Page 1

November 2013

ITI S COT N ET N EWSLETTER Isabel Hurtado de Mendoza MITI ITI Scottish Network Newsletter Editor

Tel: 07762 300068 Email: editor@itiscotland.org.uk

It’s autumn and I’m shedding My mother always says that autumn is the time of the year when you should cut your hair. It’ll then grow stronger and healthier for the rest of the year. Autumn shedding might be a popular myth, but we would do well to observe what happens to nature this season and consider whether we, as animals, follow similar patterns. You might be happy to shed some misconceptions about machine translation and dig into the new niche of post-editing (page 9) or perhaps even feel brave enough to discover Twitter (page 16). You might want to stick to ScotNet events (page 3) like the last autumn leaves hang on to their trees, but it might be time to let your tree grow a few new leaves. Ute did when she ventured to Bath for an ITI Anglophoner Tag (page 14) and, if you’d like to try out a national event, remember you might be eligible for a grant (page 29). Whatever you do, remember to take care of yourself by taking some time off (page 23) and maybe even try new meditative techniques (page 19). Sit back, relax and enjoy our new issue! Isabel ♦

Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower. ~ Albert Camus

[Photo: www.flickr.com/photos/31246066@N04/ 5115966185]

Inside this issue Dates for your diary

2

Culture in the Granite City

3

Focus on machine translation

9

Translating the (seemingly) untranslatable

11

An anglophoner Tag

14

Alison’s adventures in Twitterland

16

A favourite translation project

19

A Franco-Scottish affair

21

Working sustainably as a translator

23

Your committee under the spotlight

26

Member news

27

ScotNet grants

28

Looking forward to the next issue…

29

Your committee at a glance

30


Page 2

ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Dates for your diary ITI ScotNet AGM and Christmas lunch: Saturday

ITI North East translator meetup: Every Saturday

7th December from approx. 10:30, National

afternoon from 15:00, Cafe de Vie, Newcastle.

Piping Centre, 30-34 McPhater St., Glasgow.

This group of translators hosted by ScotNetter

For further information and to register (before

Laura Ball holds weekly meetings and any

Monday 25th November!), please check out the

ScotNet member who happens to be in the area

call notice here.

is always welcome to join them. For more

Freelancer meetup: Friday 22nd November from 19:30, The Antiquary pub, 72-78 St Stephen's

information, follow @ITINERG on Twitter or email Laura (lauracball@hotmail.com).

Street, Edinburgh. ScotNetter Sally McPhail is

Business School for Translators: For this online

hosting

course, you can choose daytime or evening

a

freelancer

meetup.

See

www.meetup.com/freelance-friday-

sessions. The daytime course (10:00 start)

edinburgh/events/104647862/.

starts on Thursday 30th January 2014 and the

The Scottish Society of the Chartered Institute of Linguists (CIoL): Saturday 16th November from 14:00, Holiday Inn Express, Picardy Place, Edinburgh. This is the Scottish Society’s AGM and, to follow, translator, interpreter and

evening one begins on Tuesday 25th March 2014

(18:00

start).

You

can

find

more

information about this 5-week long eCPD webinar on practical business knowledge and skills here.

lawyer Sue Leschen will be talking about

Creating a Client Satisfaction Survey for Your

"Interpreting

seekers;

Translation Business: Online eCPD webinar,

linguistic, legal and cultural considerations".

Thursday 5th December from 11:30. Back in

The meeting starts at 2 pm but everyone is

2011, Michael Farrell became perhaps the first

welcome to meet up for lunch beforehand at

professional freelance translator in history to

12:30.

send out a satisfaction questionnaire. He talks

For

for

French

details,

asylum

contact Anne

Withers,

amwithers@msn.com, tel. 0131 441 2519.

about his experience in this online webinar.

ITI Gernet copywriting workshop: Friday 22nd November from 9:30 to 17:00, George Fox Room, The Priory Rooms, 40 Bull Street, Birmingham. Day workshop in Birmingham on copywriting - not just aimed at translators working with advertising texts. Presenter: Piers Alder

(wordbrain.com)

For more events, remember to visit

www.iti.org.uk, where you will find the

International Calendar of Events (ICE), or our own website www.itiscotland.org.uk/diary.

who writes adverts,

brochures, customer letters for government agencies and global corporations. He is also a proponent of the Plain English Campaign. For further information and to register, visit https://iti-gernet-copywriting.eventbrite.co.uk.

And, if you would like to advertise your own event, please get in touch with us: editor@itiscotland.org.uk


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 3

Culture in the Granite City ITI ScotNet’s 2013 Summer Workshop, which was held on 17 th June at the Caledonian Hotel in Aberdeen, proved to be yet another resounding success. In the following pages, grantees Natalie Tucker, Sabine Citron, Barbara Divers, Pilar Carstairs and Maria Pelletta report on this event craftily organised by Deputy MemSec Nathalie Chalmers. A nosey Natalie reports on a cheerful Friday evening Before attending only my second ScotNet workshop, I realise that writing a report about Friday evening justifies approaching people,

asking

photographs

questions

without

being

and

taking

accused

of

harassment. With this positive mindset, I am

On a personal note, the clarification that I am not the French Nathalie with an ‘h’ “who sends lots of emails”, but the Scottish Natalie with no ‘h’ who rarely sends emails, nor Natalia who isn’t here this weekend, keeps me busy throughout the evening. I meet Nathalie with an ‘h’ and we have a laugh about this.

confident this will be a fun, entertaining evening. Entering the stylish Caledonian Hotel, I hear chatter and laughter from the bar and wonder “Could these few really loud folk be ScotNetters?”.

After

checking-in

and

returning to the bar I quickly find out that yes, indeed they are! No sooner have I purchased a drink and sat down do I start socialising (not to be nosey, but as report research). Thankfully, everyone I meet is very friendly and welcoming – characteristics I see

You are morally obliged to eat haggis when in Scotland.

in all I encounter. Throughout the evening I

In a pedestrian convoy, we walk to the Stage

realise the obvious, i.e. as linguists we love

Door restaurant five minutes from the hotel.

to communicate, and as translators we make

We are spread around 3 tables and the vocal

the most of being away from our desks and

noise gets louder as we are having a good

mixing with people instead of dictionaries

time and looking forward to our meal. As one

and PCs!

non-Brit explains, you are “morally obliged

Topics covered throughout the evening range from how we came to the industry, Scottish weather, countries to visit, health issues, ITI qualifications, CAT tools and ProZ, to what translation and interpreting jobs would be available if Scotland were to go independent.

to eat haggis when in Scotland!”, a good enough reason for me (as a Scot) to choose this starter. Seeing the number of empty plates cleared after starters and main courses have been devoured confirms that Nathalie (the one with an ‘h’ who sends lots of


Page 4

ITI ScotNet Newsletter

emails), made an excellent choice when recommending this location!

Many of us had heard good things about

An erstwhile fellow Salford student suggests we approach our lecturer/tutor from years gone

by,

having

identified

Jean-Pierre

Mailhac at the other end of our table. As our workshop

presenter

tomorrow,

we

are

relieved to discover that he has not changed much at all, albeit a slightly greyer beard. After

explaining

the

future

Sabine enjoyed a morning of theory…

of

foreign

languages in schools (“they don’t know any grammar at all!”), he asks whether he had incorporated Adrian Mole, aged 13 and 3/4 into my course. I reply in the affirmative and wonder how much may be included in

Jean-Pierre Mailhac’s (JPM’s) workshops, and his Aberdeen session was therefore very well (perhaps too well) attended. ScotNetters were not disappointed. Jean-Pierre is a seasoned lecturer. The strength of his presentations lies in the fact that he is an academic and made

us

think

about

the

theory

of

translation, which is after all what a good workshop should be about: we had taken time out to think about what we do. But JPM’s approach is not about airy-fairy abstractions: it is also very much grounded in the reality of translation as an applied task, our bread-

tomorrow’s workshop....

and-butter activity.

