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ongratulations from visit us at www.itnext.in


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Copyright Š 9.9 Media 2010

NEXT100 TEAM Concept & Research: Vikas Gupta, R Giridhar, Shashwat DC, Jatinder Singh, Ankur Agarwal, Siddhant Raizada, Swati Sharma Sponsorships: NC Singh, Sachin Mhashilkar, Raghavendra BN, Deepak Sharma Art & Design: Jayan Narayanan, Anil VK, Prashanth TR, Sameer Kishore Photography: Jiten Gandhi, Subhojit Pal, Nitish Sharma All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any other means without prior written permission of the publisher, nor otherwise circulated in any form of binding or cover other than in which it is published and without a simalr consition being imposed on the subsequent purchaser. Company, product and service names mentioned in this book may be trademarks or service marks of others. Published and printed by 9.9 Media Private Ltd A-262, Defence Colony New Delhi 110024, India

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NEXT100 | November 2010


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NEXT100 | November 2010


CONTENTS FOREWORD���������������������������� 6 ABOUT NEXT 100������������������� 8 NEXT 100 JURY��������������������� 12 FEATURE ARTICLES Understanding the changing role of an enterprise CIO . ............................................18 Leading in risky situations requires a sound action plan . ....................................32 How to influence and get buy-in from your own people.........................................46 Getting full value for price requires strategic thinking.......................................60 Superior strategies for managers who hate negotiating ..............................74 Effective communication is the key to better teamwork .......................................88 Use failure as an opportunity for improvement .............................................116 Boosting productivity of knowledge workers through empowerment . .....130 Aliging technology usage to business priorities is a major imperative . ........144

INDEX�����������������������������������158 AFTERWORD�����������������������160

November 2010 | NEXT100

5


“Remote collaboration solutions will be a key contributor towards the growth of businesses in the coming times and the CIO’s of today will drive the change.” – Pankaj Gupta, Arkadin

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NEXT100 | November 2010


Dear CIO, We at Arkadin are proud to be associated with the Next 100 initiative by 9dot9. An event like this will help identify and nurture talent that will lead & shape the future of Indian businesses in the next 20 years. We all are aware that CIO’s today have become an integral part of today’s corporate world and this initiative by 9dot9 will act as a further catalyst in exposing these next generations of IT professionals to the board rooms of tomorrow. We at Arkadin believe that every business has to be socially conscious and ensure a balance between our businesses and the environment. Remote collaboration solutions will be a key contributor towards the growth of businesses in the coming times and the CIO’s of today will drive the change. The next generation of solutions will help organizations to become not only profitable but entities that will contribute to the environment it operates in. Once again, my best wishes to the team at 9dot9 and all the CIO’s who are making India the preferred destination for business. With Best Wishes

Pankaj Gupta Country Manager & Managing Director Arkadin India

November 2010 | NEXT100

7


1,650

and the highest age is

IT MANAGERS REGISTERED ON NEXT100 SITE

36

307 FINISHED ALL FORMALITIES BY AUG 15 DEADLINE

450

IT MANAGERS TOOK LEADERSHIP TEST

OF THE

307

APPLICANTS,

Leaders are born not made, is a popular belief held not only in our brick and mortar world but also in the in domain of bits and bytes. But that was before, IT Next launched an exercise in June 2010, to find the Next 100 IT managers that were ready to make a cut to the big

league and to take on the mantle of CIOs, CTOs or even CEOs. These chosen ones will be the technology leaders of India Inc. in the days to come. Though the selection process to the top was rigorous, the enthusiasm was exceptional. The culmination of this 6-month

53

Average age of ITNext winner is

a

b

c

d

a

b

c

d

a

b

c

d

a

b

c

d

13

WERE WOMEN AND

exercise happened at Ramoji Film City, Hyderabad, where these Next 100 debuted in front of the world. While, it would be unwise to claim that we managed to bring the entire story of emotions, brilliance and excitement in the pages to follow, the emphasis is on providing a

the lowest age is

27

3

MADE IT TO THE WINNER’S LIST

glimpse of how it feel to be special. Presenting the story of these extraordinary gents and ladies and how they made it to the exclusive club...

November 2010 | NEXT100

9


METHODOLOGY TO ENSURE THAT the Next 100 awards were completely fair and unbiased, it was decided at the very onset that the editorial team would play no role in the selection or elimination of the awardees. The editors of the magazine, were not involved in the evaluation panel. Thus, in essence the Next 100 is a truly industry award given by veterans. To kick-start the process, through mass-mailers and magazine adverts, IT managers were asked to register themselves and fill up a form on a special microsite that was created for the award. Over 1600 managers registered themselves. The registration required 3 things, one was the self-nomination form that captured personal and professionals details about the applicant. Next was a special leadership test that IT Next licensed for the survey. This comprehensive test examined the leadership ability of the applicant. And finally, there was a case-study that was provided to the applicant, which was

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NEXT100 | November 2010

to be solved. The 3 components carried different weightages, with primacy given to the details that were collected from the self nomination form and then the leadership test. In the meantime, 40 top Indian CIOs were engaged in the whole process as advisors. They deliberated and decided on what steps need to be taken. Based on these deliberations, the ranking or the marking mechanism was decided upon, and a single docket for each applicant was created. To make the exercise objective, each applicant was examined by 3 CIOs. Based on the scores awarded, all the IT managers were ranked and the top 100 were selected. But the process did not end here, once the top 100 were selected there was a background or reference check done to ensure that the claims made by the applicant were true. Once, it was ascertained to be so, the final list was collated.

THE GENESIS The mammoth Next 100 exercise, while publicly announced in June 2010, started much earlier. Back in February 2010, on receiving the enthusiastic response to the 1st issue of the magazine, that spoke about 7 steps to becoming the CIO, the edit team, put on their thinking caps, on how to take the IT managers to the next level, what would be the best approach, when and what should be the mechanism, and other such things. Over the next few months, various ideas were examined and summarily debunked, some considered to be too early, while others too late. But through all this lengthy deliberations that was a consensus building up, that not only should IT Next aid the managers to move up the ladder, there also needs to be a mechanism, wherein the creme-dela-creme of the managers were given a platform to preen in front of the world. This is how Next 100 came into being. A select team of editorial advisors, marketing and branding gurus and techies was formulated to work out

the nitty-grittys. In the meantime the creative head was also involved to ensure that the output while being content rich was also slick and of high appeal. No corners were spared to ensure that the exercise reached out to as many managers as possible, and that it remained fair and just. After a few agonizing weeks of blood, toil and sweat (quite literally), the award program were announced and managers were invited to apply the rest, as they say, is history. Next 100 is not an event, is something that everyone at IT Next strongly believes in about. There is an intrinsic commitment to the community and especially to the winners. Hence, the Next 100 awardees will receive special mentorship and other benefits over the course of the year. Till the next set is discovered


WORK COMPETENCIES

PERSONALITY PROFILE

A comparison of the workplace competencies of the Next100 awardees with other applicants indicates that both groups scored relatively low on factors like visioning, customer focus, integretity and dependability. The competencies on which the Next100 group exhibited a

ABOUT THE TEST

The graph, based upon the results of CTPI test, measures the

Central Test Personality

Inventory (CTPI) for Professionals,

of the Next100 awardees with other applicants. While both groups exhibited high scores on achievent orientation, emotional stability and adapatability; they scored low on individualistic orientation. The two groups diverged on personality attributes like vigilance, self assurance, emotional stability, and foresight.

ASSESSES

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November 2010 | NEXT100

11


Jury

Ajay K. Dhir, Chief Information Officer JSL Limited

C Mohan, Chief Technology Officer Reliance Life Insurance Company Limited

Dhiren Savla, Director IT Crisil

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NEXT100 | November 2010

Arun Gupta, Group CTO Shoppers’ Stop

Daya Prakash,

Head - IT LG Electronics India

Dr.B. Muthukumaran, CTO and Chief Consultant Gemini Communication Ltd


Jury

Jagat Pal Singh, Chief Technology Officer Cybage

Nandkishor Dhomne, CIO Manipal Health Systems

Kinshuk Hora, Head of IT, India Sub Continent GlaxoSmith Kline Consumer Healthcare

Neena Pahuja, CIO Max HealthCare Group

Rajeev Jorapur,

Rajesh Garg,

Head - IT Mercedes-Benz India Private Limited

Chief Information Security Officer Nucleus Software Exports Ltd

November 2010 | NEXT100

13


Jury

Rajesh Munjal, Head IT Carzonrent India

S.P. Arya, Vice President Corporate(IT), Amtek

Sarabjit Anand, Head Information Technology Standard Chartered Bank

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NEXT100 | November 2010

S C Mittal, Group CTO IFFCO

Sachin Jain, Head IT Evalueserve

Satish Das, CSO Cognizant Technoligies


Jury

Shailesh Joshi,

Shantanu Singh,

CIO Godrej Properties Ltd

Chief Technology Officer Vfirst

Shiva Shankar,

Sivaram Tadepalli,

VP & Head - IT Infrastructure Reliance Tech Services

CIO Delhi International Airport Limited

Srinivas Kishan Anapu,

Subhasish Saha,

Vice President Enterprise Information Systems Mahindra Satyam

Chief Technology Officer Apeejay Surrendra Group

November 2010 | NEXT100

15


Jury

Suhas Mhaskar, GM, Corporate IT Mahindra

CIO Essar Group

U. C. Dubey,

Vikram Dhanda,

Executive Director ( IT ) Iffco-Tokio General Insurance Co Ltd

VP & Head, Foundation Infrastructure Reliance ADA

Vinay Mehta, CIO Escorts Construction Equipment Limited

16

Sumant Kelkar,

NEXT100 | November 2010

Vishnu Gupta, CIO The Calcutta Medical Research Institute


Jury

Zoeb Adenwala, CIO (Global) Esselgroup

Vikas Gadre, CIO Tata Chemicals

Ratnakar Nemani, CIO Himatsingka Seide Limited

Umesh Jain, CIO Yes Bank

Swaranjit S Soni, Former Executive Director (IS) India Oil Corporation

Rajeev Seoni, Chief Information Officer Ernst & Young Pvt. Ltd.

November 2010 | NEXT100

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UNDERSTANDING THE CHANGING ROLE OF AN ENTERPRISE CIO THE ROLE OF CIO IS NOT LIMITED TO MANAGING INFORMATION RESOURCES. TECHNOLOGY IS NOW SEEN AS A TOOL FOR AUTOMATION, ENABLING EFFECTIVE DECISION MAKING. IT NOW PROVIDES AN ENTERPRISE WITH THE TOOLS TO COLLATE, HARNESS AND LEVERAGE KNOWLEDGE RATHER THAN JUST DATA. — BY V RAMKUMAR

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NEXT100 | November 2010


G THE CIO’S ROLE, which has evolved over the years, has been the subject of discussion and debate in the corporate corridors. The role and function of technology within the enterprise has changed, and, accordingly, the scope of the job at the helm has also changed. Traditionally, technology was deployed for producing MIS. The IT function was considered as the custodian of the company’s information resources. MIS itself was seen as an output of financial reports and general ledger. Thus, the reporting of a CIO into the CFO was seen as a natural extension. However, today, the role of CIO is not limited to managing information resources. Information is now much more freely available, and the tools to create and edit them so widespread that the custodian model has become outmoded. Technology is now seen as a tool for automation, primarily enabling effective decision making. It now provides an enterprise with the tools to collate, harness and leverage knowledge rather than just data. The CIO is therefore a critical contributor to the development of the organisation’s strategy, a valued member of the “C” suite, a leader who is able to lead and support major change in organisational processes, manage teams of highperformance technology staff, and is an astute judge of the potential of new technologies.

THE CIO-CFO DEBATE The divide in the roles between the CFO and the CIO is sharper now than before. CFOs typically have the task to look at business plans and the operational goals of the organisation, and accordingly build budgets with capital allocation plans. The CFO is driven by metrics and measures investments by their returns; technology is seen as a cost centre and in the process the element of subjectivity has a likelihood of being lost. On the contrary, CIOs are inundated with information on trends related to the latest technology and contemporary tools. Quite naturally, on many occasions, in the quest to latch on to the latest technology, the ‘return on the investment’ viewpoint does tend to take a backseat. Both these, however, are quite natural and logical from their respective standpoints. The key question, therefore, is how to strike a balance, and, more importantly, what it that the balance should ultimately result in.

