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International Student Life in Australia

THE NEEDS OF A LIFE--------------JOURNEY THOMSON CH’NG

ISSSUE OF OCT / NOV

2 0 1 3

FREE

istudent.net.au

EDUCATION I ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW I SOMETHING FUN OUR INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY


ABILITY ENGLISH Sydney Campus 10 Quay St, Sydney NSW 2000 / Melbourne Campus Level 3, 55 Swanston St, Melbourne VIC 3000

-02 ----distribution points

ACADEMIES AUSTRALASIA George St Campus Level 6, 505 George St, Sydney NSW 2000 / Kent St Campus Ground Floor, 333 Kent St, Sydney NSW 2000 ACADEMY OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Level 2, 7 Kelly St, Ultimo NSW 2007

DISCOVER ENGLISH 376 - 378 Bourke St, Melbourne VIC 3000 EDUCATION TRAINING & EMPLOYMENT AUSTRALIA Level 1, 113 Burgundy St, Heidelberg VIC 3084 ELS UNIVERSAL ENGLISH COLLEGE Level 1, 17 O’Connell St, Sydney NSW 2000 EVOLUTION HOSPITALITY INSTITUTE Level 3, 552 George St, Sydney NSW 2000

ACCESS LANGUAGE CENTRE SYDNEY 72 Mary St, Surry Hills, Sydney NSW 2010

GREENWICH ENGLISH COLLEGE Level 2, 396 Pitt St, Sydney NSW 2000

AUSTRALIA IDEAL COLLEGE Level 8, 75 King St, Sydney NSW 2000

HOLMES INSTITUTE Level 6, 91 York St, Sydney NSW 2000 185 Spring St, Melbourne VIC 3000

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF COMMERCE AND LANGUAGE Level 9, 75 King St, Sydney NSW 2000 AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF HIGHER EDUCATION Level 4, 451 Pitt St, Sydney NSW 2000 AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION Level 2, 5 & 6 118 Walker St, North Sydney NSW 2060 AUSTRALIAN INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE OF ENGLISH Level 3, 303 Pitt St, Sydney NSW 2000 AUSTRALIAN LEARNING GROUP Level 1, 225 Clarence St, Sydney NSW 2000 BRISBANE COLLEGE OF AUSTRALIA 160 Edward St, Brisbane QLD 4000 BROWNS ENGLISH LANGUAGE SCHOOL 5 - 7 Marshall Ln, Southport QLD 4215 CASS TRAINING INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE Level 1, 53 - 55 Liverpool St, Sydney NSW 2000 CAMBRIDGE COLLEGE INTERNATIONAL Level 1, 56 York St, Sydney NSW 2000 CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE 422 Little Collins St, Melbourne VIC 3000 CHARLES DARWIN UNIVERSITY Level 9, 225 Clarence St, Sydney NSW 2000 CITY INSTITUTE Level 4, 22 Market St, Sydney NSW 2000 CROWN INSTITUTE OF BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY 116 Pacific Highway, North Sydney NSW 2060

MEGT INSTITUTE Sydney Campus 10 Quay St, Sydney NSW 2000 / Melbourne Campus Level 3, 55 Swanston St, Melbourne VIC 3000 MELBOURNE INSITITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (SYDNEY LANGUAGE CENTRE) 154 - 158 Sussex St, Sydney NSW 2000 NORTH SYDNEY ENGLISH COLLEGE Level 5, 80 Arthurt St, North Sydney NSW 2060 OISE SYDNEY Level 11, 99 York St, Sydney NSW 2000 PERFORMANCE EDUCATION Level 8, 333 Kent St, Sydney NSW 2000 / Level 2, 277 Flinders Ln, Melbourne, VIC 3000 STRATHFIELD COLLEGE Suite 704 Level 7, 451 Pitt St, Sydney NSW 2000

DISTRIBUTION POINTS

ST GEORGE & SUTHERLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE 127 - 129 Sutherland Rd, Jannali NSW 2226 STEP ONE COLLEGE Level 9, 280 - 282 Pitt St, Sydney NSW 2000 SYDNEY COLLEGE OF ENGLISH 35 - 39 Mountain St, Sydney NSW 2007 SYDNEY ENGLISH LANGUAGE CENTRE Level 2, 19 - 23 Hollywood Ave, Bondi Junction NSW 2022

KINGSWAY INSTITUTE Level 1, 110 Bathurst St, Sydney NSW 2000

SYDNEY ENGLISH ACADEMY Shop 19, 74 - 78 The Corso, Manly NSW 2096

ILSC EDUCATION GROUP Level 6, 540 George St, Sydney NSW 2000

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY Level 1, 301 George St, Wynyard Sydney NSW 2000

INTERNATIONAL HOUSE SYDNEY Level 1, 203 Clarence St, Sydney NSW 2000 INUS AUSTRALIA Level 5, 85 - 91 Queen St, Melbourne VIC 3000 KENVALE COLLEGE 38 High St, Randwick NSW 2031 LA LINGUA LANGUAGE SCHOOL Level 6, 127 Liverpool St, Sydney NSW 2000

SYDNEY BUSINESS & TRAVEL AUSTRALIA Level 2, 401 Sussex St, Sydney NSW 2000 THE SYDNEY ENGLISH LANGUAGE ACADEMY Level 2, 401 Sussex St, Sydney NSW 2000 UNIVERSAL INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Level 4, 398 Lonsdale St, Melbourne VIC 3000

LLOYDS INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE Level 1, 307 Pitt St, Sydney NSW 2000

UNIVERSITY PREPARATION COLLEGE 27 Greenfield Parade, Bankstown NSW 2200

MACQUARIE EDUCATION GROUP AUSTRALIA 552 George St, Sydney NSW 2000

VICTORY COLLEGE OF DESIGN Level 2, 16 - 22 Wentworth Ave. Surry Hills NSW 2010

MERCURY COLLEGE Level 1, Anzac House, 245 Castlereagh St, Sydney NSW 2000

WENTWORTH INSTITUTE 302 - 306 Elizabeth St, Surry Hills NSW 2010


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EDITOR’S LETTER

iStudent

HI INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS! Welcome to the new relaunched and redesigned edition of iStudent Magazine.

iStudent Corporation Pty Limited

iStudent is a media platform created for international students to ensure their time in Australia is both fun and valuable.

CHAIRMAN: David Scanlen CEO: George Lipinski GENERAL ADVISOR: Jack Wang BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT: Chanel Lee

A large portion of our team is made up of dedicated international students that have put a lot of effort into creating our new issue. Being an international student can be life changing. We know it’s important to make the most of our time abroad. Improving our English, making friends and having fun are all things we should experience as international students. But, it can be difficult to adjust to a new country. The one thing that brings us all together is our desire to succeed. At iStudent we would love to help you achieve your goals and help overcome any challenges you face while studying abroad! Feel free to contact us via email 24/7 THANKS FOR READING iStudent TEAM

PUBLISHER: iStudent Media

MARKETING: George Lipinski, Chanel (Hyojung) Lee, Shoko Mochizuki, Ha Quach, Kentaro Tanaka, Irwin Alcover, Hubert Basquin, DESIGNER: Setthawut Pattanasuwimol WRITERS: Lisa Coady, Darcy Tranter-Cook, Lauren Horner, Naaz Hussian, Stephen Lyons, Debby Ng, Benjamin Warren, Aideen Weingarth PHOTOGRAPHERS: Krissa Diamante, Reni Indrawan, Ainsley Jade, Frangky Junus, Kiho Kang, Youngtae Kim, Jessica Laker, Jon Manez, Phan Peter, Jamie Dela Rosa, Jessica Saelim, Bronte Wilson iStudent Corporation Pty Limited Level 2, 100 Alexander St, Crows Nest, NSW 2065, T: +61 289 573 573 FACEBOOK: iStudentMagazine INSTAGRAM: @istudentmagazine E-MAIL: info@istudent.ws ADVERTISE IN ISTUDENT: info@istudent.ws COVER: Thomson Ch’Ng, Joshua Sim, Rachel Fong, Ashley Leow, Joaane Lim DISCLAIMER AND COPYRIGHT: The information and other material available within iStudent Magazine comes from a number of sources including staff, third parties who have given permission for use of their material, and material copied under statutory licences. Accordingly that information and material is copyrightใ Except as permitted by the Copyright Act 1968, no part of this content may in any form or by any electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or any other means be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or be broadcast or transmitted without the prior permission of the publisher, iStudent Corporation Pty Limitedใ The views and opinions expressed by journalists within this magazine do not necessarily express those of the iStudent Corporationใ If you have any questions or concerns about the magazine, or wish to request permission to utilise any material within iStudent Magazine, please contact our staff at: info@istudent.ws

