Page 1

December 2018

ITI S COT N ET N EWSLETTER Siobhan Gorrie MITI ITI Scottish Network Newsletter Editor

Tel: 07585 838480 Email: editor@itiscotland.org.uk

For everything a season

I love a good New Year’s resolution – not always a popular opinion, I know, as there’s no reason why turning over a new leaf should be the preserve of 1 January. But as the number of days left in the year falls, I look forward to the prospect of getting started on some new, good habits. So I found this issue of our newsletter particularly inspiring, as it contains several insights into ScotNetters getting things done and thinking deeply about their professional lives. Carol Finch offers a detailed, humorous look at how she made a radical change in her working setup, and we are delighted to see Isabel Hurtado de Mendoza return with some practical tips gleaned from her maternity leave. In her autumn workshop report, Kirsty Walter demonstrates how working in this profession means using our ethical judgment as well as our linguistic one. Meanwhile, three missives from the Edinburgh Book Festival are great examples of translators taking time out to reflect on the practice of their craft. There’s something in this issue for everyone to learn from, and I hope you enjoy it! Until 2019, then… Siobhan ♦

“Change is the end result of all true learning”. ~ Leo Buscaglia

Photo: Pixabay

Inside this issue Dates for your diary

2

Flexing our moral muscles – ITI ScotNet Autumn Workshop

3

Taking a bite from the Apple: A unique experience of switching from PC to Mac

6

Three takes on the 2018 Edinburgh International Book Festival

10

Word wizardry

16

The world according to Mox

17

Isabel’s insights: A new column

18

Your committee under the spotlight

20

Member news

24

ScotNet grants

26

Looking forward to the next issue…

26

Your committee at a glance

27

Except where stated, all photos are by ScotNet members and reproduced with their permission.


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 2

Dates for your diary ITI ScotNet Spring Workshop 2019 – The Wizard

ITI Conference 2019: Beyond the Core –

of Word Returns: Saturday, 16 March 2019,

Forging the Future of the Profession: Thursday,

Quaker Meeting House, 7 Victoria Terrace,

9 to Saturday, 11 May, Cutlers’ Hall, Sheffield,

Edinburgh, EH1 2JL. Following the popularity of

S1 1HG. The theme of the next ITI Conference

ScotNet’s autumn 2017 event on hints and tips

focuses on our strengths as professionals and

for Word, Kay McBurney will be returning to

the ways in which, individually and collectively,

share more of her wisdom. In a break from

we can rise to future challenges. The full

tradition, this will be a full-day event: Kay will

programme is currently in development and will

be repeating her autumn workshop material in

include 36 sessions over four tracks – including

the morning for the benefit of those who were

one dedicated to interpreting – plus several

unable to attend previously or simply want a

exciting fringe events including a networking

refresher. Following a buffet lunch, she will

evening to kick off the conference. Stay tuned

then be adding new material in the afternoon.

to the conference website for all the latest news

Attendees are welcome to attend both sessions

and the full programme.

or just one, but coming along for the full day is highly recommended for the full experience

ITI ScotNet Summer Workshop 2019: Saturday,

and networking benefits! Further details and

1 June 2019, The Woodside Hotel, 78–82 High

the call notice will be issued in due course, but

Street, Aberdour, KY3 0SW. A highlight of the

for now, please save the date for what will no

ScotNet calendar, our next summer event is

doubt be another highly informative ScotNet

taking place in the scenic village of Aberdour in

event.

Fife, just 30 minutes from Edinburgh by train and

located

on

the

Fife

Coastal

Path.

Goethe-Institut and Alliance Française Glasgow

Translators Tim Gutteridge and Simon Berrill

will

Book

Fair:

Wednesday,

5 December to

be

presenting revision

on for

the

subject

translators

of

Wednesday, 19 December 2018, 3 Park Circus,

collaborative

Glasgow, G3 6AX. This joint book fair hosted by

drawing on their own experience of a “Rev

the libraries of the Goethe-Institut and Alliance

Club” that they run between themselves and

Française will have a wide range of books, CDs

another colleague. The workshop promises to

and DVDs available for sale. It’ll be a great

be highly interactive, with a mix of theory and

opportunity to discover new reads and even

practice – and as always, the event will include

pick up some interesting Christmas presents!

the added bonuses of a Friday evening meal, a

Entry is free and the libraries’ opening hours

dinner and ceilidh on the Saturday evening

vary by day – please see the websites of the

(featuring Da Hooley ceilidh band once again),

Goethe Institut and Alliance Française for

and a walk on the Sunday morning. The call

details.

notice with full details will be issued in due course, but for now, please save the date!

and


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 3

Flexing our moral muscles – ITI ScotNet Autumn Workshop Although we may not be immediately conscious of it, as professionals we are constantly asking ourselves questions about how to deal with tricky scenarios that arise in our dayto-day practice. How do I broach the subject of errors in a source text with a client? What should I do with the data a client has given to me, and how do I keep it safe? What’s the best way to discuss work with colleagues while keeping things confidential? As ITI members, there is one key tool to guide us: the ITI Code of Conduct, and the ScotNet autumn workshop on Saturday 29 September was devoted to discussing just that. Here, Kirsty Walter reports back on the interesting ethical conundrums that were put on the agenda. Biscuits, coffee, tea, water and the kind of

translator. Perhaps most relevant to the event

animated nattering you would only find at

– the theme of which was professionalism

one of our events kicked off the autumn

and the ethics thereof – was her experience

edition of the 2018 ScotNet workshops. For

serving on the standards committee for her

this event, we decamped to the Royal Scots

local council and her significant involvement

Club, with presentation equipment featuring

in rewriting the Code of Professional Conduct

a screen embedded in a mirror – very in

for the Chartered Institute of Linguists.

keeping with the venue’s quaint, antique feel. Janet Fraser, a Fellow of ITI, would be examining the ITI’s Code of Professional Conduct with us that morning. The aim was to help us understand how we can use the code to sell our profession, defend ourselves (should that become necessary) and act confidently, appropriately and within the bounds of our profession. And we were to make no mistake about it: we’d be working for our lunch that day. Janet was pleased to be back in Edinburgh, having completed her first degree at Heriot Watt before heading off to Germany, where

Janet Fraser, our speaker for the event

she taught translation. Her career to date included two posts as an in-house translator and a stint in multilingual journalism (where she “really learned to write”). After a period as a senior lecturer at the University of Westminster, she left to work as a freelance

Our speaker underscored the importance of a code

for

a

profession,

firstly

because

translation is indeed a profession, and we are its professionals – the fact that we joined the ITI speaks to this. She quoted the Ethics


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 4

Resource Centre, an American non-profit

errors, omission or imprecise language in the

organisation devoted to advancing ethical

material on which they work”. But, as we

standards, on the importance of a code of

would find throughout the morning, further

conduct

clauses and principles could also be applied.

and

standards occupations.

of

adhering

when

carrying

Facing

specific

out

our and

As we worked through to scenario six, the

outward, a code of conduct, she said, is an

waters got muddier. We addressed the issue

“open

of poaching (covered by the “Contractual

disclosure

both

to

[…]

inward

provid[ing]

visible

guidelines for behaviour” and setting forth

Arrangements”

what a client can expect from us. It guides us

“Professional Competence” principle, as well

in

and

as the “Client Confidentiality and Trust” and

protects us in the event that clients make

“Honesty and Integrity” principles). Later, we

unreasonable or even unlawful demands.

established

our

day-to-day

decision-making

suspicious

that and

section

under

complying possibly

the

with

some

unlawful

client

The morning was spent delving into a hand-

behaviour would indeed be “inconsistent with

out of true (but anonymised) scenarios, for

[our] professional obligations”.

each of which we had to pinpoint the specific part(s) of the ITI’s Code of

GDPR got a look in, too,

Conduct under which the

in a scenario in which a

issue began

at

hand

with

fell.

the

We

As professionals, we need to feel confident that we can conduct our work appropriately

simple

dilemma of a spelling error in

bag

had

been

stolen

from a pub. The laptop inside

was

password-

a source text for a

protected, but the USB

certified translation and the

stick for backing up its

client asking the translator to “just correct it”.

data

was

not.

