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PRESERVING INDUSTRY VEGETABLE

a far more hygienic, higher quality product. This is reflected in its significantly increased shelf life. A further benefit is afforded the beverage industry. Most pomegranate juices are obtained by squeezing the whole fruit, including peel and membrane, which gives the juice a bitter taste due to their high tannin and phenol content. The ArilSystem Juicer obtains pure pomegranate juice from the arils alone, producing a far tastier beverage. And as an extra bonus, the seeds, efficiently extracted during the juicing process, are a sought-after byproduct utilized by the cosmetics and pharmaceutics industries, yielding additional revenue.

Today’s ArilSystem™ is available in 4 models handling 10, 20, 28, or up to 56 fruits per minute. A rate of 56 fruit/minute, or 1,680 kg fruit/ hour, can yield over 550 kg/hour of superior quality arils, all from a single production line. Since the first ArilSystem was installed in Israel, there are currently ArilSystems operational in the USA, Spain, Turkey, India, South Africa, Australia and others. Now affordably available, the presence of this wonder fruit is growing in the Fresh-Cut market as well as the Food & Beverage Industries, Pharmaceutics, and Cosmetics.

MEAT

But the big winners are the consumers. Juran’s marketing director, Avner Galili says, “There is an increasing market demand for pomegranate products. We’re pleased to enable our customers to offer a superior product to the growing number of pomegranate consumers worldwide.” Greener methods for redder lychees Making food processing more natural and putting healthier products on the market is a main Juran objective. Today, fresh lychees are a tricky commodity. Starting out an attractive red, they lose their vibrant color within 2 or 3 days, becoming an unappealing brown. To overcome this marketing drawback, lychees are subjected to a sulfur treatment that helps them maintain their color for a longer marketing window. However it offers the consumer a product that is, literally, soaked in chemicals. “There is an attitude of resignation among lychee growers,” Avner Galili says, “that sulfur treatment is a necessary evil. Sulfur is a toxin, and it may penetrate the flesh of the fruit. Careful testing is then required to ensure compliance with allowable levels. The good news,” Avner tells us, “is that lychees needn’t be soaked in toxins to keep them market-red.”

www.arilsystem.com

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05/09/17 12:35

FOOD PROCESSING - 2017 - 4  

Technical, bimonthly magazine focused on food&beverage technology. It is in English and German/French/Spanish in according to the worldwide...

FOOD PROCESSING - 2017 - 4  

Technical, bimonthly magazine focused on food&beverage technology. It is in English and German/French/Spanish in according to the worldwide...