Several ScotNetters are still in the restaurant

Cultural references (CRs) sit on a scale from

when I leave at 11:15, deciding that the wonderful

atmosphere

throughout

the

evening paves the way for an enjoyable workshop tomorrow.

transparent to problematic for the end user and for the translator. To help resolve the difficulties

posed

by

tricky

cultural

mismatches, JPM suggests a range of options (or ‘procedures’), of factors (or ‘parameters’) and of strategies. At

text

level,

categories:

procedures

transplantation

fall

into

(everything

two is

transposed into the cultural realities of the target reader) and exoticism (the source culture is preserved: this can be done with minimum or maximum translator presence, or in a more or less invisible manner). At CR level, JPM distinguishes 14 different procedures and 21 parameters. Strategies will combine procedures and parameters to come up with the best possible solutions. I felt the parameters were useful but not JPM was reluctant to interrupt... during the session!

always easy to distinguish clearly or indeed to distinguish from procedures, but they are all good pointers for us to refer back to. Here is a checklist of the 14 procedures (with some examples, mainly French):


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 5

1. Cultural borrowing – ‘Facebook’ in roman

14. Adapting accompanying visual or graphic

letters in a Russian text

material – adapting images when preparing

2. Recognised equivalent – Skyfall for the

the foreign version of a computer game

French version of the film 3. Literal translation (calque) – ‘Pays d’espoir

We all came away feeling very stimulated and (even) better translators for it.

and de gloire’ for the Elgar song 4. Definition

‘Mills

and

Boon

books’

rendered as ‘romans d’amour’ 5. Equivalences number’

explained

‘National as

Insurance

‘l’équivalent

du

numéro de Sécurité sociale’ 6. Cultural substitutions (equivalent from SL culture) – to symbolise a powerful American woman, replace Diane Sawyer (not well known abroad) with Hillary Clinton 7. Cultural substitutions (equivalent from TL culture) – ‘Bovril’ becomes ‘Viandox’ 8. Cultural substitutions (equivalent from 3rd

I hope that people who could not attend will find this a useful toolkit, or that it will whet their

appetite

to

attend

one

of

JPM’s

workshops. While we had some issues with time-keeping, acoustics and the supply of oxygen, and the talk was therefore less interactive than it could have been, we all came away feeling very stimulated and (even) better translators for it.

culture) – the boxer Henry Cooper becomes …and Barbara an afternoon of Britishness…

Muhammad Ali 9. Lexical creation – ‘conkering’ rendered as ‘casse-marrons’ 10. Deletion

‘terraced

house’

avoided

where it adds nothing to the French text 11. Compensation – adding info somewhere else in the sentence to make up for deletion 12. Translator’s note – gloss for ‘Blue Peter’ 13. Combination of procedures – what it says on the tin

After

the

thought-provoking

morning

seminar, full of tips and examples, we were all keen to sink our teeth into some practical activities. First, however, we sank them into some lunch (soup & sandwiches, consumed in varying degrees of comfort). It was a lively interval and an opportunity to do some networking, particularly for those of us who


Page 6

ITI ScotNet Newsletter

had missed the previous night’s dinner and

its “Britishness”, so they either translated

were going to miss the ceilidh. There was

each

even time for a stroll in the nearby gardens!

unconvincing results) or left the original

The workshop resumed punctually, but the morning lecture spilled into the afternoon to conclude the topic about strategies, and was followed by some time for questions and comments. There were about 50 people present, (and all of us professionals, as Mailhac pointed out with some surprise); many of us contributed, but hardly anybody used

the

available

microphone,

with

consequent hearing problems between front

item

English

descriptively

terms,

to

(with

give

the

mostly

reader

the

“pleasure of discovery”. To suggest the idea of

institution,

encouraged hyphens

French

to

create

translators

were

neologisms

using

(“poisson-frites”

tomates”);

others

and

added

“haricot-

the

word

“traditional”. The “cuppa”, however, was the hardest to crack, having to simultaneously convey

colloquialism,

old-slippers-type

comfort and cultural icon...

and back rows. Nonetheless, contributions went on for some time, and it was nearly 16:00 when we finally started looking at the activities. Someone later wondered whether our speaker’s reluctance to interrupt us had been

a

form

of

“respect”

towards

professionals... did he maybe feel that we needed

less

practice

and

more

of

an

opportunity to air our views? The first passage we looked at was a twoliner taken from A Book of England, which had us toiling for a good half-hour. The context being cheap seaside holidays in the 60s, it read:

So the visitors must hunt around the cafés for their dinners and suppers, crowding and queuing for the “cuppa”, the baked beans, and the fish and chips. Each

underlined

element

represented

a

cultural challenge, tackled in different ways by the separate groups that had naturally formed.

Some

wanted

to

overcome

all

culinary references (with no equivalents in their own language) by applying a complete cultural substitution to just give the idea of a cheap holiday by the sea; others argued that, this being A Book of England, it had to retain

A nice cuppa!

The second (and last) piece we looked at was a promotional video for Liverpool, nominated European Capital of Culture in 2008, the highlight of which was discovering that even the Beatles cannot be taken for granted as shared information, when translating for certain countries. In short, it was a splendidly stimulating event,

for

Convenor

which Pierre

I thank (gentle,

our

yet

Adorable

firm

when

corralling us into order), Norma, who made the grants available, Ute, Fiona and especially Nathalie, who guarded my gluten-free food with commendable zeal, and always with a smile!


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 7

…but Pilar didn’t enjoy the dancing so much! To follow tradition, Saturday ended with a dinner and ceilidh at the Caledonian Hotel. The three course menu was very good in my opinion, though someone in my table was disappointed with the choice of puddings as it did not include chocolate or fresh fruit. Even

though

some

people

left

in

the

afternoon, there was a good turnout.

Ceilidh Mor deserves a mention for their virtuosity, choice of dances and easy to follow instructions.’ She then added: ‘After the sound check the noise level was down – but of course still loud enough to drown out the gaggle of translators’. Other comments included: ‘My other half particularly enjoyed the ceilidh’ and ‘brilliant ceilidh and band’. I have to admit that after years of living in Scotland, I still haven’t cracked Scottish dancing and find the moves highly confusing. I only joined in for one dance and everybody on the floor was very helpful guiding me through the moves.

Jean-Pierre couldn’t

dance because of elbow tendinitis, though he did join in at the end for “Auld Land Syne”. Jean-Pierre

took

an

active

part

in

the

weekend event. Not only did he deliver an excellent workshop, but he attended all the

No chocolate dessert? Sacrilege!

activities. I sat next to Jean-Pierre for dinner

The band ‘Ceilidh Mor’ had five members: Nicola on the fiddle, Neil on the keyboard, Bryan on bass guitar, Aly on drums and Ian was the sound engineer. Apparently it used to be a male-only band until the fiddler joined with some female LOUD energy. Their music

was

a

mixture

of

Scottish

and

Canadian Barn dance tunes, from the ‘Gay Gordons’ to ‘Take me Down to Tulsa’. As

and enjoyed talking to him. I was very impressed with his knowledge of music, especially from Latin America. The ceilidh ended at midnight and once again the ScotNet members lived up to their reputation for throwing a good ceilidh. I will definitely go to the Summer Workshop next year, wherever it is.

soon as the music started, people got up to dance. The dance floor proved to be too small for

the

number

of

keen

Scotnet

dancers, though it didn’t deter them from joining in. Feedback about the band in the e-forum was generally very good, with the exception of someone who commented: ‘We left after the meal, the music (especially the strident fiddle) was far too loud to come anywhere

near

it!’

However,

another

contributor commented: ‘The ceilidh band

ScotNet members lived up to their reputation for throwing a good ceilidh.


Page 8

ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Maria rounds the report off… poetically On Sunday morning, we woke up to yet another sunny day. We took our cardigans with us, still not quite wanting to believe that we were so fortunate again! We said goodbye to those who were heading back home; it was Father’s Day, after all, and there were other celebrations waiting. We counted 22 heads and set off on our two-hour city tour. I must say that what I had seen of the city so far did not make me feel too enthusiastic about seeing the rest. A granite city, grey and hard as the stone that was used to build it, where churches had turned into night clubs and where pigeons were replaced by

A hidden gem in the Granite City.

seagulls… what was there to see? Our lovely

Back on the bus, and several jokes later

guide proved me wrong. He showed us some

(which I didn’t get), we stopped to wonder in

hidden treasures, almost just round the

King’s College’s gardens, where apparently a

corner from the hotel where the event had

Bishop was “planted” in 1994! A small error

been held, and told us some funny facts and

on the plate by the monument of Bishop

stories, which I assume were funny because

Mortlach. Our lovely guide set the date in

everybody laughed. I would have been really

1494, which makes more sense. Then came

grateful if Jonathan Downie had joined us as

the oldest bridge in the UK, beautiful lush

an interpreter!

green parks by the river Dee with historical He dropped us by the sea. A deep blue sea, shimmering

in

the sunlight, a long beach

sandy and

a

horizon really, really far away. He said dolphins hang around boats in the North Sea, and sure enough, there they were, greeting us happily. Can one get used to seeing dolphins?

We

walked

away,

wandering

through the cobbled narrow streets of the Footdee

district

and,

almost

forgetting

people actually live there, we took millions of photos in awe of that hidden gem.

bridges crossing it and a lonely herring standing still by the shore, the biggest granite quarry (now full of rain water and soon to be drained to create a nature reserve). As always when you are having fun, time just flew. Soon we were hugging at the Thistle’s doors, saying our goodbyes to new and old friends and to Aberdeen: the granite city, the third most expensive city in the UK, the place where there are more millionaires than anywhere else in the UK, and the place where we felt like one of them, due to the wealth of good humour, friendship and generosity of ScotNetters and, of course, of Jean–Pierre Mailhac, who felt like joining our network too!


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 9

Focus on machine translation Here, Marion Greenway reports on an SDL Forum held on 23rd May in Glasgow. The event was certainly thought-provoking, and she soon had the chance to put to test everything she had heard. On 23 May 2013, a group of ScotNetters

errors than the contributions they received

attended the SDL Forum at the Radisson Blu

from human translators, and she found them

Hotel in Glasgow. The event began with

much easier to edit.

registration and welcome coffee (including an excellent selection of flapjacks) and a chance to meet the SDL representatives who would present the topics.

SDL estimates that post-editing plus review is 30% faster on average than human translation.

The speakers were David Marshall, Sales Manager EMEA, whose topic was ‘Assessing the

Need

for

Translation’,

followed

by

Anthony Perez, Sales Executive, on ‘The Post-Editing Revolution’. After a coffee break and a catch-up with fellow ScotNetters and other translators, Lydia Simplicio, Business Consultant, gave an overview of SDL Trados Studio 2011, followed by a Q&A session.

global pressures on translation caused partly by the explosion in digital content and customer expectations that online and social interactions occur in their native language. SDL’s solution to this is SDL BeGlobal, a translation

solution

which

apparently meets the need for reduced production costs and faster throughput that traditional

approaches

cannot

meet.

He

asked if any of us had dabbled in postediting machine translation and a few people admitted

they

had.

One

translator

controversially added that she worked as a team of editors on a large, long-term documentation

project

and

found

Revolution’ gave me a new perspective on machine translation. We learned that approx. 75% of all web users use free machine translation

tools

and

54%

of

non-

anglophones use machine translation when visiting English language web sites. SDL reckons machine translation is here to stay

In his introduction, David Marshall discussed

machine

Anthony Perez’s talk on ‘The Post-Editing

that

machine-translated texts contained fewer

and worth investing in. Mr Perez explained that some documents are more suitable for machine translation, such as user forums/reviews, wikis, blogs, text messages and e-mail, while other texts such as marketing material, user guides, legal documents and any text that requires heavy creative content, require human translation. He also emphasised that machine translation is not a review stage, but replaces the translation stage. SDL estimates that postediting plus review is 30% faster on average than

human

translation,

although

this

depends on the subject, language, skill of the editor etc. He admitted that an end-user would notice a difference

in

style

between

a

human


Page 10

ITI ScotNet Newsletter

translation and post-editing plus machine

was very suitable for machine translation,

translation, but this should not affect quality

being straightforward and concise, without

if the text is properly edited. The question of

requiring much creative input. I found that

consistency of style should not be any

post-editing requires a different focus than

different

proof-reading

with

post-editing

of

machine

another

translator’s

work.

translation than with human translation.

Greater attention must be paid to ensure the

Practice in post-editing is required to achieve

final result is free of errors. For example,

proficiency and apparently it gets faster and

people’s names are sometimes ‘translated’ in

easier with time, like everything else. Mr

the machine translation output, the syntax is

Perez concluded that machine translation is

often incorrect, extra words are sometimes

still only translation. It will not replace

added or words can be missed out. Another

human translation, but is a useful tool just

factor

like other CAT tools, which can be used to

terminology

increase productivity.

material;

is

the

lack

in

of

the

consistency

of

machine-translated

it is necessary to check very

carefully that the correct terms have been Finally,

Lydia

Simplicio

gave

us

an

used throughout the text.

informative overview of SDL Trados Studio 2011 with lots of tips and tricks for users

Overall,

and, of course, a hard sell to upgrade for

significantly faster than translating the text

those of us still using Trados 2007 and

myself, but more frustrating. Due to the

Studio

visit

greater number of errors, more time is

where

required to post-edit a machine-translated

customers can propose new functions and

text than to revise a human translation. I also

product features they would like to see in

experienced less job satisfaction from post-

SDL software.

editing as I really enjoy the process of

2009.

She

http://ideas.sdl.com,

suggested a

forum

we

I

found

post-editing

to

be

translation and found post-editing to be quite tedious in comparison. The challenges that translation presents, the research into various

topics

and

the

satisfaction

of

producing a good text are what makes it enjoyable. This is lacking in the process of post-editing and I am not sure that the time it saves overall makes up for this. [Photo: www.flickr.com/photos/22558336@N06/3239795544]

For Marion, translation beats post-editing.

All in all, the SDL Forum was a well organised event and an excellent chance to hear a different perspective on translation and get

Since attending the forum, I have done my

some free software training, as well as to

first

meet

piece

of

post-editing

machine

translation for a regular client of mine. It was IT documentation for a Danish airport and

other

professionals.

translators

and

industry ♦


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 11

Translating the (seemingly) untranslatable Just a couple of days later, another translation event took place in Edinburgh. Anne Withers reports on a unique event jointly organised by the ITI Russian Network, the Scottish Society of the CIoL and the Scotland-Russia Forum. On Saturday 25th May the Scotland-Russia

were published in Russian but the print runs

Forum,

Linguists

were large and the quality of paper, print,

(Scottish Society) and ITI Russian Network

etc. high. The same could be said of the

organised

quality

Chartered

Institute

of

a joint event at the

Quaker

of

the

translations.

Translators

Meeting House in Edinburgh. The speaker

commanded quite high fees and formed an

was Natalie Shahova, an English to Russian

elite group and those who also worked as

translator and translation agency manager

interpreters were allowed to travel abroad,

based in Moscow. Her talk focused mainly on

unlike most people in the Soviet Union.

three major works which she has been involved in translating – Bill Gates’ Business

@ the speed of thought, Linus Torvalds’ Just for fun and Lynne Truss’ Eats, Shoots & Leaves.

Following ‘perestroika’, as we non-Russians like to call the shift from Communism, and the collapse of the Soviet Union, large numbers went into the translating business, translating everything, often without regard for copyright. Natalie referred to all these

In Soviet times, translators commanded quite high fees and formed an elite group.

‘amateurs’, producing poorly laid-out work on terrible quality paper and with lots of typographical errors – even in the titles! Few readers

Natalie began by giving some background to

were

prepared

to

buy

more

expensive, challenging books.

these major projects, describing the book translation business in Russia in Soviet times.

Natalie traced the history of her involvement

The emphasis then was on quality and large

with

print runs. Translators were highly qualified

company opened its Moscow office in 1993.

and

projects

which

began

when

the

editors

and

Microsoft asked EnRus to develop an IT

only those

texts

glossary, and later to check the terminology

deemed ‘useful’ for the Soviet population

in the translation of Bill Gates’ second book,

were selected for translation and publication.

Business @ The Speed of Thought which had

One example cited was Gone with the Wind, a

been produced by a publishing house’s usual

hugely popular novel published in the 1930s,

literary translators. Natalie noticed a number

which had to wait until the 1980s before

of translation howlers, for example:

proofreaders.

involved

Microsoft,

However,

appearing in Russian because of its positive portrayal of slavery. So, few foreign authors


Page 12

ITI ScotNet Newsletter highlight having nothing to do with technical terminology and everything to do with US slang or everyday language):

Natalie managed to persuade the publisher

Natalie recommended the book as being a

that the whole job needed to be done from

good read and not just ‘for computer geeks’.

scratch and worked at top speed with a team of

another

three

disrupting

the

translators publication

to

avoid

schedule.

For example, it dealt with his life in Finland

However, Natalie did not have a great deal of

and in the USA, his meeting with Steve Jobs,

say in the layout or the appearance of the

etc.

cover and title page and her access to the

interview she conducted with Torvalds on the

author himself was nil. Since then, her

topic of minorities and languages and other

agency has gradually been squeezed out of

issues of interest

the tendering process in Russia, as its fees

(www.enrus.ru/en/publications/?6).

She

also

directed

listeners

to

an

are considered too high. Microsoft’s Moscow office, for example, now goes elsewhere and

The third translation project discussed by

Natalie’s agency only does occasional work

Natalie (and the one she said UK audiences

for them.

were most interested in) was very different again: Lynne Truss’ Eats, Shoots & Leaves.

Her

next

an

This project in 2006 was prompted both by

international bestseller was quite different.

her interest in the book and what it revealed

With her background in computer science

about the English language as well as the

(she formerly taught at the Moscow State

almost

Institute of Radiotechnics, Electronics and

translating it. Again she bought the copyright

Automation),

in

but this time no publisher was interested in

translating the book Just for fun by software

taking it on, so she paid for the printing and

engineer

design herself (and is still paying for it as

Torvalds.

experience

she

and

of

was

creator

Natalie

translating

interested of

bought

Linux, the

Linus Russian

insurmountable

challenge

of

there are still plenty of unsold copies…).

copyright and translation rights and arranged publication

through

the

same

publisher

Natalie

stressed that she

took

on this

involved with Bill Gates’ book. This gave her

translation for the fun of it and not the

access to a wide distribution network. This

money. Fortunately, she did find translating

time she had direct contact with the author

it fun right from the title, Eats, Shoots &

and embarked on a whole series of e-mail

Leaves, which she rendered as Казнить

exchanges with him, later interviewing him in

нельзя

person for a magazine. She highlighted a few

sentence where the position of the comma is

examples of the queries she raised with

crucial:

Torvalds (all of the ones she chose to

execute, not pardon’ or ‘You must pardon,

помиловать. it

can

This

either

is

mean

a

Russian

‘You

must


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 13

not execute’. However, with the exception of the title, Natalie did not look for Russian examples of the same problems that exist in English – after all, some features of English punctuation, such as apostrophes, do not even exist in Russian. While Truss’ narrative

Natalie’s translation of Eats, Shoots & Leaves was shortlisted for the Unicorn and Lion award, co-sponsored by the British Council, for best Russian translation of British literature.

text is translated into Russian, her examples are kept in English, with footnotes and brackets used to provide explanations, literal renderings into Russian and background

‘This is one of the rare English books that

cultural information.

should

probably

be

read

in

translation

(thanks to the translator, Natalie Shahova) This time, the author had a secretary who

even if you have the original available: the

acted as go-between and again Natalie

translation explains many subtleties of how

shared some of the problems she had with

phrases are structured and rules applied

the more unfathomable cultural references

which you could miss if you aren’t a native

she came across in the text:

[English] speaker or linguist’ (online journal diary.ru), to crushing dismissal such as: ‘It doesn’t make sense to translate some books. Great efforts and lots of highly qualified labour

were

wasted’

(online

forum

bakanov.org). The book was shortlisted for the Unicorn and Lion award, co-sponsored by the British Council, for best Russian translation of British literature. Where does Natalie go from here? What other (seemingly) untranslatable works are in the pipeline? She did think about translating the next of Lynne Truss’ books but it did not have such appeal. So we’ll just have to keep an eye on her website (www.EnRus.ru) to find out what this distinguished translator is doing for fun. The critical response to Natalie’s translation varied widely from unequivocal praise such as:


Page 14

ITI ScotNet Newsletter

An anglophoner Tag Between 5th and 7th July, our Membership Secretary, Ute Penny, tried her luck at an ITI event south of the border and, by the looks of it, she wasn’t attacked by the English… quite the opposite! 641 kilometres south, in Mediterranean heat,

first talk of the day by Laura Mountford, M.A.

I started my second ever (!) ITI event (time

Archaeology,

and money usually conspire against me),

Assistant: “Panacea – baths, bathing and

being greeted at Bath station by ITI member

disease in the Roman world”. We were taken

Regina Buechner-Brown, who, with her lovely

on a fascinating journey through the history

family, was going to be my kind and fun

of the bath house, which started off in the 1st

hostess for the weekend.

century AD as a place of vice, slowly

Roman

Baths

Museum

developed into a place of well-being for rich and poor, and then into the panacea of the title. Amongst many slides was a memorable one of clay votives of healed body parts left in a shrine. After a long period of neglect – and pilfering of stone to build Bath Abbey – the baths were once again used for their original purpose by the Georgians. This time however bathers entered the water fully clothed! The weekend started off with fruit juices and soft drinks.

The weekend, organised by the friendly and

Next,

alternative

therapist Natasha Wilson

talked

rather nice end of our first day.

A New Paradigm: Spas and Complementary Therapies. A Way to Well-being, Health, and Healing in Britain and Internationally. We learnt how historically

On Saturday morning, in the Bath Royal

holiness and many proverbs and sayings still

unflappable Cherry Shelton-Mills, started off with an informal dinner on Friday night at the wonderfully casual Jika-Jika café, followed by a torchlight tour of the Roman Baths and crowned by a visit to The Raven of Bath. This free house had been recommended as a must by Cherry to the four intrepid people who still weren’t ready for their beds. Two expats and two visitors to these shores shared a

Literary and Scientific Institution not far from the centre of town, we settled down to the

about

water has been associated with healing and bear testimony to this. After a period of “taking the waters” in fashionable spas like


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 15

Bath, Harrogate and Leamington Spa, water

After a lovely walk through Bath and its parks

degraded to a utility in the UK in the 20th

with some of my hosts, our evening treat was

century, far removed from nature, with a

drinks and dinner in the beautifully relaxed

slow re-emergence of old values in the 21st

atmosphere

century. Of the tens of thousands of wells in

romantically situated on the banks of the

the UK, which were holy pagan places and

River Avon. Interesting conversations and

later

are

much laughter rang out late into the night,

however only a few now known or even

and ensured that those of us who were going

visible or accessible. An ensuing discussion

on the canal boat ride on Sunday morning

highlighted how, especially in Germany, the

would not be strangers.

associated

with

saints,

there

of

the

Bathwick

Boatman,

spa culture had never really gone away, and is indeed still a big part of German life.

On Sunday morning, after a short walk along the canal, past residential narrowboats and

After a delicious buffet lunch and much

smaller, more modern vessels we reached the

standing

were

elegant Lady Lena, “the oldest electric river

divided into mixed German and English

launch in existence” (first licensed in 1891).

groups, each working on a mixture of texts

Over the next two or so hours we enjoyed the

about water. This proved to be a great

shade of the canvas canopy – as well as one

preparation for ScotNet’s summer workshop

of two lace parasols that were handed

in

around! – the pleasant canal landscape, and

near

Aberdeen

open

on

windows,

“Translating

we

Cultural

References”. A German text that had the

glasses of champagne!

German natives in stitches in my group was a guideline for parents on how to encourage children to drink lots of water. If the title had been

translated literally,

English readers

would have assumed the intention was to raise young drinkers (of alcohol)!

Aaaahhh… at long last!

Those who didn’t have to rush away finished an informative and enjoyable weekend off with lunch at the canal-side pub The George. The rest of us got whisked away in cars and taxis to reach our respective modes of transport home. Do the English not drink wine or what??


Page 16

ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Alison’s adventures in Twitterland Theory? Practice? Poetry? What exactly is this piece that Alison Hughes wrote about Twitter? Impossible to define! Read, enjoy and feel inspired! They said I should use Twitter I said it’s not for me What about a blog then? But I’d like some time left free…

horror!!) because that would take time that I simply don’t have. I don’t actively search for followers although I have a steady stream of people who follow

Where would I find inspiration to capture my potential readers? Where would I find the time to read tweets from other Tweeters?

me. I don’t automatically follow people back (I’m not sure how that stands in terms of Twitter etiquette), but I am quite frankly not interested in what the butcher in Lincolnshire has to say, even although he saw me as a

And then I thought “why not?” It seems Web 2’s really hot If I don’t air what’s on my mind I might just get left behind…

potential customer after my tweet about buying Tamworth pork sausages at the farmers’

market.

And

I

don’t

follow

celebrities because most of them are totally uninteresting on Twitter, even the comedians

And so I took the plunge…

I find very funny on the TV.

Through the twittersphere…

So what’s the point?

I love Twitter… and I can hear some of you

You must still be asking yourself this same

groan already.

question. If I’m not looking for customers,

“It’s information overload” (I know).

what’s the point? Well what I AM doing is

“I don’t have time” (yes, it can be time-

building a profile of myself as a person (first

consuming).

and foremost) and as a translator. I love food

“I don’t want to hear what a butcher in

and cooking (and the odd glass of wine), car

Lincolnshire is tweeting about” (neither do I).

boot sales and vintage shops, the theatre, French films, reading, women’s magazines (French and British), yoga… I could go on. I

So why do I tweet? First and foremost to get a feel for what other translators are doing and secondly to get a feel for what’s happening in the world – and I don’t mean just the world of languages and translation (shock horror!). I don’t tweet to get my website up the SEO rankings or to attract

new

customers

(further

shock

love chatting and I love chatting on Twitter to other translators. I almost feel I know these translators… I know where they live, what they like doing, what other skills they have (many are musicians/sing in choirs), a little about their families (if they choose to tell us)… So if I am approached to do a translation in a subject area I can’t handle, I may have a Twitter follower who works in, or


ITI ScotNet Newsletter knows

something

Page 17

about,

that

area.

example) and just look at the tweets from the

Conversely, by building my own “informal”

people on your list if you are short of time.

profile, I hope the other translators will do

To create a list (on Twitter.com) simply go to

the same. Indeed, I have already had work on

Me and click on Lists (in menu in left-hand

this basis.

column above the photos) then Create list (on the right), give it a name, enter a

I must stress that my Twitter profile is

description, decide whether it will be public

essentially formal and business-orientated (I

or private and then click on Save List. You’ll

save

then get a search box to find people you

my

mad

stories

for

my

personal

Facebook page). I retweet tweets from fellow translators

but

companies

and

also

authors,

French yoga

When you want to view your list, just go back

contacts, coeliac organisations and gluten-

to the Lists link on your profile (Me) and

free food companies, etc. but I have one

select the list or you can click on the little

golden rule – if there’s a link, I don’t retweet

wheel

unless

“compose” icon and select Lists.

I

have

museums/galleries,

want to add. Simply follow the instructions.

read

the

information

it

between

the

search

box

and

contains. This is where the time factor comes in. If you tried to read everything your followers posted on Twitter you would have no time to work and would possibly struggle to find time to sleep too. I am selective. I don’t read many language-related tweets because I specialise in creative translations and it’s more useful for me to know what beauty

companies,

fashion

magazines,

authors, museums and galleries are saying and doing. I often “unfollow” people who put out strings of tweets or “dailies” because I

[Photo: www.flickr.com/photos/37996583025@N01/2821633690]

simply find them overwhelming. Some days I don’t even tweet or retweet but I do read my timeline (because I’m nosey and don’t want to miss anything). Although this is not intended as an article on how to use Twitter, I have attended two social media workshops and did pick up a few tips I’d like to pass on: Lists You can create a list of people in a certain category (translators and interpreters, for

Searches You can search for tweets which contain certain keywords. Simply enter the word in the search box on the home page and click return. You can save that keyword as a “search” by clicking the little wheel in the right

hand

corner

and

selecting

“save

search”. Every time you click on the search box in future a list of your saved searches will appear. Simply click on one of them to


Page 18 reveal all the tweets containing the particular search terms. Suppose you have saved “French Translation” as a search, some of the tweets appearing may be worth retweeting (keeps you active on Twitter with minimum effort) or you may want to follow the author of one of the tweets who could be a potential client. And, if they are not a potential client but retweet one of your tweets, one of their followers could be a potential client and, if they aren’t but retweet… Can you see the power of Twitter now?

ITI ScotNet Newsletter Instantaneity 1) I have recently returned to Trados after several years and by simply tweeting a query I have twice had my queried answered very quickly from other Trados users AND from people from SDL. 2) While planning a city break in Berlin I asked for recommendations of a central district to stay in. Within 15 minutes I had at least five suggestions and by the end of the day I also had suggestions of museums to visit, places to see… Sanity

To get started, check out Pierre’s list of ScotNet tweeterers: https://twitter.com/ArcTranslations/lists /iti-scottish-network

Translation can be a lonely job and there is a fair amount of banter between translator tweeters which you can either ignore if you’re busy or join in if you’re bored, need a distraction, need inspiration (brainstorming sessions are not uncommon) or need advice. Plus, when you attend ITI workshops and

Hashtags

events the chances are you’ll ‘know’ some of the attendees already. It was lovely to meet

This is where Twitter is unique and really

with some of my Twitter ‘friends’ who

comes into its own. The 2013 ITI Conference

attended the ITI conference in May.

used the hashtag #iticonf13 and if you enter that into the search box you will find all the

Have I convinced you yet? Are you tempted?

tweets relating to the conference, assuming

With discipline and very little effort you really

people remembered to use the hashtag. Plus,

can make Twitter work for you, even if this

our ScotNet newsletter editor Isabel Hurtado

simply means you no longer need to talk to

de Mendoza gave a really useful session at

yourself. I generally limit my use to 20

the conference entitled “The quest for the

minutes maximum three times a day, don’t

perfect workflow – a collaborative approach”.

spend any time looking for followers and join

I tweeted some tips from the session using

in the odd ‘afternoon banter’ if I need a

her suggested hashtag #myperfectTW, and

distraction. I do, however, have one Twitter

many, many other translators joined in and

vice – I can’t stop myself opening up a link to

added their tips. Why not take a look?

a photo even when I know there’s a good chance it will be a translator’s cat sitting on a

Finally, I love Twitter for two more reasons:

keyboard. I simply had no idea how many translators have cats…


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 19

A favourite translation project In a busy freelance career, translation jobs tend to come and go and very few leave a lasting impression. This is the story of one project that was not only hugely enjoyable but also had unexpected personal and professional benefits for Sue Anderson. The translation A UK publisher I had worked for before in the field of management consultancy emailed with a new and slightly unusual request. Would I like to translate a Dutch self-help book

on

‘mindfulness’

a

meditative

technique derived from Buddhism – and its use in easing the stress of our busy modern

The publishers promptly sent a draft contract based on their standard model. A tiny hiccup was that one clause denied the translator authorship or any other credit but fortunately it turned out to be an oversight and the amended contract was signed a month after the initial email.

lives?

The

The idea was appealing. As

a

long-term

practitioner of yoga, I

Mindfulness is a mind and body practice that teaches us to observe what is going on within ourselves.

was already familiar with the

a glimpse inside the Dutch book and some reviews.

Previous

experience with the publisher made it easy to agree a fee, a percentage of receipts, and a translator’s credit inside the cover. I insisted on the latter as it had been forgotten once before and it was disappointing to receive a complimentary copy without a name check! One potential problem was the timing. Only two months of the six-month production schedule

had

been

earmarked

for

the

35,000-word translation so a strict schedule had to be devised. 7,000 words per week over six weeks gave a fairly quick turnaround while keeping me reasonably fresh and leaving capacity for regular clients. Instalments were sent in as completed, with queries submitted in a single batch at the end.

on

the

translation itself was the title. The authors and

publisher

had

together and come up

Internet research yielded online

constraint

real

already put their heads

subject-matter.

favourable

only

with their own title. The original, snappy ‘Voluit Leven’ evolved into ‘A Beginner’s Guide to Mindfulness: Live in the Moment’. A bit more of a mouthful! The tight schedule meant having to start before the contract was signed, which I would not normally recommend. The authors supplied a Word document to work from so, choosing not to use a CAT tool, I simply overtyped the manuscript while referring to the

accompanying

hard

copy

with

its

illustrations, tables, etc. that would also be used

in

the

English

version.

Actually

translating the book was a lot of fun, thanks to a well-written and entertaining source text and the bonus of feeling in tune with the subject-matter.


Page 20

ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Delivery was completed as scheduled and the

he observed clear psychological benefits

queries

after a few weeks’ practice.

were

answered

promptly.

The

publisher then brought in another pair of eyes in the shape of a competent freelance editor/proofreader. In a flurry of emails, various finishing touches were applied: a new appendix

was

added,

up-to-date

UK

statistics were obtained, an English reading list was compiled and copyright permissions were obtained. Then a huge package arrived in the post - a complimentary copy of the loose manuscript showing how the finished book would be typeset. The whole process was surprisingly smooth and efficient, and I was

delighted

to

receive

appreciative

comments from both publishers and authors and a lovely mention in the finished book.

This particular book takes the form of a nine-week DIY course of exercises and

Mindfulness Mindfulness is a mind and body practice that teaches us to observe what is going on within ourselves, to become more aware of our thoughts and feelings so that they do not overwhelm us. It has been shown to help with conditions such as anxiety, depression, addictive behaviour, stress, insomnia and chronic pain. It uses techniques such as meditation,

breathing

exercises

and

stretching to help us change the way we perceive our experiences, especially stressful ones.

with tools for the future. Much of its advice may strike people as simple common sense but the added value lies in the way the course helps you to slow down and think things through systematically - something that obviously does not come naturally if you are feeling stressed or anxious. The steps outlined in the book encourage you to take stock of your life, analyse your ‘mental pain’, get in touch with your body, observe your mind at work, and identify your personal bugbears and avoidance strategies. Dutch

Mindfulness is a popular subject for self-help books,

including

a

recent

comedian-turned-psychologist

one

by

Ruby

TV Wax,

who has used it as a tool to help overcome her

meditations and sets out to equip readers

own

mindfulness

depression workshops.

and

now

Science

holds writer/

presenter Dr Michael Mosley devoted a BBC Horizon programme to the subject, in which

readers are offered an accompanying CD of meditation attending

exercises and the courses

run

by

option

the

of

authors

themselves. In the UK, mindfulness courses are available from mental health charities, therapists and the NHS.


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 21

The lasting benefits Before taking on this project, I had never read a self-help book of any kind and might even have scoffed at the very idea. But as I worked through the text, I found myself automatically following the course and its lessons started to rub off. Freelancing has always been enjoyable but the pressure and volume of work did occasionally get the better of me and I would end up tired, stressed and resentful – a pattern that is probably familiar to many of us in ITI! Mindfulness helped me to regain control by

Changes prompted by this project have cut my stress levels and improved my focus. Specifically, I have drastically reduced my working hours and identified the clients and jobs that suit me. Working more efficiently has helped to maintain earnings. Saying ‘no’ is no longer a source of stress and my work/life balance is better. It does require maintenance but if I ever find myself falling back into bad patterns, I only need to reach for the complimentary copy on the office bookshelf!

identifying my true priorities, in work and in life.

A Franco-Scottish affair On Sunday 1st of September, Amandine Lepers married her beloved Douglas. They had a humanist ceremony at Edinburgh's Institut Français d'Écosse and an evening reception at Linlithgow Burgh Halls. Their day was everything they could have hoped for but, despite being ultra-organised and fluent in both languages, they found organising the wedding a bit of a bumpy ride. Here Amandine lists 10 things to consider when planning a bicultural wedding. 1. Travel: Not everybody you’ll want at your

expected. But eventually that was what

wedding abroad will be able to attend. Don’t

united everybody, as in “I know this seems

count guests in until they’ve checked travel

odd, but it’s just the way they do X in Y

arrangements. Other guests who you’d never

country and we want elements of both

imagine could come may surprise you -

countries”.

whilst we had a bridesmaid drop out, my

3. Administration: I’ve translated birth and

grandparents made it all the way from Spain.

marriage

2. Expectations: With two cultures come two

complications with French paperwork. But it’s

sets of expectations. If you think that

different when you have to jump through

Scotland and France are quite similar (Auld

hoops

Alliance and all), you’re in for a shock. Where

deciding on flowers and finding shoes for

everybody sits, who gets to do or say what –

your page boy. British administration: tick.

these are the kind of questions to expect.

French administration: 3 months and many

Initially, this was stressful as it felt like

forms later, tick (phew!).

nobody was going to get what they wanted or

certificates

while

sending

and

a

know

trillion

about

emails,


Page 22

ITI ScotNet Newsletter

4. Invitations: When I gave my parents their

9. Culture & language barrier: Guests who

invite, they went “Oh, it’s very, er, different”.

don’t speak the language will probably need

Forget whether you want a modern or

help finding accommodation and booking

traditional approach, you’ll have to work out

flights. And you know those last couple of

how to fit in all the text. And think about

weeks or days when you’re running around

your target reader, which for us meant a

to get the cake and decorations to your

good dose of politeness on the English side

venues in time? Well, try and squeeze in

and a detailed description of food on the

restaurant bookings for family reunions and

French side.

airport transfers. Great happy times that have

5. Readings:

We

spent

weeks

picking

to be organised too.

readings we loved with a special significance

10. Honeymoon:

Now

that

things

have

to us: Maupassant, Hugo, Brontë and McCall

calmed down a bit, we’ve started to make

Smith. Typically, the only thing left to do

plans for the honeymoon and it looks like

would be finding readers. But linguists will

there will be French and English-speaking

know that with great authors come great

locations – which just matches the bicultural

translation challenges. Read 4 weekends of

theme perfectly.

hard work. I’m particularly proud of my husband’s translation of Hugo’s poem. 6. Ceremony: Having a humanist ceremony meant we could have a truly personal wedding. Our celebrant was up for the language challenge. It involved a lot of work, e.g. we wrote (and translated) the story of our relationship, what marriage meant to us and our marriage vows – mine in French, Douglas’s in English. 7. Speeches: Something I didn’t miss not being involved in. If you do English-FrenchEnglish-French, you put your guests through death by interpreting. My husband broke his speech into manageable chunks, sometimes swapping things around to keep people listening. The chief bridesmaid played a slideshow with French sound over pictures with English text. And the best man finished off with an introduction in deliberately bad French and a snappy speech in English. 8. Music: Here again we wanted to have a mixture of French and English. And also a bit of Spanish which we both speak and a bit of Italian as Italy’s where we got engaged and some of my family’s from.

Amandine and Douglas survived a bicultural wedding.


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 23

Working sustainably as a translator In this new section, I am very proud to introduce a new series of short articles kindly volunteered by Karen Tkaczyk and Laura Ball. Together, they took up the challenge of analysing a tricky situation that was posted on our ScotNet e-group: what to do when you hit a “wall”. and experiences. Our aim is to provide you

Introduction As a translator, you love your work. Not just the actual translation process and finding just *that* right word, but also the challenge of juggling different jobs and managing the marketing,

accounting,

business

development and customer service aspects of the

work.

At

the

same

time

you

are

simultaneously your own boss, counsellor and friend. You enjoy being good and efficient at doing something and you thrive

with a summary and analysis of all these comments in a series of short articles. If the problem resonates with you, we hope that the articles, which take your comments as a starting

point,

will provide you with

a

structured way of examining your working habits and attitudes to find out why you hit this ‘wall’, what you can do when it happens and, perhaps more importantly, how to avoid hitting it in the first place.

on the challenge, even if it does get a bit much sometimes. So there’s no way you’re lazy; no way you’d be inclined to “pull a sickie”. However, every so often something strange happens. It makes no sense, you

Taking time off to do something fun is rarely self-indulgent - it is instead an important part of doing business.

don’t know how to avoid it and you don’t know what to do about it. This is what it is:

After I have been [working] for a few weeks, I tend to suddenly come up against a wall. I can't stand the thought of doing another job. Sometimes I've even turned down a 5-word sentence, such is my disgust at the thought of doing any more work. I then spend a few days thinking very hard about what I am taking on, generally erring on the side of turning work down, until I can feel reasonably cheerful about translation again.

As sole traders or small business owners,

This is the initial problem that sparked off a

sustaining yourself. Therefore, going for

hugely successful thread on ScotNet. The

coffee,

resulting 10,000 plus words of comment

bouldering on Friday afternoons, doing judo

from ScotNetters cover a wide range of topics

or even taking an afternoon off to go

one of our key concerns is to grow our business and develop client relationships. In order to do this, any business has to be sustainable. Your business model has to be viable not just in the short term, but in the long term, over ten or twenty years or even longer. A key factor in sustaining a business is to ensure that its assets are sustainable. As a translator, your single biggest asset is: you. So, sustaining your business is all about going

swimming

at

lunch

time,


Page 24

ITI ScotNet Newsletter

shopping, are all a viable, indeed necessary

make

and integral part of running, maintaining and

something that a) gets you out of the house,

sustaining

Perhaps

b) makes you actively focus on something

remembering this key factor will help you if

other than work, c) occupies your attention

you find yourself thinking work is somehow

entirely, d) is physically active and e) is

more morally acceptable than pleasure and

something that you perceive as pleasurable.

your

business.

it most effective

typically involve

that taking time off to do something fun is a tad self-indulgent. In fact, “taking time off to

It is entirely up to you to choose which

do something fun” is rarely self-indulgent -

activity or activities to spend your breaks

it is instead an important part of doing

doing, as long as they meet some or all of

business. With this in mind, please read on to

the above criteria. Some suggestions include

the first of our short articles, which is all

taking a regular break during work to

about taking time off.

meditate or have a deep brain rest1, or to intersperse work periods with cleaning the

Sustaining

yourself

through

time

management We all enjoy doing different activities to relax. Some of us may need more time to relax, others less. Some of us may benefit from taking regular breaks and others may prefer to work intuitively and take breaks on a more haphazard basis, as and when they feel like it. The following article will hopefully outline some of the underlying factors that make any leisure activity effective and help you to recognise what might be useful for you. Choosing how to spend your time off wisely

house. Various leisure activities that were cited as being helpful included attending Tai Chi, yoga, martial arts or other evening classes, going for coffee, to the gym or to have

a

massage,

visiting

children’s

assemblies and classroom events, getting into teaching or going cycling, swimming or bouldering.

However,

if

you

find

that

cleaning the house or going for a walk just doesn’t occupy your brain enough, go cycling instead

or

set

yourself

a

series

of

“housework challenges” whilst cleaning to make it more demanding. It would seem logical that an activity that meets all the above criteria will be most

Most of us are aware of the importance of

effective, whereas activities that only meet

taking breaks. However, what seems to be

one or two will be less effective. At some

equally important is how you spend your

points in the day it may only be necessary to

break. It is not enough to use your five or ten

take a short break that fulfils just one

minute break to move from your desk to your

criterion. There is also nothing to stop you

sofa to read the paper. This does not involve

from doing two separate activities that fulfil

enough of a contrast to working to give your

different criteria to be just as effective.

brain the rest and variety that it needs.

Longer breaks, however, such as leisure time spent at the weekends, on days off or in the

Reading between the lines of the comments

evening should meet more of the criteria.

made on the ScotNet thread, the types of activities that you can do during a break to

1

www.yogajournal.com/health/2601


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 25

That way you can be sure of using the leisure time effectively as well as enjoyably and that you will return to work feeling truly refreshed and ready for a new challenge.

An example from Karen Part of achieving success and sustaining it is scheduling time off. In my house, both adults work from home, so you can imagine how the family's life could be taken over by work. We choose not to work on Sundays. Whether for traditional reasons or just logistical ones, an entire day off every week can be a powerful refresher. Many freelancers would hate to limit themselves to working on weekdays only, but planning for that as the

Series authors: Karen Tkaczyk, PhD, CT, MITI is a chemist-turned-freelance translator (MITI and ATAcertified for French>English). Her translation work focuses on chemistry and its industrial applications. She has an MChem in chemistry with French from the University of Manchester and a Diploma in French and a PhD in organic chemistry from the University of Cambridge. She worked in the pharmaceutical industry in Europe, and then in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics in the US after relocating there in 1999. She has hands-on experience in many areas, from research to quality assurance to manufacturing to regulatory affairs and now uses this background to produce specialised translations that use her subject-matter expertise.

norm works for me. Another tack is to plan for ineffective days when “life” gets in the way of a schedule. For instance, for any project that will take me more than ten working days, I mentally schedule a “lost” day when I commit to the timeline. This is a realistic assessment that during any period that

long,

personal

matters

or

other

commitments will disrupt my work enough that I will lose a day during that time, which I may not be able to catch up easily. Assuming that events will overtake me is sensible for my personal situation. Another tactic is to deliberately plan to translate fewer words per day than you would normally expect, i.e. 2,000 words rather than 2,500, and then quote delivery times based on that.

Laura Ball is a translator and language trainer working in German and English. She holds a first class degree in German and Linguistics from Oxford University and a research master’s in Mediaeval German from Newcastle University. Her professional qualifications include the Diploma in Translation awarded by the Chartered Institute of Linguists and a TEFL certificate from Cambridge University. She has previously spent three years living in Germany, where she studied Philosophy and Musicology in Tübingen, worked as a language assistant in Halle/Saale and taught English and German as a business language trainer in Essen. Now based in Newcastle Upon Tyne, she offers language training services both in person and online via Skype.


Page 26

ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Your committee under the spotlight As promised in our last issue, we’ll now get to know our new Membership Secretary, Ute Penny. Deputy Membership Secretary Nathalie Chalmers interviewed her, but you’ll have to wait until the New Year to read all about Nathalie! Could you introduce yourself?

the Membership Secretary post and felt that

I was born in Stuttgart, southwest Germany.

it was probably time I gave something back

In my year abroad I came to Duns (2000

to this wonderful and supportive group of

souls) in the Scottish Borders as foreign

excitingly diverse people.

language assistant at two secondary schools

How do you see your future?

and fell in love with the country and one particular young man.

Two years ago I completely stopped teaching and have seen my translation workload

Did you always want to be a translator?

increase, simply because I didn’t have my

I wasn’t sure what to study and plumped for

teaching days interrupt my availability. I now

a teaching degree with English and History as

want to expand more – although I don’t seem

my subjects, but teaching young adults

to

turned

clients/agencies. I have also just applied to

out

languages,

NOT even

to just

be

my

forte.

different

But

German

be

very

good

at

finding

new

upgrade to MITI status.

dialects, were what we “did” at home.

What

What did you do before you went freelance?

translating?

I was a crafts person, producing painted

What DON’T I do! I sing in two choirs in

earrings and mobiles (the hanging down

Dunbar, where I live, I go to yoga, I am

version over cots or in windows) made from

membership

secretary

soft wood and plywood. I also taught German

Community

Woodland

in adult education.

occasionally go on rides with the Dunbar

What kind of translation work do you most

Cycle Group. I used to be a member of the

like doing?

Dunbar Coastal Rowing Club, but gave that

I love translating any kind of tourism texts –

up this year due to lack of time – my decision

for their challenges in conveying cultural,

confirmed in a round-about way by Hugh’s

historical and nature-related content and the

thought-provoking post on the Yahoo group

language used.

[see page 23]. I love live music, art and the

Since when have you been involved with

theatre, the first two being very well served

ScotNet, and what motivated you to stand as Membership Secretary? I joined ScotNet very early on, sometime in the

mid-1990s

when

I

was

still

just

translating part-time and didn’t yet have my Diploma in Translation. I was approached for

do

you

do

when

of

you

the

Group

are

not

Dunbar and

I

in Dunbar. I love walking along our glorious beaches and taking pictures of our stunning surroundings – there is a “Dunbar in Pictures” Facebook group which has become a bit addictive. I love gardening too, but often don’t make enough time for it.


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 27

Member news New members: Since our last newsletter, a

specialist subject areas are mechanical and

few new members - whom you might have

marine

already met at one of our events - have

health and safety equipment, Scottish politics

joined us, and there is now a new wee

and education (blended learning, applied

ScotNetter too!

linguistics,

engineering,

renewable

translation

theory).

energies,

I

am

a

member of the CIoL, the Institute of Scientific Lucy Chen: I was born and raised in Taiwan

and Technical Communicators and an ITI

until the age of fourteen. I was first exposed

Associate. I hold the DipTrans IoLET English

to the English language at age six when my

into German and work as a Masterclass tutor

father took a one-year post at the University

(SDL Trados) on the MSc Translation Studies

of Iowa. Since I was fourteen I had lived in

(University of Glasgow).

Vancouver, a city on the beautiful west coast of Canada. Last year I married and moved to

Pablo

Herrera:

Edinburgh, where I started my freelance

Spanish freelance interpreter and translator

career and new life adventure in Scotland. I

since 1994. Specialist interpreter in sound,

have been translating Chinese<>English for

music technology, film, and public health

the non-profit sector for the past eight years.

projects. With over a decade and a half of

Since I became a full-time translator, I have

experience, I have translated legal literature,

concentrated on the translation of academic

poetry,

works in the social and health sciences, and

scripts.

subtitles,

Working

and

as

film

English

and

-

theatre

official documents. I enjoy working with language

and

the

constant

personal

development as a freelance translator

Jessie Linardi: Translation was by far my favourite subject at university, so when I finished my degree in Hispanic Studies in

Katrin Frahm: I was born in Germany and

2007, I naively assumed I would walk straight

studied

into

Russian/English

interpreting

and

a

job

as

an

in-house

translator.

translation at Berlin's Humboldt University.

Although I did find a part-time, in-house

After working as a technical interpreter and

position in Glasgow, it was short-lived. The

translator at a shipyard in my hometown of

prospect of starting a freelance business

Rostock, I moved to Glasgow in 1991, where

terrified me, so I decided to change direction

I

and

by obtaining a qualification in librarianship.

Strathclyde Universities (tuition; translation

I've now been working as a paraprofessional

management) as well as freelance (translation

in educational libraries for over three years.

and interpreting – English into German). In

As much as I enjoy library work, languages

my work, I aim to combine my enthusiasm

are what I'm most interested in and I'm keen

for teaching German with my work as an

to begin building a career as a freelancer. I

interpreter and translator, and I divide my

work from Spanish into British and American

time evenly between teaching German at the

English and also do localisation between

Goethe-Institut Glasgow and working as a

these two variants of English. I'm looking

freelance

forward to meeting you all soon!

have

worked

at

interpreter

both

and

Glasgow

translator.

My


Page 28

ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Katherine Parish: I was born and have lived

Courts, Coroner, Police, Customs and Excise,

in Scotland my entire life. Originally from

UKBA.

East Lothian, I now live in Glasgow where I am

currently

Translation

studying

for

an

MSc

in

Wee Sam: Here are a couple of pictures of

Studies at the University of

Beth Fowler’s baby boy Sam, when he was

Glasgow. I graduated earlier this year from

just born in June and a few months after.

the University of St Andrews with a degree in German and Italian - I think you can guess which languages I will be translating from! I've travelled a fair bit around Europe and spent my third year of university living and studying

in

Verona,

Italy,

which

was

challenging, rewarding and of course loads of fun! Although I am relatively new to the translation

scene,

I

am

keen

to

gain

experience and meet others in the translation network

who

can

share

any

advice

or

knowledge they may have. My postgrad course is really interesting and is covering a wide range of Translation studies - from theory to practice basically, and all that's in between! By the end of the year I should emerge with a broad knowledge of the topic and also some practical SDL qualifications! I'm really enjoying myself and can't wait to meet others who are working as translators too. Pollard:

Elizabeth

I

am

a

English/Polish/English

interpreter

translator

two

with

almost

skilled

decades

and of

experience in a range of fields. I have worked with a number of different police forces across the UK and have accompanied police on two murder enquiries to Poland. My knowledge of street and foul language allows me to act in less than normal circumstances and

I

am

competent

in

consecutive,

whispering and simultaneous interpreting. My area of work: Magistrates’ Courts, Crown

Others: Congratulations to Nathalie Chalmers, Sally McPhail

and

Marian

Dougan,

who have

recently become MITIs. Well done, ladies! Félicitations to Amandine Lepers, who got married on 1st September. You can read all about her bicultural wedding on page 21! Finally,

we’d

also

like

to

include

an

apology: in our last issue, we mistakenly called Margret Powell-Joss by a different name. Sorry about that, Margret!

If you have any news to report, please let us know: editor@itiscotland.org.uk


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 29

ScotNet grants The ITI Scottish Network offers 2 levels of

If you are attending a free ScotNet event, but

grants to members towards the cost of

you would like a grant to help with the cost

travelling to ITI events:

of transport and/or accommodation, then the

1) Grants of up to £25 are available for

procedure is the same as for attending

attending Scottish Network meetings.

national ITI events.

2) ScotNetters may also apply for grants of up to £60 for attending national ITI events. General conditions: Maximum one grant per

How to apply for a grant

person per subscription year. You must be a

If you are attending a ScotNet event:

member of ITI – Friends of the Network are

Contact our treasurer (currently Norma) at treasurer@itiscotland.org.uk registering

for

the

meeting.

before Subject

to

availability, she will approve the grant and notify you and the event organiser that you may deduct £25 from the normal workshop fee. You should also mention this to the

not eligible. Also members living in the central belt are not eligible to receive grants for network meetings in Edinburgh/Glasgow. All recipients must contribute a report on the event to the ITI ScotNet Newsletter. The level of grants is reviewed every year at

organiser when booking.

ScotNet’s AGM. Under the current budget, 8

If you are attending a national ITI event:

year. From time to time the committee may

Again, email our treasurer to apply for a grant, she will notify you if it's approved. Send her your account details and a receipt for the event or transport expenses in due

grants of £25 and 2 of £60 are available each also decide to offer additional grants to enable

ScotNetters

to

attend

particular

events, such as they did recently for the ITI Conference.

course. She will then pay the amount into your account.

Looking forward to the next issue… Did you enjoy the November issue of your network’s newsletter? I bet you did! Would you like to make it a bit more your own? Then don’t hesitate to drop me a line (editor@itiscotland.org.uk) we’d love to read your articles too! And, until you're ready for that, you can look forward to reading another instalment of our new series (“Sustaining yourself with an efficient office”), a report on the ScotNet autumn event and an interview with our Deputy MemSec. I hope you can wait!


Page 30

ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Your committee at a glance

Convenor

Treasurer

Pierre Fuentes

Norma Tait

0131 6291023

0131 5521330

convenor@itiscotland.org.uk

treasurer@itiscotland.org.uk

Membership Secretary

Deputy MemSec

Ute Penny

Nathalie Chalmers

01368 864879

01888 562998

membership@itiscotland.org.uk

membership@itiscotland.org.uk

Events Coordinator (East)

Events Coordinator (West)

Angelika Muir-Hartmann

Ann Drummond

0131 3334654

0141 2219379

muirhartmann@aol.com

ann@drummond9593.freeserve.co.uk

Webmaster

Newsletter Editor

Iwan Davies

Isabel Hurtado de Mendoza

01738 630202

07762 300068

webmaster@itiscotland.org.uk

editor@itiscotland.org.uk

Scotnet newsletter november 2013  

ITI Scottish Network Newsletter November 2013