NEED FOR A BALANCE As roles and responsibilities converge, the key to mastering this challenge lies in achieving greater alignment and transparency between IT innovation and business strategy. This balance should achieve the following three results for an enterprise: l Balance between short and long term objective of enterprise:

Short term technology investments should not be held back in the quest for ROIs and payback periods. Similarly, it is important not to forget about return on investment, payback and total cost of ownership ratios for long term technology investments. The aim is to enable CFOs to make faster and more informed decisions through improved visibility of metrics. l Determining the ROI of technology investment: Finance managers are now increasingly seeing business returns on all assets of the enterprise – be it tangible or intangible, while IT managers talk of moving technology from a cost centre to becoming a strategic asset and value creator. The essence of the solution therefore is to come up with a useful ROI calculation that identifies all the sources of cost (hardware, software, training, downtime, etc.) as well as all of the sources of benefit (direct savings, enhancements to productivity and improvements to quality – i.e., customer satisfaction). Fortunately, experienced CFOs do understand the challenge of getting a real ROI estimate. A good strategy is to engage the CFO and the finance function in coming up with the appropriate matrix. l Balance between the roles of CIO and CFO: It is important to understand that the purpose of the existence of these roles has different

origins. Each role depends on the other for effective execution of the responsibilities, even while one is not a subset of the other. It is true that in the current economic scenario where the focus is on cost cutting and improving efficiency, the role of a CFO has a much larger connotation – CFOs must take ownership of the financial health of the organisation. The CIO’s role, on the contrary, has a more technical orientation; nonetheless, it too focuses around the same objectives – improving efficiencies and quality of decisions through effective automation, quality of MIS and timeliness and accuracy of information. In many ways, therefore, even while both of these roles are support functions, they reflect the two sides of the same coin. Both roles are complimentary, and both are in existence to support the larger objective of the enterprise. More importantly, the ‘endobjective’ of both the endeavours – be it the technology investment itself or be it the measurement of its return – are in the larger interests of the enterprise. Hence, the key to the success of a balanced model is in ‘active engagement’ of both the CFO and the CIO in both the decision making process and in the process of relevant measurements of their utilities. V Ramkumar is Global Head- Business Technology Practice, Cedar Management Consulting. November 2010 | NEXT100

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DEEPAK AGGARWAL Pg 22

BALAJI ALAPILLA Pg 23

AMIT BAJAJ Pg 27

NAGESH ASWARTHA Pg 25

SACHIN ARORA Pg 24

PAWAN BAKSHI Pg 28

PARESH BALDHA Pg 29

SUBHASH BAGCHI Pg 26

ASHISH BANSAL Pg 30

SHRIPAD BHARATI Pg 31

November 2010 | NEXT100

21


Deepak Agarwal

Deputy General Manager Indian Oil Corporation Ltd Birthday 30 June Highest Qualification Masters Degree Computer Science Institution of Electronics & Telecom Engineers Total Experience More than 20 years Current Team Size 21 to 35 people Technology Expertise Data center solutions, Business Continuity Solutions, Large SAP ERP project management, Large IT contract management, Technology Management, SAP HRM solutions, SAP Technology management, IIT monitoring and Network Management, Portals and websites, ITIL implementation, IT Administration

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NEXT100 | November 2010


Balaji Alapilla Program Manager IBM India Pvt Ltd Birthday 9 January Highest Qualification Masters Degree

Information Technology University of Madras Total Experience 13 to 15 years

Technology Expertise Project Management Methodology (PMI) & Tools, IT Infrastructure Projects, IT Service Management (ITIL)

Current Team Size 21 to 35 people

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Sachin Arora

Head Datacenter Bharat Business Channel Ltd (Videocon D2h) Birthday 8 February

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Business Management CSM-IGS, Canada Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size 36 to 50 people

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NEXT100 | November 2010

Technology Expertise IT frameworks, Datacenter Development, Program & Project management, Cloud Implementations, Hosting Solutions, Applications & Infrastructure Virtualization, Infrastructure Monitoring, ITIL & ISO project implementations. CRM, Billing & ERP

Implementations, Continuity Planning, Risk assessment & Mitigation


Nagesh Aswartha Senior Manager SPML Infra Ltd Birthday 25 September Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Engineering Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Total Experience 6 to 9 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise Business Intelligence Solutions, ERP and Manufacturing Solutions, HRM solutions, MIS Systems, Portals and Websites, Project Management tools

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Subhash Bagchi

Chief of Information Technology and Facility Management S S Steel Birthday 24 March Highest Qualification Masters Degree Mathematics,Statistics & OR Ranchi University Total Experience More than 20 years Current Team Size More than 100 people Technology Expertise Data Center and DR site implementation, IT Monitoring and Network Management tools, Knowledge Management Systems (KMS), MIS Systems, Project Management Tools. S/W Quality Audit and Processes

26

NEXT100 | November 2010


Amit Bajaj

Deputy Manager IT LG Electronics India Pvt Ltd Birthday 22 September Highest Qualification Masters Degree

Computer Applications Data System Research Foundation, Pune Total Experience 10 years Current Team Size 21 to 35 people

Technology Expertise IT Infrastructure Management, Server & Storage management, Business intelligence solutions, Collaboration solutions, Enterprise Content Management Systems, CRM solutions, Data warehouse and data marts, e-Commerce solutions, Email servers, ERP

and manufacturing solutions, Finance and accounting solutions, Industry-specific solutions, HRM solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, Knowledge management systems, MIS systems, Portals and web sites, Project management tools, SCM solutions, Virtualization November 2010 | NEXT100

27


Pawan Bakshi

Manager IT Infrastructure & eBiz Amway India Enterprises Pvt Ltd Birthday 13 June

Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Electronics Institution of Engineers

Total Experience 16 to 20 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people

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NEXT100 | November 2010

Technology Expertise Collaboration solutions, e-Commerce solutions, ERP and manufacturing solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, Portals and web sites, Virtualization solutions


Paresh Baldha Manager IT Gujarat Pipavav Port Ltd Birthday 8 April Highest Qualification PG Diploma Electronics Ministry of Defence, Jamnagar Total Experience 16 to 20 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise Servers, Network, Virtualisation, SAN, NAS, Gateway Security, VPN, VLAN, Email, Backups, VOIP, WIMax, WiFi, GPS, RDT, RFID

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Ashish Bansal Sr. Principal Consultant - ITS Genpact Birthday 3 January Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Business Management Guru Gobind Singh Indrapastha University, Delhi Total Experience 6 to 9 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise Email servers, IT monitoring and network management tools, Knowledge management systems(KMS)Portals and web sites, Project management tools, SCM solutions, Virtualization solutions

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NEXT100 | November 2010


Sripad Bharati

Group Manager Kale Logistics Solutions Private Limited Birthday 1 July

Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Mathematics & Computer Programming Mumbai University Total Experience 10 to 13 years

Current Team Size 36 to 50 people Technology Expertise Business Intelligence, Data warehouse and data marts, e-Commerce solutions, Industry solutions (Supply chain management-Logistics), Community system /portal

development (Logistics), Web sites, Project management tools

November 2010 | NEXT100

31


LEADING IN RISKY SITUATIONS REQUIRES A SOUND ACTION PLAN STUDIES EXPLAIN WHY SOME PEOPLE SEE CLIMBING MOUNTAINS AS SELFACTUALISATION EXPERIENCES WHILE OTHERS SEE IN IT NOTHING BUT FEAR OF HURT –BY DAVID LIM

32

NEXT100 | November 2010


N

SO THERE YOU are, standing on the edge of a precipice of ice. A gaping, bottomless slash extends from beneath the tip of your ice-crusted boots to the nearest flat block of ice, two metres, and too many heartbeats away. The little voices in your head start talking.

YOU WANT TO LIVE FOREVER? After a moment of googling your brain to assess answers to the situation, you half crouch, and then spring forward, hands wrapped around the handles of your twin ice axes, like talons, ready to claw the opposite side. You land with a dull thud and a tinkle of spraying ice chips, as your axes strike home, securing your position. You look to your left, and the Tasman Sea, 3000 m below you shimmers and glows. Your rope partner issues a few expletives; repeats your move, and you take in the slack in the thread of a rope joining both of you. After a few devilish grins, both of you make off, ready for the next challenge. We face choices daily, and whether we like it or not, all are governed by a number of preferences – fear of pain, or love of opportunities – and so on. We live with our own mental programming created by desire to reach goals, our fear of failure, and our level of hope for success in anything we do. While the adventure described above involved the first and only SE-Asian ascent of the complex Syme Ridge on Mount Tasman in 1996, whether we see any situation as an opportunity or an obstacle will

depend on the key factors described above. Having spent two decades straddling both the corporate and extreme adventure worlds, I’ve had ample opportunity to study first-hand the concept of risk-taking. Risk-taking studies explain why some people will see climbing mountains as wonderful self-actualisation experiences, and emotionally powerful goals that drive them. Others see nothing but discomfort, fear of hurt and humiliation. The skill of leading in high-risk environments is influenced by five key mental attributes and skills. The first of the five key factors that make up your personal risk profile is l Motivational Energy: this determines the clarity of life goals, commitment to these goals, and often determined by how aligned these goals are with the person’s higher purpose. People with high motivational energy tend to be people motivated by goals and opportunities. Action Plan: Skills that help “up” this energy are clear goals, aligned with your highest purpose, and internalised every day. l Resilience: Your ability to bounce back from setbacks and overcome obstacles. These could be a combination of know-how in skillspecific challenges.

Action Plan: How do we increase this factor? First, by tolerating smart failures, as well as toughening our minds through simulations; working up to the big goal. l Optimism: While “hope” is more general, optimism suggest a more situation-specific application of the expectation of success. This expectation is based on factors such as time-frames, resources, and selfbelief. Action Plan: Asking “what’s the worse that could happen, and what is the likelihood of it happening?” is one of many “power questions” that can help sort out the muddleheadedness we experience when too fearful. l Practical Criticism: The flip side of optimism is practical criticism. In short, it’s the voice you have that tends to hold you back for very good reasons. Action Plan: When stimulating this skill, constantly ask the right people for views and opinions, however brutal, of your next “great idea”. l The Alpinist’s Pack: Having had to often carry my home, food, fuel, water and clothing for a week on my back, I have a very personal system of what goes into my pack. What goes into yours? What do you carry – your emotional, cultural and physical baggage – that helps or hinders you? The leadership challenge in many corporate

organisations is that leaders hang on to “baggage” that worked well for them in the past, but fail to flex to changing external factors, and fail to embrace new concepts, ideas and beliefs for the future. Action Plan: Packing for your next step up the investment ladder? Look at what baggage you are carrying that needs to be changed or dumped to meet new success. The good news about leading in risky environments is that your personal risk quotient can be changed, and can be measured by validated tools available in the marketplace. The separate components of the leadership risk equation are also worthy in development themselves. In the hundreds of team development programmes we’ve conducted, no one has died of an overdose of clarity of goals, motivational energy or resilience; especially in groups working together. Sadly, in many cases, we have to begin with a sore deficit in many of these areas. Understanding the five components of personal risk thresholds will help organisations immensely in making informed decisions and staying effective in the face of fast changing environments. David Lim, is a mountaineer and motivational speaker who led the first Singapore Mount Everest expedition in 1998. He is the author of two books. November 2010 | NEXT100

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SUBHANKAR BHATTACHARYA Pg 36

DEBASISH CHATTERJEE Pg 41

VISHAL BISHT Pg 37

ANAND BUDHOLIA Pg 38

PRADEEP CHATTERJEE Pg 42

ASHISH CHAKRABORTY Pg 39

SHALINI CHHATWANI Pg 43

JOSE DANIEL Pg 44

MAHENDRA CHANDURKAR Pg 40

CHANDRESH DEDHIA Pg 45

November 2010 | NEXT100

35


Subhankar Bhattacharya Project Manager Syntel Ltd Birthday 25 September Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Engineering VJTI, Mumbai Total Experience More than 9 years Current Team Size 21 to 35 people Technology Expertise Collaboration solutions, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Industry-specific solutions, Knowledge management systems(KMS), Project management tools, SCM solutions

36

NEXT100 | November 2010


Vishal Bisht

Marksman Technologies Pvt Ltd Birthday 31 July Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Engineering

Aeronautical Society of India Total Experience More than 12 years Current Team Size Up to 25 people

Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Collaboration solutions, CRM solutions, e-Commerce solutions, ERP and manufacturing solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, Portals and web sites, Virtualization solutions, Web Applications

and Solutions, e Learning Applications and Solutions, e Learning Products Development, Open Source Custom Applications and Solutions, Enterprise Architectures

November 2010 | NEXT100

37


Anand Budholia

Additional Vice President Reliance Infrastructure Ltd Birthday 5 January

38

NEXT100 | November 2010

Highest Qualification M.E. Mathematics/Statistics/ Software Engineering Allahabad University / NIT Allahabad Total Experience More than 20 years

Current Team Size 51 to 75 people Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Enterprise Content Management Systems, ERP and manufacturing solutions, MIS systems, Portals and web sites, SCM solutions


Ashish Chakraborty Location IS head. Mindtree Ltd Birthday 22 February Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Computer Science University of Nagpur Total Experience 13 to 15 years Current Team Size 21 to 35 people Technology Expertise Email servers, IT monitoring and network management tools, MIS systems, Virtualization solutions, Infrastructure management, Data Center management, Information security, Virtualization

November 2010 | NEXT100

39


Mahendra Chandurkar AM/ ITHead Petroleum Conservation Research Association Birthday 10 October Highest Qualification Masters Degree Business Management Sikkim Manipal University Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise Web site & portals, web server, IT security, IT monitoring & Networks, E-mail servers, Project Management, Database management, Server & Storage management, Enterprise connectivity and communications, SW Development & implementation, Green IT, IT infrastructure, Contract Management, Technology procurement, installation and deployment

