher Group

Atkins

Zubair Furnishing

Bahwan Engineering Co.

25

project under construction

Hotel

The Malkai at Barka

Al Maeen Real Estate Services Company

Triad Oman/AW2

Not Appointed

Not Appointed

250

project under design

Mixed Use

Office Building at Al Khuwair

Ministry of Housing Electricity & Water

Al- Hatmy Engineering Consultant

Burj Oman

In House

2.5 - 15

project under construction

Commercial Buildings

Bone Marrow Transplant Unit Block

Sultan Qaboos University Hospital

Gulf Engineering Consultancy

Not Appointed

Not Appointed

16 - 30

project under design

Hospital

Dar Al Maha Residential Building - Phase 1

Sohar International Development & Investment Ministry of Manpower

Engineering Innovation Design

Al Hajiri Trading

Durat Al Shail

16 - 30

project under construction

Residential Buildings

Gulf Engineering Consultancy

Al Khalili United Enterprises

In House

35

project under construction

Educational Facilities

Housing Complex at Sohar

Mr. Abdulla Moosa

Al Hatmy Engineering Consultancy

Iskan Contracting Company

In House

17

project under construction

Residential

Redevelopment of the Crowne Plaza resort Salalah

Ministry of Tourism

Consulting Engineering Services

Not Appointed

Not Appointed

31 - 100

project under design

Hotel

Court Complex at Al-Buraimi

Ministry of Justice

Sundaram Architects

Not Appointed

Not Appointed

2.5 - 15

award awaited for the construction contract

Others

Natural History Museum in Muscat

Ministry of Heritage & Culture

Not Appointed

Not Appointed

Not Appointed

16 - 30

award awaited for the consultancy contract

Recreational Facilities

Al Qurum Gardens - Phase 1

Alargan Towell Investment

Al Abraj Consulting Engineers

Jabal Heed

In House

4

project under construction

Residential

150 Housing Units at Dhofar Region Mazyona-Centre of State Client Khasab Family Resort

Ministry of Housing Electricity & Water

Al Waha Engineering Consultant

Naheez Trading & Contracting

In House

18

project under construction

Residential

Majan Gulf Properties

Not Appointed

Not Appointed

Not Appointed

779

project in concept stage

Hotel

International Maritime College Oman

www.constructionweekonline.com

January 2010 31


PROJECT TRACKER

OMAN PROJECTS DATABASE - BUILDING PROJECTS FOCUS PROJECT TITLE

CLIENT

CONSULTANT

MAIN CONTRACTOR

MEP CONTRACTOR

VALUE / VALUE RANGE (US$ MN)

PROJECT STATUS

TYPE OF PROJECT

Multi-Storey Building at CBD area

Vision Investment Company

Rana Engineering Consultancy Office

Arabian Technical Supplies

In House

2.5 - 15

project under construction

Commercial Buildings

Development of Duqum Beach Hotel

Omran Office

KEO International

Not Appointed

Not Appointed

101 - 250

award awaited for the construction contract

Hotel

Health Centre at Rahba Al Hayl

Ministry of Health

Gulf Engineering Consultancy

Arabian Technical Supplies

In House

2.5 - 15

project under construction

Hospital

Cardiac Centre at Sultan Qaboos Hospital

Ministry of Health

Asi Etudes

Galfar Engineering & Contracting

Not Appointed

39

project under construction

Hospital

Showroom at Barka

Saud Bahwan Group

Kadri Consultant

Premier International Project

Not Appointed

2.5 - 15

project under construction

Commercial Buildings

Hotel Apartment Building at Al Khuwair

Shk. Musalam Bin Ham

Triad Oman Consultant International

National Construction & Trading

Bahwan Engineering Co.

2.5 - 15

project under construction

Hotel

Sohar Airport Package No:3 Terminal buildings

Civil Aviation Authority/ Ministry of Transport & Comm.

Hamza Associates Middle East

Not Appointed

Not Appointed

101 - 250

project under design

Airport

Residential/Commercial Building at Ghala

Al Fardan Real Estate

Dar Al Handasah

W. J. Towell Construction

Genetco

52

project under construction

Mixed Use

Township at Wadi Kabir

Saud Bahwan Group

Kadri Consultant

Oman Shapoorji Construction Company

In House

31 - 100

project under construction

Residential Development

Ministry Building at Ibri

Ministry of Manpower

Al Abraj Consulting Engineers

Business & Trade

In House

4

project under construction

Commercial Buildings

Oncology Wards & Day Care Centre at Royal Hospital

Ministry of Health

Gulf Engineering Consultancy

Premier International Project

In House

20

project under construction

Hospital

Sohar City Centre

Majid Al Futtaim Investments

Atkins/Broadway Malyan

Not Appointed

Not Appointed

31 - 100

project under design

Shopping Centre

Common Teaching Block

Sultan Qaboos University

Gulf Engineering Consultancy

International Contractors Company

In House

14

project under construction

Educational Facilities

50 Housing Units at Al Gazer

Ministry of Housing Electricity & Water

Al Saqf Consulting

Al Aetimad Contracting

In House

4

project under construction

Residential Buildings

Development of Ras Al-Hadd Airport - Terminal Building Package

Ministry of Transport & Communication

Gulf Engineering Consultancy

Not Appointed

Not Appointed

101 - 250

award awaited for the construction contract

Airport

Development of Fort Hotel

Omran Office

Maya Overseas SA/CES

Not Appointed

Not Appointed

31 - 100

project under design

Hotel

Headquarters Building for PDO

Petroleum Development Oman

Gulf Engineering Consultancy

Al Hajiri Trading

In House

47

project under construction

Commercial Buildings

Genetic Centre in Baushar

Ministry of Health

Gulf Engineering Consultancy

Ay-Tek Construction

Bahwan Engineering Co.

13

project under construction

Hospital

Extension of Health Centre at Sohar

Ministry of Health

Asi Etudes

Al Khalili United Enterprises

In House

13

project under construction

Hospital

Commercial Building at Qurum

Suhail Bahwan Group

Cowi & Partners

Oman Shapoorji Construction Company

Bahwan Engineering Co.

37

project under construction

Commercial Buildings

Health Centre at Wadi Minqal

Ministry of Health

Gulf Engineering Consultancy

Teejan Trading & Contracting

In House

2.5 - 15

project under construction

Hospital

National Diabetic Centre

Ministry of Health

Gulf Engineering Consultancy

Premier International Project

Galfar Engineering & Contracting

13

project under construction

Hospital

Note : The above information is the sole property of Ventures Middle East LLC and cannot be published without the expressed permission of Ventures Middle East LLC, Abu Dhabi, UAE

32 January 2010

www.constructionweekonline.com


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City Centre Offices, 2nd Floor, P.O. Box 22707, Dubai, UAE Tel +971 4 2038111, Fax +971 4 2038112, www.dalkia.ae


Facilities Management Middle East - Jan 2010  

Facilities Management Middle East - Jan 2010 - ITP Business

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