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June 2015

ITI S COT N ET N EWSLETTER Isabel Hurtado de Mendoza MITI ITI Scottish Network Newsletter Editor

Tel: 07762 300068 Email: editor@itiscotland.org.uk

Coming of age El hombre se madura como la fruta, a

This is a very special issue of the ScotNet newsletter for me. My baby, born in October 2007, after going through a difficult childhood, is now turning 18 – issues, not years, of course.

fuerza de tiempo, de soles y de... golpes. [As fruit ripens, so does man mature, after

many

In all these years, I have outlived three generous and helpful Convenors (Renate, Hugh and Pierre). Marian is my fourth! I’ve been lucky to count on many ScotNetters to write engaging and factual pieces. And I didn’t always have to twist their arms into volunteering! But I’m particularly grateful to Kay, who has been relentlessly correcting my typos, constantly updating the design of the newsletter and generally improving the look of it issue after issue. In my very first editorial, I wrote: “From this issue, it would be great if we could make [this newsletter] a bit more member-driven. So, please send your comments, contributions, letters, etc. to editor@itiscotland.org.uk”. This still applies almost 8 years later, so please keep your pieces coming. This publication is made by you as much as for you. Thank you, ScotNetters! Isabel

days,

suns

and

blows.]

~ José Cipriano de la Luz y Caballero

Photo: just1snap

Inside this issue Dates for your diary

2

Translation and interpreting in a multimedia world

3

Renew, rejuvenate, regenerate – Translating and interpreting in an evolving world

8

Bilingualism matters

17

Your committee under the spotlight

19

Member news

20

So who needs a translator anyway?

20

ScotNet grants

21

Looking forward to the next issue…

21

Your committee at a glance

22


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

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Dates for your diary ITI ScotNet Workshop: 5-7th June, Western Isles

information, please click on the following link:

Hotel, Tobermory, Isle of Mull. Being Good and

www.city.ac.uk/courses/cpd/introduction-to-

Keeping Safe: Ethics, Privacy, Data Security and

financial-translation.

Disaster Planning. Speakers: Sarah Dougan, Peter Barber and Christopher McKiddie. For further information and to register (some lastminute places available!), please check out the call notice here.

Three modules (29th June-7th July, 8-16th July, 17-24th

from 9:00, Arlington Centre, London. We hope all ScotNetters will be having a great time in Mull on this date but, should any Spanishspeaking members be in the capital instead (tsk, tsk!), you could attend a double workshop led by Xosé Castro. You can download the call notice here.

University

College

London.

Following on from our popular spring event, week

Translate in the City summer school: 6-10th July, City University, London. An immersion course in literary translation into English across genres taught by leading literary translators academics,

with

plenty

of

opportunities for networking with publishers, agents, university staff - and one another.

course

that

provides

a

theoretical

framework in the area of AVT as well as handson training with audiovisual material taken from different authentic contexts. You can find all the course details here. The Scottish Society of the Chartered Institute of Linguists (CIoL): 12th September, from 2pm, venue

senior

July),

you might be interested in this intensive four-

ITI Spanish Network Training Event: 5th June,

and

Summer Course in Audiovisual Translation:

tbc,

Perth.

‘Experiences of

non-EU

students studying in the UK’, a presentation by Sharne Proctor, Director of the International Office at Durham University.

She

will be

accompanied by Lei Wang, a Chinese student currently

studying

information,

at

contact

Durham. Anne

For

Withers,

amwithers@msn.com.

Contact: Loic Pupile – loic.pupile@city.ac.uk. Introduction to Financial Translation: 15th-19th June, City University, London. The course covers the following subjects: bonds, inflation, foreign exchange, shares, the stock exchange, hedge funds and derivatives. Each day begins

For more events, remember to visit www.iti.org.uk, where you will find the International Calendar of Events (ICE), or our own website www.itiscotland.org.uk/diary.

with a two-hour interactive lecture during which students learn about financial concepts through source text analysis using authentic texts. They are then given a translation task which they complete in the afternoon and which

is

then

discussed

in

a

two-hour

workshop at the end of each day. For further

more

And, if you would like to advertise your own event, please get in touch: editor@itiscotland.org.uk


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 3

Translation and interpreting in a multimedia world Saturday 28th of March was the date chosen for the spring 2015 ScotNet workshop. We held a popular event attended by old and new faces, which included three different presentations. Hugh Fraser, Catherine Roux and Luciana Nadalutti – who we hope will soon become a ScotNetter – report. Elena Zini on subtitling

that these

by Catherine Roux

country. One of these conventions is that

Elena

started

her

lively

presentation

introducing herself and how she got into subtitling. Her passion for cinema started in

subtitles

can

can

vary depending

contain

up

to

on

two

the lines

(sometimes just one) and if there are two lines, the shortest one goes at the top.

her home town of Bologna, which is the centre of Italian cinema and holds an annual film festival. Because cinema is such a big industry, she decided to delve into it so that she could understand it better and be part of that process. She also knew that networking is essential to get to know a complex process like that of film-making. She learned how subtitling works on her own and, after completing that process, she created Screen Language Services, a company that offers subtitling

for

documentaries,

short

An obviously enjoyable talk Photo: Corinne Durand

and

feature films and community projects. She told us about the technical aspects of subtitling – in a film, it’s not just the dialogues that need to be translated but also sometimes soundtracks, captions, signs, etc. She

also explained

hardware

and

recommended

briefly the

software the

that

purchase

is of

kind of needed, a

good

headset, and mentioned the possibility of using a pedal for getting the time right and the need to get to know the software you are going to use. There are various subtitling pieces of software, some of which are free. One of the free ones she mentioned is called AegiSub.

