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September 2015

ITI S COT N ET N EWSLETTER Isabel Hurtado de Mendoza MITI ITI Scottish Network Newsletter Editor

Tel: 07762 300068 Email: editor@itiscotland.org.uk

All good things come to an end Spring and summer seem to have been popular seasons for industry events this year. In this issue, we have reports on ITI network workshops, a CIoL talk and even the Swedish Association of Professional Translators conference!

The end of a melody is not its goal: but nonetheless, had the melody not reached its end it would not have reached its goal either. A parable. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Of course, you’ll feel nostalgic when you read Michael’s review of our very own ScotNet summer workshop and see some great pictures of the weekend. But all good things must come to an end. When autumn settles in, you might want to forget all about boats and kites and snuggle up with a book. If so, you might consider reading the novel Jeannette has kindly reviewed for us.

Photo: Nicholas Canup

Inside this issue Another option would be to choose your favourite pen and write a piece for the next issue of this publication. Maybe an exhibition review? An article on an invaluable piece of software? A short story? Just contact me (editor@itiscotland.org.uk) and we’ll discuss your ideas! If you’re not feeling *that* energetic, you can always consider doing some CPD. Let’s turn this ending into a new beginning! Isabel

Dates for your diary

2

Your typical Scottish summer?

3

A conference newbie

6

“Whose voice is it, anyway?” (probably that of a star-struck fan)

9

The phases of Fo

11

What exactly do you expect me to do?

15

So who needs a translator anyway?

16

The travelling translator goes to London

17

Book review: Someone Else’s Conflict

19

Member news

21

ScotNet grants

22

Looking forward to the next issue…

22

Your committee at a glance

23


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

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Dates for your diary ITI ScotNet Autumn Workshop: Saturday, 3rd

Setting Up as a Freelance Translator ITI Online

October, Royal Over-Seas League, 100 Princes

Course: starts 15th September 2015. Over more

St., Edinburgh, from 9.30 onwards. “It’s not

than 20 hours of webinars and individual

what you spend but the way that you spend it”

sessions, you will learn how to develop a

by Alison Hughes, followed by lunch at the

freelance translation business and gain an

same

understanding of how the translation market

venue.

Book

now

to

avoid

disappointment!

operates.

The Scottish Society of the Chartered Institute of Linguists (CIoL): The next meeting is at 2 pm on Saturday 21 Nov. at the Holiday Inn Express, Picardy Place, Edinburgh. Our AGM will be followed by a talk on Japanese language and culture by Dr Yoko Matsumoto Strut. All are welcome to attend and to join members for lunch in the hotel at 12:15 beforehand. As Scotnetters know, CIoL Scottish Society events cover a wide range of subjects: e.g., we had a hugely entertaining and informative event in Perth in September when our speakers were

Sharne

Proctor,

Director

of

the

For

more

information

visit

www.iti.org.uk/professional-developmentevents/iti-online-courses. Wanderlust: Great Literature From Around the World (And Other Stories and Free Word): Free Word Centre, 60 Farringdon Road, London. This is a new series of monthly events, the first of which

took

place

on

7th

September

(Championing Haroldo Conti: ‘Southeaster’ and the

translator

as

self-publisher).

For

information on future talks, as well as on all the other events the Free Word Centre has on offer (translators surgeries, International Translation Day,

etc.),

please

visit

International Office at Durham University, and

www.freewordcentre.com/events.

Chinese student Lei Wang on the experience of

Language Show Live: 16-18th October, Olympia

non-EU students studying in the UK. The first meeting of 2016 may be of particular interest to translators however. The speaker will be Ian Higgins who co-authored the Routledge series on

translation

method

entitled

Thinking

Translation. He has also published extensively on French war poetry and French poetry in general. The challenges of translating poetry will be the subject of his talk on 27 February 2016 at 2pm in the University of Dundee Tower Building on Perth Road. Anyone interested in joining us will be very welcome. Contact Anne Withers (amwithers@msn.com) for more info. ITI ScotNet AGM and Christmas lunch: Saturday, 5th December, National Piping Centre, 30-34 McPhater St., Glasgow, from approx. 10.00 onwards. Get the date in your diary NOW!

Central,

Hammersmith

Road,

London.

To

register for Europe’s leading annual event for languages for free please click here. Full information on the event can be found at www.languageshowlive.co.uk. Scottish PEN: Remember that this association regularly organises translation slams and book events. You can check their diary here or contact

Rosemary

Burnett

for

further

information at office@scottishpen.org.

For more events, remember to visit www.iti.org.uk, where you will find the International Calendar of Events (ICE), or our own website www.itiscotland.org.uk/diary. Also, if you would like to advertise your own event, please get in touch with us: editor@itiscotland.org.uk


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

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Your typical Scottish summer? For the past few years, a trend seems to have emerged and you can only be sure to have good weather in Scotland if your holidays coincide with the ScotNet summer workshop. But the weekend of 5-7th June was not going to be all play and no work for ScotNetters attending “Being good and keeping safe: ethics, privacy, data — security and disaster planning”, as Michael Loughridge reports. looked after by two waiters who not only entered into the spirit but contributed their own line in dry wit. Almost directly below, Tobermory Bay shone changeably blue, and dozens of boats lay head to wind.

The Western Isles, high on its coastal crag, is one of the grandest places we have worked in, but felt welcoming.