The

question

under

I’m sure it immediately occurs to readers

consideration was whether the translator

how they would handle the situation, but the

should let his/her clients know. It became

justification for doing so is more elusive.

clear that the “Client Confidentiality and Trust” principle was at stake here: a lost bag

Following its introductory section, the ITI

could

Code of Conduct is structured around four

“communicated to [a] third party without

principles.

prior written authority”, to quote the Code of

The

first

applicable

to

this

scenario is “Honesty and Integrity”: the Code

result

in

information

being

Conduct again.

of Conduct states that translators should “not [allow]

themselves

to

be

improperly

Scenario five was devoted to interpreting, a

influenced either by self-interest or the

mash-up

scenario

involving

tiredness,

interests of others” and should “avoid actions

parties speaking directly to the interpreter

or situations that are inconsistent with their

about each other, and the interpreter’s own

professional obligations”. The “Professional

emotions. The hypothetical interpreter in this

Competence” principle was also pertinent in

case had also contemplated picking up one

this case: “Members shall draw the attention

party’s child. How would the professional

of their clients to any significant ambiguities,

justify why he/she needed to take a step


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 5

back from this situation? The underlying

encouraged us to abide by and uphold the

principle here was impartiality but, as with all

spirit of the Code, not just its letter.

our scenarios, there were in fact many sections from the Code of Conduct that it

It is a sign of a successful workshop when

was possible to cite.

the discussion continues into lunch. Over the delicious fare provided by the Royal Scots Club,

it

was

evident

from

the

intense

conversation that every ScotNetter there had come

away

enlightened,

with

an

understanding that the Code of Conduct is there to support us in the most critical moments of our work and a feeling of much greater confidence in our ability to look critically at it and glean support from it. A convivial lunch after the workshop

Dilemmas occur in the day-to-day practice of any profession and, as professionals, we must feel confident that we can conduct our work appropriately: any illegal, unethical or generally bad behaviour from us as members reflects badly on ourselves and on the ITI. Yet

Kirsty worked as a project manager in London before going solo as a translator. She lives in Aberdeen and translates from Italian & Spanish into English. Contact: linkedin.com/in/kirstywalter

it is rare for an issue to have a black-andwhite solution and, while we all had gut reactions to each scenario, justifying that against the backdrop of the Code of Conduct was trickier. We recognised together that the ITI’s current Code of Conduct is not very well structured, making it somewhat difficult to navigate. The observation was also made that some – if not all, or even most – sections are quite general. But the Code of Conduct is not intended to serve as a rulebook; it is more a framework for making or discussing decisions and negotiating with our clients. Furthermore, it does help us act consistently, which in turn helps to strengthen our profession. Janet

ScotNetter Auriane Destrument has also provided her own take on the event in a blog post on her website. To have a read of her first experience of a ScotNet event, and to see larger versions of the great photos provided in this article, you can visit her website here.


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 6

Taking a bite from the Apple: A unique experience of switching from PC to Mac When your career is so reliant on technology, whether you work with elaborate multiplescreen setups and CAT tools or simply Word and an e-mail client, making any kind of switch in your operating system is a daunting prospect. Not only is there the need to set up entirely new pieces of hardware, there is also the fearsome task of getting to grips with programs in different places and new keyboard shortcuts (just when you’d got all your old ones under your fingers!). When Carol Finch decided to take the ultimate plunge and switch from her old, creaking PC to a shiny, new Mac, she found the process challenging but ultimately rewarding. Here is her enlightening and entertaining tale of making a Mac work for her. By

my own admission, I am

not very

support,

and

often

resorted

to

remote

technically competent: I just learn to use the

assistance, but these sessions never seemed

tools I need, pretend to talk the talk and seek

to resolve anything satisfactorily, and often

help from my 17-year-old son frequently.

made things worse. For instance, one well-

For years now, the favourite refrain of

meaning

“Technoboy” (as I call him) when anything

Acronis and it was a couple of weeks before I

has gone wrong has been “you should’ve got

realised that my computer had not been

a Mac”. Well, now I have!

backing up.

My Windows setup looked brilliant on paper:

So, two years ago I decided to take the

a super-fast Lenovo tower, two beautiful

plunge and bought a reconditioned 27" iMac.

curved Samsung screens and the usual suite

memoQ isn’t compatible with a Mac, but

of

Office,

there are ways of getting round this. I bought

memoQ, Dragon Naturally Speaking voice

Parallels, which allows you to run Windows

recognition

Practicount,

applications on a Mac, and checked with

Bitdefender anti-virus, Acronis to manage

other translators beforehand that this would

back-up, and so on. But there was the rub: it

work. But no matter how hard we tried (and

software,

rarely

ran

including

Microsoft

software,

smoothly

Microsoft

and

seemed to be in constant conflict with itself. Programs were painfully slow to open,

by

Windows looked brilliant on paper, but was painfully slow

technician

we,

disabled

I

mean

Technoboy), we couldn’t get memoQ to render clearly.

The

text

was

Excel refused to open more

either crystal-clear and

than one document at once

miniscule

or

large

and Windows got stuck in crazy update

enough to read – as long as you didn’t mind

cycles – need to update, installing updates,

the feeling that you were wearing the wrong

updates failed to uninstall, need to revert to

glasses. I contacted Kilgray to see how to

previous version, need to update…I regularly

tweak the settings, but they were stumped.

contacted the software manufacturers for

Apple Support were more helpful, but no


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 7

more effective. I decided in the end that the

I was right to be concerned. A week later, I

software simply hadn’t caught up with the

still hadn’t had confirmation of the refund

advanced Retina displays used in Macs, and

from Apple, so I got in touch and they said

reluctantly decided to send it back.

they hadn’t received it! It was finally tracked down

to

a

warehouse

in

Hinckley,

The returns process was hair-raising, to say

Leicestershire, and I did eventually get my

the least. We packaged the computer up in as

money back, but it was a scary time.

best we could and submitted a return request (note to self, always photograph goods as