40

NEXT100 | November 2010


Debasish Chatterjee

Manager, Integration Development McAfee Software India Pvt Ltd Birthday 24 December

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Physical/Life Sciences IIT Kharagpur Total Experience 10 to 13 years

Technology Expertise CRM solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, Portals and web sites, Project management tools, Virtualization solutions

Current Team Size 0 to 10 people November 2010 | NEXT100

41


Pradeep Chatterjee

Assistant General Manager Tata Motors Ltd

Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Engineering Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra

Birthday 14 January

Total Experience 13 to 15 years

42

NEXT100 | November 2010

Current Team Size More than 100 people Technology Expertise Collaboration solutions, CRM solutions, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Industry-specific solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, Knowledge

management systems (KMS), Portals and web sites


Shalini Chhatwani

Project Manager Professional Access Pvt. Ltd. Birthday 30 November Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Computer Science Thadomal Shahani Engineering College, Mumbai Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise Enterprise Content Management Systems, e-Commerce solutions, Industry-specific solutions, Project management tools, SCM solutions

November 2010 | NEXT100

43


Jose Daniel

Head Operations Sanblue Enterprises Pvt Ltd Birthday 1 July Highest Qualification Masters Degree, Executive Business Management IIM Calcutta Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size 51 to 75 people Technology Expertise e-Commerce solutions, Email servers, Portals and web sites, Application development, Security & Storage solutions

44

NEXT100 | November 2010


Chandresh Dedhia Senior Manager IT Fermenta Biotech Ltd Birthday 16 December

Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Commerce Mumbai University Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people

Technology Expertise Collaboration Solutions, ERP & Manufacturing Solutions, HRM Solutions, Systems & Network Security Management, Virtualization solutions, Technology Architecture, IT Governance, Progr am & Project Management, Contract reviews & Cost negotiation,

Vendor Management, People Management, Technology Review

November 2010 | NEXT100

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HOW TO INFLUENCE AND GET BUY-IN FROM YOUR OWN PEOPLE NOTHING EARNS THE RESPECT OF A TEAM AS MUCH AS WHEN A LEADER WALKS HIS TALK – BY DAVID LIM

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E

LEADERSHIP IS ABOUT influence, nothing more nothing less. Some leaders are in a position where they have the power to reward and punish their people. But ultimately, where we work in circumstances where we need the help of others who are not in our direct line of reporting, knowing how to win people over is an underrated skill. Former United States President Bill Clinton tells a story of when he entered the Oval Office as president, and thought that he would spend much of his time telling people to do this or that. Unfortunately for him, he recounts how he was quickly sobered by the fact that much of this time was spent persuading, cajoling and nudging various individuals and peer groups to move a few steps in the direction he wanted them to go. It was, and still is all about influence. So if the president of the US has a tough time, what about us in everyday workplace circumstances? Here are some practical leadership actions:

WALK YOUR TALK Nothing earns the respect of a team as much as when a leader walks his talk. When Ernest Shackleton urged his crew to dump overboard all their unnecessary belongings to allow better passage through the deadly Antarctic icepack, he began by tossing overboard his solid-gold cigarette case— that made an impact.

When I surrendered my place on summit teams on two different expeditions, so that better-suited team members were placed to go to the top, I earned their trust that I would do what was for the best of the team or group, and that my personal ambitions were secondary. The recent recession saw an interesting response from senior leadership across the globe. Some CEOs agreed to work for a symbolic sum of $1 as a salary to turn around their ailing firms. Some wellpaid government officers took a 10% pay cut. But when you are earning well over $1 million a year, rank and file become cynical if they too have to take an equivalent pay cut.

CHOOSE YOUR LANGUAGE CAREFULLY In influencing others, we describe things, people and our opinions using language. This language paints a “movie” in the mind of the listener. If all people have are you words to go by, choosing how you communicate can powerfully influence people. The more you can go into your listener’s world, the better able you are to win them over. Here’s a practical example: assume you are announcing a major change in certain IT systems to improve outcomes. Here are two examples of the message: “People, we are going to dramatically

change the way we do things here. In the next few months, you will see big shifts in the IT systems in three out of the five departments. This will lead to some significant changes in how we work and what we deliver. But I’m sure you’ll deal with these new things marvelously.” And this: “Colleagues, in the few months we will be making some improvements in three out of five departments, in information technology systems. So some things will change. But some things will stay the same. During this transition, we will be working carefully in improving how we work together and what we deliver to our fellow colleagues, and I will be able to answer your questions as to the changes and resources needed. ” For a conservative, risk-averse audience, which statement do you think hinders, rather than improves buy-in? One uses dramatic, sweeping phrases, and assumes buy-in is a given. The other uses more inclusive language, and inserts re-assuring elements; not to mention being open to more communication.

how do you increase your influence? Among the other skills mentioned above, you can do so by listening actively to the constituents that are keys to effecting the change you seek. This means to actively show you are listening through nodding of heads, and short asides and verbal noises that show you are listening though not necessarily agreeing to what is being said. Then, seek to improve rapport by making the other party feel more comfortable that you have taken on board their feelings and thoughts— again without necessarily agreeing. Once you have built up sufficient knowledge of the context and issues, and have gained some rapport, address your position, and invite the others to see how gaps between your position and theirs can be met. It may be easier to first agree on what can be agreed upon in principle. Winning an early agreement on easier issues helps tremendously in building momentum in negotiations.

NEGOTIATE BY LISTENING AND BUILDING RAPPORT A negotiation happens when two parties meet to discuss issues of mutual interest where at least one party seeks to benefit from the decisions made there. So where there is resistance to buy-in,

David Lim, is a mountaineer and motivational speaker who led the first Singapore Mount Everest expedition in 1998. He is the author of two books. November 2010 | NEXT100

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SUNIL DEORUKHKAR Pg 50

RAMACHANDRA REDDY GADI Pg 55

PRITAM DUTTA Pg 51

RAVINDRA PRASAD ELICHERLA Pg 52

PRITAM GAUTAM Pg 56

RITIK GOEL Pg 57

VALERIO FERNANDES Pg 53

SEBASTIN RAJA G Pg 54

VISHAL ANAND GUPTA Pg 58

RAJEEV GUPTA Pg 59

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Sunil Deorukhkar Head IT Nihilent Technologies Birthday 21 December Highest Qualification MBA - IT Sikkim Manipal University Total Experience 13 to 15 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise Strategic IT Planning, Governance, Information Security, Disaster recovery and Business Continuity Planning, Procurement,Budgeting & IT Accounting, Datacenter Solutions, IT Infrastructure & IT Operations management, CRM solutions, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, Knowledge management systems(KMS), MIS systems, Project management tools, Virtualization solutions

50

NEXT100 | November 2010


Pritam Dutta Deputy Manager- Centre of Excellence Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd Birthday 25 February

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Business Administration Marketing & HR MNNIT, Allahabad Total Experience 0 to 5 years

Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise Technology Architecting, Technology Evaluation, Project Management Tools, Business Process Management (ARIS), Enterprise Mobility solutions, Enterprise Content Manage-

ment (MOSS 2010), Shop Floor Automation, Virtual Setups, Web Content Management (Interwoven), Digital Signage, Knowledge Management, Learning Management System, E commerce, Industry specific solutions

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Ravindra Prasad Elicherla

Program Delivery Manager Tesco Hindustan Service Center Birthday 25 June 52

NEXT100 | November 2010

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Engineering Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati Total Experience 10 to 13 years

Current Team Size 51 to 75 people Technology Expertise Business Intelligence, Collaboration Solutions, Data warehouse, Knowledge Management Systems, Legacy applications and systems, Project management, Program Management


Valerio Fernandes

Head Information Technology, India Continental Automotive Components India Pvt Ltd Birthday 4 May Highest Qualification Masters Degree Computer Applications Thapar Institute of Engineering and Technology, Patiala Total Experience 16 to 20 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise Data warehouse and data marts, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Industry-specific solutions, HRM solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, MIS systems, Virtualization solutions

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Sebastin Raja G

Senior Manager Reliance Infrastructure Ltd Birthday 20 May Highest Qualification Masters Degree Computer Applications Bharathidasan University, Trichy Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size 21 to 35 people Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Enterprise Content Management Systems, e-Commerce solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, Knowledge management systems (KMS), MIS systems, Portals and web sites, Project management tools

54

NEXT100 | November 2010


Ramachandra Reddy Gadi

Freelance Social Development Consultant Society for Poverty Alleviation and Community Empowerment (SPACE)

Birthday 15 September Highest Qualification Masters Degree Business Management Osmania University Total Experience 13 to 15 years

Current Team Size 51 to 75 people Technology Expertise ERP and manufacturing solutions, Finance and accounting solutions, Knowledge management systems (KMS), MIS systems, Project management tools, SCM solutions November 2010 | NEXT100

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Pritam Gautam

Additional GM ICT DSC Ltd

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Computer Science Karnataka State Open University

Birthday 13 March

Total Experience 10 to 13 years

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NEXT100 | November 2010

Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise Collaboration solutions, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, MIS systems, Portals and web sites, Project management tools,

Virtualization solutions


Ritik Goel

Senior Lead Manager SKS Microfinance Ltd Birthday 11 February Highest Qualification Masters Degree Business Management S.P. Jain Center of Management Total Experience 6 to 9 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise IT Strategy, Enterprise Applications, ERP and HRM Solutions, Collaboration Solutions, Data warehouse and MIS Systems, Banking Applications, Project Management Tools

November 2010 | NEXT100

57


Vishal Anand Gupta

Deputy Manager System The Calcutta Medical Research Institute Birthday 26 November Highest Qualification Masters Degree Computer Science Manipal Academy of Higher Education & Sikkim Manipal University Total Experience 6 to 9 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise Collaboration solutions, CRM solutions, Industry-specific solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, MIS systems, Virtualization solutions

58

NEXT100 | November 2010


Rajeev Gupta Chief Technologist Air One Aviation Pvt Ltd Birthday 14 November Highest Qualification Masters Degree

Business Management NIMS Total Experience More than 20 years Current Team Size More than 100 people

Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, CRM solutions, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Industry-specific solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, Knowledge management systems (KMS), MIS systems, Portals and web sites,

Project management tools, Virtualization solutions

November 2010 | NEXT100

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GETTING FULL VALUE FOR PRICE REQUIRES STRATEGIC THINKING

THE LOVE FOR BARGAINS CAN BLIND US TO PAYING THE RIGHT VALUE – BY DAVID LIM

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MANY PEOPLE ARE only now, in my opinion, beginning to understand the difference between price and value. A common mindset I see is that many of us love a bargain so much that we fail to see that paying for value is often better in the long term. Worse, we constantly try to chip away at the price of something we already know will fulfill our needs. We have beer money, but demand champagne at the same price point. The result: we give up quality beer, to get bad sparkling wine instead. A costly, but timeless designer dress that you love wearing regularly is much better value than something you paid much less for, but maybe just wore once. You didn’t like the fabric or the way it hung on your frame. It remains in the darkest corners of your closet. The single most expensive piece of climbing equipment I ever bought was in 1997, a custom-built rucksack, that has since seen me through lifeand-death struggles on 15 expeditions worldwide. And yet it has been the ‘best buy’ in my climbing career, outlasting and outperforming countless other pretenders. When we buy services, we should be looking at the outcome we want, and then see what we can do to achieve the outcome. In corporate Asia, what happens often instead is that potential buyers come with a price in mind. They may focus on a workshop venue, meals, type of content and methodology, but are clueless about what they want as an outcome. They are focused on meals,

activities and topics instead of an outcomes that makes a difference in the workplace. They have an order-taking, list-ticking mentality at best. When they decide on a ‘cheaper’ provider, the result is that their entire investment is often wasted because it didn’t quite achieve their outcome. Instead, if they had paid more for a solution that worked, the worst result would be that they had paid a bit more than they should have. But they received 100% of the result. How can this mindset be calibrated more effectively? Here are some points to takeaway when assessing the price vs value issue:

HOW IMPORTANT IS A SPECIFIC OUTCOME? The higher the importance, the more you should be looking at value rather than price. If two providers are offering similar propositions, but one is somewhat more expensive, perhaps you will need to establish the reasons for this. These may include top-notch references, testimonials, sustainable quality, past history, relationship and trust aspects.

STAY FLEXIBLE This includes having some leeway on financial budgets so you can obtain a far better value outcome by, at times, paying a bit more than you had planned.

ASK ASK ASK Asking questions about relative costs, labour, skill and uniqueness are all

essential in determining if the premium you are paying is really worth it. A service, product or provider that relies too much on marketing and hype and far less on substance, is unlikely to do well in a less emotional environment such as B2B ventures and decisions. I am not saying emotion does not play a role. However, while we still like to do business with people we like, in a B2B environment, we tend to ask the tougher questions; less so in a B2C scenario where emotions play a bigger role.