She

explained

that

there

are

conventions about the layout of subtitles, but

Because subtitles are to be read, there are constraints in the exercise, the first one being the time and space constraint, but also the difficulty of cultural equivalents and the constant creativity needed to condense a dialogue. Elena pointed out that, although cinema is a big and lucrative industry, when it comes to subtitling, only 1% of an entire film budget goes into subtitling. This seems particularly unfair considering that subtitling is (to me) the best way to discover foreign films. The best part of the presentation for me was the practical exercise – Elena gave us a


ITI ScotNet Newsletter written

dialogue

taken

Page 4

from

a

Scottish

viewers of dubbed films are concerned.

documentary, which featured young girls

Because when people in, say, India, watch

talking about their home town, how they

films with Clooney in them, they expect

perceived it and what they did at weekends.

Clooney to be voiced by the same person

The dialogue contained about 3 paragraphs.

each time, namely – in the case of Hindi – a

We were given 5 minutes to come up with a

little-known actor called Shaktee Singh. If

subtitle containing two lines. It proved tricky

someone else suddenly did it, there would be

but some people came up with a subtitle that

outrage. As director Paul Mariano says2, “It

Elena seemed happy with. Altogether, this

would be

was a very good introduction to subtitling,

favourite actor in the United States: Woody

although a lot of people felt that it would

Allen, Clint Eastwood, Robert De Niro. And

have been better to have more time and do

you go to one of their movies and all of a

more practical exercises. I think that this

sudden someone else’s voice is coming out

calls for a one-day workshop in the near

of their face on the screen. Imagine how

future.

disoriented and discombobulated you would

like,

for

example,

pick

your

feel.” Catherine translates from English into French and specialises in marketing, medical and legal texts. Contact: catherine@frenchproof.com

www.frenchproof.com

Charlotte Bosseaux on dubbing

The many voices of George Clooney Photo: Corinne Durand

by Hugh Fraser This helpful introduction to the world of film dubbing started with an entertaining film clip1 that showed a selection of middle-aged men – all of them considerably less suave and visually appealing than the man we usually think of as George Clooney – saying “I am George Clooney”. They weren’t talking rubbish: in a sense, they really were George Clooney – at least as far as millions of

Dubbing is just one of several possible ways of making a film accessible to people who don’t understand the original language. The UK doesn’t really come into the equation, because it is a “source-language country”: we simply don’t watch many foreign-language films here. As for the great majority that are not source-language countries, some (e.g.

2 1

Actually the trailer for Being George Clooney , a 2015 film

about dubbing.

See http://chrisbrakeshow.com/2014/11/03/being-george-

clooney-director-paul-mariano-interview-jessica-klein-40oz-pimp/.


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

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France, Germany, Italy and Spain) tend to dub, while others (e.g. the Netherlands, Portugal and Romania) are more likely to

The process of dubbing a film is enormously complicated, and the various steps involved differ greatly from country to country.

subtitle. A small number of countries (e.g. Poland, Russia and Ukraine) frequently use a third technique: “voice-over”. This is a much cheaper option, and involves just one voice actor (or possibly two, one for the female and one for the male characters) reading out the translation of the script without any attempt to

synchronise

their

voice

with

the

characters’ lips. I experienced this for the first time when I went to the cinema in Russia to watch The Mask in 1995, and initially found it bewildering, and hilariously bad. The interview I cited before mentions someone who “went to see Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas while he was in Russia, and he said the voice dubbing was done by one single dude, and you could hear him turning the pages of the

script

during

the

film.”

However,

The process of dubbing a film is enormously complicated, and the various steps involved differ greatly from country to country. The translator is usually responsible only for producing a “rough” translation (though one attendee hotly disputed Charlotte’s use of this term). The translation then goes to a Dialogue Writer and then to a Dubbing Assistant, by which time the text will be very different from what the translator originally produced. Charlotte stressed, however, that this is only one possible sequence of events; the

international

dubbing

industry

is

extremely fragmented.

Charlotte explained that audiences can get very attached to a particular method, and she has met people from Poland who prefer voice-over to subtitling and dubbing.

Hugh works from German and Russian into English, mainly doing

There is very lively debate over which is better: dubbing or subtitling. While dubbing makes films more accessible to people in countries with low levels of literacy, it can also be used as a tool of political oppression. It can also be confusing: when native Frenchspeaker Charlotte first saw Sean Connery in a film, she though he must be French. When she eventually moved to Scotland and heard him being interviewed on TV, she was puzzled as to why, when speaking English, he put on a Scottish accent!

promotional and technical texts. Contact: hugh@frasertranslations.co.uk

www.frasertranslations.co.uk


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 6 interviews. There is also interpreting in the media, when the work takes place inside a studio, usually involving live broadcasting. Finally, a combination of all the above is possible; large events like the FIFA World Cup feature interpreters playing in all these different positions! International interesting

festivals

are

particularly

opportunities to professionals

residing in Scotland. A linguist’s work may be

Convenor Marian and the three speakers Photo: Corinne Durand

required across different platforms: subtitles, catalogues,

press

conferences,

lectures,

interviews. Pedro stressed that it is certainly

Jesús Castillo Ortiz on interpreting in a

advantageous being part of an event from

live media setting

the beginning. Translating a film festival catalogue will get you familiarised with

by Luciana Nadalutti The third speaker of the day was Pedro Ortiz, conference

interpreter,

researcher

and

lecturer

Heriot-Watt

University,

who

at

presented some aspects of “Interpreting in the Media”. While it may sound glamorous,

relevant topics and terminology that may come

up

during

press

conferences.

Therefore, catering for the different needs of a client will save you preparation time for interpretation assignments.

there is a great deal of pressure when interpreting under the spotlight. You step out of a secluded booth into complex and varied contexts and are subjected to public scrutiny. Not to mention that recordings are forever, and these days easily transmitted across several channels — live internet streaming, recorded audio and video, radio broadcast, and even the old-fashioned printed text. First,

Pedro

told

us

of

the

different

configurations this may assume. Sometimes professionals are required to interpret for the media — public figures like politicians and entertainers may hire their own interpreters when

attending

international

events

or

addressing foreign press. Interpreters may work with the media as a member of a team, going out into the field to mediate in

Familiar ScotNetters smiling for the camera Photo: Corinne Durand

The videos chosen by Pedro to illustrate his points were extremely insightful. We got a glimpse of what interpreting for festivals may look like. An Arabic interpreter was shown delivering simultaneous interpretation for a video shooting: she was standing up in the middle

of

a

road,

wearing

a

headset


ITI ScotNet Newsletter connected

to

a

Page 7

camera,

interpreting

and figure out the most suitable solution for

instructions from different crew members —

each context.

director, producer and sound technician—

The main lesson we may take from Pedro’s

and

the

talk is that we are pretty much in the hands

interviewee that she looked good on the

of God! An interpreter working in the media

screen. Spending several days accompanying

must deal with stress, public exposure,

the same speaker during the event clearly

unexpected situations and unusual work

helped the interpreter to perform in such a

conditions. How fortunate we have plenty of

complex setting.

footage available online to research and be

still

managing

to

reassure

prepared! Of

course,

when

you

think

you

have

everything figured out – different agendas, how to position yourself, or the right speed,

Luciana is an interpreter

volume and tone of your speech – the rules

(Brazilian Portuguese

of the game may abruptly change. Working as an interpreter during Depeche Mode appearances in the Spanish media, Pedro had to switch from a full translation, as requested by the radio station broadcasting a one-hour special with the band, to a very condensed rendering

of

another

interview

A/English B/French & Italian C) specialising in technical fields like oil & gas, maritime and communications and cultural events. Contact: brazil.interpreter@gmail.com

for

newspapers and television. Another clip displayed an extreme case: in a thought-provoking

exercise,

participants

were asked how they would interpret for a speaker like Italian coach Alberto Malesani. In a seemingly endless burst during a press conference, he was pounding the table and addressing four-letter words very liberally to Greek journalists who had questioned his team’s poor performance. It was refreshing to hear the solutions advanced by fellow translators condensing

and

interpreters,

the

message

such and

as

using

intonation to express non-verbal content. In my experience, an interpreter must stay true to the speaker’s intentions, and we may be excused from our usual neutrality because of this

particular

cultural

setting

(football).

Nevertheless, in the heat of the moment, a professional has to rely on his/her instinct

Our three speakers Photo: Corinne Durand


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

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Renew, rejuvenate, regenerate – Translating and interpreting in an evolving world When there’s action down in England, a sizable Scottish contingent is bound to join in, and this year’s ITI Conference was no exception. I asked ScotNet members Carol Latimer, Barbara Bonatti Divers and Birgit Wagner to report on masterclasses and talks of their choice. Hugh Fraser and Corinne Durand comment on the general ambience of the event, and Kim Sanderson writes from her perspective as presenter.

View from the venue Photo: Nathalie Chalmers

A Good Thing The Hilton Hotel Newcastle Gateshead is in

by Hugh Fraser I liked the 2015 ITI Conference a lot. I still haven’t recovered, but at least while I was there I enjoyed it a lot.

an idyllic location overlooking the river and the Tyne Bridge. Apart from the food, which somehow wasn’t quite befitting of such an otherwise slinky hotel, it was an ideal venue.

I liked the fact that there were absolutely loads of ScotNetters there, which not only made me proud to be a ScotNetter, but also meant there was always a place of refuge

The organisers had worked hard to keep things light, funky and unexpected.

when I got too embroiled in networking with other, more exotic delegates. The organisers had worked hard to keep My main aim in going was to find people who

things light, funky and unexpected. One

could help me be more successful in my

particularly unexpected moment for me was

work. As a result I didn’t feel too obliged to

when I was approached by ITI Chief Executive

go to all the talks, and happily there were

Paul Wilson and a cameraman, and Paul

always people sitting or standing around

asked me what my favourite bit had been so

ready

far. At the end of that day all 300 delegates

to indulge

network.

my

powerful urge

to

were shown a video, and my awkward


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 9

response to Paul’s question was included in

wide choice of holistic activities that ran

the video! All part of the fun though.

alongside the main events, pointing up the importance of focussing on aspects of our

There were lots of nice touches, including

working life which can often be overlooked

two lots of large silver balloons spelling out

as we concentrate on software, word counts,

“ITI”. At the end of the dinner I was amused

pricing, finding clients, etc.

to

see

three

resourceful

and

irreverent

delegates who had each pinched a balloon

The choices included chocolate-tasting (yes,

and carefully positioned themselves so that

really!). Marian Dougan, who once owned a

they now spelled “TIT”.

chocolate

shop,

traced

the

history

of

chocolate and explained the terminology. Of I guess I now need to think what my “take-

course, it was important to identify the

home message” is. I saw lots of ScotNetters,

product under discussion, and delegates who

and

could not attend the session were pleased to

appreciated

their

friendliness

and

insights as ever. I organised a meeting of the

note

that

German Network, who rarely meet each

afterwards.

the

left-overs

were

available

other, so it was great to meet these people in the

flesh

who I’d

previously only ever

encountered as faceless email addresses. And a colleague asked me – inspired by a presentation she’d just been to – if I’d like to be her “business buddy”, and I am quite keen on the idea. So my conclusion from the ITI Conference 2015 is that meeting and doing things with other translators is a Good Thing.

Hugh works from German and Russian into English, mainly doing promotional and technical texts. Contact:

Marian’s treat Photo: Corinne Durand

There were also opportunities for making or listening to music – including performances

hugh@frasertranslations.co.uk

by an ad-hoc chamber orchestra and the

www.frasertranslations.co.uk

singing translators (ScotNet singers will let you know the tour dates!), and down-time

The mantra OM! Or a holistic view of freelancing

sessions extended to Tai Chi, breathing, yoga and even massage.

by Carol Latimer

If such diversions from the translation task

If the ITI Conference in Gateshead felt a little

needed justification, this could be found in

overwhelming

Andrew Morris's excellent presentation on

at

times,

it

was

always

possible to seek out an antidote from the

holistic aspects of freelance working.


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

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As a freelancer working from his home in

His advice is: “Forget what the rest of the

France, Andrew became aware that there was

world is up to and start with yourself,

more to growing a flourishing business than

because that’s where it all takes off.”

simply networking, marketing and burning the midnight oil. And the 'work/life balance'

His session made me wish I could have made

thing was, as he puts it, “overly dualistic”.

it to Gateshead on Thursday to attend his

Instead, he adopted the strategy of the seven

workshop “The perfect likeness”, which was

spheres

work,

designed to help translators identify their

spirituality, intellect and social life), all of

own unique qualities and then make choices

which interact but only some of which have a

that accord with their particular strengths

high priority in our lives. Andrew suggested

and preferences.

(family,

finance,

health,

each person should identify his/her own priorities by asking the simple question

Never

mind,

an

important

lesson

from

“What sort of activities do I devote the most

attending conferences is that you can't do it

time to?”, using that information as an

all – and I could always buy Andrew's book!

indicator of particular strengths and then giving some regular TLC to the neglected areas. Although this may sound like a statement of the blindingly obvious, it is actually a wonderfully affirming

way to

Carol is a German into English translator. Her fields of expertise are travel & tourism and engineering. Contact: carollatimer98@gmail.com

assess and optimise our approach to life, to value

ourselves

and

our

skills

and

to

recognise that we can use our own aptitudes and preferences as building blocks to a successful career that is unlike anyone else's. Andrew's

upbeat

and

highly

creative

approach is reflected in his blog, Standing Out, which includes some stunning artwork

The Singing Translators Photo courtesy ITI Website

and photography as well as video clips of Andrew playing the piano. Well worth a click! www.facebook.com/standingoutasatranslator

Fahloun-Joffrin vs. Gentz: Ten facts about the future we can afford to ignore

by Barbara Bonatti Divers Stefan Gentz’s presentation (“Ten facts about the future the translation industry cannot afford to ignore”) had been allocated the largest room at the Conference and was very well

attended

by

both

veterans

and

newcomers to the industry, no doubt due to Photo from Andrew’s Facebook page


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 11

Gentz’s high profile as a regular contributor

included free translation of hotel websites,

to the ITI Bulletin. He describes himself as a

requesting a percentage on every booking;

speaker

motivates

free translation of Amazon self-published

translation professionals around the world”,

books, in exchange for royalties; free post-

therefore the audience was eagerly waiting to

editing

hear what he had to say. The mood, however,

charging for analysis, etc. Failing to embrace

was about to change.

these changes in today’s globally competitive

who

“engages

and

of

machine

translated

tweets,

market will spell doom for translators. He looked eminently unconcerned about this, so someone asked him: “How do you see YOUR future then?” to which he smiled smugly and replied “Oh well, I am not a translator, so I’ll be fine”.

“Plenty of high-end, well-paying clients seeking quality human translation are still out there” (Chris Durban)

What’s in a client’s mind (from Gentz’s presentation) Photo: Barbara Bonatti Divers

He started by disclosing the results of a poll amongst his Facebook translator “friends”, essentially showing that we are an insecure

Thank goodness at this point Chris Durban

bunch, who dread the rise of machine

(author of the hugely popular book “The

translation and see no prosperous future

Prosperous Translator”) who was sitting in

whatsoever for the industry. To prove this

the front row, took the microphone and said,

point he flung scary statistics at us on bright

“With all due respect, Stefan, this is bullshit”

red slides, showing how Google has already

then assured us that “Plenty of high-end,

stripped us of the “product ownership of

well-paying clients seeking quality human

translation”, handling 99% of online data and

translation are still out there” – as Nelia

translating more words in 1 minute than

Fahloun and Cécile Joffrin were just about to

humans manage in 1 year, getting more

prove.

accurate by the day; how quality does not even figure among the causes to initiate change management in business; how all clients want from us is faster, cheaper, or even free translation. His message was that to stay afloat (and barely make a living) we have to be creative, offering what the clients want (i.e. fast, cheap, even machine translated work – which elicited several gasps from the audience) with added

services

by

the

side.

Examples

Nelia and Cécile Photo: Barbara Bonatti Divers


ITI ScotNet Newsletter In

a

much

smaller

Page 12

room,

packed

with

delegates, Nelia and Cécile delivered their

different

formats,

and

one

for

aligning

translated files.

talk entitled “Business buddies: a case study on a successful collaboration in shared

Délphine gave a quick demonstration of the

marketing efforts”, with all the confidence of

tools, both of which are free to download.

an

expertly

rehearsed

duet.

Very

close

friends and colleagues for the past two years,

Glossary Converter

during a “famine” period they decided to test

This is available from SDL OpenExchange in

the methods described in the book by C.J.

the

Hayden Get Clients Now! Drawing strength

(www.translationzone.com/openexchange/ap

and courage from each other’s support, they

p/glossaryconverter-476.html#46146).

successfully stuck to the programme, which

The standalone app converts glossary files

has been coaching professionals since 1999,

between SDL MultiTerm termbases and other

managing in just one year to acquire a few

formats. The user interface is very simple,

high-end clients and drop their low-paying

using drag and drop.

"Terminology"

section

ones, increasing their income by 15%. The audience was enthralled.

LF Aligner This is open-source freeware available for

Now that’s what I call motivating. Sadly Gentz

download here:

was not there to see how it’s done.

www.sourceforge.net/projects/aligner

or

other locations – just search for "LF Aligner". It will align texts and their translations in Barbara translates

various formats and loads of languages and

English into Italian.

create translation memories in .txt, .tmx or

Specialisms: tourism and environment. Contact: intoitalian@bonattidivers .plus.com

.xls format. It will handle large texts, can do batch processing and produces remarkably accurate results, even when segmentation differs between source and target texts. The user interface is not quite as slick as that of Glossary Converter but still seems simple enough. A couple of applications where these tools would come in handy for me immediately

Tools of the trade

came to mind (where glossary conversion or

by Birgit Wagner Creating glossaries and TMX dummies (Délphine Guérou)

files

for

This brief 30-minute session in the Tech Hub introduced two very handy and easy to use apps – one for converting glossaries between

alignment had always seemed too much of a hassle). I am looking forward to trying these apps out soon as they seem so wonderfully easy to use.


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 13 There is a huge community of translators on Facebook, with a vast number of groups covering

everything

from

terminology,

software tools and jobs to general subjects and much more. According to Anne, this community found itself on Facebook after ructions at ProZ.com led to widespread defection. Facebook is a private social network and, Impromptu ITI ensemble Photo: Nathalie Chalmers

Facebook for translators: Waste of time or (net)working tool? (Anne Diamantidis) Surely, I must be one of the very few people left who are not "on" Facebook. Fully aware that this causes me to miss out here and there, I attended this talk expecting to be convinced that I couldn't possibly continue like this without running the risk of being totally left behind. As it turned out, I wasn't. At the beginning of the session, a quick poll indicated that there were a handful of others who had also not (yet) taken the plunge. Anne made it clear that she did not intend to sell Facebook to us, but rather provide information to help everyone make up their own mind as to whether it is for them or not.

unlike LinkedIn, not initially intended for professional networking. As such, it can still be

very

useful

for

translators

but

not

primarily as a marketing tool. (Although I did hear a comment from a conference speaker, who also runs a translation agency, that more and more translation jobs are being assigned via Facebook.) It is easy to get professional and private matters mixed up and it may be beneficial to keep your personal and your professional presence separate.

Although

frowned

upon

by

Facebook, it is nevertheless possible to have two accounts. If you are on Facebook, it is important to be active and keep on top of what's going on. Anne recommends checking in 2 or 3 times a day but limiting your activity to about 1 hour overall. Oh, and if you are at a loss for something to say and want your post to receive lots of "likes", putting up a picture of your cat always goes down well! The conclusion for me: As a naturally rather insular person (it's no accident that I live on an island), who doesn't feel much need to constantly share and report on my activities,

Tilly, Birgit’s cat, is not on Facebook Photo: Birgit Wagner

or lack of such, I would struggle to find things to post about and would probably be


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 14

put off by having to filter through lots of

I consulted friends and colleagues prior to

posts not relevant to me (and, I understand,

the Conference and was glad of their help.

an increasing amount of spam). I would have

Some of their ideas came in really handy

to force myself to be active on Facebook,

when I finally stood before my learned

whereas, if I need help or advice, or just a

audience: professionals with a variety of

chat with another translator, I feel that I can

language backgrounds. With 50 minutes to

call on the ScotNet community – either via

fill, making the session interactive was a

the e-group or by contacting a colleague

good idea, as was looking in advance at

directly – or use other ITI e-groups that I am

‘learning objectives’ which attendees could

a member of.

hope to gain from my talk (thanks, teacher friends). Birgit translates from

“If you already know some of your audience, as I did, then the tip that you’ll gain confidence if you ‘imagine your audience naked’ doesn’t apply”.

and into English and German. Specialist areas: engineering and patents. Contact: birgit.wagner@shetland .co.uk

I showed some people my slides. One colleague responded to my slide about the term ‘casino’ as used in the context of

Speaking at the ITI Conference – A

German buildings (it can mean ‘canteen’).

window of opportunity

She indicated that in Italian this can mean

by Kim Sanderson When I submitted a proposal to speak at the ITI Conference, it was months away and seemed an eminently sensible idea. As the date drew nearer, it gradually occurred to me how big the event would be, and now the whole prospect seemed a lot more daunting.

‘brothel’. If I hadn’t heard that fact until I was standing up giving my presentation, I might have been lost for words! Another piece of advice was less helpful: if you already know some of your audience, as I did, then the tip that you’ll gain confidence if you ‘imagine your audience naked’ doesn’t apply. The Conference weekend dawned and it was clear that this would be a busy time, with some

300

colleagues

gathering

at

the

Gateshead Hilton for several days’ sessions on a wide variety of topics. I was speaking just

before

lunchtime

on

the

Saturday,

following a day’s masterclasses and another Kim in action Photo: Paul Appleyard

day’s

Conference.

Some

people

I

know

declared an interest in attending my talk, and


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 15

others I didn’t know also said they were looking forward to it. The pressure was steadily mounting, and yet it was also reassuring to meet colleagues who were actually interested in the ideas I planned to present. I took a deep breath and had a hectic 10 minutes before the session started: the previous audience filed out, I was miked up (to

record

the

audio),

opened

my

presentation on the computer and displayed it via the projector. A variety of technical and ITI officials and colleagues helped ensure it was all ready on time. And

the

rest

was

actually

fairly

straightforward! I got a bit more than I bargained for by encouraging a room full of translators to contribute their ideas, as at times they wanted to discuss things among themselves rather than listen to me. And I wasn’t able to provide detailed answers to all the questions posed. But that does illustrate one

of

the

enjoyable

aspects

Grey's Monument, Newcastle Photo: Nathalie Chalmers

of

ITI

Conference, at least for me – discussion with colleagues and the realisation that, although you might not have definitive solutions, you’re certainly not alone.

Postcard from Newcastle About a week has passed since returning from this year’s ITI conference in Newcastle, and I am still constantly (but thankfully, quietly) singing a few Zulu words to the tune of a Disney animation… a sure sign that its effects will be as unexpected as long lasting! I

do

confess

suffering

from

Singing

translators’ syndrome again, but also hoping the conference will produce more useful outcomes. I

have

therefore

acted

on

some

old

resolutions by finally joining the LIFT and the Kim works from French and German into English.

French ITI networks, been in contact with some

of

the

exhibiting

sponsors

and

Her specialist fields are:

agencies, attended a trade event (thank you,

architecture, environ-

Alison, for your sound advice, and Barbara

ment, development and

for the reminder). I also know the difference

advertising. Contact: kim@sandersontranslations. com @sandersonkim

between chocolate confectionery and the real stuff, which I am still enjoying almost guiltfree, and purely for post-conference research purposes of course (thanks Marian!).


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 16

Unexpectedly, the conference has also given

Later

that

evening,

me the opportunity to compare different

entertainment was equally fabulous, when

yoga schools and methods, which has proved

The Suggestibles masterfully showed us how

extremely useful as I am currently training to

to improvise to best effect. I loved returning

become a Dru yoga teacher. Finally, I have

to Newcastle and visiting, at last, some of

decided to become a little more active in

Hadrian’s Wall famous sites, taking in the

promoting languages locally, not a new

stunning

interest of mine, but one I have found to be a

Northumberland

“slow process” in certain circles, to put it

beautiful sunny Sunday. And, last but not

diplomatically…

least, it was, as always, fabulous to be in the

views

the

offered countryside

post-dinner

by

the

on

that

company of well-kent faces, and getting to Beyond the inherent buzz and friendliness

meet new ones.

surrounding any gathering of translators, the strength of this year’s conference was, for

This year’s edition will undoubtedly stand the

me, the diversity of the topics and speakers

test of time, and will be one to beat. But

on offer. From yoga to Tai Chi, chocolate to

translators do love a challenge, and I can’t

fashion, salsa to crime novels, the offering

wait to see what’s in store for 2017!

was fantastic! My personal highlight was definitely “In conversation with Ann Cleeves”, a session I found fascinating thanks to the inspirational interviewee and the impressive interviewer,

followed

by

Friday’s closing

plenary session with Jonny Mitchell from the Channel 4 series Educating Yorkshire, who kept us amused with anecdotes of funny exam answers, just what was needed to wind up (before yoga!) at the end of a busy day.

Go, Scotland, go! Photo: Corinne Durand

Corinne is an English and Spanish into French translator. She specialises in medicine/ pharmaceuticals, law, environment, energy and international development. Contact: corinne@thefrenchkey.com


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 17

Bilingualism matters On 19th March, Siobhan Gorrie attended an event entitled ‘Bilingualism evening in Edinburgh’ organised by the Scottish-Finnish Society and featuring our own ScotNetter Jenni Syrjälä. Here she shares her thoughts about the talk with us. ScotNet

has

many

members

whom

precocious readers because of their innate

bilingual environments are a fact of life,

ability to see the correspondence between

perhaps as a result of relocating from a non-

letters

English-speaking country, a significant other

understanding of how language works gives

with a different mother tongue – or the

them

experience of raising a child in two or more

Experiments conducted by Professor Sorace

different languages. On 19th March, the

and others have also shown that bilingual

Scottish-Finnish

children

Society

for

hosted

a

and

sounds,

advantages

have

in

excellent

and

their

learning

early overall.

problem-solving

Bilingualism Evening in central Edinburgh

skills and are able to switch between tasks

with a focus on the third of these scenarios.

with ease.

While a husband who is monolingual (unless you count the occasional smattering of Dundonian inherited from his parents) makes it unlikely that I myself will ever experience bilingual

child-rearing

first-hand,

I

was

nonetheless fascinated to learn more about the psychology, benefits and (occasional) difficulties of this practice. Edinburgh University happens to be the base for the first of the event's speakers: Professor Antonella Sorace, a world-leading authority on

the

subject

development

of

across

bilingual the

language

lifespan.

As

a

founder member of Bilingualism Matters, a centre that aims to disseminate information on bilingualism, she is also in the business of mythbusting: it is not so long ago that raising children in two or more languages was considered to be a confusing experience that risked developmental delays. Professor Sorace's research

in fact points in the

opposite direction: children who grow up in a bilingual

environment

are

likely

to

be

Multiple tongues can prove useful for kids. Photo: Jason Trommetter

Bilingualism Matters' work in dealing with misconceptions is ongoing: while raising children bilingually is now widely held to be a positive choice – and it is a practice that is a choice, the evening emphasised – there are still some overly optimistic beliefs. The experience does not mean an automatic boost in IQ, for example, nor will it prevent dementia, although studies have shown that it may help to delay it. Bilingual child-rearing is not always a pain-free process for parents


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 18

either, as they may be alarmed to see their

Perhaps the most fascinating part of Jenni's

children beginning to talk at a slightly later

talk,

developmental stage. In a positive, healthy

experiences that the children themselves

environment,

had. Some were more keenly aware that their

however,

Professor

Sorace

however,

was

language

the

them

of

explained, the advantages will always win out

second

and children will benefit from their wider

different from their monolingual peers, while

linguistic and cultural worldview.

others simply considered it normal. Some went through

made

spectrum

periods of

somehow

favouring one

language over another, while others showed no preference. Even a set of 3-year-old twins

The advantages of bilingual childrearing will always win out and children will benefit from their wider linguistic and cultural worldview.

showed

differences,

with

their

mother

remarking that the two had not reached the same level of language development at all. In all these part-nature, part-nurture results, however, it was the advantages of bilingual child-rearing that had the most significant

With the theoretical groundwork laid by the

effect and resulted in culturally aware and

first talk, it was time to gain more insight

linguistically adept children – in other words,

into the

theory proven in practice.

practice.

Jenni Syrjälä,

ScotNet

member and newly appointed Chairperson of the Scottish-Finnish Society, has first-hand experience of a bilingual environment as a Swedish-speaking Finn, and presented the findings from her Master's thesis on the experience

of

Finnish

families

raising

children in Scotland. The majority of the parents she interviewed were keen for their children to reap the benefits mentioned in the first talk, and recognised the importance of staying in touch with Finnish culture – not to mention Finnish-speaking relatives. The parents were also a highly motivated group, supplying their children with different media in Finnish, ensuring regular visits to Finland, and building networks with parents in similar positions.

The

clear

message

was

that

developing a bilingual child does not simply happen

by

osmosis:

it

requires

active

engagement, as well as strength to overcome difficulties such as justifying this childrearing choice to other parents who may be less supportive of it.

Siobhan translates from German and French into English. She specialises in technical and commercial texts. She currently works at Louise Killeen Translations. Contact: www.lktranslations.co.uk


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 19

Your committee under the spotlight As you all know, the ScotNet committee underwent some changes at the end of last year. Here is a selection of the answers from the last member to be interviewed, Elena Zini, who has taken on the role of Deputy Convenor. breeze, I decided to move to Scotland to study translation. I sometimes dream… I have a summer home in Portugal. Especially when it's very cold outside, and when I compare the price – and taste – of vegetables in these countries! The piece of software I couldn’t live without is… Wordfast, it's extremely useful for legal translations and it has already saved me a huge amount of time. Although I do think I Elena and her partner, Alastair, performing with their band, The Badwills.

could probably survive even in a world without Wordfast.

As a child, I used to love… all the games that

My favourite word… It's hard to choose from

were considered "for boys": toy cars, speed

so many wonderful words – and in so many

races, building a tent out of sofa pillows and

languages! I love the sound of the words

umbrellas... When I wasn't playing with my

dinner table, my parents used to complain

bufanda (Spanish for scarf), malabarista (Portuguese for juggler), sparadrap (French for plaster) and the Gaelic expression s math sin (pronounced very similarly to the English

that they would never see the tip of my nose!

'smashing') to say 'great' or 'terrific'!

When I was a kid I wanted to become… a

My biggest contribution to the world… is

pianist or an explorer. Now I sing in a band

probably my first "published" piece of work,

and work as a translator, I guess I am halfway

an entry about a disastrous attempt at soup-

there!

making for a wonderful volume called the

best friend though, I would spend hours devouring books in my room or even at the

"How Not To Cook Book". I fell in love with languages… playing with my Mexican babysitter at the age of 5 and

My favourite translation… a recent project,

learning nursery rhymes in Spanish from her.

the subtitling of an old documentary about jazz in Bologna, my home town! But also the

My life changed when… sitting on top of

translation of song lyrics for a book about

Arthur's Seat, caressed by a gentle (for once)

the roots of American blues.


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 20

I am especially proud of... being able to translate, write and adapt song lyrics and

My handbag… is always full, I am not quite

rhymes! Unfortunately I don't get much of

sure

this type of work but this skill always comes

Mozambique and both the mugger and me

handy for musical translations, subtitles...

were stuck for a few minutes as I rummaged

and birthday cards!

through it, trying to find my wallet... until a

of

what!

I

was

once

mugged

in

police car passed by and he decided he'd I’m quite good at… sticking to deadlines.

rather run away than waiting for me to find it! Useful, isn't it?

I’m horrible at… sticking to my jogging "schedule".

Member news It looks like, after the initial big rush of members to sit the ITI exam, there's been a tailing off: we're only aware of one upgrade since our last issue. So congratulations to Denise Muir on attaining the lofty heights of MITI! Remember, if there have been any changes to your ITI membership status since you joined the network and forgot to notify us, please contact the Membership Secretary. In particular, let the MemSec know when you upgrade to MITI, as your details will then be made available to Joe Public online. Only one new member joined us in the last couple of months, Manuela. You might already know her because she just introduced herself in the Yahoo group.

So who needs a translator anyway?

Yummy refreshment for vampires? Photo taken from www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2295651/Lost-translation-Hilarious-advice-signs-foreignairports--English-leaves-little-desired.html.

We haven’t had any further contributions for this section. Please send your own So who needs a

translator anyway? photos to editor@itiscotland.org.uk. In the meantime, here’s a Friday-fun link you’ll love: www.pinterest.com/onehourtrans/translation-bloopers.


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 21

ScotNet grants The ITI Scottish Network offers 2 levels of

General conditions: Maximum one grant per

grants to members as a contribution towards

person per subscription year. You must be a

the costs of attending ITI events:

member of ITI, so Friends of the Network are

1) Grants of up to £30 are available for

not eligible. Also members living in the

attending Scottish Network meetings.

central belt are not eligible to receive grants

2) ScotNetters may also apply for grants of

for network meetings in Edinburgh/Glasgow.

up to £70 for attending national ITI events.

All recipients must be willing to contribute a report on the event they attended to the ITI

How to apply for a grant

ScotNet Newsletter.

Contact our treasurer (currently Norma Tait) at

treasurer@itiscotland.org.uk

registering

for

the

meeting.

before

Subject

to

availability and meeting the eligibility criteria, she will approve the grant and notify you. In due course, forward her a copy of the receipt for the event or transport expenses and provide her with your bank details. She will then pay the respective amount into your

The level of grants is reviewed every year at ScotNet’s AGM. Under the current budget, 10 grants of £30 and 10 of £70 are available each year. From time to time the committee may also decide to offer additional grants to enable

ScotNetters

to

attend

particular

events, such as they did for the 2013 ITI Conference.

account.

Looking forward to the next issue… Today, I’d like to extend my gratitude to Corinne Durand. She has provided great pictures of our spring workshop and the ITI Conference for this newsletter. If she keeps contributing so many photographs, we’ll have to make her join the ScotNet committee as Official Photographer! In our next issue, we’ll have our first book review – Jeannette Rissmann will be critiquing fellow ITI member Alison Layland’s first novel. I’m hoping this will encourage you to send in others! And who’ll be courageous enough to write our first ever software review? Remember, the address to send your pieces is editor@itiscotland.org.uk. I’m sitting on the edge of my ergonomic desk chair!


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 22

Your committee at a glance Convenor

Deputy Convenor

& Deputy Webmaster

Elena Zini

Marian Dougan 0141 9420919 convenor@itiscotland.org.uk

07765 987207 convenor@itiscotland.org.uk

Treasurer

Newsletter Editor

Norma Tait

Isabel Hurtado de Mendoza

0131 5521330

07762 300068

treasurer@itiscotland.org.uk

editor@itiscotland.org.uk

Membership Secretary

Deputy MemSec

Ute Penny

Nathalie Chalmers

01368 864879

01888 562998

membership@itiscotland.org.uk

membership@itiscotland.org.uk

Events Coordinator (East)

Events Coordinator (West)

Angelika Muir-Hartmann

Audrey LanglassĂŠ

0131 3334654

0141 5603482

muirhartmann@aol.com

audreylanglasse@alacarte-translations.com

Webmaster Iwan Davies 01738 630202 webmaster@itiscotland.org.uk

Scotnet newsletter June 2015