Meanwhile, two years pass: Kilgray still

you unpack them), then received a pick-up

hasn’t addressed the Retina display issue and

date from the courier. But we live on the Isle

Windows gets more annoying by the day. For

of Mull, where the couriers subcontract to

example, I shut down the machine every

local delivery companies that follow their

night but when I start it up in the morning,

own timetable: in other words, they turn up

instead of rebooting from shut-down mode,

when they happen to be passing en route to

it opens from sleep mode with several Word

the ferry. This could be days before or days

documents open, each containing one source

after the appointed time, and you have to be

segment from the last translation I was doing

vigilant. You can leave a parcel in the porch,

in memoQ. This problem is so weird, it is

take the dog for a walk, and come back to

almost impossible to describe to a support

find it has been picked up. Fortunately, I was

technician, and what’s worse, it feels quite

at home when Hector came for the iMac. This

sinister.

was good, because Apple hadn’t given me a label. Unfortunately, Hector couldn’t supply

“You need a Mac”, says Technoboy. “Why

me with a label either, or a receipt, or indeed

don’t you try one without a Retina display?”.

any

some

The fact that these actually exist is news to

trepidation that I watched him shove it in the

me – so we visit the Apple website and order

back of his box van with beds, animal feed

a refurbished 21.5-inch iMac, 2.3 GHz dual-

bags and various other boxes of all sizes.

core Intel Core i5, with 8 GB RAM and an

paperwork,

so

it

was

with

adapter to connect my second screen. I have a few sleepless nights worrying that I am just too old to relearn all the keyboard shortcuts, that I will not be able to find my way around a completely different operating system, that I won’t be able to get my head round the virtual machine concept, that memoQ still won’t work, and that I will end up sending it back, risking the prospect of Hector losing it again…

Living on Mull, Carol had geographical constraints to contend with, too Photo: Pixabay

When the iMac arrives, Technoboy has it up and running in no time alongside my Lenovo, with the second screen connected to both


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 8

computers so we can compare performance.

Windows apps work better in Parallels than

First, he installs Office for Mac, Parallels

they did on the Windows PC, too: Dragon, for

Desktop 13 for Mac, then memoQ, then

example, was always very unstable but now

transfers my files. memoQ works perfectly,

works perfectly. My fears of being unable to

with crystal-clear rendering and a much

cope with a completely new operating system

speedier process of opening and loading

prove unfounded. The Mac is so intuitively

projects. Then comes the baptism of fire.

designed that it makes finding things a

With Technoboy making a week-long trip to

breeze. And if you get stuck? You just Google

Inverness, I am left to cope alone with orders

it.

stacking up. It turns out to be the perfect initiation. Every time I find something I can’t

What about the hardware? I have tried various

do (from inserting the € symbol to opening a

keyboards in my time, ranging from a clunky

PDF), I keep calm and note it down. Then I try

ergonomic monster which took up all the

to resolve it. I know that if I get really stuck, I

desk

can always revert to the Lenovo. And when

Elkhuizen. My mouse of choice was an

Technoboy comes home, we work through

Evoluent

the unresolved items on the list together.

meanwhile, comes with a tiny keyboard and a

space

to

a

sturdy-looking

ergonomic

model.

Bakker

The

Mac,

flat little Magic Mouse. At first, I believe that I’ll never manage – but in fact, the keys on the keyboard are so close together that I find myself almost touch-typing without trying, which is a revelation. As for the mouse, it takes a couple of weeks to understand the gestures, but now I wonder how I managed without them. My previous keyboard was wired because I got sick of never being able to New hardware, including keyboard and mouse, to get to grips with Photo: Pixabay

find

enough

charged

rechargeable

batteries for the wireless one. However, the new mouse and keyboard are both wireless and to recharge them, you simply connect them to the port at the back of the Mac.

So how does the virtual machine work? On the Parallels side, I have memoQ, Adobe

Finding the keyboard shortcuts and getting

Acrobat Standard, Practicount and Dragon

to grips with the keys is a frustrating

Naturally Speaking (I could have Adobe

process, and it takes me a couple of weeks to

Acrobat for Mac, but I already have a licence

work out that memoQ shortcuts such as F2

for Windows). In coherence mode, Parallels

(edit source) only work when you press the

allows you to use Windows applications as if

“fn” key first, for example. I keep accidentally

they were native to the Mac, giving you all

pressing

the benefits of the smooth Mac operating

overwrites all my words in memoQ. The only

system without the need to abandon your

way to get out of this is to close memoQ,

favourite bits of software. Oddly, some

then reopen it, until finally I realise I am

some

key

combination

that


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 9

pressing “fn + enter”, which toggles the insert/overwrite pressed

the

functions.

wrong key

I

haven’t

with

yet

disastrous

results, and often it teaches me a new function – ah, that’s how you do that! Quick, write it in the little book! So, we have installed all the software, ironed out the problems, and got to grips with the new operating system – but something still isn’t quite right. When we open an app, the app icon bounces for a while, sometimes up to

14

times,

rather

than

more traditional storage option, and rely on moving parts. The HDD in the Mac had a speed of 5400 RPM, as opposed to the slightly faster 7200 RPM drives that are also present in many computers. This allows read and write speeds of around 80 MB/s (although this can vary greatly). The SSD is a more modern storage format and can achieve much faster read and write speeds of around 500 MB/s, for example. In practice, this means boot times and application launch times are significantly improved”.

opening

immediately. It doesn’t have the nippiness of my son’s Mac despite being newer and more powerful. We suspect Parallels is the culprit. When we check the Activity Monitor, the memory pressure is very high. The system is good, but not good enough. So we contact Apple Support, which provides a great service and run several tests. It concludes that the problem is indeed Parallels rather than the Mac itself.

An example of a solid-state drive Photo: Pixabay

Three months down the line, I still make lots

Parallels Support is less helpful, but after we work through their troubleshooting list, the ultimate solution seems to involve installing an SSD (solid-state drive). Going against the advice of Apple Support, which believes this to be unnecessary, we buy one from the Apple website. Technoboy reckons we can

of mistakes and I’m still learning, but I don’t find it hard or scary (well, only occasionally). I haven’t yet had to deal with crashes, update nonsense, failed backups or lost emails. The machine is virtually silent, there are very few wires – and it looks beautiful. Seems like you can teach an old dog new tricks after all!

put everything on it, including the entire operating system, and run the Mac from it, so I just let him get on with it. It is a small device that plugs into one of the ports. And it works.

Every

app

I

open

launches

immediately. We love you, Technoboy! At this point I thought it would be helpful to explain why the SSD makes it faster, but I don’t actually know, so I asked Technoboy. This is what he said: “Hard disk drives are the

Carol lives on Mull and translates from German to English. Her main areas of specialism are agriculture, horticulture and construction. Contact: techtranslation.co.uk


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 10

Three takes on the 2018 Edinburgh International Book Festival In recent years, the Edinburgh International Book Festival has hosted a growing number of events that honour translators alongside authors – and given its far-reaching international profile, we can no doubt all agree that the Festival provides an excellent ambassadorial opportunity to show the public what the activity of translation (or at least literary translation) is all about. The events have naturally become popular among ScotNetters, and this year was no different. Sue Anderson, Catherine Roux and Elisa Cristóbal González attended events focusing on three different languages – German, French and Spanish respectively – and here they write about their sometimes very different views of how things proceeded. Sue Anderson attends Michael Hofmann

Michael asked about their paths to literary

on Translation

translation. Frank had fallen into it, having

A discussion on translating novels for an English-speaking audience was chaired by Michael Hofmann, renowned German–English translator and poet, and co-judge of this year’s

Man

Booker

International

Prize.

