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December 2015

ITI S COT N ET N EWSLETTER Isabel Hurtado de Mendoza MITI ITI Scottish Network Newsletter Editor

Tel: 07762 300068 / +34670488288 Email: editor@itiscotland.org.uk

Is it time to make a change? Change is inevitable, and it comes in all sorts of shapes and sizes. It can come fast and unexpectedly as a result of “sentimental reasons”, for example, as happened to Lynda Hepburn. Or it can be slow and predictable, like a project you’ve been giving a lot of thought too, such as publishing an academic book.

Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain

to

miss

the

future.

~ John F. Kennedy

Humans tend to dislike change, but sometimes it’s for the best. Now that 2015 is almost over, it might be a good moment to sit still and seriously consider if we could benefit from getting out of our comfort zones in the New Year. Alison Hughes taught us how to acquire a new specialisation on a budget. Maybe you could try a field you’re passionate about to complement the one that pays the bills. Or you could attend an intensive course and finally embrace social media. I will attempt to make friends with Dragon Naturally Speaking. Anyone care to join me? You could also decide to work less and read more. Perhaps a book from each country in the world? Make sure you write a review or two for us! Whatever you do, take the bull by the horns and make the most of it! Isabel ♦

Photo: Joshua De

Inside this issue Dates for your diary

2

Expenses, expenses…

3

Engaging audioguides?

4

Bookworm adventures

6

Song in translation: Scotland, Russia and the music of language

12

Cool customers

15

An Edinburgh translator in Italy

17

ScotNetter turns published author

20

Member news

23

ScotNet grants

24

Looking forward to the next issue…

24

Your committee at a glance

25


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

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Dates for your diary ITI ScotNet AGM & Christmas lunch and “It’s not

ITI CPD workshop “High Level Writing With

what you spend but the way you spend it”:

Style”:

Saturday

5th

29th

January,

10:00-16:00,

Milton

December, National Piping Centre,

Keynes Business Centre. This workshop takes a

30-34 McPhater St., Glasgow. Alison Hughes’

close and analytical look at the challenges of

free workshop will start at 9:30 and the AGM at

writing for a specialist audience or on specialist

11:00 (with tea and biscuits before, as usual!).

technical subjects such as business, finance

For further information, please check out the

and science. Tickets are £89 for ITI members.

call notice here.

For further details, visit www.iti.org.uk/professional-developmentevents/iti-events-

ITI ScotNet 2016 workshops: Bought your new

calendar/icalrepeat.detail/2016/01/29/2604/-

diary but still have nothing to write in it? Let’s

/high-level-writing-with-style.

fix that straight away! Save the date for these two ITI Scottish Network events: 5th March (Edinburgh) — spring workshop; 21st May

ITI CPD workshop “Make an Impact with Social

(Dunkeld)

Media

summer

weekend

workshop.

Further details to come soon!

and

Digital

Marketing

How

to

effectively market yourself online in 2016”: 26th February, 9:30-15:00, Milton Keynes Business Centre. During this interactive session, you will

The Scottish Society of the Chartered Institute

go through the dos and don’ts of online

of Linguists (CIoL): Please remember to check

marketing and social media, and talk about

the CIoL website for information on their

content marketing. For further details, visit

upcoming events:

www.iti.org.uk/professional-development-

www.ciol.org.uk/index.php?option=com_conte

events/iti-events-

nt&view=article&layout=coil:norelated&id=247

calendar/icalrepeat.detail/2016/02/26/2664/-

&Itemid=687.

/make-an-impact-with-social-media-anddigital-marketing-how-to-effectively-marketyourself-online-in-2016.

Setting Up as a Freelance Translator ITI Online Course: January-March 2016. Over more than 20 hours of webinars and individual sessions, you will learn how to develop a freelance translation business and gain an understanding of how the translation market operates. For more information visit www.iti.org.uk/professional-developmentevents/iti-online-courses.

For more events, remember to visit www.iti.org.uk, where you will find the International Calendar of Events (ICE), or our own website www.itiscotland.org.uk/diary. And, if you would like to advertise your own event, please get in touch with us: editor@itiscotland.org.uk


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

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Expenses, expenses… On 3rd October, ScotNetters met at a new venue, the Royal Over-Seas League (Edinburgh) for their autumn workshop. New member Katherine Wren reports on Alison Hughes’ popular event. As a new translator (German>English) with

The title of the workshop, led by Alison

around two years’ experience working in the

Hughes, was “It’s not what you spend, but

music industry, I have been considering

the way you spend it”. The first session

membership of the ITI for a while. When I saw

focused on non-negotiable expenses such as

details of the ITI Scottish Network’s autumn

publicity

workshop on Twitter, I decided that it was

membership, CPD and CAT tools. While I was

too good an opportunity to miss. Further

aware of all of these, there were numerous

encouraged by a friendly reply from Alison

additional tips, such as using postcards to

Hughes, I decided to take the plunge and see

make

what the ITI had to offer me.

ubiquitous

a

materials,

bigger

websites,

impression

business

cards

than

and

ITI

the

tailoring

approaches to individual clients, with a letter often making a bigger impression than email. Networking is definitely not something I find easy (I’m aware I may not be alone in this!) but the message from Alison was very much to

seize

opportunities.

The

more

you

practise, the better you will become at it. Clever ways of doing this, and also of accruing

CPD

on

a

budget,

included

volunteering to help at events, often in Alison Hughes

Elena Zini’s opening gambit was to ask who was new to the network. I stuck my hand up and was informed that tradition has it that new members write a report on their first impressions and was I up for it? To be honest, I thought she was joking at first, and

exchange for free or reduced entry.

While it’s important to network with other translators, it’s at least as important to attend events in your specialist area, making contacts and keeping abreast of the language used in your area of expertise.

in any case I had to own up to not yet being a member. This was simply met by friendly comments that I would now have to join! Actually, “friendly” was the overwhelming impression that I took home with me from the workshop.

After a short break, with the opportunity to put those networking skills into practice(!), the attention turned towards creative ways of approaching CPD and marketing without breaking

the

bank.

Alison

continually


ITI ScotNet Newsletter emphasised

the

need

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to

engage

with

people with years of experience who were

potential clients. Again, there were things

happy to connect with me and offer advice.

that I hadn’t thought of that would help me

Will I be joining the ITI? You bet!

grow my new business. While it’s important to network with other translators, it’s at least as important to

attend

events in

your

specialist area, making contacts and keeping abreast of the language used in your area of expertise. For those of us working in the cultural and leisure industries, it can be fun, too! I left the session feeling that I had learned an awful lot. I’d also connected with a lot of

Katherine is a German into English translator specialising in culture (particularly classical music) and sport. Contact: katherine.wren@talktalk.net www.katherinewrentranslator.co.uk

people, ranging from other people like me, just starting out, through people I’d known on my MA course but not met for a while, to

Engaging audioguides? I bet you’ve used a museum audioguide in the past. Some of you might have even translated their scripts. But did you ever reflect on the translation process behind these guides and their impact on museum visitors? Here Sarah Tolley reports on an event discussing this. Edinburgh University’s Language Department held its first research seminar in the new academic year on Wednesday 23 September. Dr Sharon Deane-Cox was there to tell the 40-odd students and faculty about her research into the way translations facilitate access to the past for visitors to French museums that contextualise events that took place during World War II. Her talk was entitled ‘Engaging audioguides?’ and she used two translations of audioguides: one from the Museum in Oradour-sur-Seine and one from the Museum of Resistance and Deportation in Besançon.

Dr Dean-Cox at Edinburgh University


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The other case study featured an English translation that mediated a more distanced

Dr Dean-Cox’s research uses the concept of ‘prosthetic memory’, a term coined by Alison Landsberg to describe the way technologies of mass culture make it possible for anyone to assimilate as personal experience historical events that they themselves did not live through.

and factual version of the original script, which was voiced by famous French actors. This example raised issues about the way meanings are negotiated, and how this can affect the ability of visitors to empathise with the museum’s presentation of past events. Indeed, Dr Dean-Cox’s research uses the concept of ‘prosthetic memory’, a term coined by Alison Landsberg to describe the way technologies of mass culture make it possible for anyone to assimilate as personal

Her method involves using the transcripts of the original text and the translation for comparative

analysis,

applying

Michael

experience

historical

events

that

they

themselves did not live through. It was fascinating to consider the extent to which

Halliday’s theory about language function.

translations of

She illustrated her approach with extracts

audience was keen to discuss Dr Deane-

from

the

Besançon

audioguide,

which

relevant audioguides can

hinder or enable this process, and the Cox’s research after she finished her talk.

provides an English language voice-over, and allows the original words of the French witnesses to be heard. Some wonderful mistranslations were noted, but in general, she thought that the voice-over was less appropriating,

allowing

the

original

intonations and emotion to be heard, and providing a better sense of a real person.

Sarah translates from French and German into English. Her specialist areas are: art, art history, history, architecture, travel. Contact: tolleytranslations@gmail.com www.Tolleytranslationservices.co.uk


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

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Bookworm adventures It’s no coincidence that translators love reading, so year after year a healthy representation of the ITI Scottish Network attends various events at the Edinburgh International Book Festival. This summer, Hugh, Katrin and Barbara volunteered to report on their experience. Stories without borders

Although

By Katrin Frahm

“cosmopolitan”, Ann Morgan had only ever

Leafing through the Edinburgh Book Festival

English in her youth and stated that she had

immediately. In “Stories without borders”, moderated by Daniel Hahn, Michael Hofman and Ann Morgan promised to enlighten their audience on the question of whether it is possible to enjoy a book in translation just as as

in

regarded

herself

as

a

read British and North American literature in

2015 brochure, one event caught my eye

much

having

the

original

and

the

role

translation plays in introducing works of literature written in other languages to a broader, international audience.

“distrusted” translations. This provided her with the idea for her book “Reading the world”,

in

which

she

described

her

experience of reading one book from every country over the period of one year. The books were recommended to her by book enthusiasts from all over the world and were meant to be representative of their countries of origin. In the process, she did of course have to rely on translations. This posed a problem,

as

there

was

a

much

larger

selection of suitable works available from India, compared to a very limited choice of books from francophone Africa that were available in English translation. I started wondering how many literary gems we were missing out on as they never made it to translation? Compared to Ann Morgan, Michael Hofman, award-winning poet and translator, had had an entirely different experience of reading in Michael Hofman and Dr Anne Stokes, Course Director of Stirling University’s MRes in Translation Studies and herself a German to English literary translator (e.g. of German poet Sarah Kirsch)

The event started with Ann Morgan and Michael Hofman providing an insight into their different approaches to reading in their youth.

his youth. He described that, as a young man, the works of “world literature” like those by Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Gogol’s “Dead Souls” had graced his bookshelves. Hofman had just published his collection of critical essays “Where have you been” about authors whose books he had read, and was able to read, in the original.


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As many of us have to rely on translation

Switzerland. When translating more difficult

when reading books in languages that we do

concepts

not

interesting

experience of life on a Paris estate), he

question of whether it is of vital importance

recommends “translating like for like”, i.e.

to the reader, namely for their enjoyment/

substitution with an element that readers of

understanding

of

the translation are “familiar” with in their

language

book

speak,

this

a

poses

the

the

book,

played

just

a

“trivial” part if something similar could also be written in another language. In his attempt

to

which

other

has

originally been written or if language

in

of

answer

authors

(e.g.

the

culture (e.g. life on an

I was somewhat surprised to learn that a general “distrust” in translation as a practice prevents many people from reading literature in translation altogether.

estate

in

London’s

Brixton) and so helping the

reader

of

the

translated work to “stay at home”.

this

question, Michael Hofman highlighted the

As someone who readily grew up surrounded

differences between translating novels and

by international works of literature and has

poems. In his opinion, a novel, even in

enjoyed many books in translation since, I

translation,

the

was somewhat surprised to learn that a

original whereas with a poem “everything can

general “distrust” in translation as a practice

get lost in translation”. He described the task

prevents many people from reading literature

of the translator as “ferrying stories across”

in

and trying to meet the challenge of creating

judgement is clouded here and this topic

an “experience”. The English translation of a

would lend itself for discussion in our

German

ScotNet group over the Christmas lunch?

“fortified”

retains

literary with

“something”

work

can

“German

at

of

times

elements”,

be

translation

altogether.

Maybe

my

i.e.

German words like “Wurst” and “Schnapps” to create a feeling for the original cultural setting. I agree with Hofman who states that a translation of a work of literature attempts to provide “as rich an experience as possible” and that in this process, the target language has at times to “express things for which it was not originally meant”. I found his view that a translator cannot be “invisible” and that every literary translation is a “game between reader, author and translator” very descriptive, engaging and — above all — reassuring. Michael Hofman, who translates works by the contemporary Swiss writer Peter Stamm into English, stated that he found it easier here to produce a translation that reads like an original as there is little in Stamm’s books that links them particularly to

Swiss author Peter Stamm (right) in discussion with his translator Michael Hofmann

Another most interesting point touched upon in Morgan’s and Hofman’s talk was the notion of “world literature”. They alerted their audience to the fact that “world literature”


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

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was usually displayed on a separate shelf in

great to see a good number of ScotNetters at

bookstores (alongside other classifications of

the

literary works such as “women’s writing” or

discussion afterwards.

event

all

engaging

in

a

lively

“military writing”) and that separate tables for “foreign books” in bookstores, which are

Katrin’s working languages are English and German. She specialises in education, science and technology.

meant to attract attention, often made us feel like

entering

a

“quarantine

zone”

from

“literature proper”. Furthermore, they stressed that it is a selective process which determines which books are actually translated — in the past,

Contact: kfgermantrans@aol.com

publishers often had a special interest in particular books from certain countries to emphasise selected aspects they wished to draw attention to. Interesting points to consider when trying to determine one’s understanding of “world literature”. Is the latter simply literature from all over the world and should we have a further classification of “global

literature”

to

refer

to

globally

successful literature? Hofman stated that translators play another important role — it is the translator who often spots talented young writers from another culture, and new media like Twitter with

#translationthursday

translators,

readers

and

encourage publishers

to

cooperate in looking for new talent. I found it encouraging to hear that there is an expectation of a translator to “champion a cause”, of starting a wider discussion on topics like what expectations we have of literature. With their engaging talk, which touched on so many interesting points too numerous to mention here, Ann Morgan and Michael Hofman certainly provided much food for thought and time just flew by! It was also

Nothing but the poem - Poetry in translation By Hugh Fraser Having done some poetry translation in the past, I went along to this workshop at the Edinburgh International Book Festival. The event was led by Jennifer Williams of the Scottish Poetry Library (gorgeous place — if you haven’t been there, I warmly recommend going along to soak in the airy, liberating vibe). The audience consisted of about 15 people sitting round in rather a cosy circle in the “Writers’ Retreat”, a particularly intimate little tent at the Book Festival. Jennifer was assisted by a Polish writer called Agata Maslowska. In short, the event involved us giving our opinions on existing English translations of various Polish and Hungarian poems. Before we started, Jennifer pointed us to a lovely quotation by the recently deceased Swedish poet Tomas Tranströmer, which is probably the thing that made the biggest impression on me at the whole event:


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“Let me sketch two ways of looking at a

Agata,

our Polish

writer,

there,

as her

poem. You can perceive a poem as an

readings of the Polish poems, although

expression of the life of the language itself,

incomprehensible to most of us — me

something organically grown out of the very

included — gave us real insights into the feel

language in which it is

of the original poems,

written — in my case,

and hence into what had

Swedish.

A

poem

The event definitely did its job of deepening my enthusiasm for reading and translating poetry.

written by the Swedish language through me.

been lost, or retained, or added,

in

the

translations.

Impossible to carry over into another language.

The event was not aimed especially at translators. I, as a translator,

“Another, and contrary, view is this: the

already knew that it was possible to translate

poem as it is presented is a manifestation of

the same text in very different ways; the

another,

a

same was not true for the non-translators

language behind the common languages.

present, however, and much hilarity ensued

Thus,

as five different existing translations of

invisible

even

translation.

the A

poem, original

transfer

written

in

version

into

is

English

a or

Szymborska’s

poem

Some

Like

Poetry

Malayalam is merely the invisible poem’s new

(Niektórzy lubią poezję) were read out. As an

attempt to come into being. The important

example of the kind of variation we saw, the

thing is what happens between the text and

last two words (“zbawiennej poreczy”) were

the reader. Does a really committed reader

variously translated as “a saving hand-rail”,

ask if the written version he reads is the

“a saving bannister”, “a redemptive handrail”,

original or a translation?”

“a sustaining railing” and “a life line”!

Jennifer was very much for the second

I didn’t learn anything very concrete at the

interpretation

into

workshop, but arguably nothing to do with

(think

poetry should be about “learning anything

traduttore, traditore). But she also urged us,

concrete” anyway. The event definitely did its

if ever we are reading a bilingual book of

job of deepening my enthusiasm for reading

poems, not to ignore the “foreign language”

and translating poetry.

negative

she

definitions

doesn’t of

buy

poetry

part of the book (even if we don’t know a word of the language), because even the physical shape of the original can help us to better understand the poet’s intentions. Once we had got into the main part of the workshop, we read poems by three different

Hugh works from German and Russian into English, mainly doing promotional and technical texts.

poets, none of whom, I am afraid, I had heard of: Wislawa Szymborska, Zbigniew Herbert

(both

Polish)

and

Attila

József

(Hungarian). It was very helpful to have

Contact: hugh@frasertranslations.co.uk www.frasertranslations.co.uk


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Translation duels: French — Ros Schwartz

given the first chance to see each other’s

vs. Frank Wynne

work while the audience took their seats.

By Barbara Bonatti Divers

They both looked a little nervous as they set out to justify their stylistic choices. Just as Daniel began assuring us that the word “duel” does not imply violence on stage, Ros murmured

something

inaudible

and

he

conceded that blood may be shed after all: he observed how fitting it was that both translators had won a Dagger Award and suggested they throw trophies at each other at the height of discussions. We were all handed a copy of the original excerpt and both translations, a PDF of which Frank Wynne, Ros Schwartz and Daniel Hahn

Translation duels are a relatively new and hugely popular feature at the Edinburgh International Book Festival. Their formula is simple: give two English translators the same excerpt from a foreign book to translate prior to the event, then ask them to comment on dissimilarities in front of an audience. Knowledge of the original language is not required, which is why my basic French and I were happy to attend: I had met Ros Schwartz at the ITI Conference in May and simply wanted to see her in action. On the stage with Ros, who since 1980 has translated authors such as Simenon and St Exupéry, was Frank Wynne, author of I was

Vermeer and translator from Spanish and French of Allende and Lemaitre, among others. Daniel Hahn, author and translator in his own right, competently chaired the event with tongue-in-cheek humour. Frank and Ros had been assigned a piece from Flaubert’s Madame Bovary; they were

you can find in a ScotNet Yahoo folder. The translated pieces were first presented one after the other, then again side by side and sentence

by

sentence

to

enhance

any

dissimilarity. It was clear from the first paragraph that both translators had taken some liberties and Hahn was not going to let them pass unobserved: Structure

Ros

admitted

she

dislikes

semicolons and tends to use full stops instead.

As

a

result

her

piece

had

7

sentences more than Frank’s. Whose voice is it anyway?  Both translators were clearly familiar with Flaubert’s novel and felt the urge to influence the readers’ perception of the characters: they could not help putting their own words in Charles Bovary’s mouth, to either make him sound more pleading (Ros: “Tell me I did”) or hurt by Emma’s rudeness (Frank: “Well, now...”). Frank went a step further by writing that Emma “pretended not to hear”, rather than “seemed not to hear”, but readily admitted it was a liberty he should not have taken.


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Accuracy  Ros did not like Emma’s elbow “on the edge of her plate” (“It would tip over,

surely!?”) so she opted for elbow “on the table”.  The rendition of “ancienne pouliche” (old filly) spurred quite a debate: both translators opted for “mare” (or “old mare”), but Sabine Citron from the audience remarked that Flaubert’s intention had presumably been to show

Charles’

incompetence

in

equine

matters, which was lost in both translations.

ScotNet bookworms

 As for the poor animal’s knee problem (“un peu couronnée”), Ros went to great lengths to find out exactly what it was (she even

consulted

a

horse

specialist

vet),

whereas Frank preferred to go for a simpler, more colloquial rendition (“buck-kneed”).  “Son mari [...] lui trouva bonne mine” was respectively

translated

by

Ros

as

“Her

husband remarked that she had some colour on her cheeks”, by Frank as “Her husband [...] felt there was a healthy glow about her” and by Google as “Her husband found her good looks” (comment by Hahn: “One wonders

where?”).

Then Frank said something that caused a stir among the Romance languages speakers in the audience: he claimed that the Spanish and French LOVE repetitions — unlike the English

challenging

ABHOR repetitions — unlike English! — I had my doubts about this, which were confirmed by numerous shaking heads in the audience. For lack of a Dagger, a senior French lady grabbed the microphone to challenge him, but still left him unmoved (and mercifully unscathed).

translate

“joncs”

“bulrushes”, associates

with

as

he

these

with

Moses. He blamed his Sunday school memories it,

them

languages to translate. Knowing how Italians

Frank could not bear to

for

making

to

which

Ros

Overall, it transpired that

Frank’s translation, with its poetic and antiquated language, evokes the right atmosphere, flows harmoniously and arouses more emotions in me as a reader than Ros’s does.

replied that she is Jewish and they have Moses, too, but the bulrushes gave her no trouble. However, she did spend quite some time listening to recordings of wind blowing through them, to finally establish whether they whistle, whisper or sigh.

Ros had strayed a bit more from the source than Frank. A translator chap

in

the

audience

asked Ros what makes her go for more liberal translations

and

explained that he also translates rather liberally, possibly to rebel against his very strict mother (a maths teacher). Her answer was that her aim is to achieve the same feeling, music and general response as the original, rather than to be loyal to individual sentences.


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

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Throughout the event Ros appeared a little

say” and his “lofty heights” and his “lyric

more defensive than Frank, while he readily

throng of adulterous women”. I felt a little

offered her his admiration for her work and

sorry for my rushed judgement of him and

more than once conceded that her renditions

rather wished he had been less gallant and

were better than his. I wonder now whether

more assertive. This is of course just my

he did it out of gallantry, or because the best

humble opinion. I wonder about yours.

defence is flattery. It certainly did not do him much favour at the time: I remember being unimpressed by his lack of assertiveness and

Barbara translates English into Italian. Specialisms: tourism and environment.

conviction in his own choices. When I got home, however, and had a chance to properly read the two translations in full, I rather changed my mind. Frank’s translation, with its poetic and antiquated language, evokes

Contact: intoitalian@bonattidivers.plus.com

the right atmosphere, flows harmoniously and arouses more emotions in me as a reader than Ros’s does. I really like his “Do

Song in translation: Scotland, Russia and the music of language So far in this issue, you’ve read about poetry in translation and the impact of translated audioguides on museum visitors, among others. Not quite the work we deal with on a daily basis, right? What if we now added that translations sometimes need to sing? Read Elena Zini’s report if you’d like to find out when! On Friday the 9th of October I spent an

world

of

poetry

and

fascinating,

enchanting evening listening to the songs

sometimes interweaving,

and translations performed by Russia-

Scotland and Russia through past and

based Scottish bard Thomas Beavitt at

present times.

stories

from

the Wee Red Bar, in Edinburgh’s Art College. I came to this event not knowing

Thomas Beavitt is a Highland-raised,

exactly what to expect. The atmosphere

Scottish musician and linguist who, at

was warm, intimate and welcoming. The

some point in his career, found himself

stage, dimly lit, induced the audience to

naturally looking for a ‘bigger place’ than

sit close to the speaker. By the end of the

his home country, but the American, Bob

evening, we had been transported to a

Dylan-centred folk music scene was not


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

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the answer he was looking for. After a

“The sounds of the languages carry the meaning in a way that maybe the semantics don’t”.

chance meeting with a Russian group in Edinburgh's folk pub Sandy Bell’s, he was impressed by their positive attitude and surprisingly

deep

knowledge

of

the

Scottish Bard Robert Burns. Following this, he was invited to perform at the Moscow City Day festival, where he truly fell in love with Russian language and culture. Since then, Beavitt has been invited to perform at numerous events in Russia, among which was a sell-out concert in Moscow dedicated to Robert Burns’ 250th birthday. Beavitt reflected that this closeness in the sensitivities of Russians to those of the Scots was one of the driving forces in his move to Russia, a country

he

declares

himself

to

be

"addicted to" today.

to certain types of texts in translation. Similarly, Thomas Beavitt told us he found that the Scottish register was more apt than standard English to translate certain songs from Russian. The common thread of the evening was the idea of a translation of sounds, rather than words, for, to quote Beavitt, “the sounds of the languages carry the meaning in a way that maybe the semantics don’t”. Music

translation,

he

specified,

also

needs to take into account aspects such as the rhyme scheme, syllable count and the stress patterns of the original song. Furthermore, the translator of a poetic song needs to have a musical sensitivity. For example, when translating a song from

Vysotsky,

which

was

originally

performed in two versions, one in 3/4 and one in 4/4, in his English version He

hasn’t returned from the battle, Beavitt used 3/4 and 4/4 rhythms in the same version. This time signature duality drew a parallel with the story of the song’s

Thomas Beavitt on stage

protagonist, a soldier who has lost a

I was fascinated by the fact that, from the very start,

Thomas Beavitt

reiterated

something I had previously heard from Massimo Bocchiola, an Italian translator of

several

Sometimes

books the

by

Irvine

standard,

Welsh. official

language of a country does not do justice

comrade and, while adjusting to his death, is living between two realities. The evening continued with translations and performances drawn from Thomas Beavitt’s

several

works,

including

translations into Russian and English


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 14

respectively of Burns and Vysotsky. The

were vocal admirers of his translations.

latter could be said to have a similar role

During

to that of the Scottish bard, as a poet

touching Russian song in its English

who is “as Russian as they come, but with

translation, the daughter was moved to

a universal character”. To those who may

tears, and the father proclaimed: “You did

argue

it

that translating poetry is not

possible, Beavitt opposes the idea that “if

the

very,

performance

very

right”.

of

a

What

very

better

confirmation could a translator ask for?

these translations help you into your appreciation of Vysotsky — and, I would

Thomas

Beavitt

is

still

add, of any poetry and music worth

Ekaterinburg,

sharing — my job will have been done”.

translating, as well as developing and

teaching

living

English

in and

performing his bilingual repertoires in When

asked

about

his

translation

collaboration

with

Russian

musicians,

process, Beavitt explained that he uses

writers and translators. He is the initiator

tools such as Wordfast to aid with

and promoter of a project called the

terminology, and his approach involves a

Global

first draft translation, then amendments

translators, songwriters and bards in an

taking into account the rhyme scheme,

“attempt to revitalise the traditional role

followed by a final adaptation. His focus

of the village bard in the context of the

is on the fact that “the main point of the

present globalised situation”. You can

song is to be singable, only then I think

listen to Beavitt's songs, watch his videos

about the meaning. You have to capture

and learn more about his project on the

the emotion of the song, if you do that

website www.globalvillagebard.org.

Village

Bard,

which

involves

people will be more forgiving of your adaptation”.

This event was part of the ‘Scotland and Russia: cultural encounters since 1900’

And indeed, his translations were well

project,

done. Despite having no knowledge of

University and sponsored by the Royal

Russian whatsoever, I thoroughly enjoyed

Society of Edinburgh.

the

songs,

between

which

storytelling,

were

explanations

of

life and work. The songs translated into English seemed to flow naturally, they an

innate

musicality.

by

Edinburgh

performed

their origins and anecdotes of Beavitt's

had

organised

While

my

opinion might not take into account the Russian text, the members of a Russian family, who were sitting in the first row,

Elena translates from English, Portuguese, Spanish and French into Italian. Her specialisms are: law, media, literature and art. Contact: www.elenazini.com


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 15

Cool customers Some time ago, Helen Robertson contacted me about writing a piece on an unusual translation project of hers. As we discussed the details of her contribution, her interesting pro-bono work turned into a deeply satisfactory experience. Go on, you know you want to read all about it! When a client in Stuttgart first recommended

of interest to ScotNetters from both the

me to Die Brueder she told me “I hope it

linguistic and the content point of view). The

works out, they’re incredibly creative”. One

transformation of the media to digital and

look at their website confirmed that and I

the major publishing houses’ search for new

was hooked. I’ve supported them on a few

business models make this a super-exciting

communication projects from racing bikes to

field, as the men and women of the indie

wheeled caravans that convert into boats to,

scene play their part in supporting the rise of

most recently, a music festival — the latter

print.

caused quite a stir on the ScotNet e-group in the hunt for an English term for “Wegbier”.

Held at the palatial Heine-Villa in Hamburg, this year’s Indiecon included a conference on 28th and 29th August followed by a big Free Trade Zone for Printed Goods at Hamburg's Oberhafen on the Sunday which was open to everyone, independently of Indiecon, a great chance for people to sell and publicise their magazines. It’s aimed at independent magazine (indie mag) makers, and this year was so small —

Photo credit: Malte Spindler/Die Brueder

Last year they asked for a quote on a nonprofit project of their own, but I quoted at normal rates and lost the chance. This year, I

100 places were available — that if you weren’t a mag maker you might have been pushed to get a ticket. Voluntary helpers are welcome, though I am very sure their input is nothing to the unpaid work the creators did.

wasn't going to let it get away and said “tell you what, I'll do it for free”. Rare words from an Aberdonian.

I think it would be a great conference for linguists to visit, scrutinise your training budgets!

That’s not the interesting bit, though. The fun freebie was “Is Indie Forever?”, the second outing for Indiecon, an annual festival

Indiecon has some public funding and also

for indie mags (independent magazines: with

generates revenue from ticket sales, but is

presentations in both German and English —

far from breaking even at present. While any


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 16

additional money will be channelled back

named — were still recovering the last time I

into the Conference — co-organiser Urs

was in touch.

Spindler makes it clear that Indiecon will always be non-profit — it would be great to

Why am I telling you about this in such a dry

be able to pay contributors. The theme was

fashion instead of producing an up close and

therefore of crucial interest not only to

personal reportage as planned? I was meant

delegates,

to be there helping out and was prevented at

but

also

to

the

Indiecon

organisers. An excerpt from the programme:

the last minute by urgent personal affairs — nothing tragic, not even work-related, but it

“The governing question of Indiecon 2015 is:

had to take priority. Maybe I was just scared

‘Is Indie Forever?’ — and it's a question that

of “sitting in [someone’s] lap and interpreting

really pushes our buttons. We've been self-

simultaneously” as offered by the website

employed for some years now ourselves and

Q&A! I’m told that in the end two interpreting

live by selling our ideas, marketing our

students helped out. Anyway, there’s always

creativity and, not least, from our labours as

another year, and hopefully many more. I’d

copywriters, photographers, graphic artists

love to meet these guys in person.

and programmers. I think it would be a great conference for The question of survival — what will pay the

linguists to visit, scrutinise your training

bills at the end of the day — will also be part

budgets! I don’t think it conflicts with the

of this year’s Indiecon. However, we won’t be

ScotNet summer weekend workshop, either.

content with mere survival. We want to go a

There’s one snag — or incentive: bear in

step further and ask: what can our work

mind that to get right to the top of the list

achieve, for our environment, the world

for tickets you need to be making an indie

around us, the social context we operate in?

mag. There must be room for a few of those

What can it contribute to making our world a

in translation and interpreting…

fairer,

freer,

slightly

better

place

for

ourselves and others?

Indiecon

was

kindly

supported

by

the

GANSKE VERLAGSGRUPPE, one of the largest It’s under this banner that we want to talk

publishers in Germany.

with you about independent magazines and the working and living models behind them: how they function, what drives them, how they become stabilised — and what they can accomplish.” It was clearly a vibrant event, and my greatto-work-with

contacts

Urs

Spindler

Helen is a German and Dutch into English translator. She translates business, management and marketing material.

and

Malte Brenneisen — one half of each the two pairs of brothers for which the company is

Contact: hertransl@yahoo.co.uk www.hertranslations.co.uk


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 17

An Edinburgh translator in Italy On a warm summer day, Lynda Hepburn decided to tell us about her lengthy stay in Italy. But her descriptions of the Italian way of life and the stunning pictures she attached pushed me to save this article for the snowy winter days. I hope this piece will warm you up and Italian members will reply to Lynda’s cry for help! While it is not uncommon for translators to

For, with the dolce vita on the doorstep,

live in the country of their source language —

there were just too many things out there

this probably applies to half the ScotNetters I

that I wanted to see, do, eat and experience.

know — it is probably less common for a translator to go off to live in a country whose

So the very first weekend saw us climbing the

language they don’t speak at all. Why would

biggest mountain we could see from our

anyone choose to do that?

window.

Don’t

think

of

the

Edinburgh

Pentlands, don’t think of bog and moorland, think of something very nearly vertical, gleaming white limestone (actually dolomite), 2000 metres high and covered in the most fantastic wild flowers. Then the old town of Trento (famous for being the seat of the Council of Trent in the 16th century), with medieval winding streets, a stunning central piazza, countless churches Lynda’s photo of Rifugio Pedrotti in the Brenta Dolomites

But this was my choice, nearly two years ago, when I arrived in Trento in the Dolomites in northern Italy knowing only the 3 Ps, i.e.

in pale gleaming stone, beautiful mansions decorated

with

frescoes,

medieval

castle… plus the energy added by a vibrant university. All this is just a 10-minute walk from our flat beside the river Adige where I sit typing on this hot June evening.

pasta, pizza, polenta. I was here, as some of you know, because my husband had landed a research post at an Italian institute and, thanks to the great portability of our job, it was no problem to follow him here for what, I was later to learn, the Italians quaintly refer to as “motivi sentimentali”. I knew from the start that I was not going to just shut myself away for 2 years with broadband and a punishing work schedule.

the

Wild flowers


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 18

But what of daily life, we surely can’t have spent all our time in the mountains or enjoying the art and architecture? Daily life is leisurely, involving cappuccino and brioche (more of a croissant), but only before 10.30, after that coffee is drunk black and strong. Italians still eat a cooked meal in the middle of the day, followed by the siesta, even here in the north, and shops all shut until 3.30. I stuck to my bread and cheese for lunch — but what cheese! So many local cheeses to choose from — but the bread proved a

River Adige and Lynda’s house on the left bank Photo credit: Visit Trento website, 2015 Trentino Marketing S.r.l.

problem, probably because it is really an “extra” to the meal and not its basis, Italian

And then the Italians… we have made so

varieties all seem very insubstantial — so

many friends here that leaving is already

bread baking was regularly on the agenda.

weighing heavily, like one of the brooding thunderstorms. As we enjoy making music, my husband quickly joined the local band

A surprise at the beginning was that supermarkets are full of Italian food.

and I found a choir. So I’ve had 2 years of singing Italian style — with much feeling — and performing in concerts singing excerpts from Italian opera with incredible soloists

A

surprise

at

the

beginning

was

that

supermarkets are full of Italian food. This may sound obvious, but whereas in Scotland we have acquired a taste for food from the Middle East, India, China and much of the rest of the world, here there are 5 aisles of pasta, 1 aisle of risotto rice, 1.5 aisles of coffee, lots of cured meats, cheeses and what I unkindly refer to as scrapings from the bottom of the sea i.e. seafood. It can be hard to locate a packet of tea and there is usually no couscous, bulghur, houmous or any of that sort of thing. But probably the most stunning thing for my northern eyes are the fruit and vegetable markets — so many kinds of green things I’ve never seen before, such wonderful fruit (in season of course), all the freshest of the fresh, no Italian housewife would accept anything less.

and an atmosphere that you might be forgiven for mistaking for La Scala Milan. But what about the language — did everyone just speak English to us? No, Italians do not seem especially inclined to foreign languages (and we thought that was just a British trait). Here, being next to Südtirol/Alto Adige which is bilingual, everyone learns German at school… but no one admits to speaking it. There are cultural and political reasons for this which I can’t go into here. But of course we wanted to learn the language — it is a must in a foreign country. We ended up at a school for foreigners run by an organisation which does a variety of cultural and other work for Trento’s many non-Italians. Lessons are free and happen four times a week with different

volunteers.

So

we

have

been

immersed in the Italian language, along with


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 19

fellow students from so many countries I’ve

dishes. Needless to say, I’m coming back to

lost count: Indonesia, the Czech Republic,

Edinburgh a few kilos heavier than I left.

Russia,

Switzerland,

Scotland,

France,

Albania, Pakistan. Is Trento particularly multinational? Probably not, though the university and research institute bring in many foreigners. Added to this are the economic migrants from Eastern Europe and some of the huge influx from Africa and the Middle East currently arriving in the south and dispersing northwards. Being

foreigners

foreigners

too,

because,

you

meet

whatever

other

Castello Buonconsiglio, Trento

your

background, you are all in the same language boat, so to speak.

And now our time here is nearly over: just a few weeks to cram in one or two more mountain walks, say goodbye to our friends, get rid of all the extra things we’ve acquired out here, sing in one more concert, have a few more cappuccinos and one or two of the best ice creams you can imagine and — whitewash the whole flat! Yes, it’s standard procedure (for extra stress when leaving the country).

Piazza Duomo, Trento Photo credit: Visit Trento website, 2015 Trentino Marketing S.r.l.

But I’m planning ahead for my return: where do they do really good coffee in Edinburgh? Where can I find an Italian class? Who will chat to me in Italian over a glass of Prosecco?

I’ve been in a rather special position as a

I know there are Italians in ScotNet, so I’m

native English speaker, in high demand to

banking on you having all the answers.

help Italians with their English. So I’ve peppered my days with “language tandem” sessions where you meet up and spend half the time speaking English and half speaking Italian. I’ve also been the guest of honour in a group of Italian ladies who meet monthly to improve their English. After several hours of

Lynda works from German into English. Her fields of expertise are environment, technical, science and philosophy.

hard work there is always a wonderful supper to

which

everyone

brings

along

Italian

Contact: lynda@summittranslations.co.uk


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 20

ScotNetter turns published author Next spring, Jonathan Downie’s book Being a Successful Interpreter: Adding Value and

Delivering Excellence will be published by Routledge. Now that he’s putting the final touches to it, Silvana Vitale has discussed the writing process with him. If you’d like a preview of what’s coming in 2016, don’t miss this interview! with that amount of experience are most likely to be open to the main messages of the book. A secondary audience would be those who are currently training as interpreters as I would love to see them pioneer a whole new way of looking at our profession.

When you say interpreters, do you mean conference

interpreters,

public

sector

interpreters or both? Jonathan Downie

It is aimed at interpreters of all stripes. I

First of all, congratulations on your new book. I’ve only read a taster and can’t wait to

deliberately used stories and research from every form of interpreting I could find.

read the rest. How did the idea of this book come about?

You’re

That’s a good question. I was in the final stages of my PhD thesis (now submitted) and had been writing for the ITI Bulletin for a couple of years and had started writing for the VKD Kurier. Almost everything I had written

was

about

taking

research

absolutely

right

in

saying

that

interpreters are a lot more than “dictionaries on legs”. You also challenge one of the main tenets

of

the

interpreting

profession:

neutrality/impartiality. Can you elaborate on this?

and

They are actually closely linked. What we

applying it to practice. I started wondering

recognise now as neutrality is very much a

whether that might form the core idea of a

product

book. Being a wise man, I had a chat with my

professionalised in the 40s, 50s and 60s. In

wife about it and her response was to ask

those days it was all about conference

why I hadn’t started writing it yet!

interpreters,

of

international Wise man indeed — and ever wiser wife! Who are your target readers?

how

modern

working political

for

interpreting

growing

organisations

and

learning their craft around diplomats. Even now, people still talk about interpreters

The main target is interpreters with less than

being like channels, or ghosts or the ‘voice

20 years of experience, as I feel that people

of the speaker’. It is a short walk from there


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 21

to the ‘dictionaries on legs’ or ‘google

why we are being asked to do at each

translate in a suit’ idea. As I mention in the

specific job.

book, this same ethical and professional stance would be passed into other forms of

The second way of being seen as valuable is

interpreting as they professionalised, without

to be more open about the impact of our

anyone ever asking if that was either realistic

work.

or effective.

confidentiality but saying something like,

We

need

to

respect

client

“my work at a press conference for a leading It turns out that it certainly was not realistic.

player in the construction industry led to two

Just about the only established result of

articles in the French press” or “this month, I

research into real-life interpreting is that no

have

one ever finds traces of interpreters taking

medical treatment” is absolutely fine. Those

on that kind of neutral and invisible role.

kinds of hard numbers and real-life case

What might be surprising is that this applies

studies, couched in terms that make sense to

right across the board, from courts to

our clients, can go a long way to improving

business negotiations, to the point where

our position as businesspeople.

helped

15

people

receive

urgent

research on the ‘position of the interpreter’ is now seen as old hat by some researchers. I looked at that in more detail in a recent article in the ITI Bulletin called ‘Interpreting by the book?’.

“pyjama-wearing/CAT-tool using colleagues” in terms of how to become successful entrepreneurial linguists?

A bigger question is whether this neutral, impartial,

Do you think we have a lot to learn from our

language-machine

view

of

interpreting is actually any good for us as professionals. That one I will leave for those who read the book.

Absolutely! It still stuns me that translators have cottoned-on to the fact that they are businesspeople and service providers while interpreters are still arguing over whether remote interpreting is a bad thing, rather than how we can use it effectively. I would

You say, and rightly so, that interpreting is not seen as valuable. We must work on increasing our value. How can we do that?

recommend that all interpreters read The

Entrepreneurial Linguist by Judy and Dagmar Jenner and do a course like the ITI Starting Up as a Freelance Translator course so we

That is a big part of the book but I can briefly

get exposed to the realities of being business

give two ways of doing that. The first is to

people. We also need to get used to being

work hard to actually listen to what our

more flexible in our approach to work.

clients really need and want from us. The

Obviously, we need to use our common

sooner

service

sense and not be taken advantage of but the

providers hired to do a specific job, the

truth is that people who keep saying “that’s

better. Of course, to start with we are likely

not my job” are likely to find that they end up

to get the same old pat answers but there are

with no job at all. If it’s okay for translators

good ways of really getting to the heart of

to offer copywriting services and give advice

we

realise

that

we

are

on layout and style, surely interpreters can


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 22

find it in their hearts to offer training for the

fine to disagree with certain policies and to

professionals who might work with them

choose not to work under a given contract,

and, as part of the pre-job brief, give a few

we need to be very careful not to get stuck in

notes on any likely cultural clashes, without

‘protest mode’. The people who make cuts

favouring one party over the other.

are doing the job they are told to do and even senior officials make decisions for

A very biased question: how does all this apply to PSI? As a PS interpreter, I feel I am highly valued by clients and end users, and yet this is not necessarily reflected in the amount I bank for each job. How can we change the perceived value of interpreting in the public sector?

certain reasons. Until we make an effort to understand the pressures on them and talk their language, we are unlikely to see real and lasting change. Graham Turner’s work on the Sign Language Bill is a great example of how you can mobilise a community and work with government to make real change. It’s an example we should follow.

That is something that is very much on my mind at the moment. I think there are two dynamics at work that need to be addressed. The first is interpreting has a real image

I couldn’t agree more. A topic for your next book perhaps?

problem. People still tend to see interpreters

Funny you should say that, I do have an idea

as doing a job that can and should be done

for a second book. I will wait until book 1

by computers and our own ways of talking

hits the shelves before burdening my editor

about the profession haven’t exactly helped

with another proposal, though!

us. We need to be pro-active in seeking and publishing cases where interpreters really added value, especially when the value can be written up in politically valuable terms, such as reductions in follow-up doctor’s appointments or increased integration. In short, we need to be talking about the results of interpreting in terms that politicians and business leaders will understand. The second dynamic is that we need to be very careful about our stance to our clients and their management. While it is absolutely

Silvana is an English into Italian translator specialised in criminal law & with a penchant for literature and the arts. She also works as a public service and liaison interpreter. Contact: www.silvanavitale.co.uk


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 23

Member news With the introduction of the new ITI membership structure recently, quite a few people have recently moved category within ITI. If this applies to you, please remember to notify the Membership Secretary of any changes to your ITI membership status since you joined the network. In particular, let the MemSec know when you upgrade to MITI, as your details will then be made available to Joe Public online. New members:

stages, so while looking for clients I keep

 Jennifer Alexander: I am a Portuguese to

myself busy studying some law, trying to

English translator, not long getting started

build

again as a freelancer after some years out

interpreter for the public services in Tayside.

(mostly working as a teacher). At the moment

I

I do all sorts of general work, but my

ScotNetters and making some connections in

preferred

area!

areas

are

education,

social

am

my

website

now

and

looking

working

forward

to

as

an

meeting

subjects, literature and marketing/websites etc. My Portuguese was learned in Brazil

 Claudia Cuero: I am a Colombian bilingual

where I lived for some time — in Rio, Porto

Spanish-English/English-Spanish

Alegre and Salvador — and I still love all

and interpreter. I moved to Scotland in 2012

things Brazilian! In the past I have also

and recently completed an MSc in Translating

studied German and Danish language and I

and Conference Interpreting at Heriot-Watt

hope to translate from Danish again in the

University. My work as a translator includes

future. I work from a wee village in Fife and

the translation of legal documents, manuals,

am so pleased to be joining the network and

business presentations, product descriptions,

meeting similar people in such a friendly

academic

group.

proficient

texts, in

among using

translator

others.

Microsoft

I

am

Office

applications, Trados, and WinCAPS. As a  Elisa Cristobal: I am an English/French into

subject

for

my

MSc

Spanish and Catalan translator, and a sworn

successfully

translator (EN-ES). I specialise in legal, IT,

dialect and its translation in an audiovisual

marketing, tourism and travelling, literature

text. I am also a certified TEFL teacher with

and environmental translations, and have

experience

been doing quite a few sworn translations

adolescents.

analysed

of

a

dissertation, South

teaching

I

American

adults

and

lately. I come from the east coast of Spain, where I studied Translation and Interpreting. After finishing my degree, I was a language

 Finally, please note that Deputy Convenor

teacher for a while, translated two novels and

Elena Zini now has her own Scottish Network

worked as an interpreter for the Spanish

address: deputyconvenor@itiscotland.org.uk.

Police. A year ago, after 3 years working for a big translation company, I decided to move to Scotland, settled down in Perth and started my freelancing career. I am still in the early


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 24

ScotNet grants The ITI Scottish Network offers 2 levels of

General conditions: Maximum one grant per

grants to members as a contribution towards

person per subscription year. You must be a

the costs of attending ITI events:

member of ITI, so Friends of the Network are

1) Grants of up to £30 are available for

not eligible. Also members living in the

attending Scottish Network meetings.

central belt are not eligible to receive grants

2) ScotNetters may also apply for grants of

for network meetings in Edinburgh/Glasgow.

up to £70 for attending national ITI events.

All recipients must be willing to contribute a report on the event they attended to the ITI

How to apply for a grant Contact our treasurer (currently Norma Tait) at

treasurer@itiscotland.org.uk

registering

for

the

meeting.

before

Subject

to

availability and meeting the eligibility criteria, she will approve the grant and notify you. In due course, forward her a copy of the receipt for the event or transport expenses and provide her with your bank details. She will then pay the respective amount into your account.

ScotNet Newsletter. The level of grants is reviewed every year at ScotNet’s AGM. Under the current budget, 10 grants of £30 and 10 of £70 are available each year. From time to time the committee may also decide to offer additional grants to enable

ScotNetters

to

attend

particular

events, such as they did for the 2013 ITI Conference.

So who needs a translator anyway? Remember this?

Ahem! Apologies to all avid readers of this section and thank you to the eagle-eyed member who alerted us to our mistake in the last issue. Barbara Bonatti Divers wishes to apologise to our readers and the wider francophone community for having mistaken "baby foot" for a wrongly spelled offer of baby food at a Swiss restaurant. Thanks to Hugh Fraser she now understands that this is what the French call "table football". She blames her miserable knowledge of French (and football) for her last newsletter’s bloopers’ blooper, and considers herself lucky to have managed to survive unscathed for a week in the beautiful French Swiss Alps. Sacrebleu, quel bordel! P.S. Our editor Isabel Hurtado de Mendoza and our proofreader Kay McBurney wished to apologise, too, for failing to notice, but they have been gagged and tied and thrown into the boot of the car until they become more reasonable... Never argue with an Italian! Next time you’re sure about a translation blooper, please send your own So who needs a translator anyway? photo to editor@itiscotland.org.uk.

Looking forward to the next issue… With Christmas around the corner, you’ll be busy buying presents, baking cookies and entertaining the in-laws but, after all that fun is over, remember that I’ll still be here, waiting for your contributions. I already have some proposals, but there’s room for a lot more. Could I ask, for example, for our first review of a foreign film? Do drop me a line (editor@itiscotland.org.uk)!


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 25

Your committee at a glance Convenor

Deputy Convenor

& Deputy Webmaster

Elena Zini

Marian Dougan 0141 9420919 convenor@itiscotland.org.uk

07765 987207 deputyconvenor@itiscotland.org.uk

Treasurer

Newsletter Editor

Norma Tait

Isabel Hurtado de Mendoza

0131 5521330

07762 300068

treasurer@itiscotland.org.uk

editor@itiscotland.org.uk

Membership Secretary

Deputy MemSec

Ute Penny

Nathalie Chalmers

01368 864879

01888 562998

membership@itiscotland.org.uk

membership@itiscotland.org.uk

Events Coordinator (East)

Events Coordinator (West)

Angelika Muir-Hartmann

Audrey LanglassĂŠ

0131 3334654

0141 5603482

muirhartmann@aol.com

audreylanglasse@alacarte-translations.com

Webmaster Iwan Davies 01738 630202 webmaster@itiscotland.org.uk

ITI ScotNet Newsletter December 2015