Event speakers: Peter Barber, Sarah Dougan and Christopher McKiddie

ScotNet’s 2015 summer workshop was held on Saturday 6 June at the Western Isles Hotel,

The Western Isles, high on its coastal crag, is

Tobermory, on the island of Mull, with the

one of the grandest places we have worked

traditional associated social events extending

in,

from

mid-afternoon

reception rooms have long views east to the

Sunday. Given the relative remoteness of Mull

Sound of Mull and south over hilly, wooded

for most members, and its beauty, the

Tobermory. On Saturday all the presentations

weather mattered rather more than usual for

and discussions took place in the splendid

overall enjoyment. Prognoses were iffy, but

40-foot long dining room. I

in practice we got a very acceptable package,

speakers found this venue as rewarding as I

sunshine

and

Friday

for

evening

Friday

to

arrival

and

Sunday

but

felt

welcoming.

The

two

main

hope the

other participants did: not only a

excursion, low cloud and drizzle on the

gracious room with masses of space for

indoor workshop day: thanks go to Angelika

everyone, but also acoustically better than

in faraway Vorarlberg for some efficacious

many more modern venues.

black magic. This long bright room was also the setting The meet hit the ground running, if gales of

for the conference dinner. Handsome A4

laughter up and down the dinner table on

menus, three courses with plenty of choice

Friday night were anything to go by. Corinne

for each. And this was where ‘Chip’ (Ciprian,

and her camera were in action from the start.

from Rumania, I gathered) came into his own.

The unexpected bonus that evening was provided by the Western Isles Hotel, all Victorian gravitas to the eye, but getting us


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 4 phone Reception: ‘Is this some kind of practice?’ — but no, it was real, everyone outside in the wind, dressed or not, lots of smoke billowing forth. Much jangling and a (surely rare) sortie by the Tobermory fire brigade.

Half

an

hour

of

refugee

accommodation at the hotel up the road, bits of emergency clothing found. Chip — who else? — the hero of the hour in various ways. Entrance of the Western Isles Hotel

Already remarked on Friday evening for combining the build of a slight 14-year-old boy — he was maybe 19 to 21 — with an astonishingly

deep,

resonant

voice

‘stentorian’, that’s it — he now used it to dominate the full length of the dining room. In tones that would have quelled an unruly S5 class, he reduced the whole ordering process to five minutes by the simple means of a show of hands for each course. And it was

The welcoming Isle of Mull

done with charm. The food, I think it was generally agreed, was delicious,

and

ample.

The

Mull-based

members responsible for the choice of venue and all who shared the work of preparing this weekend did a brilliant job and deserve everyone’s

gratitude.

Their

efforts

were

crowned by the Saturday night ceilidh, with a great five-piece band, much intermingling of ScotNetters,

other

guests

and

locals,

excellent compering, and a selection of contrasting

favourite

numbers

to

have

everyone come away happy.

and ceilidh had begun in an interesting way: some time round 8 a.m. the hotel’s fire sounded,

although

and at 9.30 four or five cars headed up the hill for the rolling road to Calgary on the west coast — 12 miles but a good half-hour away. Here a welcome spot of hospitality from Carol, briefly sharing out the privilege of living in this wonderful spot. And then she led us 100 yards down the road, up and over the lovely craggy little woodland trail and sculpture park with its summit view over the bay — bathed in sunlight after Saturday’s rain — and down over the machair to the beach. Nobody mentioned bathing, but one

This long Saturday of workshop and dinner

alarms

On Sunday, all got their lie-in, smoke-free,

not

all

that

convincingly. Out of shower or sleep to

of our party got an energetic lesson in kite control (central Europe doesn’t do wind much). Pad uphill again to the craft centre for a rather good light lunch, and then it was back


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

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in the cars for a further ten miles of

Perfect ending to a really super weekend!

capricious single track with opposing cyclists

Congratulations and thanks to all of you who

— the ‘Isle of Mull Sportive’ had attracted

made it happen, and to Corinne who helped

dozens

me with the write-up.

of

competitors,

ScotNetter’s

husband,

including

one

uphill-downhill

dialogue not recorded — before we reached our final stop of the weekend, Lip na Cloiche on Loch Tuath. This was an imaginatively and beautifully planted and landscaped garden open for public delight. But it was not your usual flat toddle: average slope from house to top fence roughly 45 degrees, or 1 in 1. Brilliantly engineered paths up and down — with stout rope handrails. And it was here, on the rather less steep small lawn below the cottage, that we spent our last half-hour, with tea and home baking to enjoy in warm sunshine, before we split up and went our different ways.

Michael Loughridge translates from German into English and specialises in academic (Geisteswiss.); politics; travel and tourism. Contact: kerrinan@btinternet.com


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Many thanks to our photographers, Corinne, Kay and Nathalie for such a beautiful rendering of the weekend.

Page 6


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 7

A conference newbie Translation conference virgin Jenni Syrjälä decided to test the waters with the ITI conference in Newcastle and she must have liked the experience, because soon after she was already attending the SFÖ conference in Sweden. Let’s read what she got out of it! began by asking how many of us Google ourselves regularly, which very few people admitted to. He pointed out that our clients certainly do, so we should make sure to have control over what they find. LinkedIn is one of the first things that will come up, and this gives us great control over what our clients will see, so we should use it to our advantage. All photos courtesy of Gisela Weltzin Thunberg

Naprapath Karin Versteegh gave a talk on Less than two weeks after my first ever

how to include more movement in a static

conference in Newcastle I was already on my

work environment. Her key theme was that

way to my second one, the SFÖ (Sveriges

whatever you do, you need variation. Even if

Facköversättarförening)

you sit in a perfect position, you should still

conference

in

Eskilstuna, Sweden. I knew it would be hectic

vary

to have two large conferences back to back,

mechanism” in your chair was recommended.

but

the

Other suggested changes were: getting a sit-

Scandinavian Network had recommended the

stand desk, keeping printers and folders far

SFÖ conferences, and because I badly needed

away from the desk, not using the bits at the

more contacts in my language pairs, I

back of your keyboard to prop it up, and

decided it was worth the investment.