Participating were winning translator Jennifer Croft, fellow shortlistee Frank Wynne, and Antonia Lloyd-Jones, a leading translator from Polish.

grown up with few books at home except for Wodehouse, Churchill and an illustrated Mein

Kampf. Antonia had an Oxford classics professor for a father and took up Slavonic languages precisely to thwart him. Jennifer had been writing fiction since childhood, and her geography professor father and desire to escape

Oklahoma

inspired

her

to

learn

Russian, then Polish, and take a translation degree. Everyone agreed that writing well in your target language is more important than knowing your source language. After all, you can always research what you don’t know but, to quote Frank, you “can’t cure a tin ear”. Frank recommended Google Maps and Street View to get a feel for locations, while Antonia stressed the importance of finding a “voice”: if you can’t, don’t do the book. This applies even within an author’s canon, as she and Jennifer have translated different books by Tokarczuk. To improve their writing and ear, they read extensively in the target language, listen to radio, watch TV and even

Event chair Michael Hofmann with Jennifer Croft

eavesdrop on public transport.


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 11

How do they work? Frank always reads the

reader. Frank agreed: above all, he said, it

whole book first, for the unadulterated

was important to be reader-friendly and

pleasure of reading. Then he translates with

refrain from creating obstacles. Finally, it was

multiple revisions, once being charged for

asked whether some languages are easier to

making more than 5% changes at the proof

translate

stage. Jennifer reads the whole book, too, to

similarities? Jennifer said that she finds

immerse herself in its world and find a voice.

Spanish

Antonia pitches actively to publishers, so is

temptations

usually already familiar with the book. She

syntax; with Polish, it’s obvious you need to

translates in daily chunks (which get larger as

change more. Frank warned against using

the deadline approaches!). Everyone stressed

“too-posh” Latin words, recommending more

due

to

linguistic

surprisingly of

hard

cognates

or due

and

cultural to

the

following

natural-sounding Anglo-Saxon ones instead. Antonia cited Asian languages because so

Writing well in your target language is more important than knowing your source language

much is said “between the lines”.

the importance of reading aloud, especially for dialogue, and Antonia suggested listening to an author-read audiobook if possible. Frank disagreed that all books should be beautiful when read aloud. Tempted to polish the

prose

Houellebecq, deliberate

of

French

enfant

he

decided

to

flatness,

resorting

terrible

respect to

Sue translates from Dutch, German, Afrikaans & French into English. Her specialisms are animal health, veterinary medicine and psychology. Contact: suanderson.squarespace.com

its

reading

“boring, text-based porn on the internet” until he was numb enough to find the right register! What about where they work? Cafés and communal workspaces suit Jennifer; Antonia works mainly at home, but dips into poetry on bus rides. Frank translates at home but can revise anywhere as it uses a different part of his mind. Michael, meanwhile, agreed that translations mature like hams when shelved for a while. The audience asked how the speakers would approach a source text that was slangy or unclear. Michael stated that he would err on the side of clarity so as not to lose the

Catherine Roux: French translation duel with Ros Schwartz, Frank Wynne and Daniel Hahn As with all Book Festival events, I was eagerly anticipating this translation duel, held in the beautiful Spiegeltent with its elegant pillars and coloured glass at the top. Although the venue was only half-full, ScotNet was well represented – I counted about 10 members. And while I am happy to report that one ScotNetter I spoke to enjoyed the event, I must admit that I was left a bit disappointed and

frustrated,

and

I

hope

contribution can explain why!

that

this


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 12

The text chosen for the duel was by a trendy

The translators did come up with different

French writer called Édouard Louis, who

nuances: for example, « Berlin séparée par

created something of a literary sensation a

un mur, puis la chute de ce mur » became,

few years ago with The End of Eddy, an

for Ros, “Berlin sliced in half by a wall, and

autobiographical novel about growing up

then the fall of that wall” and, for Frank,

amid

in rural

“Berlin being split by a wall, then the fall of

France. The text chosen was the first page of

that wall”. The presenter himself – in an

another novel by Louis, called Qui a tué mon

attempt, I suppose, to show how much better

père. To start things off, Daniel Hahn

human

explained how, eight or nine years ago, it

machine – read a Google translation of a

was felt that translation had not really been

paragraph. The problem was that the Google

talked about – especially when it came to its

result was not as atrocious as one would

abstract aspects – and, after introducing the

have expected!

poverty

and

homophobia

translators

are

compared

to

a

duelling pair, stated that the two translators had taken exceptionally different approaches

The only other translation duel I witnessed

to rendering the text.

before was the one between Ros and Chris Durban at our summer workshop in Boat of Garten and I had thoroughly enjoyed their presentation. So why was this one different? I think the choice of source text was not great: being a literary sensation does attract the punters and the Book Festival needs to fill its venues, but the text, in my opinion, did not present the necessary challenges that would make a good duel. Additionally, I felt that the presenter talked too much and so the duel, which should have been all about the two

Book Festival deckchairs Image: Geograph

We

were

translation

given

the

original

side

by

side.

translators, became his own show. However, I say all this with the caveat that it is only my and

each

Daniel

then

opinion and there are hopefully some other ScotNetters out there who can contradict me!

proceeded to study differences and asked Ros and Frank to justify their choices. Although he was trying to make the event entertaining (this was, after all, the Book Festival and not a translation workshop), and Ros and Frank justified their choices well, there

was

something

lacking

for

me.

Ultimately, I believe that the problem was the source text: it was not a very difficult text and, as it transpired, the translations did not vary so dramatically as Daniel had said.

Catherine translates from English into French, working on texts in the medical, marketing and legal fields. Contact: frenchproof.com


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 13 Spanish

To begin with, Spanish author Javier Cercas

translation duel with Rosalind Harvey,

was asked to explain his text, admittedly

Elisa

Cristóbal

González:

Margaret Jull Costa, Javier Cercas and Daniel Hahn On a sunny Saturday morning in August, I joined the masses of readers walking into Charlotte Square during the last weekend of the Edinburgh International Book Festival. It was my first time attending this kind of event and I was pleasantly surprised at the buzz in the square, with people sunbathing in the grass, relaxing at the various cafés and chatting away.

autobiographical, and written in a humorous tone. It was about an incurable optimist who would like to be a pessimist in order to avoid daily disappointments, and also because (so we are told) pessimists are widely considered more intelligent. In the meantime, Margaret and Rosalind were given each other’s texts to compare and we soon heard a gasp. It came from Rosalind, who quickly confessed to the audience: “I forgot a word in the first sentence!”. No

At the Spiegeltent, I took a seat close to the stage, hoping to see the speakers’ faces during the event. I hardly had the time to

blood was spilled in this encounter where her opponent tried to appease her – how big is the difference between “I get up” and “I leap jubilantly out of bed”,

look at the handout with the

translations

after all? But soon after

before

Translators are like psychoanalysts for authors – they know them very, very well

host Daniel Hahn made his appearance, followed by translators Margaret

Spanish author Javier Cercas, whose work was going to be the focus of the event. opened

the

session

by

translation duel between the two translators, and

Rosalind,

who

had

been

entrusted with the task of translating the same article by Javier Cercas. By popular demand from the previous event (the French translation duel), this time Hahn had brought two real (plastic!) daggers so that both translators could poke at each other if things got ugly – but I am happy to report that there was no need to resort to these! Some “verbal injuries”

were

indeed

“every

word” was important in

inflicted,

translators’ lives were gratefully spared.