BE REALISTIC Nothing was ever the cheapest and the best. And do not forget that the law of diminishing marginal returns applies. Getting 20% extra value from a whole array of everyday and corporate services often demands an additional investment of up to 100%. But if you are convinced about the impact and quality, then it may be worth paying extra. A classic example: cameras. For less than US$15, you can get a disposable camera to take party snapshots. But for something a bit better in terms of options, control and features, you would need to fork out around US$150.

staff obtained from the presentation. Again, price vs value is the issue here. One of the founders of modern Singapore rock-climbing, Lawrence Lee, gave me a piece of advice which is worth remembering even today: “Buy the best you can possibly afford.” Halfway up a mountain is no place to find out the meaning of quality. Tell that to my friend who ‘saved’ US$100 by buying a cheap backpack to see it fall apart on an expedition. The first Singapore Mt Everest expedition in 1998 which I led, cost over US $600,000. But the countless people who have been inspired by our own small mark in Singapore history, and have gone out to achieve their own dreams is what makes our expedition ‘valuable.’ Value remains long after you have forgotten what you paid for something. The great investor Warren Buffett described the price-value relationship best when he said “Price is what you pay, value is what you get.”

EXAMPLES IN DAY-TO-DAY LIFE When you have a serious heart condition, do you ask people to find you the cheapest heart surgeon around? Every client of ours who said our fees were high apologised afterwards because of the tremendous value their

David Lim, is a mountaineer and motivational speaker who led the first Singapore Mount Everest expedition in 1998. He is the author of two books. November 2010 | NEXT100

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ADONI GURURAJA RAO

GIRISH HADKAR

AROON HINGORANI

AYAZ HYDER

VAMSIKRISHNA ITHAMRAJU

Pg 64

Pg 65

Pg 66

Pg 67

Pg 68

DIGVIJAY JADEJA

HEMANT JHA

RAVISH JHALA

BYJU JOSEPH

VINAY JOSHI

Pg 69

Pg 70

Pg 71

Pg 72

Pg 73

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Adoni Gururaja Rao General Manager KPIT Cummins Ltd Birthday 2 December Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Engineering Vasavi College of Engineering, Osmania University Total Experience 16 to 20 years Current Team Size More than 100 people Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, CRM solutions, Data warehouse and datamart Management, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Project management tools, IT Hardware Solutions, Storage, Security Solutions

64

NEXT100 | November 2010


Girish Hadkar Manager Corporate IT Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd Birthday 2 March Highest Qualification Masters Degree

Business Management Chetana’s R. K. Institute of Management & Research, Mumbai Total Experience 10 to 13 years

Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Collaboration solutions, Enterprise Content Management Systems, Industryspecific solutions, Knowledge management systems (KMS), Portals and web sites

Current Team Size 11 to 20 people November 2010 | NEXT100

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Aroon Hingorani

Associate Vice President Information Technology Reliance Capital Asset Management Ltd

Highest Qualification Others Commerce Institute of Chartered Accountants (Intermediate) Total Experience 13 to 15 years

Birthday 6 June

Current Team Size 11 to 20 people

66

NEXT100 | November 2010

Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Enterprise CMSCRM solutions, e-Commerce solutions, Industry-specific solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, Knowledge management systems(KMS), MIS systems, Portals and web sites, Project management

tools, Virtualization solutions


Ayaz Hyder Senior Delivery Manager OnMobile Global Ltd Birthday 13 November Highest Qualification Masters Degree Business Management Indian Institute of Commerce and Trade Total Experience 6 to 9 years Current Team Size 36 to 50 people Technology Expertise Enterprise Content Management Systems, Knowledge management systems (KMS), MIS systems, Portals and web sites, Project management tools

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Vamsikrishna Ithamraju Senior Lead Manager IT SKS Microfinance Ltd Birthday 27 May Highest Qualification Masters Degree Business Management S.P. Jain Institute of Management Total Experience 6 to 9 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise Technology Infrastructure Services, IT Strategy and Project Management

68

NEXT100 | November 2010


Digvijay Jadeja

Senior Consultant/Lead Essar Information Technology Limited Birthday 15 July

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Business Management Sikkim Manipal University Total Experience 6 to 9 years

Current Team Size

0 to 10 people

Knowledge management systems (KMS), Project management tools

Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Enterprise Content Management Systems, CRM solutions, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Finance and accounting solutions, HRM solutions, November 2010 | NEXT100

69


Hemant Jha Senior Manager IT Aircel Ltd. Birthday 26 March Highest Qualification PhD 70

NEXT100 | November 2010

Computer Science Belford University Total Experience 13 to 15 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people

Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, CRM solutions, ERP and manufacturing solutions, HRM solutions, Knowledge management systems (KMS), MIS systems, Portals and web sites, Project management tools


Ravish Jhala

Systems Manager EIH Ltd. -Trident, Bandra Kurla, Mumbai Birthday 14 March Highest Qualification Electronics Father Agnel Polytechnic College, Mumbai Total Experience 8 to 10 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Collaboration solutions, Data warehouse and data marts, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Industry-specific solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, Knowledge management systems (KMS), Portals and web sites, Project management tools, Virtualization solutions, Hospitality Solution, Retail Solutions, Air Catering Solutions, Business automation

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Byju Joseph Vice President-IT Future Generali India Life Insurance Co. Ltd Birthday 30 May Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Computer Applications M G University Total Experience 13 to 15 years Current Team Size 50 people Technology Expertise Business Process Management Solutions, Collaboration Solutions, Enterprise Content Management Systems, ERP for retail and manufacturing solutions, Industry-specific solutions, MIS systems, Project management tools

72

NEXT100 | November 2010


Vinay Joshi

Deputy Manager - BPM, Corporate IT Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd Birthday 5 March

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Business Management Indira Institute Of Management, Pune Total Experience 0 to 5 years

Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise ARIS-BPM, Project Management, IT infrastructure ,Business analysis for technology evaluation, SAP-MDM

November 2010 | NEXT100

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SUPERIOR STRATEGIES FOR MANAGERS WHO HATE NEGOTIATING NEVER FORGET THAT HUMOUR WILL ALLOW YOU TO BE MORE COMFORTABLE IN DEALING WITH POTENTIAL PARTNERS BY DAVID LIM

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G

FOUR PRINCIPLES AFFECT negotiation outcomes. They are: dealing with people as though the relationship will last a lifetime; following the other side’s negotiation style and interests; recognising feelings as facts and knowing your default or preferred negotiation style; and lastly, understanding what kind of negotiation power is owned by either side. However, a common refrain from people I meet is: “I couldn’t possibly say that!” Or “I just hate bargaining!” So here are some tips on how you should approach your next negotiation if you always get anxious.

GENDER BENDER If you are a woman, be careful of how overt sexism is being replaced by implicit sexism. In a study by researchers from Carnegie Mellon and Harvard universities, women who were assertive in job benefit negotiations were penalised up to three times more than men. This is complemented by Bowles and Ruddick’s study that women are similarly penalised more than men for self-promotion. Understand how adjusting your style, if it is “assertive” to calibrate possible unconscious prejudices, may work in your favour. Dial down the table-thumping attitude if you are a woman. In societies such as China and India, there are already biases against women which count against them

in business. However, a recognised peer who is a foreigner evokes fewer prejudices in these countries. So Indian and Chinese women may need to consider the “assertiveness” they use while negotiating.

MAKING THE FIRST OFFER This aspect of negotiation gives many people sweaty palms and anxiety. Galinsky’s research from the Northwestern University has revealed something many of us in the field already know. Introducing the first offer anchors the conversation and pricing for the remainder of the conversation. People who start at a higher point often end up with a price closer to that point. Conversely, if you start discussing a lower price point, the final number will also be closer to that number. This position is supported by a study by researchers from Houston and Michigan universities where they measured the anxiety level and business outcomes of MBA students engaged in a one-item price negotiation. If the business outcome is the main focus, then train yourself to make the first offer. If factors such as business relationship are vitally important, consider inviting the other party to make an offer.

HUMOUR ME A key component in making negotia-

tion seem less intimidating is establishing good ties with the other party. This can be done in a variety of ways. Associate professor Tommy Koh, a key player in the Law of the Sea and Malaysia-Singapore water talks, did this once: faced with possible tough negotiations, he and his team still brought the opposing team on a pleasant, historical tour of Singapore. This helped break the ice and establish mutual respect which ultimately helped in the talks. A Finnish study looked at a set of internal and external negotiations. The findings of the study suggest that the use of humour, especially “insider” jokes, tone of voice and strong rapport-building attitudes, helped in the negotiations. However, some people are reluctant to “use humour” while dealing with external companies owing to a perception that they have to remain “serious” while dealing with external parties. You must understand that humour will allow you to be more comfortable in the negotiation process.

and be more open to lateness may be impacted by where they are educated. Many Singaporeans who are educated in the US or the UK may return with a very linear, sequential, empirical based attitude towards many things, and may prefer punctuality versus “standard Asian time” and so on. Deference may be overshadowed by more Western-biased assertiveness and impatience with results. People from India and many other parts of Asia are “polychromic”— they do not discuss things in a linear fashion, they have flexible time considerations and are more open to ambiguity. Americans and Europeans work in a “monochronic” fashion where time management, certainty of issues and so on are key. Constant revisiting points previously thought to be settled can drive an American nuts. So be aware when you are settling on issues with people of a different culture orientation. So do prepare the ground and know who you are dealing with so that you will feel more confident and poised to negotiate more effectively.

CULTURE CRUNCH Be aware of the other party’s culture of education. The more you know what to calibrate, the less anxiety you will have in negotiating with the other side. For example, a Chinese national whose traditional culture suggests they will be more relationship focused, deferential to authority

David Lim, is a mountaineer and motivational speaker who led the first Singapore Mount Everest expedition in 1998. He is the author of two books. November 2010 | NEXT100

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RAVI KUMAR KAKUTURU Pg 78

JITENDER KHANDUJA Pg 83

RAHUL KATHARE Pg 79

CHITRANJAN KESARI Pg 81

SARITHA KAZA Pg 80

OMESH KHANNA Pg 84

SANJAY KHARB Pg 85

DHIRAJ KHURANA Pg 86

RAMESH KESAVAN Pg 82

CHANDRASEKARAN KRISHNAN Pg 87

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Ravi Kumar Kakuturu Project Manager KMG Infotech Ltd Birthday 21 July Highest Qualification Masters Degree Computer Applications SVU College of Engineering, Tirupati Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size 25 to 30 people Technology Expertise Industry-specific solutions, MIS systems

78

NEXT100 | November 2010


Rahul Kathare Manager IT Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd Birthday 28 November Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree

Engineering Fr. Conceicao Rodrigues College of Engineering, Mumbai Total Experience 7 to 10 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people

Technology Expertise Email servers, IT monitoring and network management tools, Knowledge management systems (KMS), MIS systems, Virtualization solutions, Datacentre Magement and Security Management

November 2010 | NEXT100

79


Saritha Kaza Manager – IT Vijai Electricals Ltd Birthday 19 April Highest Qualification Masters Degree 80

NEXT100 | November 2010

Business Management IGNOU) Total Experience 13 to 15 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people

Technology Expertise Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, MIS systems, Portals and web sites


Chitranjan Kesari Head IT Advanced Enzyme Technologies Ltd Birthday 25 January Highest Qualification PG Diploma Computer Applications Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size 76 to 100 people Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, CRM solutions, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Industry-specific solutions, HRM solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, MIS systems, Portals and web sites, Project management tools, Virtualization solutions

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Ramesh Kesavan Senior Manager Lear Corporation Birthday 18 December Highest Qualification Master Degree Computer Applications A.A. Government College Total Experience 13 to 15 years Current Team Size 21 to 35 people Technology Expertise Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Finance and accounting solutions, Industry-specific solutions, MIS systems, Portals and web sites, SCM solutions

82

NEXT100 | November 2010


Jitender Khanduja

Highest Qualification PG Diploma Business Management Management Development Institute, Gurgaon

Birthday 12 December

Total Experience 16 to 20 years

AGM-IT JSL Stainless Ltd

Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise Datacenter Management, ERP and manufacturing solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, Virtualization solutions

November 2010 | NEXT100

83


Omesh Khanna IT Manager Verint Systems India Pvt Ltd Birthday 13 May Highest Qualification Masters Degree 84

NEXT100 | November 2010

Finance & Control Punjab University Total Experience 13 to 15 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people

Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, e-Commerce solutions, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Finance and accounting solutions, Industryspecific solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, MIS systems, Portals and web sites, IT Budgeting and

System Administration, Hospital Information System, Project Implementation and Cost Saving


Sanjay Kharb Assistant Vice President Makemytrip India Pvt Ltd Birthday 2 January Highest Qualification Masters Degree Computer Applications DOEACC Total Experience 13 to 15 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Enterprise CMSData warehouse and data marts, e-Commerce solutions, Email servers, Industryspecific solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, MIS systems, Portals and web sites, SCM solutions, Virtualization solutions

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Dhiraj Khurana Delivery Manager IBM India Pvt Ltd Birthday 21 August Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Engineering Kurukshetra University Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size More than 50 people Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Enterprise Content Management Systems, e-Commerce solutions, Industryspecific solutions, Knowledge management systems (KMS), Portals and web sites, Project management tools

86

NEXT100 | November 2010


Chandrasekaran Krishnan

Highest Qualification

Senior Program Manager Keane Inc

EPSM, IIMC & Bachelors degree Engineering Shanmugha College of Engineering

Birthday 12 January

Total Experience 6 to 9 years

Current Team Size 21 to 35 people Technology Expertise Portals and Websites, Enterprise Applications and Solutions, Presales and Marketing, Project management tools

November 2010 | NEXT100

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EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION IS THE KEY TO BETTER TEAMWORK GOOD LEADERSHIP IS BASED ON CLEAR ARTICULATION OF INTENTIONS AND ENSURING ENGAGEMENT –BY DAVID LIM

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N THE OBVIOUS IS not always obvious if you see the world through your own filters and biases. Let me give you an example from the ice climes of Ladakh, which is on the top left-hand side of India. Some of the highest peaks in the Indian side of the Himalayas are located there, and it’s popular with mountaineers. In 1995 I led a large team of Singaporean mountaineers to climb Kun, a 7000-metre peak which is part of the twins, Nun-Kun. This was the largest team I had ever led in the mountains, and was the first of the many smaller and larger peaks on our programme to train for an eventual expedition to Mount Everest—the 1st Singapore Mt Everest Expedition in 1998. I set off with much enthusiasm and planned the climb down to the smallest detail, thinking that a group motivated to climb and to train for Everest would find ways to make the whole trip a success. However, what seemed obvious to me was not necessarily obvious to the team which comprised a mix of individuals. There were overlapping cliques, stronger and weaker links of friendship and collegiality. Things started to go pear-shaped when we encountered bad weather near the Kun. The horsemen transporting our heavy equipment went on strike and we had to settle with attempting the sister peak Nun. Nine months of planning was substituted with a rough sketch on a piece of paper.