getting up every 30 minutes. Those using a

because

so

many

people

in

it,

so

unlocking

the

“rocking

sit-stand desk were advised to lift it up when And what a great decision that was! The

you go for lunch and at the end of the day,

three days spent in Eskilstuna were fantastic,

so you will automatically work standing up

and I came back not only with lots of

when you get back to work.

contacts,

but

also

with

so

much

new

knowledge, a couple of books, a new piece of software and lots and lots of notes on things to implement in my own business. I would love to tell you about all the fantastic talks I heard, but as there are word counts to stick to, I had better just summarise the best ones. In one of the first sessions Henrik Björklund talked about how to succeed on LinkedIn. He


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

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On the second day Helén Vedlé spoke about

much can/should I charge? Where am I now,

getting out of the “email trap”. Helén gave us

and where am I headed?

great tips on how to organise our email to avoid spending too much time searching for

Apart from all the interesting talks, there

things, using the inbox as a to-do list and

were also some excellent activities in the

archiving everything else, and to only read

evenings. On Friday night, participants were

emails at certain times of day, rather than

split into three groups, with a choice of a

checking them as soon as we hear a *ping*

guided tour of the city, a visit to the Museum

from our inbox. She suggested that those of

of Art, and sampling different local beers.

us who have clients who give out jobs on a

The three groups then met up at the end of

first-come, first-served basis direct less

the

urgent emails into other folders straight

interesting museum where the conference

away, and only have super urgent emails go

participants could network surrounded by old

into the inbox to reduce the amount of

tractors, followed by a buffet dinner. The

interruptions.

conference

evening

at

Munktellmuseet

banquet

on

Saturday

an

night

offered a different kind of excitement, with the entertainment provided by the magician Julien Dauphin. The after-dinner show was followed by a DJ, and it did not take the Swedish translators long to rush to the dance floor. I am very pleased that people in ScanNet recommended this conference to me. I would also like to thank the Scottish Network for The only talk in English was given by Chris Durban on translators’ blind spots. The definition she used of a blind spot was “a tendency to ignore something, especially something

difficult

and

unpleasant”.

An

example of this was that, when translators are asked how they know that their clients are happy with the work, many reply “They haven’t complained” or “They keep coming back”, whereas Chris argued that this might not actually mean that the clients are happy — they may just not have the time to find someone else, for example. To avoid these blind spots, she said we should ask ourselves the following questions: What do my clients really think? How good is my work? How

the generous grant that I received to attend this event. The conference talks had a fantastic focus on very practical topics, and this is definitely something I will look for in any future conferences that I attend.

Jenni’s language combinations and specialisms are: Swedish/Finnish/English & education, public administration, business, tourism. Contact: www.linguanordica.co.uk


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

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“Whose voice is it, anyway?” (probably that of a star-struck fan) ScotNet speakers are always chosen very carefully and usually receive standing ovations. Sometimes, they even have groupies. Or do they? Read this report of “Whose voice is it, anyway?” by Barbara Bonatti Divers to find out. It is true, I wanted to hear Charlotte Bosseaux

European

talk some more about dubbing, after the

focused on the meaning and importance of

short presentation she had given at the

the human voice: Rebecca Tipton (University

ScotNet spring event; and it is also true that I

of

was looking forward to seeing Kari Dickson

interpreting

again, who had so memorably revealed the

situations; Charlotte on dubbing for the

secrets

last

media and the film industry; and Theo

summer in Dumfries... But if I have to be

Hermans (University College London) on how

entirely honest with you, my legs turned to

translators’

jelly the moment I saw that Christopher

themselves, with examples from centuries of

Brookmyre was going to be there. Give me a

(very

book by Brookmyre any day and I will be

Dickson chaired

RABID until it’s finished: don’t touch me,

followed. I will not linger on Charlotte’s

don’t speak to me, don’t even think of asking

presentation, as Hugh Fraser has already

for help with your DIY (that’s why they call it

reported on her similar one from March, but I

do-it-yourself, mate!)... So you see, I was not

took away some interesting concepts from all

entirely CPD-driven as I made my way to

speakers.

of

crime-fiction

translation,

Commission.

Manchester)

in

the

Three

context

performance

“voices”

liberal!)

in

can

literary

scholars

of

conflict

often

reveal

translations.

the panel

the

Kari

session that

Edinburgh on 15th May. From

Rebecca:

how

social

beings

are

polyvocal, employing different registers for different audiences; how translators may impose their own voice over the author’s through the use of footnotes, but the effect will not be as lasting in our consciousness as an interpreter’s decision to mimic or not their client’s intonation and expression; a decision

which

can

have

serious

repercussions. She spoke about the “illusion

Kari, Theo, Rebecca and Charlotte Photo: Barbara Bonatti Divers

of

interpreters’

impartiality,

which

is

shattered in early practice”, and how the The event itself, conceived by Angeliki Petrits

charity Freedom from Torture is the only

(Language Officer, DG Translation, European

client known to her who actually encourages

Commission Representation in the UK) was

the “empathetic voice” of interpreters, to help

organised by Charlotte Bosseaux (University

victims talk of unspeakable topics. This led

of

to the inadequacy of interpreters’ current

Edinburgh)

and

subsidised

by

the


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 10

training that leaves them unprepared for the

German readers among us failed, however, to

emotional traumas they often have to face.

find evidence on his slides that the translator

She mentioned some interesting cases, such

had done anything but his professional best.

as interpreting during child abuse interviews,

When asked about it later Hermans replied: “I

when older children sometimes resort to

would be very surprised if he did not show

baby talk; and she concluded with some

any bias, when biased publishers were paying

humorous examples from her own public

for his work”.

service interpreting experience.