Javier went on to confess that he was “scared” of translators, who, he said, “are like

explaining the ground rules of the event – a Margaret

that

on!

Harvey, and – as a pleasant surprise –

Hahn

claiming

his text. The battle was

Jull Costa and Rosalind

Daniel

the author himself was

but

psychoanalysts. They know you very, very, very well. They know your vowels/bowels”. There was a little confusion here with his pronunciation of “v” or “b”, but as Daniel Hahn put it, whichever word he meant to say, both worked perfectly well in context! The

panel

started

translations,

segment

bringing

up

comparing by

both

segment,

and

issues

and

translation

differences as they went along. The usual dichotomies came up about literal versus non-literal translations, adding or omitting explanatory changing

content, sentence

maintaining

length,

or

punctuation


ITI ScotNet Newsletter issues,

conscious

versus

Page 14 unconscious

choices, keeping mistakes in the translation or correcting them, the invisibility of the translator, and so on. For example, at one point the text mentions the lyrics of Doraemon, a Japanese cat-like cartoon character very popular in Spain that the

author

classes

as

an

“enfermo

de

Duelling translators

optimism” – that is, a sickly/insane optimist (the translation obviously depends on which

Another topic that came up was sentence

translator you ask!). As both translators had

structure, because the number of paragraphs

noticed, the actual lyrics in Spanish speak

differed at least in one of the translations. It

about a happy world, instead of a happy city,

was said that Spanish is known for its higher

but both of them retained the word “city” in

tolerance to long sentences, which means

their translations. Having the author at hand

text often gets cut into shorter sentences in

proved very useful at this point (as it usually

English. This was partly Rosalind’s approach,

is): he was able to explain that the lyrics had

but the view of Margaret – whose translation

been

his

was closer to the source text in this regard –

article, “like music, was constructed with

was that this is not necessarily true and short

repetitions and variations”, and there were

sentences could be considered a modern

further references to a city later in the text.

trend that should not be abused. She also

changed

on

purpose

because

argued that keeping longer sentences intact helps retain more of the essence of the Spanish. Rosalind went on to explain that Spanish admits clauses with further clauses inside, whereas in English you would often need

to

resort

to

punctuation

and,

in

particular, to the use of semicolons. She had considered that option, but in one particular segment

being

contested,

Rosalind

had

chosen to split up the sentences in an effort to avoid excess: “I love semicolons. I was once told by an ex-boyfriend I was the only person who put them in text messages. But there is a limit”.

Doraemon, the (overly?) optimistic cat Image: Pixabay

By this point the audience was extremely engaged

and

waves

of

laughter

and

agreement kept rising around the room. At some point, the author intervened to say that he was quite happy with both translations,


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 15

but that he liked how Margaret’s translation

duel, after the audience had been shown how

was more “faithful” to the source text.

obvious the differences were between two

However, it was soon highlighted that she

translations of the very same text and how

had in some instances added content. She

they had been affected by conscious and

explained in her translation, for example,

unconscious choices made by the translators. Towards

“I have sometimes the impression that my translators improve the text” – Javier Cercas

the

end,

there

was

general

agreement in the panel that both translations worked well individually, but that the results would have been close to perfection if combined!

that

Ramon

Llull

was

a

“13th

century

philosopher”. Her aim was to help the readers understand why, later in the text, the protagonist is surprised that Llull must have known about “tips” back then. But I should perhaps have said “bonuses” here, because this is how both Margaret and Rosalind had decided to translate the word propina (which in Spanish can refer to any “bonuses” or “extras”, not necessarily money), another point that was discussed by the panel. The underlying feeling really was that translation is a balancing act.

All in all, it was a very lively event and the audience left in high spirits and craving more. I may or may not have been guilty of taking the fight outside and discussing the translations further with complete strangers! I am already looking forward to more of these events next year, but in the meantime, I will keep in mind a sentence by Javier Cercas that I hope we will all hear many times

in

sometimes

our

professional

the

life.

impression

“I

have

that

my

translators improve the text”.

Elisa is a sworn translator and works from English into Spanish and Catalan, specialising in law, academia, leadership, IT and marketing. Contact: elisacristobal25@gmail.com

The balancing act that is translation Image: Pixabay

In the heat of the debate, Margaret had described the invisibility of the translator as “guff”, something that Daniel picked up on. This seemed quite clear by the end of the


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 16

Word wizardry A regular column hosted by the Word Wiz (aka Kay McBurney) to share tips and tricks about Microsoft Word features that are handy for writing and editing Word documents (and maybe even one or two about Excel and PowerPoint as well). As it emerged from my questionnaire at the

navigate to FileOptionsTrust Center and

AGM (many thanks to everyone who took the

click the Trust Center Settings… button at

trouble to complete it!) that about 75% of

the bottom right. Now choose Protected View

ScotNetters frequently or occasionally use

on the left and untick the Protected View

MS-Excel, today’s column features a tip for

checkboxes. Done!

Excel as well as one for Word.

Protected View settings I mentioned this in passing in connection with the Trust Center privacy settings at last year’s workshop and as someone recently complained to me about this security feature, I think it’s worth revisiting here.

(For detailed information about the options offered in your particular version of Word (or any other MS-Office program, click on the question mark at the top right corner of the

Do you see a message such as “This file was

dialogue box.)

opened in Protected View” or “This file was opened from a potentially unsafe location” or

If you uncheck these boxes, you should of

something similar every time you open a file? This is triggered by the Trust Center settings in

newer

versions

of

Word,

Excel

and

PowerPoint. The defaults were no doubt chosen because most MS-Office users work in a corporate network

environment, but they are not

particularly

helpful

for

freelancers

who

generally work on a standalone PC and who receive all the files they use in the course of their work either as email attachments or over the internet in one way or another. Microsoft considers these “unsafe locations”. It takes just a few clicks, however, to get rid of these annoying messages forever – simply

course refrain from opening any files you download before running an AV scan first – though all good anti-virus programs should do this automatically anyway.

Multiple Excel files in separate windows Many moons ago, the default action on opening multiple Excel files was for them to launch in a separate window each time. At some point (Excel 2007?), Microsoft changed this default behaviour and from then on workbooks opened within the same window, which was rather a faff if you wanted to compare texts side by side or copy and paste between files. Until recently, I believed there was no way round this that didn’t involve delving

into

the

murky

depths

of

the


ITI ScotNet Newsletter Windows

Registry

Page 17

definitely

not

an

4. Close the new workbook in this second

undertaking for the faint of heart. And since I

instance.

have two screens, my workaround was simply

5. Finally, open the second Excel file you

to drag the Excel window across both

want in the now empty window in any of the

screens, then resize the two individual panes

usual

as needed so I could arrange the files side by

shortcut or clicking the Open Recent icon on

side within the one window. Much to my

the Quick Access Toolbar if it’s a file you use

delight, however, not long ago I discovered

frequently, as glossaries often are).

that there is in fact a way to have two (or more!) separate Excel windows open on your display(s), which you can then shift around to your heart’s content:

ways

(fastest

is

usually

CTRL+O

Hey presto! Two files in separate windows which is much more convenient all round, and you can then use the standard Windows shortcuts ALT+Tab or WIN+Tab to switch

1. Open the first file and resize/drag it to

between different xls glossaries or Word

wherever you want it on your screen.

documents, or any translation environment

2. Now, instead of opening the second file

tools you have running at the same time.

from within Excel or double-clicking on a file in Windows Explorer, launch the program a second time – either from the Start menu, or by right-clicking the Excel shortcut icon on your

taskbar/desktop

and

clicking

the

program name. A new instance of the program containing an empty workbook will now appear (note that if you didn’t move the first one, the second one will be on top of it). 3. Move this second instance to your other screen or wherever you want it.