We agreed that owing to the tougher conditions, not all the team members would be given a crack at the summit. We then supported a smaller group of what we considered stronger climbers of our team to help them reach the top. Straightaway, cracks began to form in the team. Some climbers carried half loads, selfishly saving their strength, and some failed to support a secondary climbing objective I had selected. I forged ahead thinking the rest would follow, but they did not, making up some excuse after another. So the following day I solo-climbed a small peak which was challenging. Climbing the peak was so absorbing and I failed to realise the risk I was taking. The Nun summit team spotted me on their long trudge back, having been beaten by dangerous conditions, stunned that some “idiot” they could see at a distance was pulling off a solo climb. We failed in that expedition and returned to a thorough debrief. We returned to Leh rather demoralised. With just four days left, we identified Stok Kangri, a shapely 6000-metrehigh peak that could be climbed in lightweight fashion, from Leh, but only if we all performed like the team we thought we were. In that climb, members who had previously been selfish began to do things such as fetching water from the river for the rest of the team members. It was amazing how the team transformed, realising that that opportunity would be our final chance

of climbing anything on the trip. Four of us reached the top on that expedition within an expedition, and we returned to Singapore with this modest success. Three years later one of our Nun-Kun team members climbed Mount Everest in our landmark 1998 expedition. So what can you learn from this experience in guiding teams to effective communication? l Identify areas of common interest and ensure that everyone agrees on working towards the same goal and sharing the burden. I failed as a leader. I was not specific enough about how we were supposed to climb the peak. On Kun, more problems were created when some were happy to let others take up the slack they left behind, and weren’t put straight until afterwards. Address bad behaviour as quickly as possible. l As a leader, have clarity of purpose and communicate this to the team. On Kun, I had let my “mountaineer” mode kick in, and failed to discuss in detail with my team as to my intentions to climb solo, or engage them sufficiently to follow me that fateful day. l Manage expectations by outlining what you expect of each team members and invite the same. Many members of the team had not climbed with each other and had different expectations. Some had only climbed in the relative “pam-

pered” comfort of expeditions supported by several climbing Sherpas or local Nepalese guide. l Focus on specific observable behaviours. Do not focus on promises, intentions and cheap talk.While fixing dysfunctionalities, focus on behaviours, not personalities. When we debriefed the failed Nun-Kun attempt we made efforts to focus on good work, as well as poor behaviour. l Invite ideas and views by using open-ended questions. Ask closeended questions that elicit “yes/ no” answers when clarifying or winning support and making a decision. l Allow people to agree to disagree so long as it does not paralyse action or endanger the team goals. Ultimately, your role as a leader is not to have all the answers all the time, but to effectively engage, frequently ask your team for ideas and inputs. After absorbing all these, you are better placed to reach a decision, based on the style best suited for the team in question, and move towards action.

David Lim, is a mountaineer and motivational speaker who led the first Singapore Mount Everest expedition in 1998. He is the author of two books. November 2010 | NEXT100

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RAHUL KUMAR Pg 92

ARUN KUMAR Pg 93

AKSHAY LAMBA Pg 97

KAUSHIK KUMAR Pg 94

SRIDHAR MARUPADIGE Pg 98

PRAVAKAR KUMAR Pg 95

GAURAV MARWAHA Pg 99

TIRTHADEEP KUNDU Pg 96

AANCHAL MISHRA Pg 100

MUKESH MISHRA Pg 101

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Rahul Kumar

HEAD MES & SHOP FLOOR IT SOLUTIONS Essar Steel Ltd Birthday 24 August Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Engineering SVNIT Total Experience 16 to 20 years Current Team Size 21 to 35 people Technology Expertise Industry-specific solutions, SCM solutions

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NEXT100 | November 2010


Arun Kumar Senior Manager IT GlobalLogic India Pvt Ltd Birthday 13 January Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree

Engineering Institution of Engineers Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people

Technology Expertise IT Operations, IT Integration, Project Management, CRM and ERP Solutions, Collaboration Solutions, IT monitoring and Network Management tools, Cloud Computing, Desktop Virtualization

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Kaushik Kumar

Project Manager Orange Business Services (France Telecom) Birthday 1 July

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NEXT100 | November 2010

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Business Management Lal Bahadur Shastri Institute of Management Total Experience 10 to 13 years

Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise CRM solutions, Project management tools, Process Reengineering, Service Delivery Management, SLA Management, Transition Management, Service Desk Management


Pravakar Kumar

Manager - IT Varun Beverages Ltd Birthday 2 January Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Computer Applications IGNOU Total Experience 13 to 15 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise SAP, Project Management, ERP Implementation & Rollout, Manufacturing & SCM Solution, Asset Management, IT Operation, IT Monitoring & Network Management, ITIL

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Tirthadeep Kundu

Senior Program Manager SAP Practice ITC Infotech India Ltd Birthday 7 October Highest Qualification Masters Degree Business Management University of Cambridge Total Experience 16 to 20 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise Enterprise Content Management Systems, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Finance and accounting solutions, Industry-specific solutions, HRM solutions, Knowledge management systems (KMS), MIS systems, Project management tools

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NEXT100 | November 2010


Akshay Lamba

Chief Architect & Director IT Strategy, Planning & Alliances Sistema Shyam TeleServices Ltd Birthday 14 July Highest Qualification PG Diploma

Business Management Management Development Institute, Gurgaon Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people

Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Collaboration solutions, CRM solutions, Data warehouse and data marts, e-Commerce solutions, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Industry-specific solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, MIS

systems, Portals and web sites, Project management tools, SCM solutions, Virtualization solutions, Telecommunciations technology stack including business facing and internal facing applications, integrations, customer facing value added services, IT infrastructure and information security November 2010 | NEXT100

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Sridhar Marupadige

IT Test Manager Novartis Healthcare Pvt Ltd Birthday 14 July

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Business Management Madurai Kamaraj University Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people

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NEXT100 | November 2010

Technology Expertise e-Commerce solutions, Project management tools


Gaurav Marwaha Technical Architect GlobalLogic Birthday 21 November Highest Qualification Masters Degree Computer Science Maharshi Dayanand University, Haryana Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Collaboration solutions, Portals and web sites, Project management tools, Virtualization solutions, Enterprise & Consumer Applications, Product Management

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Aanchal Mishra

Program Manager Hewlett Packard India Ltd Birthday 21 August Highest Qualification PG Diploma Business Management IMT, Ghaziabad Total Experience 16 to 20 years Current Team Size More than 100 people Technology Expertise Network Services and Data Centers, Call center Infrastructure, SAPCRM with Services, Remote Infrastructure Management, Remedy, HP Open view, WFM, Master Data Management, Knowledge Management Solutions, Project Management Methodologies and Tools

100

NEXT100 | November 2010


Mukesh Mishra

Assistant General Manager IT Central Electricity Supply Utility of Orissa Birthday 2 October

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Business Administration & Computer Applications Utkal University Total Experience More than 20 years

Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise CRM solutions, Data warehouse and data marts, e-Commerce solutions, Email servers, Industry-specific solutions, MIS systems, Portals and web sites

November 2010 | NEXT100

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BETTER PREPARATION CAN MAKE NEGOTIATIONS SMOOTHER AND PRODUCTIVE GOOD NEGOTIATORS ALWAYS ALLOW PEOPLE ACROSS THE TABLE TO SAVE THEIR FACE – BY DAVID LIM

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ONE OF THE quickest, and the best, ways to increase your negotiating ability is to eliminate some common errors that even the most experienced guys make. An examination and constant review of the common errors listed here will help you get rid of these mistakes from your negotiating style and help you become a more effective negotiator in Asia.

LACK OF UNDERSTANDING OF YOUR STRENGTHS Studies have indicated that most negotiators tend to underestimate their own power in a negotiation, mainly due to the complexity of negotiations. Certainly, you are aware of the limits to your power in a given “negotiation situation”, but you are also often unaware of the limits to the power of the other party. This means, there is a consistent tendency to underestimate your own power in a negotiation. In that sense, if you come from a non-Asian culture which insists on things being said all the time, you may miss calibrating the other side’s nuances. A Japanese executive may say “this will be a bit difficult” when he actually means “this is not going to happen at all”. Sometimes, silence after a preliminary position is taken as a wise move as both parties sit back momentarily to absorb information. Sometimes, if the suspense is too great, the first party that proffers a concession, a sweetener, will be the one losing money at the end of the meeting.

JUMPING TO A CONCLUSION One of the most common errors made in negotiations is making assumptions rather than checking facts. A good example is of assuming what the other party’s desires are, rather than skillful-

ly probing with questions to determine precisely what they want. Rather than assuming, the skilled negotiator becomes more effective by asking probing questions which can sometimes determine the real needs of the other party. In team negotiations, awareness of the more talkative members of the other party may allow you to engage them such that they may inadvertently reveal more than they had anticipated. For example, they admit that they are running short of time as an event for which the vendor was being assessed has been brought forward. If you are a vendor, and have already engaged them for some time, the other party may feel too invested to start the process all over again. This knowledge, if extracted, can be immensely useful. The skilled negotiator avoids jumping to a conclusion.

to nearly 30 years of peace between the two countries. A brilliant solution? Not really. Because, you see, each of the daughters got only one-half of what they could have had, had they taken the time to look at the interest behind the position. One of the daughters wanted the orange for juice; the other needed the peels for baking. Now, you might suggest that this is very simple example and that some of our most experienced business people would not make that mistake in the business-negotiating environment. However, in numerous business simulations, participants get caught up in positional arguments, and then may feel they have to continue behaving in a way consistent to that position.

FOCUSING ON POSITION, NOT INTEREST

In the book, Getting to Yes, Roger Fisher and William Ury point out the extreme importance of determining a BATNA (Best Alternative to Negotiated Agreement) before entering any negotiation. The only reason to negotiate in the first place is to arrive at a conclusion that is better than that which would be achieved without the negotiation. If we take the time to analyse our BATNA, we will then know clearly what our “best alternative” is. In the case of a business dispute, your BATNA might be a lawsuit and subsequent trial. In the case of negotiating the cost of a financial consulting project, your BATNA might be using another consultant. Keep in mind an important caution here—don’t fall into the trap of cumulatively looking at all options and seeing

One of the most significant findings to come out of the Harvard Negotiation Project was the understanding that a very common error in negotiation was to focus on the other person’s position without looking behind that position to the real needs and interests of the other party. The muchquoted example is of two daughters arguing over the last orange in the house. A wise father handed one of the daughters a knife and asked her to slice the orange into half, indicating that the other daughter would then select the other half of the orange. Egyptian leader Anwar Sadat’s historic break from the positional way of looking at issues led to the landmark Israel-Egypt peace deal, which led

ENTERING A NEGOTIATION WITHOUT A BATNA

the many different benefits inherent in all of them. You will not have the option of all of them and, therefore, it is necessary to weigh your current negotiation situation with the best alternative to a negotiated agreement. One of the major advantages of having a BATNA in every negotiation is that it helps you determine your negotiating philosophy; whether one is “hard” or “soft”, “firm” or “flexible” now becomes largely a consideration of how strong a BATNA you have. An extremely strong BATNA allows you to use the more risky tactics of “walkout” or “take-it-or-leave-it”.

GETTING HUNG-UP ON A SINGLE NEGOTIATED ITEM In practically all negotiations, there is more than one item to be negotiated. Whenever this is the case, the skilled negotiator realises that they need not be hung-up on a single negotiated item. Well, price could be a good example. If price becomes a non-negotiable item for one side in the negotiation, the other side could concede price negotiations, if they got concessions that accomplished the same thing in the areas of interest rates, payment plans, quality and content specifications, etc. The experienced negotiator looks at the total package and is not hung-up on a single negotiated item. In Asian societies which often value the relationship ahead of the transaction a lot, sometimes being too tough over one single item can sour an otherwise profitable relationship. See the bigger picture. David Lim, is a mountaineer and motivational speaker who led the first Singapore Mount Everest expedition in 1998. He is the author of two books. November 2010 | NEXT100

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JATINKUMAR MODH Pg 106

RAVEENDRAN NAGARAJAN Pg 107

RAJNIL PANGERKAR Pg 111

KATHIRVELRAJ NATARAJAN Pg 108

SANJAY PATANKAR Pg 112

RAJSHEKAR PATIL Pg 113

VISHAL PANNALA Pg 109

CHARUDATTA PAWAR Pg 114

TEJ PANDEY Pg 110

AMIT PHADKE Pg 115

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Jatinkumar Modh

Manager IT Mettler-Toledo India Pvt Ltd Birthday 14 December Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Engineering P.D.V.V. Patil College Of Engineering Total Experience 6 to 9 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Collaboration solutions, CRM solutions, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Portals and web sites

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NEXT100 | November 2010


Raveendran Nagarajan

General Manager Enterprisewide Solutions Sakthi Finance Ltd/ABT Industries Ltd Birthday 31 May

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Business Management PSG Institute of Management Total Experience More than 30 years Current Team Size

11 to 20 people

Technology Expertise ERP Management (SAP), Business Intelligence – Concepts & Implementation, Knowledge & Collaboration Management (Lotus Notes), Enterprise Performance Management (Balanced scorecard etc), Software Project Management, Open source tools & Technologies November 2010 | NEXT100

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Kathirvelraj Natarajan

Senior Manager, Enterprise Applications Extreme Networks India Pvt Ltd Birthday 15 April

108

NEXT100 | November 2010

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Engineering BITS Pilani Total Experience 13 to 15 years Current Team Size 21 to 35 people

Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, CRM solutions, Data warehouse and data marts, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Finance and accounting solutions, Industry-specific solutions, HRM solutions, IT monitoring, Knowledge management

systems (KMS), MIS systems, Project management tools, SCM solutions, Application Integrations


Vishal Pannala BI Architect Johnson & Johnson Ltd Birthday 14 September Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Engineering University College of Engineering, Burla Total Experience 6 to 9 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Enterprise Content Management Systems, Data warehouse and data marts, Industry-specific solutions, Data Mining & Analytics, Knowledge management systems (KMS), Portals and web sites, Project management tools

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Tej Pandey

Senior Project Manager PathPartner Technology Consulting Pvt Ltd Birthday 14 December Highest Qualification Masters Degree Engineering IIT Kanpur Total Experience 10 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise Industry-specific solutions, Project management tools, SCM solutions

110

NEXT100 | November 2010


Rajnil Pangerkar

Manager IT Tata Consulting Engineers Ltd Birthday 30 May

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Physical / Electronics Mumbai University Total Experience 20 to 30 people Current Team Size 36 to 50 people

Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Collaboration solutions, Data warehouse and data marts, Email servers, ERP solutions, Finance and accounting solutions, HRM solutions, IT monitoring, Knowledge management systems (KMS), MIS systems,

Project management tools, Virtualization solutions

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Sanjay Patankar General Manager Godrej Infotech Ltd Birthday 8 July

Highest Qualification Post Graduate Diploma Software Technology NCST, Mumbai Total Experience More than 20 years Current Team Size More than 100 people

112

NEXT100 | November 2010

Technology Expertise Data warehouse and data marts, ERP and manufacturing solutions, MIS systems, Project management tools


Rajshekar Patil

Deputy Manager - IT TVS Interconnect Systems Ltd Birthday 4 March Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Engineering BMS College Of Engineering,Bangalore Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise Collaboration solutions, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Industry-specific solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, MIS systems, Virtualization solutions

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Charudatta Pawar

Senior Program Manager Mercedes-Benz Research and Development India Pvt Ltd Birthday 27 September Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Engineering Institute for Studies in Technology, Pune Total Experience 15 to 20 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise IT Infrastructure Management, SAP Basis Delivery Management, Datacenter planning and consolidation, Transition and Transformation Projects, Information Security, Process Management, Change Management

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NEXT100 | November 2010


Amit Phadke

Head - Systems and Technology Kale Consultants Limited Birthday 29 July Highest Qualification Masters Degree

Business Management Welingkar Institute of Management Studies and Research Total Experience 13 to 15 years

Technology Expertise IT Infrastructure Management, IT Security, Networks, Applications, SQL & Oracle Database, Cloud Computing, VoIP, CRM, Email servers, IT monitoring and network management tools, Portals and web sites

Current Team Size 30 to 40 people November 2010 | NEXT100

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USE FAILURE AS AN OPPORTUNITY FOR IMPROVEMENT THE INTERPRETATION OF FAILURE IS INTEGRAL TO HOW WELL YOU DO THEREAFTER –BY DAVID LIM

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RECENTLY A NEWSPAPER reported the demise of a once-lauded business award called the Phoenix Award. The prize, at one-time administered by a well-known publishing group, recognised outstanding business people who had bounced back from failure. Like the mythical phoenix rising from the ashes, the business person awarded this accolade was praised for his resilience and ability to learn from failures. However, in recent years, the number of nominees fell to a point when it became unsustainable to continue with the annual award. The main reason given: Asians are reluctant to talk about their failures. So, when can failure be good? There are basically two kinds of failure: ‘smart’ ones and ‘dumb’ ones. Smart failures are where you did everything right, had a great team, but perhaps, like a mountaineer, were thwarted by a sudden shift in weather patterns, or an unexpected illness. A ‘ dumb’ failure is where your sloppiness and negligence contributed to the failure. In reality, though, the reasons for failure and success are often complex. It is the interpretation of failure that can determine how resilient you are at leading yourself through turbulent times. Assume, you had done remarkable planning, displayed great leadership and had a great team. However, you met with a negative response from the client owing to some people making an irrational decision. What happens next determines your ability to bounce back

and thrive as a leader. A ‘good’ failure is when you have not only done all that is possible within your competencies and commitment, but also one where you interpreted the failure appropriately. Studies and research by the University of Pennsylvania’s department of positive psychology shows that people who attributed failure to external factors, tended to do better after a failure. They were also those who did not see failure as all pervasive and all-destroying. They also saw failure as a temporary state. Conversely, those who took it personally, believed the failure struck at their core as worthy people, and that they would be totally and permanently devastated, did not have good outcomes post-failure. In short, the interpretation of failure was integral to how well you did thereafter. People who avoid taking calculated risks and thus the chance of failing ‘cleverly’, can seldom learn powerful lessons that failure can bring. I was recently delivering a leadership presentation to a European private equity firm in the south of France. One of the challenges faced by many of the teams involved in the long and arduous process of buying out a company, was that the seller sometimes made emotional and illogical decisions and would sell to another bidder. The team would then have to regroup and start all over again with another prospective target. The people who seemed to do best at this high-stakes financial game were those who only felt sorry for

themselves for a limited period, and took it in their stride. In short, their reactions mirrored those subjects that Dr Martin Seligman from the University of Pennsylvania studied. Those able to bounce back from failure had these valuable attributes, and having successive failures, in my opinion, only made them even better at their game. After all, as Winston Churchill said: “ Success is the ability to go from one failure to another without any loss of enthusiasm” Edison was said to have failed thousands of times on his way to creating the first incandescent light bulb. A long time ago, I had the privilege of sitting next to an Israeli innovation expert on a long-distance flight. I asked him how he came up with all his good ideas and he said: “By coming up with a lot of stupid ones first.” So here, perhaps, is a practical guide in using failure effectively in your organisation: l Calibrate the fear of failure by picking projects and goals where failure will not be fatal to the organisation, but where a great pay-off could be an outcome. In short, pick the long-shot goals that may make the risk worthwhile, but with a modest downside. l Fail quickly and early. Prior to my first Everest expedition, we chose stretch goals that would boost our learning curve prior to the Everest climb. In the three preceding years,

we tackled peaks that were often a bit harder than our perceived abilities at the time. When we failed, we studied the failure, always taking the stance that failure provided valuable information. The quicker you fail, the more time you have to recover before your actual main event, or goal. l Reward success, reward the ‘smart’ failures, and punish inaction. It is stultifying to have people always playing it safe when an organization has to take calculated risks to grow and succeed. And yet, many companies have compensation structures which punish failure, and reward inaction. l Treat failure as information allowing you to succeed better the next time. Remove, as much as possible the emotional content of failure (read: fear, sadness, anger and resentment), and look at what were some of the best things you learned from it on a purely factual, objective basis. These could be certain structural weaknesses in your plan, unproductive behaviour of a team member, or even weak teamwork. Remove the emotions and you will be left with valuable data. If your organisation is not failing fast enough, you are not winning fast enough. David Lim, is a mountaineer and motivational speaker who led the first Singapore Mount Everest expedition in 1998. He is the author of two books. November 2010 | NEXT100

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RANJITH RADHAKRISHNAN Pg 120

SAREEN SALAM Pg 125

MILIND RAJHANS Pg 121

DHANANJAY ROKDE Pg 122

JATINDER AGGAWRAL Pg 126

SANJEEV SANGWAN Pg 127

SOUROV ROY Pg 124

YUSUF ROOPAWALLA Pg 123

BHAVITA SAXENA Pg 128

ASHISH SHAH Pg 129

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Ranjith Radhakrishnan Assistant Genaral Manager TVS Motor Ltd Birthday 4 September Highest Qualification Masters Degree Systems & Information BITS, Pilani Total Experience 30 to 40 years Current Team Size 51 to 75 people Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Collaboration solutions, CRM solutions, e-Commerce solutions, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Portals and web sites

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Milind Rajhans Manager IT The A.P. Mahesh Cooperative Urban Bank Ltd Birthday 14 April

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Computer Science Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad Total Experience 10 to 13 years

Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise Collaboration solutions, e-Commerce solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, Virtualization solutions

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Dhananjay Rokde

Manager Information & Infrastructure Security (Global) Integreon Managed Solutions Birthday 16 September 122

NEXT100 | November 2010

Highest Qualification PG Diploma Computer Applications Symbiosis Center for Information Technology Total Experience 0 to 5 years

Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise Collaboration solutions, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, Knowledge management systems (KMS), MIS systems,

Portals and web sites, Project management tools, Virtualization solutions


Yusuf Roopawalla Head Technology CB India Standard Chartered Bank Birthday 28 November Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Electronics Shah And Anchor Kutchhi Engineering College, Mumbai Total Experience More than 20 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise Collaboration solutions, Enterprise Content Management Systems, CRM solutions, e-Commerce solutions, Email servers, Industry-specific solutions, HRM solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, Knowledge management systems (KMS), MIS systems, Portals and web sites, Project management tools, Virtualization solutions

November 2010 | NEXT100

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Sourov Roy Assistant Vice President EXL Service Birthday 3 March Highest Qualification PG Diploma Business Management IIM, Kolkata Total Experience 13 to 15 years Current Team Size 21 to 35 people Technology Expertise ERP, Finance & HR Solutions, IT Strategy, BI Solutions

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Sareen Salam Director Global Customer Support Aspect Software Birthday 11 May

Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Engineering Bangalore University Total Experience 10 to 13 years

Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Collaboration solutions, CRM solutions, Industry-specific solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, MIS systems

Current Team Size 36 to 50 people November 2010 | NEXT100

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Jatinder Aggarwal Project Manager HCL Technology Birthday 24 August

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Computer Applications University of Hyderabad Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size 50 to 100 people

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Technology Expertise Project, Program and Delivery Management, BFSI Technology Solutions


Sanjeev Sangwan

Manager - ITS DCM Shriram Consolidated Ltd, Birthday 9 July Highest Qualification Masters Degree Electronics CCS University , Meerut Total Experience 13 to 15 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise Enterprise CMSCRM solutions, Data warehouse and data marts, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, MIS systems, Project management tools

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Bhavita Saxena

DGM Information Systems and Business Solutions RFCL Ltd Birthday 15 May Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Engineering Madhav Institute of Technology and Science, Gwalior Total Experience More than 20 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise CRM solutions, HRM solutions, Portals and web sites

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Ashish Shah

AVP IT Future Generali India Life Insurance Co. Ltd Birthday 2 February

Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Business Management S.P. Jain Institute of Management Research Total Experience 13 to 15 years

Current Team Size 36 to 50 people

formation Security Management & IT Service Management

Technology Expertise Collaboration solutions, Email servers, IT monitoring and network management tools, Portals and web sites, Project management tools, SCM solutions, Virtualization solutions, InNovember 2010 | NEXT100

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BOOSTING PRODUCTIVITY OF KNOWLEDGE WORKERS THROUGH EMPOWERMENT THE KEY IS IDENTIFYING AND ADDRESSING THE BARRIERS WORKERS FACE IN THEIR DAILY INTERACTIONS – BY ERIC MASTON & LAURENCE PRUSAK

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ARE YOU DOING all that you can to enhance the productivity of your knowledge workers? It’s a simple question, but one that few senior executives can answer. Their confusion isn’t for lack of trying. Organisations around the world struggle to crack the code for improving the effectiveness of managers, salespeople, scientists, and others whose jobs consist primarily of interactions—with other employees, customers, and suppliers—and complex decision making based on knowledge and judgment. The stakes are high: raising the productivity of these workers, who constitute a large and growing share of the workforce in developed economies, represents a major opportunity for companies, as well as for countries with low birth-rates that hope to maintain GDP growth. Nonetheless, many executives have a hazy understanding of what it takes to bolster productivity for knowledge workers. This lack of clarity is partly because knowledge work involves more diverse and amorphous tasks than production or clerical positions, where the relatively clear-cut, predictable activities make jobs easier to automate or streamline. Likewise, performance metrics are hard to come by in knowledge work, making it challenging to manage improvement

efforts (which often lack a clear owner in the first place). Against this backdrop, it’s perhaps unsurprising that many companies settle for scattershot investments in training and IT systems. Since knowledge workers spend half their time on interactions, our research and experience suggest that companies should first explore the productivity barriers that impede these interactions. Armed with a better understanding of the constraints, senior executives can get more bang for their buck by identifying targeted productivity-improvement efforts to increase both the efficiency and effectiveness of the interactions between workers. Among companies we’ve surveyed, fully half of all interactions are constrained by one of five barriers: physical, technical, social or cultural, contextual, and temporal. While individual companies will encounter some obstacles more than others, our experience suggests that the approaches to overcoming them are widely

PHYSICAL AND TECHNICAL BARRIERS Physical barriers (including geographic distance and differences in time zones) often go hand in hand with technical barriers because the lack of effective tools for locating the

right people and collaborating becomes even more pronounced when they are far away. While these barriers are on the wane at many companies given the arsenal of software tools available, some large, globally dispersed organisations continue to suffer from them. One remedy implemented by some organisations is to create “communities of practice” for people who could benefit from one another’s advice—as the World Bank has done to help the 100 or so of its planners who focus on urban poverty to facilitate discussions on projects to upgrade slums. The communities feature online tools to help geographically dispersed members search for basic information (say, member roles and the specific challenges they are addressing) and sometimes use the latest social-networking tools to provide more sophisticated information, including whom the members have worked or trained with. By supplementing electronic tools with videoconferences and occasional in-person meetings, communities can bridge physical distances and build relationships.

SOCIAL OR CULTURAL BARRIERS Examples of social or cultural barriers include rigid hierarchy or ineffective incentives that don’t spur

the right people to engage. To avoid such problems, Petrobras, the Brazil-based oil major, created a series of case studies focused on real events in the company’s past that illuminate its values, processes, and norms. The cases are discussed with new hires in small groups— promoting a better understanding of how the organisation works and encouraging a culture of knowledge sharing and collaborative problem solving. (To benefit further from such approaches, companies should include knowledge sharing in performance reviews and ensure that team leaders clearly communicate acceptable response times for information requests. The communities of practice described above can help too: employees are far more likely to give timely and useful responses to people in their network.) Employees who face contextual barriers struggle to share and translate knowledge obtained from colleagues in different fields. Complex interactions often require contact with people in other departments or divisions, making it hard for workers to assess a colleague’s level of expertise or apply the advice they may receive. Think of the disconnect that often occurs between a company’s sales department and its product-development November 2010 | NEXT100

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IF VALUABLE INTERACTIONS ARE FALLING VICTIM TO TIME CONSTRAINTS, EXECUTIVES CAN USE JOB ROLES TO HELP IDENTIFY EMPLOYEES THAT KNOWLEDGE WORKERS SHOULD BE INTERACTING WITH. —Eric Matson.

team over customer data. The two groups frequently struggle to communicate because they think and talk so differently about the subject (sales staff devote attention to customer insights while developers focus on product specifications). To overcome contextual barriers, organisations can rotate employees across teams and divisions or create forums where specialists in different areas can learn about one another’s work. The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), for instance, holds a biannual “Masters Forum” to share knowledge across disciplines. About 50 employees from different parts of the agency attend the meetings to hear other NASA colleagues talk about the tools, methods, and skills they use in extremely complex projects. The sessions are lightly moderated and very interactive. Similarly, managers at Ecopetrol, a Colombian gas and oil company, have found that technical forums not only break down the natural barriers between occupations but also facilitate knowledge sharing across geographic boundaries. Moreover, the forums build trust, which encourages employees to share information more freely.

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THE BARRIER OF TIME The final barrier is time, or rather the perceived lack of it. If valuable interactions are falling victim to time constraints, executives can use job roles and responsibilities to help identify the employees that knowledge workers should be interacting with and on what topics. In some cases, companies may need to clarify decision rights and redefine roles to reduce the interaction burden on some employees while increasing it on others. Boston-based Millennium Pharmaceuticals, which develops drugs for cancer treatment, did just that. When it found that researchers didn’t have time to share lessons from their experiments, it created a small group of scientists to act as “knowledge intermediaries.” Based on meetings with company scientists as well as presentations, these employees summarise findings and submit them to an internal database. They also act as brokers by sharing knowledge across groups. The company reckons that this practice, combined with other initiatives, has boosted success rates for the company’s research and reduced the time needed to make key decisions.

Eric Matson is a consultant in McKinsey’s Boston office; Laurence Prusak is a visiting scholar at the University of Southern California Marshall School of Business and a former senior adviser to McKinsey. This article was first published in September 2010 on The McKinsey Quarterly Web site, www.mckinseyquarterly.com. Copyright © 2010 McKinsey & Company. All rights reserved. Reprinted by permission.


NEERAJ SHARMA Pg 135

NARESH SHARMA Pg 134

LAWRENCE SOOSAI RAJ Pg 139

ANANTH STP Pg 140

MANISH SINHA Pg 138

ABHISHEK SINGH Pg 137

BALWANT SINGH Pg 136

JAYESH TANK Pg 141

HURSH TANNA Pg 142

DEVENDRA THAKKAR Pg 143

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133


Naresh Sharma Deputy General Manager IT RSWM Ltd. Birthday 26 August Highest Qualification Masters Degree Computer Applications Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra Total Experience 16 to 20 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, Portals and web sites, Project management tools

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Neeraj Sharma Head - IT Harlal Institute of Management & Technology Birthday 8 June

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Computer Applications (MCA) PUNJAB UNIVERSITY CHANDIGARH Total Experience 10 to 13 years

Current Team Size 21 to 35 people Technology Expertise ERP and manufacturing solutions, MIS systems, Portals and web sites

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135


Balwant Singh Manager IT Indo Asian Fusegear Ltd Birthday 18 March

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Information Technology Amity University Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size 21 to 35 people

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Technology Expertise OpenSource Solutions, Software Development, Business intelligence solutions, Collaboration solutions, Enterprise Content Management Systems, CRM solutions, e-Commerce solutions, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions,

Industry-specific solutions, HRM solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, MIS systems, Portals and web sites, Project management tools, Virtualization solutions


Abhishek Singh

Manager - Maintenance Services and Offer Management Avaya India Pvt Ltd Birthday 14 October Highest Qualification Masters Degree Business Management Indian School of Business, Hyderabad Total Experience 6 to 9 years Current Team Size 21 to 35 people Technology Expertise e-Commerce solutions, Project management tools

November 2010 | NEXT100

137


Manish Sinha IT Head OnDot Couriers & Cargo Ltd Birthday 21 October Highest Qualification PGDBM IT-Systems IMT Ghaziabad Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size More than 100 people Technology Expertise ERP, CRM, e-Commerce, & Manufacturing Solutions - Implementations, IT Infrastructure & Network, Management, ITIL, ISO - Project Management

138

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Lawrence Soosai Raj

Sr.Manager Projects & Delivery Cethar Consultancy Services Pvt Ltd Birthday 23 March

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Computer Applications Madurai Kamaraj University Total Experience More than 20 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people

Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Collaboration solutions, CRM solutions, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Industry-specific solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, MIS systems, Project management tools

November 2010 | NEXT100

139


Anant STP

AGM IT Rain CII Carbon (India) Ltd Birthday 25 December Highest Qualification Masters Degree 140

NEXT100 | November 2010

Engineering BITS Pilani Total Experience 6 to 9 years Current Team Size 36 to 50 people

Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, HRM solutions, MIS systems, Project management tools, SCM solutions, SAP ERP


Jayesh Tank General Manager IT Harsha Engineers Ltd Birthday 9 April Highest Qualification Masters Degree Computer Applications IGNOU Total Experience 16 to 20 years Current Team Size 36 to 50 people Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, HRM solutions, MIS systems, Portals and web sites, Project management tools, SCM solutions

November 2010 | NEXT100

141


Hursh Tanna Senior Manager IT Gulbrandsen Technologies (India) Pvt Ltd Birthday 13 June Highest Qualification PG Diploma Business Management IIM, Calcutta Total Experience 16 to 20 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise Collaboration solutions, Enterprise Content Management Systems, Email servers, HRM solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, Knowledge management systems (KMS), Portals and web sites, Project management tools, Virtualization solutions

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Devendra Thakkar

Assistant General Manager (IT) TPL Birthday 25 April

Highest Qualification PG Diploma Computer Science Gujarat University Total Experience More than 20 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people

Technology Expertise IT project Management ( Software Applications, Infrastructure and IT Audit ), IT Strategy & Budget planning and execution. Technology evaluation, Business case preparation and presentation to top management.

Pharma specific, Retail, Utility and Manufacturing specific applications including ERP implementation.

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143


ALIGING TECHNOLOGY USAGE TO BUSINESS PRIORITIES IS A MAJOR IMPERATIVE IT’S USUALLY NOT THE TECHNOLOGY THAT FAILS; IT’S THE INTERACTION BETWEEN THE TECHNOLOGY AND THE ORGANISATION ITSELF. BY JACK BERGSTRAND

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PETER DRUCKER WAS the most influential management thinker of the 20th Century for good reason and those reasons have become even clearer in 2010. Drucker consistently pointed out the need for business leaders to reinvent their enterprises by systematically improving their knowledge work (organisational) productivity. It’s clear that the next generation of project management will need to be at the heart of this reinvention because projects are the only true mechanism for sustainable change. Knowledge work (work that uses ideas, expertise, information and relationships to achieve tasks) is the central ingredient to today’s enterprises and enterprise projects. Unfortunately, the interdependence and changing nature of this work does not respond well to the scientific management methods that helped companies successfully manage projects over the past century. The implication of this for large organisations and society overall is huge. According to the Project Management Institute, $12 trillion— nearly 20 percent of the world’s GDP—is invested in projects. And with this work, systematically improving productivity within and across organisations is the most common bottleneck. This bottleneck causes high enterprise

project failure rates, which, for large enterprise technology projects, is as high as 70 percent according to Standish Group research. Managers involved with changing large organisations consistently run into the “knowledge work” problems. It’s usually not the technology that fails; it’s the interaction between the technology and the organisation itself. I saw this often when I worked as an employee for more than 20 years in large organisations; among other jobs I ran the CocaCola Company’s global information technology function and was CFO of Coca-Cola Beverages Ltd. While Peter Drucker didn’t focus his writing specifically on technology projects, there is nothing in large enterprises that exposes the function and dysfunction of “knowledge work productivity” more than such projects, given their ever-changing inter and intraorganisational complications.

THE NATURE OF KNOWLEDGE WORK Traditional project management was designed for what Peter Drucker termed “manual work” and is based on the scientific management principles developed by Frederick Taylor in the early 1900’s. This type of work like the work required for building

an assembly line was and is visible, specialised and stable. Knowledge work on the other hand is invisible, holistic, and ever changing. Unlike manual workers who mainly use their hands and backs to get work done, knowledge workers use their situational knowledge to accomplish goals in dynamic environments. Knowledge work needs to be managed differently than manual work because there are so many ways for it to go off track. A few common examples of unproductive knowledge work include: 1. Too many meetings that produce too few decisions and actions. 2. Competing internal priorities with no mechanism for resolution. 3. Studies that are completed and put on the shelf. 4. Projects that get started but are never finished. 5. Projects that get started but are not finished on time. 6. Projects that never get started but get talked about every year. 7. High executive turnover that causes frequent direction changes. To productively manage the often invisible and ever changing nature of knowledge work projects better, Drucker advised executives to take a more holistic approach, understanding that large projects, like business itself, is more of a social science.

He emphasised our need to remove unproductive work and restructure work as part of an overall system. In this light he believed that knowledge should be organised through teams, with clarity around who is in charge at what time, for what reason, and for how long.

ACCELERATION IS THE NEW QUALITY The next frontier of project management, in line with Drucker’s thinking, requires that we deliver improvements with greater speed to compete globally. In the 21st Century, large firms won’t threaten smaller companies nearly as much as fast companies will threaten slower ones. Does it take your large company a couple of weeks to set up a meeting with key people because their calendars are so busy or because they won’t be in the office for awhile? And even then, is it difficult to get contentious tradeoffs made and decisions acted upon? If so, you are either in trouble or headed towards it. The role of acceleration is to knowledge work projects what quality control is to manual work projects because knowledge work changes so rapidly. With knowledge work, acceleration doesn’t imply that the efforts can be shoddy or sloppy. Rather, it means that work needs to be facilitated in real time. It requires November 2010 | NEXT100

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ongoing prototyping in the field versus striving for perfection in the office. In today’s knowledge age, it is important to turn knowledge into application fast. For knowledge work projects to be managed more productively, a holistic underlying system is needed. It must get everyone on the same page and properly sequence and accelerate Where-Why-WhatWhen-How-Who. Managers often are clear on many of these things at an individual level. But, collectively, it’s very common to have different individual views that don’t add up to a shared enterprise picture. With large enterprise projects, this results in unproductive work and high failure rates. Using a purely objective approach based on scientific management principles to manage the fluid and invisible nature of knowledge work does not work well in practice. When knowledge work is managed like manual work, it tends to get over engineered, with overly complex governance structures and project designs. Knowledge work productivity often benefits from a “just-in-time” mindset versus the “just-in-case” approach. With manual work, taking more time to prepare often improves results and reduces risk because the work won’t change while you’re

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preparing. In case of knowledge work, “just in time” is less risky and more productive.

enterprise projects regularly struggle, not because they are too complex, but because they are too complicated.

EXCHANGE COMPLEXITY FOR COMPLICATION

VELOCITY IS THE BOTTOM LINE

Where traditional project management benefits from being very specialised and mechanised, effective enterprise knowledge work projects require a more holistic and socialised approach. It requires a minor amount of initial complexity at the front end to avoid an unworkable amount of complication later on. This difference between complexity and complication is more than semantic. Grandmasters in chess, for example, are successful because they apply a certain amount of cognitive complexity up front. By doing this they can view large chunks of the chessboard, whereas amateurs see a mass of individual pieces. In practice, this makes the game much more complicated for less skilled players and makes novices less successful when they play. A key difference between complexity and complication is that complexity has a coherent architecture and can be effectively managed. In contrast, complication is largely random and therefore becomes unmanageable over time. Large enterprises and large

In the late 1990s, I was interviewed for Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates’ book, Business at the Speed of Thought. In his book, Gates emphasises that the past was about reengineering but the future depends on velocity. With knowledge work, velocity is at the heart of the productivity opportunity. Sustainable success is not simply driven by urgency, because you can urgently go in the wrong direction. Knowledge work productivity is not about speed or direction. Similar to velocity, it is a function of speed and direction. Peter Drucker wrote that the three dimensions of an economic task were to make the present business effective, identify and realize its potential, and make it into a different business for a different future. In our changing economy, this needs to be accelerated. The four-part knowledge work productivity mantra based on the social sciences requires that companies manage their projects tied to four fundamental questions. If you can’t clearly articulate the answer to these questions, within and across your or-

ganisational silos, your project will have no chance of being accelerated. Where do we intend to go and Why? What needs to happen when? How can those things best get done? Who is going to be responsible for which tasks? The knowledge work productivity management system is to enterprise projects what competition is to capitalism. It breathes life into it, creates order out of chaos, and improves enterprise velocity. Drucker wrote that doing this was essential to economic tasks. It is also essential to enterprise reinvention and our long term economic prosperity.

Jack Bergstrand is the author of Reinvent Your Enterprise, and founder of Brand Velocity. Prior to this, he was CIO of The Coca-Cola Company and CFO of Coca-Cola Beverages Ltd.


JIGNESH VANIA Pg 148

CLAUDE VEIGAS Pg 149

AJAY VERNEKAR Pg 153

BIJU VELAYUDHAN Pg 150

SHELTON VETHARAJ Pg 154

PRAKASH VENKATESH Pg 151

DEEPU VIJAYANATH Pg 155

VINAY PRAKASH VERMA Pg 152

PRAVITHA VIJAYKUMAR Pg 156

SEETARAMAIAH VISSAPRAGADA Pg 157

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Jignesh Vania

Head - Information Technology Mundra International Container Terminal Pvt Ltd Birthday 28 February Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Electronics S S Engineering College Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise Infrastructure Management and solutions, ERP solutions, Email Servers, Oracle Database, IT monitoring and Network Management, MIS systems, Portal and website, Project Management tools, Telecommunication, Certified ISO27001:2005 lead auditor, Business intelligence solutions and automation, DR solution and BCP solution

148

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Claude Veigas Senior Manager IS Pinstorm Technologies Ltd Birthday 19 December Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree

Physics - Electronics Mumbai University Total Experience 13 to 15 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people

Technology Expertise Database Administration, MIS Systems, Knowledge Management Systems, ERP, SCM and Manufacturing Solutions, Process Automation and optimization, Vendor Management

November 2010 | NEXT100

149


Biju Velayudhan Senior Manager IT GKNM Hospital Birthday 30 May

150

NEXT100 | November 2010

Highest Qualification PG Diploma Computer Applications Mega Micro College of Computer Studies, Ooty Total Experience 16 to 20 years

Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise Hospital Information System, Picture Archival and Communication System, Laboratory Information System, Electronic Medical Records, Telemedicine, MIS,

Business Intelligence, Email & Internet Servers and Network Management


Prakash Venkatesh Consultant

Birthday 20 July Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Computer Science Bangalore Institute of Technology Total Experience 16 to 20 years Current Team Size 36 to 50 people Technology Expertise Optical Character Recognition Business Intelligence Solutions & Datawarehousing, Collaboration Solutions, Enterprise Application Integration, Print Management, Computer Language Parsers, Industry specific solutions in Healthcare, Logistics & Retail domains, Software Delivery Management, Project Management & Estimation Tools

November 2010 | NEXT100

151


Vinay Prakash Verma Senior Manager Panasonic AVC Networks India Co. Ltd Birthday 14 July Highest Qualification Masters Degree Business Management IIM, Calcutta Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise Collaboration solutions, CRM solutions, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Finance and accounting solutions, Industry-specific solutions, IT monitoring and network management tools, MIS systems, Portals and web sites, Project management tools, SCM solutions, Virtualization solutions, Oracle database, IT Infrastructure Management and Datacentre Management

152

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Ajay Vernekar

Director IT / Head IT Infrastructure Fullerton India Credit Company Ltd Birthday 28 September

Highest Qualification PG Diploma Business Management Wellingkar Institute of Management, Mumbai Total Experience 16 to 20 years

Current Team Size More than 100 people Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, Collaboration solutions, Enterprise Content Management Systems, CRM solutions, Email servers, IT monitoring and network

management tools, Knowledge management systems (KMS), Virtualization solutions

November 2010 | NEXT100

153


Shelton Vetharaj

Information Management Manager Madura Coats Pvt Ltd Birthday 23 August

154

NEXT100 | November 2010

Highest Qualification Masters Degree Engineering / Systems Thiagarajar College of Engineering Total Experience 16 to 20 years

Current Team Size 11 to 20 people Technology Expertise Collaboration solutions, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Industry-specific solutions, HRM solutions, IT monitoring and network management

tools, MIS systems, Portals and web sites, SAP R/3


Deepu Vijayanath

Senior Manager IT MPS Ltd. A Macmillan Company Birthday 12 January Highest Qualification Masters Degree Business Management T. A. Pai Management Institute Total Experience 6 to 9 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise Collaboration solutions, Enterprise Content Management Systems, Email servers, IT monitoring and network management tools, MIS systems, Portals and web sites, Project management tools, Virtualization solutions, IT Infrastructure, IT security, Software development

November 2010 | NEXT100

155


Pravitha Vijaykumar Business Analyst Dell Ltd. Birthday 14 March Highest Qualification Bachelors Degree Engineering Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Technological University, Raigad Total Experience 10 to 13 years Current Team Size 0 to 10 people Technology Expertise PLM & Collaborative Solutions, Project Management, Information Security and Quality Management System

156

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Seetaramaiah Vissapragada General Manager IT Paradeep Phosphates Ltd Birthday 10 July

Highest Qualification

Masters Degree Computer Science IIT, Madras Total Experience More than 20 years

Current Team Size 36 to 50 people Technology Expertise Business intelligence solutions, CRM solutions, Data warehouse and data marts, Email servers, ERP and manufacturing solutions, Finance and accounting solutions, IT

monitoring and network management tools, Knowledge management systems (KMS), MIS systems, Portals and web sites, Project management tools, SCM solutions

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157


INDEX A

Chatterjee, Debasish......................41

H

Agarwal, Deepak . .......................... 22

Chatterjee, Pradeep......................42

Hadkar, Girish...................................65

Aggarwal, Jatinder . ................... 128

Chhatwani, Shalini.........................43

Hingorani, Aroon.............................66

Alapilla, Balaji.................................. 23

D

Hyder, Ayaz....................................... 67

Arora, Sachin....................................24

Daniel, Jose . ...................................44

Aswartha, Nagesh ......................... 25

Dedhia, Chandresh.........................45

Ithamraju, Vamsikrishna.............68

Deorukhkar, Sunil...........................50

Jadeja, Digvijay...............................69

Dutta, Pritam....................................51

Jha, Hemant.....................................70

B

Bagchi, Subhash............................. 26 Bajaj, Amit......................................... 27

E & F

I & J

Jhala, Ravish ....................................71

Bakshi, Pawan.................................. 28

Elicherla, Ravindra Prasad......... 52

Joseph, Byju..................................... 72

Baldha, Paresh................................. 29

Fernandes, Valerio.......................... 53

Joshi, Vinay....................................... 73

Bansal, Ashish..................................30

G

K

Bharati, Sripad..................................31

G, Sebastin Raja..............................54

Kakuturu, Ravi Kumar.................. 78

Bhattacharya, Subhankar........... 36

Gadi, Ramachandra Reddy.........55

Kathare, Rahul................................. 79

Bisht, Vishal...................................... 37

Gautam, Pritam..............................56

Kaza, Saritha....................................80

Budholia, Anand.............................. 38

Goel, Ritik........................................... 57

Kesari, Chitranjan............................81

Gupta, Vishal Anand......................58

Kesavan, Ramesh............................ 82

Chakraborty, Ashish...................... 39

Gupta, Rajeev...................................59

Khanduja, Jitender........................ 83

Chandurkar, Mahendra................40

Gururaja Rao, Adoni.......................64

Khanna, Omesh...............................84

C

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Kharb, Sanjay ..................................85

Pangerkar, Rajnil ........................... 111

Singh, Balwant.............................. 136

Khurana, Dhiraj...............................86

Pannala, Vishal.............................. 109

Singh, Abhishek..............................137

Krishnan, Chandrasekaran......... 87

Patankar, Sanjay . ......................... 112

Sinha, Manish................................. 138

Kumar, Rahul................................... 92

Patil, Rajshekar.............................. 113

Soosai Raj, Lawrence.................. 139

Kumar, Arun..................................... 93

Pawar, Charudatta........................114

STP, Ananth....................................140

Kumar, Kaushik...............................94

Phadke, Amit................................... 115

Kumar, Pravakar.............................95 Kundu, Tirthadeep.........................96

R

T & V

Tank, Jayesh....................................141

Radhakrishnan, Ranjith.............. 120

Tanna, Hursh.................................. 142

Rajhans, Milind............................... 121

Thakkar, Devendra....................... 143

Lamba, Akshay................................ 97

Rokde, Dhananjay..........................122

Vania, Jignesh................................ 148

Marupadige, Sridhar......................98

Roopawalla, Yusuf........................123

Veigas, Claude................................ 149

Marwaha, Gaurav............................99

Roy, Sourov..................................... 124

Velayudhan, Biju........................... 150

L & M

Mishra, Aanchal.............................100

S

Venkatesh, Prakash...................... 151

Mishra, Mukesh...............................101

Salam, Sareen.................................125

Verma, Vinay Prakash..................152

Modh, Jatinkumar........................ 106

Sangwan, Sanjeev ....................... 126

Vernekar, Ajay ............................... 153

Saxena, Bhavita..............................127

Vetharaj, Shelton.......................... 154

Nagarajan, Raveendran............. 107

Shah, Ashish................................... 129

Vijayanath, Deepu........................ 155

Natarajan, Kathirvelraj.............. 108

Sharma, Naresh ........................... 134

Vijaykumar, Pravitha................... 156

Pandey, Tej.......................................110

Sharma, Neeraj.............................. 135

Vissapragada, Seetaramaiah.........157

N & P

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159


Dear CIO’s, I would like to thank 9dot9 for this great initiative of identifying and nurturing the new IT leaders of Indian corporate world and feel proud to be associated with this great initiative. Traditionally our IT managers have been always surrounded by an environment of uncertainty with no clear information of organization objectives, budget constraints, lack of trained manpower, modernization of legacy systems and lack of interest from the senior management. They have been always in the fire fighting and reactive mode. Now is the time for the IT Manager to move from the back office to the board room. And, you as the future CIO’s, it is important that you think big and align yourself with the company goals & objectives with a sense of ownership as a business leader. Selling is an integral part of our life today. As a future CIO, it is important that you develop sales skills to sell your views, plans and strategy in the board room as well. You become a business enabler, a trusted partner and a friend than just a technology facilitator. I am quite confident that with this transition you will lead India to the next level of growth and prosperity. I wish you all the best for your role as future CIO’s and once again compliment 9dot9 for this great initiative. With Best Wishes

Raj Kumar Sharma Vice President - Sales Arkadin India

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