The charity Freedom from Torture is the only client […] who actually encourages the “empathetic voice” of interpreters, to help victims talk of unspeakable topics.

Theo

Hermans

panoramic

view

gave of

an

entertaining

English

translators’

Barbara with Christopher Brookmyre Photo: Katrin Frahm

liberties taken over four centuries, when in the name of decency authors were “castrated” in numerous creative ways: from having

At last, centre stage was taken by Brookmyre

sexually explicit content translated into XVI

and his German translator Hannes Meyer,

century French (Payne’s English translation of

with

The

Decameron,

in

1893)

or

in

Latin

(Egerton’s English version of The Golden

Lotus, in 1930). My protest that censorship is still going strong in British publishing (the

The Thousand and One Nights and even The Outlander — an American novel — have “unabridged”

English

edition

of

Charlotte

asking

them

about

the

challenges and rewards of translating Tartan Noir, as well as the relationship (or lack thereof) between authors and translators. For our amusement Brookmyre produced a long list of dubious questions asked by his French ex-translator (whose name was given — alas! — and quickly forgotten); he assured us

entire sections omitted, compared to the

however that he is approachable and happy

Italian translations) elicited a disappointing

to answer queries by translators - provided

response: “don’t be too harsh on censors,

they check on Google first. On this subject,

you would not want a child reading certain

Meyer explained how he asked his online

things”... which left me rather shell-shocked,

community of Scottish gaming pals for the

I must confess. He then showed us an extract

exact meaning of “the close”, only to discover

of Hitler’s Mein Kampf — opposite its English

that

the

Edinburgh

close

(an

outdoor,

translation published during World War II,

covered alleyway) is not the same as the

heavily annotated by the publishers — and

Glasgow one (the indoor access to tenement

suggested

also

flats). Brookmyre admitted he has no way of

showing a bias against the content. The

judging the quality of his work in translation,

that

the

translator

was


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

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but was relieved to hear the audience laugh

Brookmyre read aloud an extract from one of

in all the right places when he attended a

his books, and I finally plucked up the

public reading by Meyer of one of his books

courage to ask him for an autograph and a

in German. He said he does not really worry

photo, courtesy of Katrin Frahm.

about the way translators decide to convey his content, provided his values are being

My day was made, I felt fifteen again. What

respected, and he wondered in the passing if

else is CPD for?

any of his translated books have any Latin in them. Meyer was asked by Kay McBurney whether he is aware of writing with a specific voice for Brookmyre, different from that of

Barbara translates English into Italian. Specialisms: tourism & environment. Contact: intoitalian@ bonattidivers.plus.com

other authors; his reply was that he listens to the characters’ voices, not the author’s: over time

he

has

learned

to

recognise

the

different styles and registers associated with each character and to reflect this in German.

The phases of Fo Last May, Simon Oladjins attended a talk organised by the Scottish Society of the CIoL. There, he learnt all about Nobel prizewinner Dario Fo and his wife, Franca Rame, leading figures in contemporary playwriting. Four times a year The Scottish Society of the

Glasgow,

Perth

and

Dundee

to

make

Chartered Institute of Linguists holds a

attendance easier for the more far-flung

meeting, centred around a talk on a subject

membership (some members are further

related to languages and the cultures within

flung than others).

which they exist. The idea is to provide something of interest to CIoL members (and

On May 20th 2015 in Glasgow, the guest

therefore

else

speaker was Professor Joe Farrell, Professor

interested in languages), so that translators,

Emeritus at the University of Strathclyde, who

for example, can lift their weary heads and

gave a talk on the Italian dramatist and actor

sore noses from the grindstone, and enjoy

Dario Fo entitled “The Phases of Fo”. As

broader horizons as a change from the

someone who knows Dario Fo personally,

routine of daily toil. Past topics have ranged

and his late wife Franca Rame until her death

from Icelandic prepositions (!) to the works of

in 2013, his talk was very much a series of

Gabriel Garcia Marquez, for example, and

illuminations of aspects of Fo’s work and

meetings are rotated between Edinburgh,

character rather than a chronological recital

by

definition

to

anyone


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

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along the lines of “and then he wrote this and

decline it. Apparently the name of Bob Dylan

that play, which was very good ...” giving it a

was being considered as

more intimate and personal feel than a

recipient, but this proved unnecessary when

detached academic lecture.

Fo accepted the prize. Bob Dylan is still

an alternative

waiting. Prof. Farrell described Dario Fo as standing four-square

in

the

Italian

tradition

of

actor/authors, an exceptional actor as well as an author of extremely funny comedies suffused with his political convictions. A quintessential man of the Italian theatre, Fo was supported and influenced for many years by his wife Franca Rame, whom he married in 1954 after meeting her in a Milan review

Empty theatre (almost). Photo: Kevin Jaako

show in which they were both working, and

To set the scene, Prof. Farrell likened Fo’s work to the comedy “Yer Granny”, which at the time of the talk was a current touring production

of

the

National

Theatre

of

Scotland. This is a domestic comedy based on the Argentinian “La Nona” by Roberto Cossa, about a centenarian grandmother who eats her family out of first their fish and chip shop and then their house and home, and is very much in the style of Dario Fo. Dario Fo was born in 1926 and his next birthday will be his 90th, an event which may be marked by an exhibition of the art to which he has turned his hand in his latter years as a departure from playwriting. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1997, a

controversial

decision in some

quarters due to his very left-wing political position as a social dissident and committed Marxist. Before he was awarded the prize, there was some speculation that he might reject it, although according to Prof. Farrell this was never Fo’s intention; if the prize were offered, Fo would most certainly not

Prof. Farrell told how in later years she was proud of being the one who had initiated the relationship. She was already very much an actress, playwright and political activist in her own right when she and Fo met, and came from a family at the heart of the Italian tradition of touring actors that dates back to the 19th century. This is a style of theatre based

on

improvisation

(the

Commedia

dell’Arte more familiar to us is in fact only one facet of Italian theatre), in which a touring company of actors would typically appear in a town or village and after talking to various inhabitants to obtain some local knowledge, would put together a piece based on current events and personalities but incorporating memorised existing speeches and dramatic situations. Fo, on the other hand, had no such family history in the theatre, but nonetheless had background influences of his own. Prof. Farrell described how Fo was brought up in a small town on the shores of Lake Maggiore, where storytelling was a local pastime, and the tradition of the fabulator and folk


ITI ScotNet Newsletter narratives

was

alive

and

Page 13 strong

in

a

would be put on in municipal and national

community where the local working men

theatres, giving scope (and creating the

tended to be fisherman or glassworkers from

space) for such actor-managers who write

all over Europe. This environment greatly

and perform their own work. Fo became a

coloured Fo’s later work, as reflected by the

dominant figure in the field, beginning with

strong elements of story-telling, fantasy,

two collections of one-act farces, and over

irony, local satire and class division in his

the years creating a series of comedies and

theatre. The combination of Dario Fo and

farces satirising various aspects of Italian life

France Rame - he the writer, she the actress

and politics. Although contemporaneous with

and performer - was to lead later to the

the theatre of the absurd, the comparison is

founding of a small company of real ability.

a false one, as Fo’s work, such as “The Virtuous

Fo was present in Milan for

the

overthrow

of

fascism during the war, and was inspired by the cultural hegemony theory of Antonio Gramsci that sees

high

culture

as

boulevard

He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1997, a controversial decision in some quarters due to his very left-wing political position as a social dissident and committed Marxist.

farce

as

opposed to intellectual farce. In 1956, together with

Franca,

he

co-

wrote and acted in a film

entitled

Screwball”,

class

by

the

is

simple but successful

imposed by the ruling on

Burglar”,

working

“The

influenced

figures

such

as

people as a means of domination. Prof.

Jacques Tati, Buster Keaton and Charlie

Farrell pointed out that Fo has always

Chaplin. This was described by Prof. Farrell

regarded himself as a playwright of popular

as somewhat of a fiasco in its time, but one

as opposed to high culture, setting out to

that holds up in retrospect.

subvert its accepted mores for political reasons and overturn convention for comic

Fo

then

entered

purposes. An example of this is Fo’s take on

although

the David and Goliath story; Fo sees it from

“commercial” would be a better description,

the perspective of Goliath, a harmless jovial

producing one comedy per year involving

(but physically large!) character cruelly and

improvisation and satire but staged in official

needlessly killed by the aggressive upstart

theatres. The censorship in Italy at the time

David.

meant that Fo’s plays had to be continually

Prof.

a

Farrell

“bourgeois” pointed

period,

out

that

re-written and depart from their script on a Prof. Farrell then turned to the post-war

daily basis in order to avoid being banned,

period, when Dario Fo became involved with

and as a result they evolved over time. In the

the “small theatres” movement of the time,

authoritarian

writing and performing his own monologues,

establishment of the time, the Christian

including on radio, and developing into the

Democrat party and the Church were wealthy

typically-Italian

One

powerful opponents of a voice such as Fo’s,

reason for this is that Italian theatre lacks a

and at one point even a TV talent show

history of major playwrights whose work

featuring sketches by Fo was cancelled by

actor-author

figure.

right-of-centre

Italian


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 14

RAI (the Italian public service broadcaster)

Carabinieri, which illustrates the political and

due to censorship.

cultural situation in Italy at the time.

In 1968, after the “events” in France, Fo

In 1995, at the age of 69, Fo suffered a

broke with the bourgeois theatre and set up

stroke, and some of his attitudes seem to

an alternative theatre circuit. This featured

change afterwards. He began writing books

the popular figure from Italy’s past of the

on art, and although an atheist is now

jester or minstrel rather that stories with

fascinated by religious subjects, such as the

human characters. Although this could have

fact that Dante indicates in the “Divine

been

was

Comedy” that St. Boniface will go to Hell, the

anything but, as Fo despised the avant-

raising of Lazarus, and St. Francis of Assisi.

garde.

He is also an admirer of Pope Francis.

Fo’s most well-known play outside Italy, the

Prof. Farrell summed up by describing Fo as

farce “Accidental Death of an Anarchist”,

representing the development of modern

followed in 1970, and was based on the

playwriting

death

was

chronologically a successor to Pirandello

arrested for bombing a bank (a charge later

though not a follower, and someone who is

disproved) but was mysteriously and swiftly

occasionally overtly political. His work is

defenestrated from the Milan police station

always critical, satirical, and firmly in the

after

custody.

dissident tradition, with a coherence to his

Although a farce and fictional in content, the

point of view throughout. Above all, he is

play’s similarity with real-life events meant

very funny, and Prof. Farrell’s talk was

that unsurprisingly it had to be re-written by

certainly an encouragement to explore his

Fo each night to avoid enforced closure.

work further.

regarded

of

a

an

as

avant-garde,

Italian

anarchist

brief period

of

it

who

police

within

the

Italian

tradition,

Prof. Farrell also reminded us that the 1970’s were also the time of increasing feminism, and Franca Rame encouraged Fo to produce a number of feminist pieces, although as collaborators it is unclear who wrote what. In 1973 Franca was kidnapped by fascists for several allegedly

days, with

and the

tortured

and

connivance

raped, of

the

Simon works from German and French into English. He specialises in engineering and law. Contact: otd@trceleven.demon.co.uk