If you have a tip you’d like to share with other ScotNetters, please send it to Kay at intec@blueyonder.co.uk in the first instance and she’ll include it whenever there’s space (we’re aiming for easily digestible chunks). Likewise, if there’s something you’d like Kay to feature in a future column – or indeed in her advanced workshop next spring - drop her a line and she’ll do her best to oblige.

The world according to Mox When a client thinks it’s better to do it themselves

Reproduced by kind permission of Alejandro Moreno-Ramos, see mox.ingenierotraductor.com


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 18

Isabel’s insights: A new column Since going on maternity leave, former ScotNet newsletter editor Isabel Hurtado de Mendoza has worked exceptionally hard on finding the right work–life balance and establishing her priorities. In a series of new articles that we’re delighted to introduce to the newsletter, she will be sharing her wisdom with us – looking at how her maternity leave has had an impact on her translation business, how to maintain a good relationship with clients, how to improve productivity and focus, and other topics where she hopes to provide useful tips and advice. Read on and start taking notes! As you all know, I now have a toddler in my

was born, however, I soon realised how vital

office-cum-home. My baby girl is now 15

it was for me to be in tip-top shape if I

months old and has already broken my

wanted to take good care of her and cope

phone charger and taken the E key from my

with my family and my professional life all at

keyboard. But I still manage a successful

once. So here is what I did:

translation

business.

Or,

at

least,

it’s

successful for my purposes. In the first of a

1. I changed my priorities: my daughter was,

new series of articles, I’d like to shed some

obviously, at the top of my list, so I told my

light on how taking maternity leave has

clients the good news and then I took off my

affected my business, in the hope that it

watch

provides interest, insight and maybe some

Permanently. Existing and potential clients,

inspiration. I’ll be touching on a range of

stimulating CPD, friend dos, house chores

areas and believe they could be interesting or

and basically anything else was put on hold

useful

until I was ready. Do you think you could do

to

those

who

are

considering

maternity/paternity leave or want to work

and

put

my

phone

on

silent.

that if need be?

less without any considerable economic loss, for example. And so, shall we get down to business? Since the colder months are already comfortably sitting among us, and viruses are planning their impending line of attack, we might as well start this series dealing with how to take care of oneself. When I am in a strenuous situation – picture a recent baby birth, the sudden admission of a family member into hospital or a hard deadline for a mammoth project – I tend to push my needs into the background and eventually end up regretting it. When Olivia

Getting organised: one of Isabel’s weekly charts

2. I set boundaries: in the same way as I decided who would be allowed into my hospital room, I also chose who would come


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 19

home for a visit and when. And I purposefully

5. I asked for help: in the past, I have always

limited the time I spent checking email and

been reluctant to ask for help. Because I have

the moment of the day I did it at. Consider

had a disability since I was a child, I have

what you might need to do to keep your

always felt as though I had to prove my

focus.

independence to myself and others and have tried to do things on my own. But my

3. I got organised: before I went to hospital, I

maternity contributed to my coming to terms

had Olivia’s room ready, both our bags were

with the idea that asking for help is nothing

packed and the freezer was full of home-

to be ashamed of. I asked my mother to cook

made comfort food for our return. When you

for my family, my mother-in-law to do the

know a difficult time is looming or you are

laundry, my father to buy the newspaper, my

going to have a busy period, cook nice meals

brother to buy titbits…and my husband?

that lend themselves to freezing and buy

Everything else! This helped me realised that

healthy snacks that you can have on the go.

there’s no need to try to be Superwoman.

I’ve even incorporated this into my “normal”

Today, I apply this to my work, and clients

life: I plan the week’s meals in advance, keep

treat me with respect and value my work just

a stash of nuts and cereal bars in my

as they did before, even though I have

cupboard,

become much better at negotiating fees and

and

always

handbag/backpack/buggy

bag

pack

my

the

night

deadlines. Ask and you shall receive!

before for the coming day. When I returned to work after my leave, I had 4. I mastered the sleep–eat–exercise combo.

to re-establish my priorities again and find a

After giving birth, life was hectic and chaotic,

new

and I was a wreck. One day, I put my foot

changing my working hours and my working

down and consciously decided that I needed

days. If you are curious to know how I did,

to get more exercise done, rest more and eat

don’t forget to read my column in the next

at regular intervals. I planned my days

newsletter!

work–life

balance,

which

included

around Olivia’s schedule, of course, but I didn’t let tiredness get in the way of my brisk walks or my lunch slot. Having a daily routine written down and hung up on the fridge helped me motivate myself. Being healthy and well-rested means you’ll be less stressed and

ready

to

cope

with

challenging

situations. In terms of work, it will also help you be more efficient and creative, so…what are you waiting for?

Isabel now lives in Spain and translates from English into Spanish. Her specialisms include international business and governmental organisations. Contact: lingotrans.co.uk


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 20

Your committee under the spotlight Next in our hot seat is Elisa Cristóbal González, who became involved in ScotNet a few years ago. She recently began assisting the committee on the digital side, volunteering her time to ScotNet’s website and social media presence. Here, Siobhan talks to her about her work and outside interests. networking, online presence, etc. She gave us lots of fantastic tips and one of them in particular still resonates with me: attending any translation/CPD requiring an investment below £25. I had such a good time at the AGM and lunch – people were so friendly and welcoming – that I could not help attending all the ScotNet events after that. And because I wanted to stay in the network, and could afford the fee after a couple of years in business, I went on to join the ITI before the “trial” period expired. Elisa in the middle of the River Earn!

More recently, I decided to do my bit and Hi Elisa, and thanks for talking to us! Could

volunteer my social media skills (well, do

you tell us a little more about how you got

something useful with my social media

involved in ScotNet?

addiction!), and now I help our Digital

Believe it or not, my first contact with ScotNetters was through social media back in 2015, nearly a year after I moved to Scotland. I introduced myself in a translators’ group, and Alison Hughes and Marga Burke-Lowe encouraged me to join the ITI Scottish Network. I was not yet an ITI member, but they explained the Friend of the Network

Coordinator and our Webmaster when our busy schedules allow it. So if you have any ideas

about

translation-related

links

or

topics that we may share online, or would like to see any specific changes in our social media strategy or the website, please feel free to drop me an email! How did you get into translation?

option, which allows newcomers to join the network for two years before making a

I wish I had a lovely story to tell, but I guess

decision

it was the small choices that led me here. I

on

their

ITI

membership.