w w w. i s t u d e n t . n e t . a u


CISA PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

-05 ----CISA

The Council of International Students Australia (CISA) was formed in 2010 in response to the needs of a unified voice for all international students studying at postgraduate, undergraduate, TAFE / VET, ELICOS and foundation levels. As a peak student representative organisation, we are an association of student associations. As individuals, we are leaders of student leaders. Similar to many of you, I have embarked on my journey as an international student with the aim to seek a different study experience and qualification. Since arriving from Penang, Malaysia back in 2009, I have completed my Bachelor Degree in Finance and Management, and I am currently undertaking a Masters of Project Management at Curtin University Sydney. At the moment, there are approximately 500 000 international students in Australia, making it both a large and diverse community. Over the last few years, I have met and made friends with students from countries across the region, from Asia to Africa, Europe to South America, anywhere you can think of. Since the formation of CISA, we have worked on many of the challenges faced by international students with other stakeholders and groups. A few of our achievements include the Post Study Work Visa (for University students), the Flexible Work Hours Arrangement, transport discounts (for New South Wales) and many others. The team and I continue to strive in assisting you in any way we can. We want to ensure that you have a great time throughout your stay in Australia. We look forward to meeting you in the near future.

THOMSON CH’NG NATIONAL PRESIDENT COUNCIL OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AUSTRALIA


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-07 ----contents

CONTENTS

#TIPS AND TRICKS SURVIVE OVERSEAA 020

#ENGLISH EXERCISES 013

01

_____ EDUCATION 010 Guide to Aussie Slang and Idioms 013 English Exercises 014 6 Ways to Prepare for the TOEFL 016 Top 5 Resources to Master the TOEFL

#STREET STYLE 052

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ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW 020 Tips and Tricks - Survive Overseas 022 Tricky Legal Questions 024 Cultural Awareness 026 The NSW Police Force

SOMETHING FUN 030 Real Stories By Real Students 031 The Myths of Australia 032 Calendar Events 034 Past Events 036 When in Australia 038 Movie Review

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#THE NEEDS OF A LIFE JOURNEY 056

OUR INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY 042 Mix ‘n’ Match 046 My Story 048 Success Story 050 Monika Kamycka 052 Street Style 056 The Needs of a Life Journey 060 Recipes 062 D  efinitions: Macquarie Dictionary


O1. education guide to aussie slang and idioms english exercises 6 ways to prepare for the toefl top 5 resources to master the toefl


-010 ----education

Guide to Aussie Slang and Idioms Writer: Darcy Tranter-Cook

BARBIE Is short for barbecue, which is a type of grill used primarily* for outdoor gatherings. The gatherings themselves are also referred to as barbies or barbecues.

’s ing to Keith ‘Are you go tonight?’

YOUR GUIDE TO THE AUSSIE LANGUAGE

barbie

RECKON This is a word used to ask what people think about something, or to explain what you think about something.

‘Do you reckon you’ll get good marks for that test?’ ARVO Is a shortened version of the word afternoon, which simply means the period of the day after noon (12pm).

for this ‘Have you got any plans arvo?’

Slang

A

ustralian slang can be a little confusing even for people who grew up here. Some slang can only be found in movies (very few Australians say the word ‘crikey’), but a lot of it is for real. Australians are famous for being relaxed, casual people and this is reflected in our language. Some of these words are simply shortened versions of common English phrases; some are sayings that aren’t meant to be taken literally*, and then there are words that even we don’t know the origins of.

DUNNO Is a shortened version of “I don’t know”. It is often said while shrugging.

‘Do you reckon it’ll rain this arvo for Keith’s barbie?’ ‘Dunno, it might.’ SHE’LL BE RIGHT This is a phrase used to express confidence that something will go well, or to tell someone not to worry.

umbrella to ‘Reckon I should bring an Keith’s barbie this arvo?’ ‘Nah, she’ll be right’


Idioms dioms are ‘sayings’— combinations of words that have a particular meaning in a certain culture due to their common usage. Idioms can be found in many languages and cultures, but they can be confusing if you’re not already familiar with their meaning. Here are some explanations for a few of the more common Australian idioms.

BRING A PLATE If someone asks you to bring a plate to a party or barbecue, do not take a stack of plates. This actually means they want you to bring a plate of food, not just the plate (they probably have plenty of those).

‘Could you please br ing a plate of something to Keith’s barbie tonight?’ HE’S KICKED THE BUCKET While I’ve found that kicking buckets is a good way to relieve stress, this saying actually means something quite grim. In the middle ages, when someone was to be hanged for a crime, they would have a noose tied around their neck and stand on a bucket. The executioner would then kick the bucket from under the criminal’s feet so he would begin to choke. Now, if someone has ‘kicked the bucket’ it just means they have died.

’ ‘Where’s Freddy? rd? ‘Haven’t you hea cket.’ He’s kicked the bu ARE YOU PULLING MY LEG? If someone says this to you, it doesn’t mean they want to know if you’re actually tugging on their leg. It means they think you’re joking or making fun of them. The origins of this saying are thought to come from purposely tripping someone to make them look silly as they fall over. I guess people had to do something before they invented TV.

olate.’ our choc ‘I ate all y ing my leg?’ pull ‘Are you

*See page 62 for definitions

education

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-011 -----


Writer: Darcy Tranter-Cook

YOUR / YOU’RE

The word ‘your’ shows that the person owns something, whereas ‘you’re’ is a short form of ‘you are’. The best way to remember which to use is to read the sentence with ‘you’re’ in its long form If it sounds awkward, ‘your’ is probably correct. Try it with this sentence: ‘I like _____ hat.’

THEN / THAN

‘Then’ defines the time in which something is happening. ‘Than’ is used when comparing two things. If you’re stuck on which to use, remember that ‘then’ describes when something is happening, and they are both spelt with an ‘e’. ‘Wait until twelve, _____ put the pie in the oven.’

ACCEPT / EXCEPT

‘Accept’ means to take something when it is given to you, to receive. ‘Except’ means to exclude or leave out something. A good way to remember which to use is that ‘except’ is spelt with an ‘x’. Picture what is being excluded being crossed out with a big red X in your mind. ‘All drinks cost $1, ______ lemonade which is more expensive.’

education

English Exercises

-013 -----

DIFFUSENFUSION...! THE CO The English language has a lot of words that sound and are spelt very much the same, but actually mean different things. Below are some examples and ways to remember the correct option.

TO / TOO / TWO

‘To’ is a word used to put phrases together, ‘too’ is an adverb (describes a verb) and ‘two’ is a number. Remember that ‘two’ is spelled t-w-o, similar to its related numbers like twelve and twenty. ‘Too’ is often used in place of ‘also’, when adding more information, or describing an amount of something. ‘I like video games, but I like board games ____.’ ‘Could I buy___oranges? Three is___ many.’ ____________________________________________ ANSWERS • ‘I like your hat.’ • ‘Wait until twelve, then put the pie in the oven.’ • ‘All drinks cost $1, except lemonade witch is more expensive.’ • ‘I like video games, but I like board games too.’ • ‘Could I buy two oranges? Three is too many.’


-015 ----education

6 Ways To Prepare for the TOEFL Writer: ETS TOEFL Photographer: Jamie Dela Rosa

MASTERING YOUR TOEFL TEST

T

he Test Of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) examines your ability to succeed in universities in Australia. As a non-native speaker of English, you need to attain* a passing score on the English language proficiency test before you can be considered for admission to an undergraduate or graduate program. Today more than 8,500 colleges and universities in 130 countries accept TOEFL scores as admission. Different institutions require different scores for entry. Below are a few tips to get your TOEFL exam preparation started for 2013. LEARN ACADEMIC ENGLISH The best way to practise for any English language test is to read as much as possible beforehand on a variety of topics, such as current affairs, health and sports. Writing, speaking and reading English language material (e.g. newspapers and academic publications) will help improve your vocabulary and prepare you for academic life in Australia. Do one English activity every day. Listen to the radio, watch a movie, read a magazine or newspaper. Have a conversation in English. Make it something that you are interested in and enjoy! FIND A MENTOR Another way to prepare for your TOEFL test is to talk with native speakers. You will often have many questions that your textbook cannot answer. It is also helpful to work together—find another student or friend and work as a team to help each other.

USE PRACTISE TESTS Practise makes perfect! The more you practise, the better the results. Find a textbook that includes practise tests or look for free samples on the Internet to supplement* your textbook. Identify the sections that you find most challenging and work on them. Brush up on basic grammar rules, spelling and punctuation. IDENTIFY YOUR WEAK AREAS What parts do you find difficult? Work harder to improve them, so you know where your strengths and weaknesses lie. This will help you decide where to focus your energy on as you prepare for the test. DEVELOP YOUR OWN STUDY PROGRAM A study program provides a roadmap to prepare for the English proficiency test. It can help you understand the skills and knowledge covered in the test and where to focus your attention. Create and commit to a schedule that works best for you and allows regular study breaks. IMPROVE YOUR TYPING SKILLS Try to improve your typing skills before taking the TOEFL. Even if they are strong, try doing practise tests on other computers. Some students get so used to their own computer that they often get nervous when they have to type on a new keyboard on test day.

*See page 62 for definitions


-016 ----education

Top 5 Resources to Master the TOEFL Writer: ETS TOEFL Photographer: Jamie Dela Rosa

I

f you’re an international student in Australia, or are looking to become one, you will have probably come across the Test Of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). For many students, the prospect of taking the TOEFL is very intimidating, however the key to achieving a good score in this test is to be confident and come prepared.

YOUR FIRST STEP WOULD BE TO LEARN HOW THE TOEFL WORKS AND WHAT IS EXPECTED OF YOU. WE HAVE MADE IT EASIER FOR YOU BY NARROWING YOUR SEARCH DOWN TO THE TOP FIVE FREE RESOURCES THAT WILL GIVE YOU EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW. THE MORE YOU PRACTICE, THE BETTER PREPARED YOU WILL BE! ABOUT THE TOEFL TEST For nearly 50 years, the TOEFL test has been the most widely accepted English language assessment in the world. The test measures an individual’s ability to use and understand English. The test also evaluates how well an individual is able to integrate* listening, reading, speaking and writing skills. The TOEFL test is recognized by more than 8,500 institutions in more than 130 countries including Australia, the United Kingdom, Canada and the United States. The TOEFL test is available at more than 4,500 testing sites in more than 165 countries. To date, more than 27 million students around the world have taken the TOEFL test.

*See page 62 for definitions


#1.

education

LINKS TO RESOURCES >>>>

#2.

#3. 1. PREPLAN YOUR TEST WITH THE TOEFL TEST PREP PLANNER With the TOEFL Test Prep Planner you can set weekly practise goals that will help you stay on track with tasks leading up to your test day. Each week you are presented with an objective, tasks to complete, and resources to help you complete them. The planner will help you understand how to prepare for the test effectively and build on your English language skills. 2. T  HE TOEFL IBT QUICK PREP With the TOEFL iBT Quick Prep you will have access to several training questions from all four sections of the TOEFL iBT test: Reading, Listening, Speaking and Writing. You can now practise by answering a series of different questions and develop techniques to answer them quickly. This guide also provides you with access to the scoring guides, giving you inside knowledge of what markers are looking for 3. T  HE TOEFL TEST VIDEO SERIES The TOEFL test video series will provide you with an in-depth overview of the writing and speaking sections of the test. 4. T  HE TOEFL TV CHANNEL On this channel you can easily access videos that share best practices and study tips from previous successful TOEFL test-takers,English language teachers and representatives from institutions around the world. 5. C  OME PREPARED It is important that you are aware of what to expect on your test day, so that you come prepared and confident. The TOEFL iBT Testing Site gives you a detailed overview of the do’s and don’ts for the test. It will also provide a detailed listing of what you need to bring with you on the test day itself. Included in this site is a six-minute video to familiarise you with the registration, check-in and testing process.

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#4.

#5.


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O2. all you need to know

tips and tricks- survive overseas tricky legal questions cultural awareness the nsw police force


VA FO LU PR R E E OV DU ID C E R AT S ION NO SURCHARGES RECONCILIATION OF FUNDS RECEIVED ALLOWING STUDENTS TO PAY IN LOCAL CURRENCY SIMPLY SAVE YOUR STUDENTS MONEY

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CU

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Inc CIE .R S MB

com.au

E: info@nexpay.com.au

1300 786 320


-021 -----

Writer: Naaz Hussain Photographer: Franky Junus

DON’T: GET AGGRESSIVE While many of us can admit to wanting to smack people being racist square in the face, it’s not the most effective way to combat racism. Getting violent or loud will only make it easier for the person making the comment to get away with it.

NO ONE LIKES RACISM. IT COMES FROM IGNORANCE, IT MAKES CONVERSATION AWKWARD AND I HAVE IT ON GOOD AUTHORITY THAT PEOPLE WHO SAY RACIST THINGS ALSO THROW BRICKS AT SMALL CHILDREN. OKAY, THAT LAST PART WAS A LIE, BUT THE TRUTH IS RACISM ISN’T FUN.

DEALING WITH RACISM ”

The tricky thing about racism is that it’s not always easy to identify. It can disguise itself in a sarcastic* comment, a distant attitude, or an apparently ‘humorous’ joke. What’s important to know is that if a comment about race makes you feel uncomfortable, you have the right to defend yourself. Whether this means moving away from the situation or having a calm discussion, racism is something we need to stop normalising.*

DO: EXPRESS YOUR FEELINGS Let the person know you are affected by their racism. Tell them, in a calm manner, that you are offended and why. Explain exactly what was said or done that made you feel this way. DON’T: CALL THEM RACIST It’s important to make the distinction between a person’s behaviour and their character. Saying the words: ‘You’re racist’ might seem like an effective way to go about things, but it’s not. Labelling someone changes the nature of the conversation and makes it easier for them to hide from the real issue. What’s important is what they said or did, not who they are. DO: REMOVE YOURSELF FROM THE SITUATION If you’re in a situation where having a conversation isn’t possible, you could always show disapproval by walking away and removing yourself from the situation. DON’T: IGNORE IT Sometimes pretending everything is okay seems like the safer option. But research has shown that the more silent we are about racist comments that offend us, the unhappier we become. Standing up to racism can be scary, especially if you’re in a foreign country. But knowing you did something about it will leave you feeling a whole lot better.

*See page 62 for definitions

all you need to know

Tips and TricksSurvive Overseas

DO: REACT CALMLY It is easy to get angry or upset when met with racism but this usually makes the situation worse. Take a few deep breaths and try to think before you react.


com.au

HE ST LP UD F ENOR TS PAY IN OWN CURRENCY NO EXTRA COSTS WHEN YOU TRANSFER $ FOR TUITION FEES SAVE UP TO $1,000

Tricky Legal Questions Writer: Lisa Coady Photographer: Reni Indrewan

WHEN MAKING THE DECISION TO STUDY ABROAD, THE QUESTION OF WHETHER OR NOT TO WORK WILL OFTEN ARISE. NO MATTER THE REASONING BEHIND THE DESIRE TO WORK, IT IS IMPORTANT TO KNOW YOUR RIGHTS BEFORE THIS DECISION IS MADE.

“ WORKPLACE RIGHTS ”

Firstly, it is important to note that as an international student you are protected in the workplace under Australian law. If an employer tells you that because you are an international student, you don’t have rights, do not believe them and find assistance as soon as possible.

E: info@nexpay.com.au

1300 786 320

Contact www.fairwork.gov.au or call 131 394 if you feel you are being mistreated* in your workplace.


-023 ----all you need to know

Everyone working in Australia has basic rights at work, including international students and people on working holiday visas. These rights entitle you to: -

A minimum wage Challenge unfair dismissal* from your job Breaks and rest periods A healthy and safe work environment

Most employers in Australia are covered by an ‘award’, which sets minimum wages and conditions for every field of work. To find out more about your work rights, and what you should be getting paid, visit the Australian Government’s Fair Work website. Prior to applying for any type of work there are a few things you must first consider: 1. You must check that your visa grants you the right to work in Australia. If you are uncertain, check with the Department of Immigration and Citizenship on either 13 18 81 or www.immi.gov.au. 2. Apply for a Tax File Number via the Australian Taxation Office on 13 28 61 or www.ato.gov.au You must have a TFN to work in Australia.It will ensure that you pay the least amount of tax possible.

A typical student visa allows a student to: - W  ork up to 40 hours every two weeks while your course is in session - Work unlimited hours while your course is not in session (during holidays), however you cannot start working before your course begins - Undertake volunteer work on top of the 40 hours without being paid If you have any questions or feel that you are not being treated fairly, you can contact the following people: - F air Work Ombudsman (language assistance is also available). It is an independent statutory body t hat w a s c r e a t e d b y t h e F a i r Wo r k Act 2009 - Department of Immigration and Citizenship

*See page 62 for definitions


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Writer: Stephen Lyons Photographer: Franky Junus

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WAY TO PAY AND RECEIVE TUITION FEES

NEXPAY MAKES LIFE EASY FOR STUDENTS AND EDUCATION PROVIDERS E: info@nexpay.com.au

1300 786 320

GETTING TO KNOW THE PEOPLE AT WORK CAN BE AN EXCITING EXPERIENCE, BUT DIFFERENCES IN CULTURE AND LANGUAGE CAN SOMETIMES MAKE THIS A CHALLENGING PROCESS. AUSTRALIA IS A MULTICULTURAL NATION, MADE UP OF PEOPLE FROM MANY DIFFERENT CULTURES, NATIONALITIES, AND LANGUAGES. AUSTRALIAN WORKERS ARE AWARE OF THESE DIFFERENCES, AND FOR THE MOST PART, CELEBRATE THEM.

“ SMALL TALK FOR BIG OPPORTUNITIES ”

Although it can be intimidating at first, and sometimes it may seem impossible, it is important to speak with the people at work in order to form healthy working relationships. This is because, after all, healthy working relationships often turn into strong friendships. Remember that the people you work with will want to get to know you too. As an international student you can share interesting stories and perspectives, and this is valuable to most people. When speaking with someone for the first time, it’s best to use ‘small talk’ to start a conversation. Small talk is the term used for sharing ‘casual’ or ‘informal’ information, and it’s the best way to connect with someone you don’t already know. Small talk can include asking about a person’s weekend, to commenting on the new shoes they may be wearing—it’s up to you. It’s best to keep the subject simple and easy to talk about.


-025 ----all you need to know

So, now that you’ve found someone that you would like to be friends with, here are some examples of small talk—the topics that work and the topics it’s best you avoid. SMALL TALK ISN’T BIG TALK Try to keep small talk* small you don’t know this person yet. It can be difficult for a stranger to listen to you if you talk too much. FIND SOMETHING IN COMMON Pick something that you will both enjoy talking about. Sport, music, and fashion are interests that are shared internationally. REPEAT THAT, PLEASE? Listen to the other person and, if you don’t understand something, don’t be afraid to say so. People are generally patient, and will usually be happy to repeat themselves. Remember, they want you to understand. WATCH THE NEWS A good way to start a conversation is to talk about a recent event. Watch the news or read a newspaper and try to keep up with local events. POLITICS, RELIGION, AND MONEY It’s best to avoid these topics. Politics, religion, and money are more personal subjects and it’s easy to offend somebody that you’ve only recently met. Small talk is the best way to form new friendships at work. It can be difficult at first, especially if your English isn’t as good as you would like it to be. But consider the topic, be friendly and confident, and you will find that speaking English with others is the best way to both improve your skills, and better develop your working relationships.

*See page 62 for definitions


ฃ -026 ----all you need to know

THE NSW POLICE FORCE HAS WOVEN A TIGHTER THREAD IN ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS THROUGH A NEW PARTNERSHIP WITH MACQUARIE UNIVERSITY. The university’s Translation & Interpreting Office Administrator, Alice Wu said these students translate the messages under the guidance of unit coordinators, with these translations forming part of their course’s practical component. Story: Esther Tang Corporate Communications Unit

Since launching in January, Det Supt Gavin Dengate’s Facebook and Weibo pages have burgeoned under strong support from the Chinese community. Weibo is one of the most popular social chat sites in China, used by more than 30% of Internet users. With the corporate Weibo page now host to more than 10,367 followers, the NSWPF is directly involving international students in translating updates for our Chinese audience.

“This partnership has been very beneficial to our students,” she said. “It has aroused interest not only in current students, but also students studying other units and alumni. “Former students have been telling me they wish they could have been involved in such a positive activity with NSW Police. ”Corporate Spokesperson for International Students, Supt Gavin Dengate said this partnership demonstrates the organisation is continually flexing its adaptability and finesse. “We need to communicate the way our community communicates,” he said.

The project was borne out of a need to provide accurate and timely messages in the native language of thousands of international students in NSW.

“We know that our students connect close to 24/7 on social media, so we need to as well.” Underpinning this proactivity is an effective use of Weibo, achieved through a collaborative relationship with the Chinese social networking site itself.

Postgraduate students in translation at Macquarie University who are fluent in Mandarin Chinese, are placed on a roster to receive messages from Supt Dengate’s support team.

In March, Supt Dengate met with the Weibo Australia team in Melbourne to discuss ways to maximise participation in the platform’s macrocosm of 503 million users.


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“This is about us working with Weibo to improve the quality of life for all people within the Chinese community,” he said.

“The students responded very positively to Tui’s talk and expressed a lot of interest in the police equipment she was carrying.

“We learned that we can reach more people and improve perception of our messages by interacting with influential Weibo users.”

”Stella Maris College student Jojo Qian said Snr Cst Ormsby’s visit went beyond providing advice.

The NSW Police Force’s efforts to engage with the Chinese community has seen positive results due to a strong link between online and offline service. IT IS WORKING Earlier this year, Supt Dengate received encouraging feedback through his Corporate Spokesperson’s Facebook page from the International Student Officer at Stella Maris College, Jiani Chen. Jiani had asked the Manly Youth Liaison Officer to present to the international students at the college. Snr Cst Tui Ormsby gave the students personal safety advice, tips on how to report a crime, and phone numbers for local police. There are about 25 international students in our school and most of them come from Chinesespeaking backgrounds,” said Jiani. “Many have families in Ashfield and Hurstville, so my concern is that they are vulnerable travelling a fair way on public transport to visit them.

“I believe her talk has not only had an educational effect on me, but also created a close and trusted relationship between the police officer and us,” said Jojo. With the International Students portfolio expanding, collaboration with Chinese speaking students has set the standard for synergy with other ethnic student groups. Consultations with internal staff and external agencies have resulted in the development of a draft NSWPF International Students Strategic Plan 2013-2017. “We have had some fantastic feedback,” said Supt Dengate. “I know with the small but committed team that help out, we will only get better, and if we get better, our community will get safer.”


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real stories by real students the myths of australia calendar events past events when in australia movie review


>>

>>

Merry Christmas! ” -030 ----something fun

Real Stories By Real Students “

“When I first came to Australia, Christmas was coming. I went to a supermarket and there were some Xmas bags. I asked the cashier how much they were, and she said ‘three’. But I had just been in the country for one month, so I didn’t understand much. I understood ‘free’ instead of ‘three’. Later, when I checked the receipt, I had paid $9 for the three bags that I took.”

“I

Name: Fagner Sposito Nationality: Brazilian School: SIEC (Sydney International English College) ____________________________

____________________________

Would you like oranges with that? ” >> “It

was my third week in Sydney when I got a job at a prestigious university as a salad maker in the cafeteria. My face was so blank when people talked to me because they spoke English too fast. Their slang and words sometimes made my jaw drop. I’ll never forget when my boss, the owner himself talked to me, and without fully understanding his fast words, I just said “Yes” and nodded my head up and down. I did not dare have his words repeated because I knew it’d make a bad impression, so I used all my hidden intellectual treasures to figure out what he had just said. I went down to the fridge and grabbed some oranges and handed them to him with outstanding confidence. His face made me want to go to the moon and never come back. He suddenly whispered something to the store manager, and the store manager relayed it back to me. And here were the words, the words that turned my world around… he said, “Go to break, not get the oranges.” Name: Angelica Guevarra Nationality: Filipino School: Australian Pacific College

Gates to heaven ”

The sound of music ”

>>

“Last

t i m e I w a l k e d t o the bathroom and knocked on one of the doors and got no response. But then when I opened the door, I saw one of my mates sitting on the toilet with her earphones on!” Name: Annie Huang Nationality: Taiwanese School: MLC High School ____________________________

was so sure that the train ticket that I was going to use was the correct one, so I put the ticket in the machine and just walked through, without noticing that the gate didn’t open. In the end I hurt myself and the guy behind me was smiling wide…” Name: Agnes Laurent Nationality: Indonesia School: Macquarie University

Wet puddle ” >>

“F alling

asleep in a lecture, d r o o l i n g o n t h e l e c t u r e r ’s architectural model piece and having to explain to him why there was a stain on it.” Name: Richard Nguyen Nationality: Vietnamese School: U TS, University of Technology Sydney ____________________________


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PLATYPUS

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The Myths of Australia Writer: Naaz Hussain

DROP BEAR

THE DROP BEAR

THE PLATYPUS

WHAT ARE THEY? THE DROP BEAR, OR THYLARCTOS PLUMMETUS, IS SAID TO BE A PREDATORY AUSTRALIAN MARSUPIAL RELATED TO THE COMMON KOALA. HOWEVER, THESE FURRY CREATURES ARE NOT SO CUTE AND CUDDLY.

WHAT ARE THEY? THE PLATYPUS, OR ORNITHORHYNCHUS ANATINUS, IS OFTEN DESCRIBED AS A ‘DUCK DESIGNED BY COMMITTEE IN REFERENCE OF COURSE TO ITS SHEER WEIRDNESS. WHEN SCIENTISTS FIRST IDENTIFIED THE PLATYPUS, MANY BELIEVED IT TO BE A PRACTICAL JOKE.

According to the Australian Museum, the size of an average drop bear is 130 cm long (90 cm at the shoulder) and weighs 120 kg, making it around the same size as a leopard. The Drop Bear Aware team have even reported over 200 tourist encounters with the animals. WHERE ARE THEY FOUND? Drop bears are found in forested areas of central and South-eastern Australia. There have also been reports of drop bear sightings in Kangaroo Island and Mount Lofty Ranges. Luckily for most Aussies, drop bears are never found near human habitation*; the large marsupials prefer closed canopy forests and open woodlands. FUN FACTS These giants feed on medium to large mammals.* Often, their prey is larger than the drop bear itself. These carnivores are vicious, trapping prey by dropping onto their heads from above. The initial impact stuns the prey, which is then bitten on the neck by the animal and immediately subdued. TRUE OR FALSE? False! Drop bears are as real as the tooth fairy. The only thing you should be worried about dropping on your head while exploring Australian bushland is, well, animal droppings.*

Why wouldn’t they? We’re talking about an animal with a duck’s bill, the tail of beaver and the webbed feet of an otter. Not to mention it’s one of the few venomous mammals in the world and one of five other mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth. WHERE ARE THEY FOUND? The platypus is found mainly in the eastern parts of Australia. Their size ranges from 40 cm to 50 cm in length and 0.7 kg to 2.5 kg in weight. In addition to their other odd features, the platypus has a body temperature of 32°C, unlike the typical 37°C for other placental mammals. FUN FACTS This furry, semi-aquatic, poisonous thing, as strange as it is, has also played an important part in both Indigenous and Australian culture. One popular Dreamtime story tells the tale of the origin of the platypus. According to Aboriginal legend, the water rat Bilargun fell in love with a duck, Daroo and had children we now call the platypus. TRUE OR FALSE? True! While the platypus is a confusing animal, the truth is that these weird creatures exist. *See page 62 for definitions


____________________________ WORLD SOLAR CHALLENGE darwin to adelaide stuart highway, SA

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CALENDAR EVENTS ----------------------____________________________ BROADWAY MUSICAL the addams family capitol theatre, haymarket, sydney NSW mar. 11 - oct. 06 ____________________________

oct. 6 -13

THE HANDMADE EXPO MARKET the morayfield leisure centre, morayfield road, brisbane QLD

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oct. 06, nov. 03, dec. 01

MBANTUA FESTIVAL awakening the desert telegraph station, alice springs NT

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oct. 09 - 13

oct. 12 - 13

____________________________

____________________________

MELBOURNE FESTIVAL federation square, melbourne VIC.

THE SUMMER NIGHT MARKET queen victoria market, 513 elizabeth st, melbourne VIC

oct. 11 - 27 ____________________________ ROYAL LAUNCESTON SHOW inveresk precinct, launceston TAS.

oct. 11 - 13 SYDNEY MODERNS art for a new world ____________________________ art gallery nsw, sydney NSW FLORIADE jul. 06 - oct. 07 commonwealth park ____________________________ canberra ACT AUSTRALIA UNIVERSITY GAMES gold coast QLD

sep.14 - oct. 13

sep. 29 - oct. 04

CANBERRA NARA CANDLE FESTIVAL lennox gardens, canberra nara park ACT

____________________________ ROYAL ADELAIDE WINE SHOW adelaide show ground adelaide SA

____________________________

____________________________

GREEK FESTIVAL townsville QLD

Wednesday night from nov. - feb. ____________________________ BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL brisbane, QLD nov. 13 - 24 ____________________________

ICONS GUIDE # Art & Culture # Shopping

oct. 26 ____________________________

# Food # Entertainment

oct. 04 # Event & Festival

____________________________


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Past Events SYDNEY, NSW

BRISBANE, QLD

THE SUN-HERALD CITY2SURF, presented by Westpac is not just Sydney’s favourite sporting event, it is the world’s largest run. Walk or watch the 14 kilometre race from Hyde Park in Sydney’s central business district to the finish at spectacular Bondi Beach. << 11 August

GOLD COAST, QLD

BROADBEACH JAZZ FESTIVAL Groove to the rhythm, feel the beat and jazz up your life at the annual broadbeach Jazz Festival. << 16 -18 August

PERTH,WA

PANORAMAS: MUSEUM OF BRISBANE offer exhibition goers a rare chance to view some of the most beautiful panoramic shots of Brisbane in times gone by. The exhibition is the first in the ‘Document’ series which traces the ways in which artists have recorded the Brisbane landscape over the years. << 6 April - 6 October

SECRETS OF THE AFTERLIFE Ancient Egypt has captured the imagination of generations with its endless myths and mysteries. This exhibition, which includes 100 artefacts from the British Museum, immerses visitors into Ancient Egypt’s quest for eternal life. Artefacts on display include decorated coffins, two mummies and a gilded mummy mask. This spooky exhibit is bound to get your imagination going!<< 17 May - 22 September


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SYDNEY, NSW FESTIVAL OF WINDS Bondi Park, Bondi Beach and Bondi Pavilion << 8 September SYDNEY, NSW VIVID SYDNEY is an annual outdoor winter festival of light and music. The beautiful light works attract a large crowd who gather to witness Sydneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s iconic treasures light up the night. The Sydney Opera House, The Sydney Harbour Bridge and Darling Harbour are a few of the special places that literally brighten up the city to the delight of audiences from all over Sydney.

MELBOURNE, VIC OPEN HOUSE MELBOURNE << 27 - 28 July http://www.openhousemelbourne.org


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When in Australia Writer: Naaz Hussain Photographer: Bronte Wilson

A GUIDE TO THE GREAT AUSSIE BARBIE(BBQ) ONE OF THE GREATEST AND MOST LOVED AUSSIE TRADITIONS IS THE BARBEQUE. BARBEQUES ARE AFFECTIONATELY CALLED ‘BBQS’ OR ‘BARBIES’ IN AUSSIE SLANG. THERE’S NO BETTER WAY TO GET FRIENDS TOGETHER THAN HEATING UP THE BARBIE AND THROWING ON ANY PIECE OF DEAD ANIMAL YOU CAN FIND.


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WHAT YOU NEED

THINGS TO AVOID

THE SUN No one likes waiting for food to cook while standing in the freezing cold. Make sure you’ve checked the weather well in advance and have plenty of outdoor seating so your friends can soak up the Vitamin D.

THE MOSQUITO BITE If you’ve already spent more than a week in Australia then you’ve probably realised that our mosquitoes are brutal. They’re big, they’re ugly and they leave bites the size of a small child’s foot.

MEAT Sorry vegetarians! Meat is an important part of any good Australian barbeque. Lamb chops, steak and snags (which are really just sausages, but as you’ll come to notice, Aussies like to complicate the English language). To make the most out of your meat, make sure you use thin cuts to minimise cooking time. Also avoid poking and flipping the meat too much to allow for even cooking. THE BARBEQUE You can’t throw a barbeque without, well without an actual barbeque. Things might get a bit complicated when deciding whether you should go with a gas or charcoal barbeque. Gas is easier to clean, whereas charcoal gives you a great, distinct taste. At the end of day, it all comes down to personal preference.

To make sure these crafty little insects don’t ruin your day in the sun, provide your guests with insect repellent spray or cream. Lighting citronella candles is also an effective way to keep the mozzies away at night.

FIRES The only thing that should be burning hot at a barbeque is the food. The leading cause for gas fires is an obstruction to the flow of fuel. If you suspect any problems, turn off the flame and disconnect the gas tank immediately, while also making sure not to burn yourself on the hot surface. Charcoal grill fires can especially occur when attempting to light up the charcoal. Never use gasoline or kerosene to light the fire. Try using *paraffin or chimney starters, which you can buy from any good hardware store. It is also important to remember to keep a fire extinguisher around and avoid placing your barbeque in an enclosed or dangerous area.


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Movie Review Writer: Darcy Tranter-Cook

The Intouchables is a film about an unlikely friendship that grows between two men from completely different worlds. Philippe (Francois Cluzet) is a wealthy quadriplegic who’s seeking a new live-in carer. Driss (Omar Sy) is just looking for someone to sign off on his welfare payment and so attends the job interview. From the moment they meet these two personalities clash, and yet, Philippe sees something in Driss and decides to give him the job on the spot.

THE INTOUCHABLES Despite their vastly different lifestyles and backgrounds, Driss and Philippe form an incredible friendship, teaching one another about what they feel are the best things in life. It’s genuinely funny, aesthetically crisp, thoughtprovoking, emotional, heartwarming and—as far as feel-good comedies go—The Intouchables is truly untouchable. Tip: Try watching the movie without subtitles It will help you learn English much faster!


iStudent is Offering a voluntreer program for International Students! iStudent is offering a voluntreer program to students to help them gain exposure in the industry. If you are a photographer, graphic designer, journalist, marketing person or accountant and are interested in developing your skills in your field of study then send your resume to info@istudent.ws BECOMING PART OF THE ISTUDENT TEAM WILL ALLOW YOU TO: • improve your interpersonal communication skills • gain real life experience working with a team • improve your English skills • meet people from different industries / businesses • enjoy working in a fun and relaxed atmosphere • make new friends • interact with local Australian businesses • develop good references to add into your resume The iStudent team will provide ongoing support and give you the opportunity to untillse your talents to your full potential. You will be able to use our office space to work, chill out, do your homework as well as surf fast internet. iStudent Magazine is run by international students a nd w it h t h e a i m o f s u p p o r t i n g t h e g r o w i n g international student community in Australia.


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international community mix â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; match my story success story monika kamycka street style the needs of a life journey recipes definitions macquarie dictionary


Paris


Mix ‘n’ Match HUBERT & ELLY

Seoul


WHAT ARE YOUR NAMES?

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Hubert & Elly

WHAT IS YOUR BACKGROUND ? Hubert: French Elly: Korean We’ve both lived in Sydney for 5 years.

our international community

WHAT ARE YOU DOING AT THE MOMENT? WORK STUDY ETC? Hubert : I graduated in July from with a Master of Commerce (Marketing, Strategy & Innovation) and I’m looking  for opportunities. Elly :  I’m currently studying last my semester of Bachelor of Nursing. HOW OFTEN DO YOU SAY “I LOVE YOU” TO ONE ANOTHER? AND WHO SAYS IT MORE? Everyday. Hubert tends to say it a bit more. WHAT WAS THE FIRST THING THAT ATTRACTED YOU TO EACH OTHER? Hubert : Elly’s smile. Elly : Hubert’s humour. WHERE DID YOU GO FOR YOUR FIRST DATE? HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN DATING?

A Korean restaurant near Town Hall.

A year and a half.

“Be yourself and love will come to you” WHO HAS MORE POWER IN DECISION MAKING? OR WHO HAS THE LAST WORD? Equal. We take turns, we are really flexible when it comes to decisions and separate tasks. HOW DO YOU GET OVER DISAGREEMENTS?

We talk until we convince one another.

HOW OFTEN DO YOU HAVE MISUNDERSTANDINGS AND WHAT ARE THEY USUALLY ABOUT? Once a month.. Usually related to stress from uni or period crankiness. WHAT IS THE BEST THING YOU HAVE LEARNED FROM EACH OTHER? Hubert :  Elly appreciating every moment of the life. Elly : Hubert being well organised. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO OTHER MIXED-RACE COUPLES? Hubert : Try to learn the culture of the other one and be open minded. Also don’t judge people that are different. Elly :  Don’t worry about the language barrier, be yourself, at the end you will be able to understand anyway if you love other one! DOES LANGUAGE AND CULTURE CREATE A BARRIER IN YOUR RELATIONSHIP? TELL US A LITTLE MORE ABOUT IT? We do not feel that we have any problem with language, because we both speak good English. There are different views about relationship between our families. For example, Elly’s family (Asian family) want the relationship to be settled sooner than my family (European family). SOME PEOPLE SAY THAT HAVING A GF OR BF FROM ANOTHER COUNTRY IS MUCH MORE INTERESTING BECAUSE YOU HAVE SO MUCH TO LEARN AND DISCOVER ABOUT ONE ANOTHER? DO YOU AGREE WITH THIS? Yes, you can learn different languages, food, culture, dress code (traditional historical French clothes vs traditional historical Korean clothes), history, and movies (French movies vs Korean movies). And there is so much more to learn.


-045 ----our international community

TELL US A FEW THINGS YOU LOVE TO DO TOGETHER? We love movies (one days we will watch a French film, the next day a Korean and then an American movie). We love social activity; going out with friends, walking, ejoying Sydney’s countless cafes. We love taking photos of almost everything from food to the sunset. We love eating out and of course cooking our traditional food at home. IF YOU COULD DESCRIBE EACH OTHER IN 1-2 SENTENCES WHAT WOULD YOU SAY ABOUT ONE ANOTHER? Hubert: Elly is a smart girl and also very cheeky. Elly: Hubert is a good listener and good talker. ARE YOU PLANNING TO GET MARRIED OR IS IT TOO EARLY TO TALK ABOUT IT? Yes, within 2 years. WHAT ARE THE THREE THINGS YOU LIKE ABOUT EACH OTHER THE MOST? Hubert : Humour, her playfulness and she’s down to earth. Elly : His kindness, fashion sense, and knowledge (he knows the things I don’t know about).


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My Story Story: Debby Ng Editor: Aideen Weingarth Photographer: Phan Peter

Strolling side by side in the multicultural sphere of Chatswood onlookers are offered just a glimpse of an intercultural couple in Sydney. The difference in their ethnicities is physically evident – yet they understand how important it is to try and stay on the same foot.

THE CULTURE FACTOR: MY KOREAN HUSBAND

--------------------------------------------------------Nichola and Hugh Gwon are young newlyweds living in Sydney. Nichola is Australian; Hugh is Korean. Debby Ng discovered what makes their relationship unique. ---------------------------------------------------------

Nichola and Hugh met through advertising ‘language exchange’ on Gumtree, while Hugh was an international student on a working holiday. After a sneaky Facebook add and some conversations online, the pair decided to meet and “he asked me out on the first day.” The couple’s cultural mishaps are shared through Nichola’s blog, ‘My Korean Husband’, which began after she stumbled upon “all this ridiculous negative stuff” on the internet about Korean men. This prompted her to “do something positive” and post light-hearted, often amusing stories about their daily experiences. So what does Mr Gwon have to say about all the attention? When his wife quips, “It’s about himself!”, Hugh replies, “I’m happy because she’s happy.” They believe that being from different cultures can be an advantage. Nichola explains, “[It] makes you so much more careful, which helps you strengthen [your relationship] and be conscious. Things fail when people are careless in their relationship. And also just being exposed to new things all the time… that’s really interesting.” Another positive? Cute pet names. When she wants something, Nichola will refer to her beau as ‘oppa’, but mostly uses “‘jagiya’... which means like ‘honey’, ‘baby’.”


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The Gwons believe that being open to new and foreign experiences is important for students arriving in Australia. This can be achieved by trying “to get English-speaker friends... somebody who is not from your country. Even if their English is not that good you’ll have to speak in English to them; I think that really helps.” Hugh also believes in leaving inhibitions at the door, saying “Asian [and other international] people worry too much about grammar and pronunciation. Just speak and talk and try! That’s really important. And if they don’t understand, then they will teach you how to say these things. Language exchange is very good, if you meet these people you can feel more confident.”

The multicultural aspect of Australia can also make it very easy to refrain from branching out. Nichola advises, “Make friends that are not from your country very quickly because the longer you wait, the harder it gets and the more comfortable you get in your own culture and people from that culture. When I’m starting a new course, I have the aim of making at least one friend on the first day and really putting yourself out there.” So why not dare to immerse yourself - maybe you’ll even find a Korean husband of your own!

mykoreanhusband.com

our international community

“He’s really taken to calling me pig; I will start calling him pumpkin. It means ‘ugly’ in Korean,” she adds playfully.


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Success Story Writer: Naaz Hussain

Food for thought (and success) GOOD FOOD IS ONE OF LIFE’S GREATEST TREASURES. IT HAS THE POWER TO MAKE BORING FAMILY GATHERINGS AMAZING. IT IS A GREAT FORM OF ENTERTAINMENT IF USED WELL (JAPANESE IRON CHEF ANYONE?). AND IT KEEPS US ALIVE, WHICH I THINK MOST PEOPLE FIND QUITE HANDY. BUT THE BENEFITS OF FOOD DO NOT STOP THERE. FOR TWO INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS LIVING IN SYDNEY, THE LOVE OF FOOD HAS ALSO GIVEN THEM AN OPPORTUNITY TO SHINE. Doungjan Komvisate ‘Tang’, 26, is a student at the Evolution Hospitality Institute. Hailing from Bangkok, Tang says her father has a lot to do with her passion for food. “He is my idol. He can cook anything and make it good. He doesn’t need any recipe, he just tastes a meal and then he can cook it at home perfectly.” Despite a family tradition of good food, Tang’s ambitions to conquer the culinary world were initially met with reluctance from her father. “He didn’t want me to be a chef. But later on he said if I do something I like, I will do something good. That’s all that matters.”

Doungjan Komvisate ‘Tang’

And something good is exactly what Tang did. In her homeland of Thailand, Tang won third place in a national fruit carving competition. But more recently, her talents have seen her win first place at this year’s Pantai cooking competition. “I was the only girl. I could see everyone look at this tall guy thinking he is going to win. But then I won. This small girl”, Tang says with a look of noticeable disbelief. While studying in Sydney has provided Tang with many great opportunities, the hardest thing she’s faced is the Australian winter.“In Thailand there’s just hot and super hot. Not cold. That’s the biggest change for me.” And while the sometimes-unpredictable weather can be cause for difficulty, Tang’s passion for food brings her all the happiness he needs. “For me when I see the customer smile that’s it.That makes me the happiest.” Tang’s story is one from a group of international students in Australia who want to make their time here as rewarding as possible.


Ram Bahadur Khati, 35, hails from Nepal. Arriving in Sydney in 2008 with his wife, Ram’s initial plan was to study I.T. But, as fate would have it, his love for cooking won.

Some might find a Nepalese native cooking Irish food odd, but National Manager of Evolution, Brad Bennet says there’s nothing surprising about Ram’s success.

Ram Bahadur Khati

“I couldn’t be prouder of Ram. To have a graduate from our school move on to become Head Chef is amazing. But to have an international student reach that level is just wonderful. I can’t think of anyone more deserving and hard working. Ram shows other internationals that success is there if you work hard. And he works hard every day.” Ram’s achievements do not stop there. His talent and determination have seen him win the 2013 Destination NSW Minister’s Student Achiever Award. “I was so shocked. All of a sudden I just thought to myself, ‘where am I’ and then I just became very emotional.” For foodies like Ram and Tang, it seems a strong passion and hard work are the keys for making the most of the international student experience. Ram said: “For me I just wanted to cook. That’s all I wanted. And I think if you want something you should just go for it. Work hard to make you happy.”

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Since graduating from Evolution Hospitality Institute with a Diploma of Hospitality, Ram has climbed up the culinary ranks and is now Head Chef at Sydney’s Criterion Hotel on the busy Pitt street.


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Monika Kamycka Writer: Lauren Horner

Monika Kamycka loves her life in Australia. She loves the warm weather and friendly nature of the people, or simply, when someone smiles at her. It is so important to surround yourself with good people, people who inspire you, especially when you draw inspiration from those around you to create artwork. She finds designing to be an emotional practice. When she wants to draw, she takes paper and a pencil and line by line, gives life to something. When there is no time to draw then and there, she takes a book, to write down her idea to come back to when she isn’t feeling so inspired.

A

I COULDN’T HELP BUT SMILE WHEN I MET MONIKA KAMYCKA, A BRIGHT EYED, YOUNG POLISH STUDENT WHO CAME TO AUSTRALIA ON A WHIM TO MAKE A CHANGE IN HER LIFE. The feeling that we don’t belong is something that everyone will experience at least once in their lifetime. This feeling drove graphic designer Monika Kamycka to seek out something new and different in Australia. Travelling halfway across the world to follow her dreams, this multitasking prodigy works part time, furthers her studies in web design, and still makes time to let her imagination run wild designing tattoos and drawing for her small business selling t-shirts online. She admits that this constant juggling act is challenging, and lets me in on her secret: it’s about creating habits. “If you say you will draw every two or three days, you will do it. There are no excuses.” We all need money to pay the rent, and that’s where the part time job comes in, but you can’t let it stop you from drawing. This website became a link between making art and making money necessary to combine these two essential elements in her life. The website keeps her drawing.

The inspiration behind her artwork is largely derived from stories she made up with her sister when she was younger. She often reaches back into her memory to the characters they created together and renders them with a newfound edgy precision. Comics, computer games, and movies are other sources of her inspiration which constantly inform her of new techniques she could try to better her practice. You’ll find that she does not draw from nature, but instead learns how nature can draw. She watches the sun, the moon, the stars and studies what happens with the light, how contrasts are formed and how things are made beautiful: textures, tones, lines, the simple things, even those that aren’t obvious. With the freedom to express herself through visual image, and power to share it with the world through her website, we can all take home a piece of Monika Kamycka.


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A

darkmatterdesign.com.au


_____________________________ # PAVEL VALSA; nationality: czech, school: elsis (english language school), personal style: individual, own, different, trendy, inspired by other people (on websites, look books), type of clothing: white, blue and red converse platforms, shoes with banana, teal socks, divide jeans, topman jumper & jeans jacket and lastly ray-ban sunglasses.__


STREET STYLE ___ phototgraphers : brinte wilson, phan peter, jon manez, jaime dela rosa, setthawut pattanasuwimol


_____________________________ # DANICA JAYME; nationality: canadian / filipino, school: university of western australia (perth) , personal style: semi casual/hipster, favourite type of clothing: dresses__


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#1 __

#2 __

#3 __

#4 __

#1.EMILY CHAI; nationality: japanese, school: university of technology, sydney (uts) personal style: comfy semi-casual, favorite type of clothing: beanies __ #2.NOAL; nationality: nepali, school: raffles college of design and commerce, favorite item of clothing: __#3.CHOLADA KLUAYMAI; nationality: thai, school: tafe college - marketing personal style: simply chic,favorite item of clothing: pink and violet__#4.JULIET; nationality: japanese, school: college of fine arts, Personal style: pulled together, favourite type of clothing: mixture of modern and vintage.


THE MANY BITS AND PIECES OF THE INTERNATIONAL STUDENT JOURNEY BECOME VALUABLE LIFE EXPERIENCES. AFTER COLLEGE, I WAS AT A CROSSROADS. A DECISION HAD TO BE MADE ON WHETHER OR NOT TO FURTHER MY EDUCATION. THIS TIME MARKED THE BEGINNING OF A JOURNEY; A NEW JOURNEY TO LOOK FORWARD TO.


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“THE NEEDS OF A LIFE ” JOURNEY ---------------

THOMSON CH’NG NATIONAL PRESIDENT COUNCIL OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AUSTRALIA (CISA)


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Australia is now one of the most culturally diverse countries in the world. With so many languages spoken by people from different regions and backgrounds, it is important to highlight the fact that having a common language⎯is essential for communication. Yet this has always been one of the challenges that international students face. Translation and interpretation services are still essential to overcome language barriers. Language proficiency is an ongoing learning process requiring self-effort, determination and commitment combined with support from peers, friends, educational institutions and the community to successfully adapt to the local environment.

““ I

Safety, accommodation, employment, social isolation, health and wellbeing, and the cost of living are just a few key issues for international students (on a macro level). The government, educational institutions, industries, community groups and student associations must continue addressing these issues through working partnerships. All of these areas are best described as “needs”, identified by the famous American Psychologist, Abraham Maslow’s Theory of Needs. Safety (sense of security), love, a sense of belonging, self esteem (including sense of respect from others) and self actualisation are all followed in sequenced after the basic human physiological needs, according to the Maslow hierarchy of needs.

came from the town of Butterworth in Penang, Malaysia. With the support of my family, I was given the opportunity to seek a different experience,⎯an experience I hoped would lead me to a different life. With courage I left home for the very first time, knowing that I would face challenges as well as opportunities.

As a country hosting approximately 500 000 international students, there needs to be a space of conversation for these students and the wider community, government policies to foster supportive and positive relationships, and nurturing from the Australian society to embrace a multicultural and diverse student community.

Over the past three years, I have become an active member in the international student community. I have met many of my peers from countries across the world—Asia to Europe, Africa to South America, United States to the Middle East. Although we have different views, cultural beliefs, and values, we share the common experience of being an international student in Australia.

In order to contribute to the nation as a whole, students need to be given the opportunity to blend their fresh international perspectives and opinions from their home country into the current local context. This will allow Australia to continue to be viewed as a truly global country in the world stage where all contributions from diverse backgrounds matter.


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STUDENT LEADER SOCIAL BUTTERFLY PIANIST AND MUSICIAN

our international community

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Recipes Writer: Benjamin Warren

TANDOORI CHICKEN ฦ/ CORIANDER AND MINT DRESSING . TANDOORI CHICKEN IS A TRADITIONAL INDIAN MEAL NOW POPULAR ALL OVER THE WORLD. IT IS EASY TO PREPARE AND PERFECT TO WHIP UP IF YOU WANT TO INVITE A COUPLE OF FRIENDS OVER FOR DINNER. AS WELL AS TASTING DELICIOUS, IT FILLS THE WHOLE KITCHEN WITH A MOUTH WATERING AROMA.

TANDOORI CHICKEN 1. Cut the chicken breast into six pieces in the same direction. Each piece should be long and thin. 2. Add the tandoori paste and half of the yoghurt (2 tbsp) into the large bowl or container. Mix it together until it is all the same colour. 3. Put the chicken in the bowl or container with the tandoori/yoghurt mixture. Rub the mixture all over the chicken with your hands. Don’t be shy! 4. Cover the bowl and put it in the fridge. Leave it there for at least one hour. The longer you leave it, the more flavour the chicken will have. 5. Put the butter or oil in the saucepan and turn it up to medium (number 4 or 5) on the stove. 6. Add the chicken to the saucepan and cook. After 10 minutes turn each piece over and cook for another 10 minutes. It is normal for some of the sauce to burn, but if it seems to burn too much, turn down the heat a little. 7. When the chicken is done, move it straight onto a plate and enjoy!


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1. Put  the mayonnaise and the rest of the yoghurt into a large cup or jug. 2. Roughly  cut a bunch of mint and coriander leaves. 3. Add the leaves to the mayonnaise and yoghurt. Mix with the stick blender. (If you don’t have a stick blender, chop the leaves until they are very fine and mix them in with a fork). 4. T  ear up some lettuce leaves. Try not to use a knife as this can damage the leaves. 5. Slice the cucumber, and then cut each slice into four pieces. Add the cucumber to the lettuce leaves.Serve the chicken on freshly cooked rice with a side of salad. Sprinkle the dressing over everything.

SERVES: 4 INGREDIENTS

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1 double chicken breast (500-750 g) 4 tbsp (80 ml) tandoori paste 8 tbsp (160 ml) natural yoghurt 1 tbsp (5 g) butter or oil 4 tbsp (80 ml) whole egg mayonnaise 1 sprig of fresh coriander 1 sprig of fresh mint 1 iceberg lettuce 1 cucumber

our international community

DRESSING AND SALAD


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DEFINITIONS Macquarie Dictionary 01 I EDUCATION

03 I SOMETHING FUN

#AUSSIE SLANG Literally: (adverb) 1. in a literal manner; word for word. Primarily: (adverb) 1.first or highest in rank or importance; chief; principal.

#WHEN IN AUSTRALIA Affectionately: (adverb) 1. a settled goodwill, love, or attachment. Preference: (noun) 1. the act or fact of preferring. 2. to set or hold before or above other persons or things […] like better; choose rather. Paraffin Oil: (noun) 1.Chemical. A thick colourless mixture of hydrocarbons obtained from petroleum.

#6 WAYS TO PREPARE (TOEFL) Attain: (verb) 1. or reach, achieve or accomplish by continued effort. Supplement: (noun) 1.something added to extend a thing, supply a lack, or correct mistakes. #TOP 5 RESOURCES (TOEFL) Integrate: (verb) 1. to bring together (parts) into a whole. Register: (noun) 1. a book or list in which records of acts, happenings, names are made. 2.a recording in such a book or list.

02 I ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW #CULTURAL AWARENESS “Small Talk”: (phrase/idiom) 1. making polite conversation, sharing casual or informal information with others. #WORKPLACE RIGHTS Mistreated [see: Maltreat]: (verb) 1. to treat badly; handle roughly or cruelly; abuse. Dismiss: (verb) 1. to direct or allow to leave. 2. to remove as from office or service. #TIPS AND TRICKS (RACISM) Sarcasm: (noun) 1. harsh or bitter derision or irony. 2. an ironical taunt or jibe; a sneering or cutting remark. Distinction: (noun) 1. a marking of something as different. 2. the recognising or noting of differences; discrimination. Normalising: (verb) 1. to bring or return to a normal standard condition or state.

#AUSTRALIAN MYTHS Marsupial: (adjective) 1. of or relating to a marsupium (pouch or fold of skin in the abdomen of a female marsupial which holds the mammary glands and serves as a receptacle for delivering young) Habitation: (noun) 1.a place of abode, a dwelling. 2. the act of inhabiting; occupancy by inhabitants. Mammal: (noun) 1.a member of the Mammalia, a class of vertebrates whose young feed upon milk from the mother’s breast. Most species are more or less hairy, all have a diaphragm, and all (except the monotremes) are viviparous. Droppings: (noun) 1. fecal matter of animals.

04 I OUR INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY #MY STORY Dormitory: (noun) 1. a room for sleeping, usually large and containing many beds, sometimes in cubicles, for the other inmates of a school or other institution. #GET INVOLVED Capitalise: (verb) 1. to write or print in capital letters. 2. to take advantage of; turn to one’s advantage. #INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION “[…] at a crossroads”: (phrase/idiom) 1. at a turning point or a point where a decision needs to be made. Proficient: (adjective) 1. well advanced or expert in any art, science, or subject; skilled. Perspective: (noun) 1. the relation of parts to one another and to the whole, in mental


ch oic e the qu ali ty

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Istudent magazine octnov2013