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 15

What exactly do you expect me to do? When asked to proofread a text, Audrey Langlassé kept wondering what she was meant to do precisely. Not even her clients were totally sure! So last June, she attended a revision seminar. For the past six months, most of my

freelance translators often receive from their

workload

clients.

has

consisted

of

editing/

proofreading work for a variety of clients (individual,

businesses,

institutions

and

translation agencies). Each time, I have been struggling

with

understanding

their

real

needs and expectations. Therefore, I was very interested in the joint LRG/EU revision seminar that was held on June 22 at the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. To cater for as many people as possible, this half-day workshop was offered on a morning and afternoon session. Travelling a long way from

Writing in red. Photo: pedrik

Glasgow, I had opted for the afternoon session, spending the morning on the train busily working on a revision project.

attendees

This was not my first training on the subject, but it was the first one with speakers from the European Commission — Paul Kaye and Stephen Turkington are language officers at the

European

Representation;

Commission’s Brian

Porro

is

London a

legal

translator who has worked for the Court of Justice, the EU and the Commission in his 27-year long career; and Peter Workman is an EU translator based in Luxembourg. In the first part, the speakers described the different stages of their work as translators and revisers at the EU. What was striking for most of the audience was the way the translation process and quality checking are strictly defined and organised there, in comparison

with

the

vague

I was reassured by a quick poll among the

instructions

that

revealed

that

the

terms

“proofreading” and “checking” tend to be most

requested

by

clients,

and

that

“revision”, “reviewing” and “editing” are often used interchangeably. Consequently, clients may ask (and pay) for proofreading when they really want revision, whereas the time and expertise required for the two jobs differ greatly. It also emerged that none of the people in the room who have done a postgraduate course in translation had been introduced to the issues of revision. As one of the speakers summed up, “Everybody assumes that, if you can translate, you can revise”. A useful set of definitions drawn from the ITI 2008 Orientation Course referring to the international standard (BS EN 15038) was provided:


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 16

- “Revision: examining a translation for its

similar event specifically tailored to my

suitability for the agreed purpose, comparing

language and its specific needs.

the

source

and

target

texts

and

recommending corrective measures.” This is

PS: Apologies for the lack of photos. I was so

the most complete and thorough service.

engrossed in the workshop that I forgot to

Revisers

take out my camera!

must

know

as

much

as

the

translator. - “Proofreading: checking of proofs before

Audrey translates from English into French and specialises in international development, environmental issues, advertising, tourism and education. Contact: www.alacartetranslations.com

publishing.” Proofreaders need only look at one language version and concentrate on purely formal aspects of the text. - “Reviewing: examining a target text for its suitability

for

the

agreed

purpose

and

respect for the convention of the domain to which

it

belongs

and

recommending

corrective measures.” Reviewers need only look at one language version, but must be expert in the subject to ensure that the style and terminology are correct. Although “editing” is not defined in BS EN 15038, it is generally understood to mean “going through a text as you would do for proofreading but also improve the style and message.” Therefore, editors are expected to have

writing

skills

that

go

So who needs a translator anyway?

beyond

proofreading. I

must

say

that,

since

attending

this

workshop, I have made sure to refer to these definitions in my quotes; it helps my clients understand the work and cost involved as well as clarify their brief. The second part of the workshop consisted of a variety of hands-on exercises on

French Swiss Alps café advertising helpful services for parents of young children (or a new type of cannibalistic delicacy, perhaps?).

punctuation very much in the spirit of Lynn Truss’s book, Eats, Shoots and Leaves. This was quite useful and entertaining even for non-native English speakers. However, I left this workshop wishing I could attend a

Thanks to Barbara Bonatti Divers for this translation blooper.


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 17

The travelling translator goes to London When you are an islander, you have to travel far for your CPD. ScotNetter María Pelletta knows this well, and here she tells us of her first training event down in London hosted by the ITI Spanish Network. language group, we should focus on training specifically

for

our

language,

so

the

workshop-in-Spanish-seed was planted. We believe that it is the first training event given in a language other than English, or one of very few, in any case. Yet, the ScotNet event formula was my inspiration. We invited Xosé Castro Roig, a language guru for those using Spanish in their work. Google his name and you will find a funny bloke with a massive CV (xcastro.com/en) and a career that makes you think he started working when he was in primary school. How does he do

it?

He

defines

himself

as

“super

productive”. He even films himself to see in which ways he wastes time. Have you ever Speaker Xosé Castro. Photo: Lisa Agostini

tried doing that? He asked us which was our working tool and, of course, we all said

I have to confess that I feel a little bit of a

“language”. “Wrong”, he said. “Your tool is

traitor for having chosen to go to the

your computer and you need to know how to

SpanNet Training Event in London instead of

use it. Your computer is your money-making

taking the ferry to Mull for the Scottish

machine. Imagine this conversation at the

Network summer event. But I didn’t have a

garage:

choice, really. I am a member of the SpanNet coordination team and have been involved in

- What is this tool for?

organising this event, the first one for

- I don’t know, I never use it.

SpanNet and the first one of its kind.

- And this one? - Errrmmm… no idea, didn’t even know it

We decided to expand the usual AGM + bash

was there.

(dinner, chat and networking) formula. We

- Oh… no, don’t touch that! I am scared of

wanted to offer something else to our

touching that one!

members. SpanNet is a pioneer in many ways, for example creating the Mentoring

This is what some of us sound like when

Scheme which has now been adopted by

asked about some keys on our computers! I

several groups. We thought that, being a

blushed.


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 18

His first workshop “Advanced Word for

the use and abuse of formatting options;

translators”, boring as it sounded, was mind-

etc., all compared to their uses in English.

blowing. Of course we all know how to use

Refreshing! As I was one who claimed that

some key combinations to avoid taking our

my working tool was language, I felt a lot

hands off the keyboard to go looking for the

more

mouse, but this was something else. At least

dissipating doubts, and generally able to

for me, as I am always chasing behind the

relate to what he was saying. Phew!

comfortable

with

this

subject,

technology advances and IT stuff in general, puffing and panting and never seeming to catch up. Yet, delegates who claimed they knew a lot about Word were amazed at the amount of new possibilities Xosé revealed. I can’t pass on any tips, because they are all equivalent easily if you google keyboard shortcuts. To sum up, I volunteered (why, oh, why) to be humiliated in front of the 31 delegates on a speed competition. The task took me 11 seconds to complete, Xosé finished it — and added a creative something else to it — in less than 1 second. I blushed again. (In my defence, his keyboard was in Japanese, he explained the laptop he was using was a bargain he couldn’t resist, but it had a detrimental effect on my brain, as you can imagine.) With our heads crammed with information after three hours of Advanced Word, we

María and Susie Kershaw, winner of Xosé’s book, Inculteces

stopped to enjoy the lovely lunch that the Arlington Centre (in the buzzing Camden

Making the most of the sun as soon as the

Town) provided, we chatted and relaxed, and

workshop finished, we went for a lovely walk

we drank lots of water (it was really hot in

to Primrose Hill to see the London skyline

London, when I saw the sun for the first time

from that vantage point, feeling like tourists

since September 2014!) to ready ourselves

among tourists and locals that were enjoying

for the following 4 hours of entertainment.

the sun in the park with dogs, frisbees, bare

Yes, Xosé could have been a successful

feet and ice-creams.

stand-up comedian too if he had wanted. The second workshop was on editing. Details

We had a fantastic conclusion to the event at

on

inverted

Andy’s taverna, a Greek restaurant also in

commas; notation for dates, hours, figures;

Camden Town, busy, noisy and full of life,

dialogues; when to use or not use capitals;

served by a waiter who could speak perfect

how

to

use

commas

and


ITI ScotNet Newsletter Spanish!

The

meal

was

Page 19 delicious

and

to catch the bus to town: “It rained all

abundant and the heavyweights that were

Monday, just like Sunday. But now it seemed

still there at midnight were treated to a

to be raining in another way, because

special Greek liqueur! Xosé wants to come

something different and bitter was going on

back! Me too. We are already thinking about

in my heart. At dusk a voice beside my chair

the next one and I won’t allow it to clash with

said: ‘This rain is a bore’.”

any ScotNet events, promise. That way, all ScotNet members who work with Spanish will also be able to come.

María translates from English into Latin American Spanish. Her specialisms are education, NGOs, environment/renewables and social sciences: www.mariapelletta.com

I flew back to Inverness, put my jacket on and walked into the rain that was still falling. Back to Macondo, I thought, and this quote from One Hundred Years Of Solitude came to my mind when I was running across the road

Book review: Someone Else’s Conflict Translators are readers by definition, but we are also readers for pleasure. This is why from now on I would like to encourage members to write short reviews of books they’ve enjoyed lately. The first review we’ll be publishing could be no other than Jeannette Rissmann’s review of ITI member Alison Layland’s debut novel, Someone Else’s Conflict. Holdwick

in

the

Yorkshire

Dales.

The

when

the

three

main

characters

come

Saturday market is bustling. Jay plays a tune

together, this allows the reader an intimate

on his flute and starts telling his story about

insight into each of their thoughts, fears and

a

king’s

daughter,

hopes. Jay has been on

princes and knights. He

the road for years, not

draws in the shoppers, among who

them

enjoys

Marilyn, listening,

and Vinko, a teenager in leather

jacket

who

By translating some of her stories and an early novel from Welsh into English [Alison] gained the confidence to write in her own language

wanting to settle down, trying to escape ghosts of the past in Yugoslavia, especially that of a little boy.

Marilyn

has

just

bumps into her. Little

emerged

from

a

do they know that their

controlling

relationship

paths have crossed, not fleetingly, to change

and is looking forward to setting up as an

their lives completely within a few weeks.

independent artist in her own workshop. Vinko, an illegal immigrant, is trying to

The

narrative

is

written

from

three

viewpoints. Technically difficult, especially

survive in the dark world of petty crime and black market labour.


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 20

At the centre of the novel are three themes —

works

love, friendship and trust. As Jay and Marilyn

information texts. Her writing career started

get closer, the reader empathises with the

relatively late. When she moved to Wales in

constant doubts and bouts of mistrust mixed

1991

with moments of fulfilment. Why does Jay not

finishing an A-level course, she continued by

talk

Marilyn

taking a creative writing class in Welsh. In

understand? And what about Vinko? Can he

2002 she won the short story competition at

trust Jay, the friend of his long-dead father,

the

neither of whom he’s ever met? Will he help

translating some of her stories and an early

him build a life in Britain? As the past catches

novel from Welsh into English she gained the

up with Jay, he will have to face his inner

confidence to write in her own language.

about

his

past?

Would

of

she

creative

started

National

fiction

learning

Eisteddfod

and

specialist

Welsh.

Festival.

After

By

demons. Alison has always been fascinated by oral storytelling, giving her the idea for the character Jay who uses stories to hide his past. When translating a book on Croatia she developed

an

interest

in

the

Balkans,

travelling in Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia. She decided to locate Jay’s past in the Croatian conflict of the 1990s. Having read up on the history of the Balkans and the conflicts of the 1990s,

she

also

started

learning

the

language. Alison’s language skills help to represent the character’s background and characterise situations. For example, Vinko’s mother tongue is Croatian but he has grown Set in the present, the narrative relies on

up in Germany. He’s been in England for a

flashbacks that shape the present action and

short time and his English is rather weak. So

combines realistic narrative with elements of

it is only natural that more familiar Croatian

fantasy. The way the past is remembered by

and German words slip in, especially in

Jay represents the confusion of memory and

moments of stress and tiredness.

effects of post-traumatic stress disorder on someone who is trying to come to terms with

At the moment, Alison is working on her

mistakes and traumatic events experienced

second novel. Someone Else’s Conflict is

in Croatia. The novel certainly does not lack

published by Honno Press.

suspense and tension, especially with regard to the rocky road of Jay and Marilyn’s relationship and a thriller developing towards the end of the story. Alison Layland is a translator and writer. She translates from German, French and Welsh —

Jeannette’s language combinations are: GEEN, EN-GE, RUS-EN, RUS-GE. Specialist areas: drama, tourism, history, general. Contact: Jeannette.Rissmann@ed.ac.uk


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 21

Member news With the introduction of the new ITI membership structure recently, quite a few people have recently moved category within ITI. If this applies to you, please remember to notify the Membership Secretary of any changes to your ITI membership status since you joined the network. In particular, let the MemSec know when you upgrade to MITI, as your details will then be made available to Joe Public online. New members:

 Virginia Pastor: I am an English/French to

 Auriane Destrument: I am a freelance

Spanish

scientific and medical translator working

Languages and Translation at the University

from English into French. I am relatively new

of Alcalá (Spain) and hold an MA in Legal and

to the profession, having recently decided to

Financial Translation from the University of

swap a career in scientific research for one in

Córdoba (Spain). I started my career as a

translation. After obtaining a degree and a

translator in 2012, when I graduated, and I

PhD in biochemistry and working as a

recently moved to Edinburgh to start my

research

research

freelance translation career. I specialise in

associate, I took a professional break to

legal, financial and business translation, but

become a mother. This gap gave me the

also in tourism, fashion, beauty and cooking

opportunity to reconnect with my other

related texts, as they are some of my

major interests - languages and linguistics —

passions. I also translate/localise websites to

and to retrain as a translator. I am currently

help people and businesses to reach wider

studying towards the Diploma in Translation

audiences. Occasionally, I have worked as an

from the Chartered Institute of Linguists and

interpreter at several weddings… it was so

have completed two units already. At the

exciting and fun! I hope I can meet you all

moment, I work mainly for agencies and

soon at one of the workshops or events!

assistant

then

as

a

occasionally for direct clients, including my yoga teacher who needs a yoga fanatic (that will be me) to help him run workshops in France.

translator.

I

studied

Modern


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 22

ScotNet grants The ITI Scottish Network offers 2 levels of

General conditions: Maximum one grant per

grants to members as a contribution towards

person per subscription year. You must be a

the costs of attending ITI events:

member of ITI, so Friends of the Network are

1) Grants of up to £30 are available for

not eligible. Also members living in the

attending Scottish Network meetings.

central belt are not eligible to receive grants

2) ScotNetters may also apply for grants of

for network meetings in Edinburgh/Glasgow.

up to £70 for attending national ITI events.

All recipients must be willing to contribute a report on the event they attended to the ITI ScotNet Newsletter.

How to apply for a grant Contact our treasurer (currently Norma Tait) at

treasurer@itiscotland.org.uk

registering

for

the

meeting.

before

Subject

to

availability and meeting the eligibility criteria, she will approve the grant and notify you. In due course, forward her a copy of the receipt for the event or transport expenses and provide her with your bank details. She will then pay the respective amount into your

The level of grants is reviewed every year at ScotNet’s AGM. Under the current budget, 10 grants of £30 and 10 of £70 are available each year. From time to time the committee may also decide to offer additional grants to enable

ScotNetters

to

attend

particular

events, such as they did for the 2013 ITI Conference.

account.

Looking forward to the next issue… While I write this, you’ll probably be enjoying yourselves at one of the many Scottish summer festivals. In fact, three of you have already volunteered pieces on the Edinburgh Book Festival. Many thanks for that! I have also lined up an event report, an author interview and a piece on living in Italy. Would you like to contribute to this exciting upcoming issue of our ScotNet newsletter? Send in your proposals to editor@itiscotland.org.uk!

An exercise in collaboration. Photo: Giulia Forsythe


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 23

Your committee at a glance Convenor

Deputy Convenor

& Deputy Webmaster

Elena Zini

Marian Dougan 0141 9420919 convenor@itiscotland.org.uk

07765 987207 convenor@itiscotland.org.uk

Treasurer

Newsletter Editor

Norma Tait

Isabel Hurtado de Mendoza

0131 5521330

07762 300068

treasurer@itiscotland.org.uk

editor@itiscotland.org.uk

Membership Secretary

Deputy MemSec

Ute Penny

Nathalie Chalmers

01368 864879

01888 562998

membership@itiscotland.org.uk

membership@itiscotland.org.uk

Events Coordinator (East)

Events Coordinator (West)

Angelika Muir-Hartmann

Audrey LanglassĂŠ

0131 3334654

0141 5603482

muirhartmann@aol.com

audreylanglasse@alacarte-translations.com

Webmaster Iwan Davies 01738 630202 webmaster@itiscotland.org.uk

ITI Scotnet Newsletter September 2015  

ITI Scottish Network Newsletter September 2015