No

was always a bookworm, even before I could

excuses then!

read (I would just memorise the stories!), so My first ScotNet event was that year’s AGM,

everyone said I would end up working in a

which

was

library. I had never given translation a

repeating a previous talk about the best ways

thought, because I had no idea it was a

to spend our limited resources on CPD,

“thing”! However, I grew up in a bilingual

was

special

because

Alison


ITI ScotNet Newsletter region

where

people

spoke

Page 21 Valencian

It took me a very busy three years to decide

(Catalan) as well as Spanish, which helped me

that I was ready to take the leap from being

develop a love for languages. I was also lucky

an in-house translator to becoming a home-

to spend a month in Ireland during high

based freelancer. And because I had lived for

school – a great experience that helped me

a while in Scotland before and dreamt of

realise that there was a wide world to explore

coming back one day, I convinced my partner

out there. By the time I had to apply to

to start a new life over here!

university, the career guide’s description for translation and interpreting was a lot more appealing.

How do you find Scotland compares with Spain? This is a tough one. If I compare it to the east of Spain, where I come from, the first words that come to mind are rainier and greener, which makes sunny days so special and enjoyable!

But

Spanish

geography

and

climate are extremely varied. Part of my family live in Asturias, in the north of Spain, which is about as green and lush as the west of Scotland! You do get more hours of sun and light in the winter, that’s for sure, but we Like many of us, Elisa has always been a bookworm Source: Pixabay

Studying translation was an eye-opener in every aspect and, in spite of some of our professors

being

pessimistic

about

job

prospects, I always believed I would find my way. My first paid job in the field took a couple of years to arrive after finishing my studies, but then I was lucky enough to land a temporary public interpreting job at a busy police station, followed by a couple of (poorly paid) book translations with short deadlines. I really enjoyed translating them, but that rhythm was not sustainable! Then I found a good opportunity to work in-house for a multinational LSP, which helped me learn the workings of the translation market from “the other side”, improve my translation, review and post-editing skills, and use CAT tools and other technology in my daily work.

also get our share of snow, even in Alicante. By

contrast,

summers

in

Scotland

are

fantastic unless you particularly love melting at temperatures well above 38 ºC (about 100 ºF). So there you go, I thought about the weather first of all! If there’s something I really miss here, it’s fresh fruit and vegetables. I guess I was spoilt for choice growing up in a rural area in a sunny country, where neighbours would often exchange excess seasonal fruit and vegetables – tomatoes, courgettes, apples, lemons, you name it! Funnily enough, it is easier for a vegetarian like me to eat out in Scotland than it used to be in Spain! The sector has improved a lot in the last few years, but Scotland is still ahead in terms of including and highlighting vegetarian options on menus. In any case, Scotland is rich in other produce which we now consume more


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 22

often, such as apples, berries, neeps, carrots

What does a typical weekend look like for

or oats. I love a good bowl of porridge on a

you?

dreich day!

I

usually

volunteer

for

Victim

Support

You have an interest in sustainability and the

Scotland on a Monday, so I tend to catch up

environment – do you have a favourite text of

with work one day over the weekend. On

this kind that you’ve worked on?

either Saturday or Sunday, I try to get out of

I am passionate about the natural world, plants and wildlife, and sustaining them for future

generations,

interest

in

which

translating

explains

texts

relating

my to

sustainability and the environment. My only experience so far has been translating a horticultural article for Cosmopolita Scotland on how to grow a garden for bees on your

the house and do some sports with my partner and/or friends. My favourite choices are

either

depending

cycling on

Munro-bagging,

or

the

walking

season,

can

berry-picking,

which, involve taking

photos, fungi-foraging or any other outdoor event nearby! And Perthshire is fantastic for this!

balcony. So I’m still working on it, but I’m getting there. What career goals would you still like to achieve? At the moment I am happy with my clients and loving the flexibility of freelance work and exploring a variety of fields, but my goal is to keep developing my specialisms further. For example, I am qualified to offer sworn (certified) translations into Spanish, which are often of a legal nature, so I am always on the lookout for new CPD in this field, like the Dual Spanish/English Litigation Workshop organised by the ITI this coming January. But my curious mind cannot limit itself to one subject, varied as it is already, so I work on leadership

training,

marketing,

Elisa loves the great outdoors

education

and even software. My main career goal is to

How do you keep in touch with your source

keep enjoying this profession of ours for as

culture?

long as I can and charging decent rates for it. And always striving to embrace the “free” in

My partner is also Spanish, so we use the

freelance!

language at home every day and try to travel to Spain to see our families twice a year, or have them visit us when they can. I also often speak to my friends and family on the phone


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 23

or in writing – I love long emails and letters,

allergy

although these are a rare sight nowadays.

engineers

And I read a lot, from the news every

translation!

morning to novels and interesting things I come across when I’m on social media or researching something for a translation. I also enjoy listening to radio podcasts and watching

films

and

series

in

Spanish

whenever I can.

to

client with

platforms

little

to

no

created idea

by

about

And finally, since you’re our last interviewee of the year, what does Christmas typically look like for you? My Christmas is usually quite atypical and I think the only tradition I always respect is

Do you like to listen to music or the radio

having two lavish meals on the 24th and

while you’re working?

25th. We are not too bothered with buying

Sometimes – it depends on my level of

do like to have friends or family over when

tiredness

we can, though.

and

many presents or decorating the house. We

concentration,

and

the

requirements of the task at hand. When I need to really focus on something (for

When we are Spain, I usually celebrate

example, reviewing my work or someone

Christmas

else’s), though, I prefer some peace and

parents, siblings and now my nephew!) and

quiet. It was different when I worked in-

then

house, because music helped me cut off the

extended family. The second most important

outside

my

date for us used to be 6 January, when we

concentration, but now I prefer to take

celebrated the Three Kings’ Day. We would

frequent breaks to recharge my batteries

open the presents left by the Kings during

when I find my mind wandering.

the night, and we would have a hot chocolate

world

and

increased

What translation tool – or software tool in general – couldn’t you do without? I think it would be hard to make a living as a translator without an internet browser and a

Eve

with

Christmas

Day

my

family

with

my

breakfast. If you’d like to find out more about it or even try making it yourself, you can find a recipe and information about its history here. Enjoy!

one of these if I can’t say both. I consider these the very basics, but with so many file formats, a PDF viewer (and preferably editor) and spreadsheet editor are also essential! And obviously CAT tools make my life easier, particularly for my recurring customers. I have used a number of them, but it could be with my GP, but I think I’ve developed an

father’s

with a cake called roscón de reyes for

good text editor, so I guess I would choose

any as long as it is good – I should check this

(mainly

A delicious-looking roscón de reyes Source: Wikimedia Commons


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 24

Member news Here’s where we welcome new members to the network. Also, please remember to notify the Membership Secretary (membership@itiscotland.org.uk) of any changes to your ITI membership category since you joined the network. In particular, let the MemSec know when you upgrade to MITI, as your details can then be made available to the general public online. New members:

 Auriane Destrument: I am a freelance

 Lydia Carter: Hello ScotNet! I am a Spanish

scientific, technical and medical translator

into English translator specialising in sports

working from English into French. Based in

and marketing. Originally from Boston in the

Northumberland,

north-eastern US, I am currently living in St

Belgium but have lived in the UK for half my

Andrews. As part of my MA in Hispanic

life. My first career was in scientific research

linguistics, I studied linguistic variation in

but in 2013, I took a professional break to

baseball Spanish, and this got me started in

become a mother and decided to reconnect

working with sports language. I have a

with my other major interests: languages and

certificate

linguistics.

in

Spanish–English

translation

I

I

am

retrained

originally

as

a

from

translator,

from the University of Massachusetts, and am

acquired the Diploma in Translation from the

certified

Translators

Chartered Institute of Linguists and have

Association for Spanish into English. I have

since been working as a translator and

translated for the National Baseball Hall of

reviser. My typical clients are from the

Fame Archive and especially enjoy translating

medical, pharmaceutical and biotech sectors.

the writing of athletes. I appreciate the

Beside working, I am a huge yoga lover and

friendly welcome I received at the ScotNet

experienced

autumn

translate and interpret for travelling yoga

by

the

workshop

American

and

look

forward

to

practitioner.

I

occasionally

working with and learning from many of you

teachers and this is a specialisation I am

in the future.

working on developing. I am really looking forward to getting more involved with the

 Edwin Hewetson: Hi, everyone! I've been a

many events this fantastic network is so

freelance French to English translator since

good at organising!

2009. I used to live in the south of France, which is where I began translating, and I

 Timothy Barton: I’ve been working as a

moved to Glasgow last year. I started out

freelance translator since 2005. Originally

doing mainly legal translations and over time

from York, I lived in Paris for three years,

have added IT and marketing to that as

Catalonia for 14 years and Namibia for two

specialist areas. I obtained the Diploma in

and a half years before coming to Dundee,

Translation from the Chartered Institute of

where my wife is doing a master's. I translate

Linguists in 2015. My interests outside work

from French, Catalan and Spanish to English

include going to gigs, walking, reading and

and

playing chess. I look forward to meeting

macroeconomics and development, which I

fellow translators!

do mainly for international organisations,

have

two

specialist

fields:


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 25

and sport, especially yacht racing. Since I will

So who needs a translator anyway?

only be here for a year before moving back to my isolated town in the desert, I am keen to do as much networking as possible with translators in Scotland. Having been an active member of MET and APTIC (the Catalan translators’ association) for well over a decade, I have seen the benefits of meeting up with my colleagues, so I am looking forward to the opportunity of getting to know translators based here in Scotland.

Other news:  Those of you who attended this year’s summer workshop (and those who were unable to, in fact!) may be interested to know that Gaston Dorren’s latest book is now available. Entitled Babel Around the World in

Twenty Languages, it is a language-lover’s tour of the world’s twenty most-spoken languages. Over ten publishers have now bought the translation rights to the book!  It is with sadness that we note the recent passing of Anthea Bell, prominent translator of Asterix and Kafka, to name just a couple of

examples

of

her

achievements.

Bell

worked from both German and French into English, and stated her belief that translators were

in

the

“business

of

spinning

an

illusion…that the reader is reading not a

On holiday in Greece, Kay McBurney spotted these instructions and safety information for a screwdriver – a translation that seems to surpass even Google Translate in its lack of intelligibility! Please send your own So who needs a translator anyway? photos to

editor@itiscotland.org.uk

translation but the real thing”. 

Congratulations

to

newsletter

editor

Siobhan Gorrie, who was shortlisted for Employee of

the Year

at

the Rochdale

Business Awards this month. Siobhan works as a translator for a company based in Greater Manchester, and even though she didn’t win in the end, she was delighted to be nominated.

The past, the present and the future walked into a bar. It was a tense situation.


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 26

ScotNet grants The ITI Scottish Network offers 2 levels of

General conditions: maximum of one grant

grants to members as a contribution towards

per person per subscription year. You must

the costs of attending ITI events:

be a member of ITI, so Friends of the

1) Grants of up to £30 are available for

Network are not eligible. Also, members

attending Scottish Network meetings.

living in the central belt are not eligible to

2) ScotNetters may also apply for grants of

receive grants for

up to £70 for attending national ITI events.

Edinburgh or Glasgow. All recipients must be

network

meetings

in

willing to contribute a report on the event they attended to the ITI ScotNet Newsletter.

How to apply for a grant Contact our Treasurer (currently Norma Tait) at

treasurer@itiscotland.org.uk

registering

for

the

meeting.

The level of grants is reviewed every year at

before

Subject

ScotNet’s AGM. Under the current budget, 10

to

grants of £30 and 10 of £70 are available

availability and meeting the eligibility criteria,

each year. From time to time, the committee

she will approve the grant and notify you.

may also decide to offer additional grants to

In due course, forward her a copy of the

enable

receipt for the event or transport expenses

ScotNetters

to

attend

particular

events, such as they did for the 2013 ITI

and provide her with your bank details. She

Conference.

will then pay the respective amount into your

account.

Looking forward to the next issue… As we move towards the end of 2018, we’ll be providing full coverage of our recent AGM and Christmas lunch festivities in the next issue. In the meantime please see overleaf for the committee as it now stands. In brief, Elena Zini stood down as Deputy Convenor, with Karin Bosshard stepping into her shoes. Marian Dougan stepped down as Digital Coordinator and Elisa Cristóbal González will take over coordinating the network’s social media activities. Sarah Tolley resigned as Deputy Treasurer and the committee decided not to fill this post for the time being. Of course, we’d also love to hear from you if you have an idea for a contribution in a future issue. Have you been to an interesting event, read a great book, or want to write something on the role that languages play in your everyday life? Feel free to drop a line to the usual editor’s email address

(editor@itiscotland.org.uk),

and

you

can

also

siobhangorrie@gmail.com. Thank you!

contact

me

separately

at ♦

This issue was brought to you by: Editor: Siobhan Gorrie

Deputy Editor: Kathleen Clegg

Graphics/layout: Kay McBurney


ITI ScotNet Newsletter

Page 27

Your committee at a glance Convenor Lynda Hepburn 07563 975216 convenor@itiscotland.org.uk

Treasurer

Deputy Convenor

Norma Tait

Karin Bosshard

0131 5521330

07944 524201

treasurer@itiscotland.org.uk

deputyconvenor@itiscotland.org.uk

Membership Secretary

Deputy Membership Secretary

Catherine Roux

Sue Anderson

01383 415034

07703 713971

membership@itiscotland.org.uk

membership@itiscotland.org.uk

Events Coordinator (East)

Events Coordinator (West)

Angelika Muir-Hartmann

Audrey Langlassé

0131 3334654

0141 5603482

muirhartmann@aol.com

audreylanglasse@alacarte-translations.com

Newsletter Editor

Deputy Editor

Siobhan Gorrie

Kathleen Clegg

07585 838480

07964 695052

editor@itiscotland.org.uk

info@afirelanguages.com

Webmaster

Digital Coordinator

Iwan Davies

Elisa Cristóbal González

01738 630202

07597 683799

webmaster@itiscotland.org.uk

elisacristobal25@gmail.com

Profile for Iwan Davies

ITI Scottish Network Newsletter | December 2018  

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded