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D E C E M B E R 1 -7, 2 0 1 6

VOL. 41 NO. 48

MADISON, WISCONSIN

IN FOR THE LONG HAUL S R         

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■ CONTENTS

■ WHAT TO DO

4 SNAPSHOT

BOOZE AND POLITICS

Local Republicans toast the new world order.

7-9 NEWS

CRIME AND DEFERMENT

Dane County expands a program to give opioid offenders tough love instead of punishment.

RECOUNT TERESE ALLEN

ALLISON GEYER

15 COVER STORY THIS WAS NOT Allison Geyer’s first visit to Indian country — in 2012, while working at the La Crosse Tribune, she traveled to Pine Ridge, South Dakota, with a volunteer medical team to investigate health care and hospital conditions on the reservation. “The situation at Pine Ridge was bleak, but the people were resilient,” Geyer says. She felt that same spirit at Standing Rock, along with something surprising. “There is an overwhelming sense of hope and unity among the people there,” she says. “The movement itself is a victory.” COVER PHOTO BY ALLISON GEYER

21 FOOD THIS WEEK we welcome back Terese Allen, who wrote about food for Isthmus from 1999 to 2011. Now a columnist for Edible Madison and Edible Door magazines, she is also the author of The Flavor of Wisconsin and The Flavor of Wisconsin for Kids. This summer she purged her cookbook collection, giving away some 18 boxes. Still, she wonders, “How come my shelves are still full?”

Wisconsin officials defend the system’s integrity, but see value in checking the math.

11 TECH

BINGO

Madison game developers cash in with new products for casinos, corporate training.

12 OPINION

HOLD THE MOTORCYCLES

Restrict heavy-impact recreational uses at restored Badger Ammo site.

15 COVER STORY

HUNKERING DOWN

Protesters at Standing Rock embrace a revived form of resistance.

21-26 FOOD & DRINK

THE GOAT IS THIRSTY, MY FRIENDS Fitchburg sports pub excels at smoked meats.

27 SPORTS

BADGERS SURPRISE

Unranked at the season’s start, UW has had a stellar season. And it could get better.

28-30 MUSIC

GOTHIC FOLK

J. Hardin relocates to Madison for a clean slate and creates a magical album.

32-33 SCREENS

LOVE WINS, PART ONE BILL LUEDERS

4 SNAPSHOT WHEN BARACK Obama won the presidency in 2008, Bill Lueders wrote about the election night party thrown by the Dane County Republican Party. Overheard there: “You know, it wouldn’t surprise me if the Democrats started using the Koran.” Lueders was banned from future Dane County GOP events but, eight years later, it looks like all is forgiven, or at least forgotten. Lueders reports from the group’s December gathering.

Loving revisits the relationship at the center of the groundbreaking court case.

City of your dreams Monday, Dec. 5, Central Library; Wednesday, Dec. 7, The Village on Park; both 5:30-7:15 pm Don’t miss this opportunity to be heard! The Imagine Madison listening campaign is designed to get feedback from residents on such topics as racial equity, sustainability, housing and transportation. Your comments will then be used to guide the once-a-decade update to Madison’s Comprehensive Plan. At two meetings, city staff will give an overview of the process and be available to speak directly with residents. Translation services for Hmong- and Spanish-speaking residents is available, as well as childcare. Ideas can also be submitted online at imaginemadisonwi.com.

Meeta’s meetup

40 EMPHASIS

Friday, Dec. 2, Central LibraryMadison Room, 7-10 pm

PRACTICAL POTTERY

Toast Ceramics offers spritely designs and useful forms.

IN EVERY ISSUE 9 MADISON MATRIX 9 WEEK IN REVIEW 12 THIS MODERN WORLD 13 FEEDBACK 13 OFF THE SQUARE

34 ISTHMUS PICKS 41 CLASSIFIEDS 41 P.S. MUELLER 42 CROSSWORD 43 SAVAGE LOVE

PUBLISHER Jeff Haupt ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Craig Bartlett BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Mark Tauscher EDITOR Judith Davidoff NEWS EDITOR Joe Tarr ASSOCIATE EDITOR Michana Buchman FEATURES EDITOR Linda Falkenstein  ARTS & CULTURE EDITOR Catherine Capellaro STAFF WRITERS Dylan Brogan, Allison Geyer EDITORIAL INTERN Elisa Wiseman CALENDAR EDITOR Bob Koch ART DIRECTOR Carolyn Fath STAFF ARTISTS Todd Hubler, David Michael Miller, Tommy Washbush

ISTHMUS is published weekly by Red Card Media, 100 State Street, Suite 301, Madison, WI 53703 • Edit@isthmus.com • Phone (608) 251-5627 • Fax (608) 251-2165 Periodicals postage paid at Madison, WI (ISSN 1081-4043) • POSTMASTER: Send address changes to 100 State Street, Suite 301, Madison, WI 53703 • © 2016 Red Card Media, LLC. All rights reserved.

Living the blues jam Thursday, Dec. 1, Knuckle Down Saloon, 8 pm

James Earl Tate has been hosting an open jam for blues players for more than three decades in the Madison area. Former Madison Blues Society member Luke Parker has researched the history of the jam, and will talk about what he has learned at this 30-year celebration of the event. Of course, the evening also includes the weekly jam with Tate & the 008 Band.

Winter wins Saturday-Sunday, Dec. 3-4, UW Union South-Varsity Hall

The Hoofer Ski & Snowboard Club hosts a gear swap featuring new and lightly used ski and snowboard equipment. Don’t be the wimp who finds frosty fun too cold to hack. At least try it this way with a small initial investment. End up with frostbite? Sell your stuff back next year. The swap is open 9 am-6 pm Saturday and 9 am-1 pm Sunday.

FIND MORE ISTHMUS PICKS ON PAGE 34

DECEMBER 1–7, 2016 ISTHMUS.COM

CONTRIBUTORS John W. Barker, Kenneth Burns, Dave Cieslewicz, Nathan J. Comp, Aaron R. Conklin, Ruth Conniff, Michael Cummins, Marc Eisen, Erik Gunn, Mike Ivey, Bob Jacobson, Seth Jovaag, Stu Levitan, Bill Lueders, Liz Merfeld, Andy Moore, Bruce Murphy, Kyle Nabilcy, Kate Newton, Jenny Peek, Michael Popke, Steven Potter, Adam Powell, Katie Reiser, Jay Rath, Gwendolyn Rice, Dean Robbins, Robin Shepard, Sandy Tabachnick, Denise Thornton, Candice Wagener, Tom Whitcomb, Rosemary Zurlo-Cuva ADVERTISING PRODUCTION MANAGER Todd Hubler ADVERTISING MANAGER Chad Hopper ADVERTISING ASSISTANT Laura Miller ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Lindsey Bushart, Peggy Elath, Lauren Isely  WEB ANALYST Jeri Casper CIRCULATION MANAGER Tim Henrekin MARKETING DIRECTOR Chris Winterhack  EVENT DIRECTORS Kathleen Andreoni, Courtney Lovas  CONTROLLER Halle Mulford OFFICE MANAGER Julie Butler  SYSTEMS MANAGER Thom Jones  ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Carla Dawkins 

“Tactile Textiles: Colors and Culture” is a chance to meet UW-Madison interdisciplinary artist-in-residence Meeta Mastani, an acclaimed print/dye artist and co-founder of Bindaas Unlimited, a fair trade textile and craft business in India. Students from her “Tactile Textures” course unveil new works (on display through 12/6), and Li Chiao-Ping Dance will perform “Rubedo,” a collaborative dance piece created in response to Meeta’s work.

3


n SNAPSHOT

Scott Grabins asks: “Can anyone tell us the last time we had the president, Congress, Legislature and governor” all at once? (It was 1952.)

Happiness is a Dane County Republican

ISTHMUS.COM DECEMBER 1–7, 2016

BY BILL LUEDERS n PHOTO BY CHRIS COLLINS

4

I’ve done some scary things for a byline. Jumped out of an airplane. Bought guns while acting like a lunatic. Interviewed Scott Walker. But never have I felt more unease over an assignment than on Tuesday night, when I hung out with the Dane County Republicans. Would I get thrown out? I was, after all, banned from Dane County GOP events after accurately reporting things said and done at the party’s bash on the night of Obama’s 2008 election. But I spoke with party chair Scott Grabins ahead of time, and he seemed welcoming. Didn’t get the memo, I guess. But there was more: I knew that the assembled Republicans at tonight’s event, unlike in 2008, would be happy. Could I stand their smug self-righteousness? Could I control mine? Tonight’s event, at Babe’s restaurant, is called “Pints and Politics.” These get-togethers have been occurring monthly for about eight years. Grabins says the county party has around 400 dues-paying members and an email list of thousands. This is the first county GOP event since the Nov. 8 election. It draws about 40 people to drink beer, eat fried food and hear featured speaker Peter Theron, a three-time unsuccessful candidate for Congress. Everyone is friendly; most are ebullient. “It’s a pretty happy crowd here tonight,” says Nancy Bartlett, the group’s vice chair. Rolf Lindgren is happy. Once vice chair of the state Libertarian Party, he joined the GOP in 2014 and now serves on the county party’s executive board. Trump is the first major party presidential candidate he’s ever voted

for. Lindgren likes Trump because the candidate criticized the Federal Reserve, did not get major backing from Wall Street, and is such an outsider that Mitt Romney and the former Presidents Bush all declined to support him. Lindgren introduces me to Robert Hall, who could give those guys in the Dos Equis commercials a run for their money as the most interesting man in the world. He was a Marine in Vietnam, has worked for professional associations all over the country, and his business card lists interests including “Sonnets,” “Jacobite Plots” and “Lost Causes.” Hall, 70, resigned from the county party’s board this year because he could not stomach Trump. Looking to the future, he says, “I have low expectations, and I hope that I’m wrong for the sake of the country.” Why is Hall so down on The Donald? Trump, he says, has been “a lifelong liberal” who supported abortion rights, dissed guns and gave money to Hillary Clinton and other Democrats. “He was everything that I despise,” says Hall, who remains “unconvinced by his sudden conversion to conservatism.” Others are less ambivalent. “I’m really excited, I’m hopeful,” exclaims one well-dressed woman, who declined to be named. She hopes Trump can reverse the “communistic, socialistic” direction the country is heading, where young people are taught it’s okay to burn the flag but not to love their country. She blames Obama for, among other things, “giving away the internet to a multinational whatever.” She adds that she has “a lot of Islamic friends, a lot of black friends.” None of them are here.

Grabins opens the program by asking, “Can anyone tell us the last time we had the president, Congress, Legislature and governor” all at once? It was 1952. He talks about the upcoming recount, encouraging party members to sign up for paying jobs or as observers. “I don’t think this recount is going to change anything, but we’ve got to stay engaged.” Theron, who lost with 31% of the vote Nov. 8 to Democrat Mark Pocan, begins with a joke: “I don’t think I’ve seen the Democrats so angry since we threatened to free their slaves.” His talk is called “Winners, Whiners & Where Do We Go From Here?” The identified whiners are Hillary Clinton, for losing a state her husband won twice; the Democrats, for failing to unseat Sen. Ron Johnson; and Jill Stein, for getting more votes than Clinton’s margin of defeat. When I note later that he gave no examples of actual whining, Theron says he was just going for alliteration. Theron’s talk ends with a prediction. As the “left-dominated” mass media and academia suffer, he says, they will move even further to the left “and then probably expire in some way.” So we have that to look forward to. Bartlett, the vice chair, puts things in perspective. It’s true, she says, that “we have a better attitude when we win.” But she remembers what it was like to see Republicans lose to Obama, in 2008 and 2012. “We got it out — our disappointment, the sadness. We didn’t let it linger. We lost. We moved on and made the best of the situation.” For the majority of Dane County residents, who are not so happy, that’s good advice. n

Event: PINTS AND POLITICS When: USUALLY THE FIRST TUESDAY OF THE MONTH Where: VARIOUS LOCATIONS; CHECK DANEGOP.ORG Next: JAN. 3 AT BABE’S, 5:30 P.M. Number of Dane County residents who voted for Donald Trump: 71,279 Percentage of the total: 23.1 Number who voted for other candidates: 237,846


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n NEWS

County expands opioid deferment program More addicts will get a chance to avoid jail BY CAMERON BREN

In 2013, the Dane County District Attorney’s Office established a special deferment program for those charged with opioid-related crimes. This allows prosecutors to recommend defendants suffering from opioid addiction for a special treatment program, which, if completed, could lead to the dismissal of the charges. The program was immediately overwhelmed with candidates, says Pat Hrubesky, director of the Deferred Prosecution Unit. “We quickly discovered the need is just way beyond what we can possibly meet.” To make the program more manageable, the DA’s office decided to limit it to people with less serious charges and little or no criminal history — typically people who had overdosed and were saved by medical personnel or police, Hrubesky says. Defense attorney Michael Short says a lot of people suffering from drug addiction would clearly benefit from the program, but are unable to get into it. About a third of Short’s clients are accused of opioid-related crimes, and he attributes a spike in propertyrelated crimes throughout the county to addictions. “It is an absolute necessity that the county expand the program,” Short says. Next year Short will get his wish, as the county adds funding to double the capacity of the program. County Executive Joe Parisi says he felt a duty to expand it. “If someone has a drug addiction, we don’t necessarily want to treat them as criminals, we want to treat this as the health condition that it is,” Parisi says. “Just putting someone in jail and not getting them treatment, letting them sit there and then letting them out, isn’t addressing the challenge and isn’t helping anyone.”

ing prescription for naloxone for the Walgreens pharmacy at 311 E. Campus Mall. And on Aug. 26 the state’s chief medical officer, Dr. Jon Meiman, signed a standing order that allows pharmacies statewide to dispense the drug. “It is much, much more accessible now, and I hope that means we are going to see a continued decline in overdoses,” Hrubesky says. While the drug is saving lives, it could also be keeping some addicts from having contact with police, reducing the deferred prosecution unit’s caseload. “People who are overdosing are less likely to have to rely on first responders,” Hrubesky says. Short agrees that there are people who could benefit from being charged with a crime. “That is one thing about the criminal justice system; it does have the ability to force people into treatment,” he says. “Once these people are forced into it, it seems like there are a fair amount of success stories. I go to drug court, and it is amazing the transformation some of these people make while they are in the program.” With the program’s expansion, the county is now considering offering it to those who have been charged with more serious crimes and may have criminal histories—as well as those with more minor charges, like simple possession. However, anyone charged with or convicted of a violent crime DAVID MICHAEL MILLER is still ineligible. The program has relied “We started this in mid-2013, and it be- primarily on a grant from the state Departcame immediately evident that it was going ment of Justice’s treatment alternatives and to be process changing because no one else diversion program, but this year the DA’s ofhas ever done this that we are aware of in the fice received a smaller grant. country,” Hrubesky says. “It is learning as we “So what I decided to do in the 2017 budgrow how to manage the program.” get was to fill the rest of the need that the Sauer has been overwhelmed with work grant didn’t cover plus add an additional full since the program started. “James can man- diversion specialist to the program, bringing age at best 45 people at a time, and that is up our capabilities to 80 people,” Parisi says. really pushing it,” Hrubesky says. A second caseworker will allow the program to serve twice as many people. Sauer The program’s caseload may have been expects to have the position filled within the eased by naloxone, which goes by the brand first quarter of 2017. Short says many of his name Narcan, a drug that can reverse a her- opiate-addicted clients are considered to be oin overdose. In recent years, it has become on the low end of criminality. Diverting these more readily available. Many police officers addicts into a treatment alternative would do routinely carry it, and it’s also widely avail- wonders, not just for Short’s clients but for able at drugstores. the criminal justice system. Gov. Scott Walker signed a bill into law in “Opiate addiction is so prevalent right now December 2015 that allows standing orders to it is affecting every part of the criminal justice be written for pharmacies to dispense nalox- system,” he says. “There are so many opiate one without a prescription. addicts that are repeatedly committing crimes On July 26, University Health Services right now to support their addictions that I repsychiatrist Dr. Angela Janis wrote a stand- ally think it is overwhelming the system.” n

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People referred to the program are required to meet weekly with the program’s lone caseworker, James Sauer, take frequent random drug tests, be in a treatment program and make restitution. They may also be required to do community service and get involved with community groups. If they fail to comply with the program, they can be prosecuted for the original charges and face jail time. “It’s the intensity and the relationship of this that I believe has kept individuals aboard,” Sauer says. “Because they come

here, they sit in that chair, they do their intake, and they see the contract. I can see it in their face — they don’t want to say anything, but when they leave this office they are saying, ‘Oh shit, I got to do all this crap, what did I sign up for, what am I doing here?’ In the beginning it is like that. After they’re a couple or several months in, they say the structure of this program ‘saved my life.’” Sauer says about 60 to 65 percent of participants complete the program. “After three years, July 2013 to June 2016, the recidivism was 15 percent,” he adds. “I think that’s a very admirable statistic. It just told us we are doing something right, at least we hope so.” Hrubesky says the program was one of a kind when it started, so she knew it would take some time to balance needs with resources.

7


n NEWS

Double-checking Although officials trust Wisconsin vote results, they see some value in recount BY CAMERON BREN

Wisconsin Elections Commission chair Mark Thomsen says the presidential recount is an insult to the state’s poll workers and county and municipal clerks. “To say that we didn’t count them correctly the first time or that somehow there were illegal votes being counted is really inappropriate,” Thomsen said at a Nov. 28 commission meeting to determine a timeline for the recount, which has been requested by Green Party candidate Jill Stein. Thomsen is the Democratic appointee to the newly formed election commission that replaced the Government Accountability Board. Gov. Scott Walker and the Republicancontrolled Legislature eliminated the board last session and replaced it with the partisan ethics and elections commissions. The election commission met for the first time on June 30 and now will oversee the state’s first presidential recount. Thomsen says he is confident it will be done properly and on time. Although he doesn’t expect the results to change, he believes there could also be an upside to the effort.

“If nothing else this is going to give us a very good audit; it is going to reassure Wisconsin voters that we have a fair system, that we are not counting illegal votes, we’re not counting dead people’s votes,” Thomsen said. Karen McKim, who lost a challenge against Dane County Clerk against Scott McDonell on a platform of verifying election results, says a recount is the only way for voters to ensure integrity. “I find it unacceptable that voters are practically forced to allege fraud before they can get the election officials to check the accuracy of the results,” says McKim. “I don’t like recounts, but until they build verified election results into the procedures, they are going to have people alleging fraud.” She wants officials to randomly verify by hand a number of voting machines for every election. “The American Statistical Association has developed a method called ‘risk-limiting auditing’ that is recommended by every national elections administration expert,” she says. “That has a different sample size for every race depending upon how many ballots and the margin of victory of what the machines reported.”

ISTHMUS.COM DECEMBER 1–7, 2016

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“If nothing else this is going to give us a very good audit.” — Mark Thomsen, Wisconsin Election Commission chair On Nov. 29, Stein’s campaign paid the original estimated $3.5 million it will cost to the state. The estimate has since gone up to $3.9 million, but the state has ordered the counting to begin Dec. 1 and under federal law it must be completed by Dec. 13. The state will either bill or refund Stein’s campaign, depending on the actual cost. Stein asked that the recount be done by hand, but the election commission unanimously rejected her request. On Nov. 28, Stein filed a lawsuit trying to force a hand count — and Hillary Clinton’s campaign later filed a motion in support. In a Nov. 29 hearing, three witnesses who were deemed experts in computer science, statistics and voting integrity testified that there would be no way to rule out hacking or malfunctions of voting machines without doing a hand count. Although Dane County Circuit Judge Valerie Bailey-Rihn agreed that a hand count would be the most accurate, she rejected the request because it did not meet the burden of proof in state statute. Election commission administrator Michael Haas says without a hand count, the most populous counties estimate the recount will take five to six days while smaller counties are estimating it will take three to four days. However, Thomsen says it took about a month to complete the last recount in 2011 for the state Supreme Court race, even though that involved far fewer votes. Haas says it’s unlikely that fraud swung Wisconsin’s election for Trump. All voting machines are tested and certified at the federal level for technical and security standards, he says. The election commission also tests equipment to ensure compliance with state laws.

And municipal and county clerks test each voting machine within 10 days of an election, Haas adds. “There are a number of reasons why we are skeptical of any claims that voting equipment is either not working correctly or being tampered with,” Haas said, explaining that counties use different brands of voting equipment, none of which are connected to the internet or linked. “An individual would need to have unfettered physical access to voting equipment and to be able to enter the locked cabinet where the software memory device is located,” Haas said. “To do that once and not be detected is hard to do, but to do that throughout the state with a variety of different equipment seems very unlikely.” But McKim says without verifying election results, no one can say for sure. “It is ridiculous for anyone to stand up and declare the Nov. 8 election results are hacked, and it is ridiculous for anyone to say they are confident that they are accurate,” McKim says. “No one has checked yet, and until someone checks everyone is irresponsible for declaring either accuracy or inaccuracy.” “Voters are sensible to ask whether the voting machine output is accurate,” says McKim, adding that ATMs, casino slot machines and store scanners are all routinely checked for accuracy. She says there remain many scenarios where equipment could be tampered with or corrupt officials could manipulate vote tallies. “There are all sorts of vulnerabilities that the county clerk, municipal clerk, the poll worker, none of them have full control of,” she adds. “It is just outside their control, given that they need to audit the results, and if no one audits the results, then there is going to be suspicion of fraud, and there are going to be recounts.” n


■ WEEK IN REVIEW

■ MADISON MATRIX ■  UW football head coach

MONDAY, NOV. 28 ■  A body found in an SUV

submerged in Lake Mendota is identified as 51-year-old Julie Bush Metcalfe, the wife of prominent local businessman Tim Metcalfe, owner of the grocery chain Metcalfe’s Market.

TUESDAY, NOV. 29 ■  Local radio host Mitch

Henck takes a call from a listener named Paul from Janesville, who turns out to be Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan. Henck was supposed to interview the speaker on his morning show, but forgot. “I feel like the biggest idiot in the history of the world,” Henck tells Ryan and his listeners.

Paul Chryst is named the Big Ten Conference Coach of the Year, as voted on by coaches. Chryst is the first UW coach to win the award since Bret Bielema in 2006. Let’s see if Chryst can get his No. 6 Badgers past No. 7 Penn State on Saturday and into a good bowl game. ■  The Wisconsin Supreme Court rules 4-3 that a Wood County sheriff’s deputy did not violate the Fourth Amendment when entering Richard Weber’s garage without a warrant during a 2012 arrest. A routine traffic stop turned into a “hot pursuit” after Weber drove 100 feet into his own driveway a “few seconds” after the deputy turned on his emergency lights. Dissenting, Justice Ann Walsh Bradley writes, “We may awaken one day to discover that the freedoms for

which so many have fought and sacrificed have been severely curtailed.” ■  Hey, has anyone found a thermal imaging monocular lying around lately? The Dane County Sheriff’s Office lost one Nov. 19 and would like it back, please. The device is used to search for lost children, dementia patients or anyone who may be missing or fleeing police.

BIG CITY

The last statewide recount in Wisconsin was the 2011 race between Supreme Court Justice David Prosser and challenger JoAnne Kloppenburg. In the end, Prosser squeezed out a 7,006-vote victory. Kloppenburg gained just 310 votes in the recount.

Officials will have less than two weeks to recount Wisconsin’s presidential vote. Currently, President-elect Donald Trump leads by 22,177 votes. The campaign of Green Party candidate Jill Stein is footing the bill — estimated to be $3.9 million — which she calls “exorbitant.”

ION L L I $3.9 M

LOSING

WINNING

After operating nearly 30 years downtown, Rainbow Bookstore Cooperative closes for good. However, Alexander Berkman’s Now and After: The ABC of Communist Anarchism is still available at walmart.com for $18.99.

Madison’s Board of Estimates unanimously approves $13,080 to pay the legal bills of Monona Terrace director Gregg McManners. The subject of an ethics complaint, McManners was cleared by the Ethics Board, but Mayor Paul Soglin says the merits of the complaint are still being investigated.

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Discover hundreds of shops and restaurants, many locally-owned. Enjoy a free trolley and carolers on State Street and the Square, Saturdays through December 17. Stop by the Downtown Visitor Center on State Street or Overture Center Info Table for maps, directions, and shopping and dining suggestions.

FRANK MARIONETTE Find something special from Wisconsin like a handmade marionette! Made by Madison artist Ken Vogel, each one features a famous Wisconsin icon and is truly one-of-a-kind.

This holiday season we are raising the bar in affordable fashion and bridal jewelry with gemstones and diamonds from Chatham Gems.

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A screenshot from Danger Arena, a game developed for casinos by Madison’s Human Head Studios.

Jackpot Madison’s game companies branch out into casinos, corporate training BY AARON R. CONKLIN

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If you walk into Caesar’s, Harrah’s or Bally’s casinos in Atlantic City and stroll through the slots section, you’ll find an unusual alternative to simply pulling the lever and hoping for triple bars: a first-person shooter game called Danger Arena, where you can put in coins and earn cash based on the number and type of targets you hit within the game’s time limit. Here’s another surprise: The game’s developed by Madison-based Human Head Studios. “Demographically, casinos are losing,” explains Tim Gerritsen, Human Head’s director of business development. “Sixty to 70 percent of the money taken in comes from slot machines, but the younger you are, the less likely you are to play slots.” That’s the math that drove New York-based GameCo to reach out to Human Head, a veteran, versatile developer with a long shooter pedigree (Prey, Dead Man’s Hand) to create a game that casinos could market to a new generation of gamblers raised on blasting robots with oversized guns. “We don’t sell the game, we just make the game,” says Gerritsen. “This is not the type of game we normally would work on, but it was an interesting challenge. We had to take the parameters they laid out, including a payout system, and there was a lot of back and forth to figure it all out. It’s still the same skill set we’re applying. On the flip side, these types of games can be quite lucrative.” Human Head doesn’t see any of the gambling profits — that would be illegal — but does receive a percentage of each unit sold. If the new machines expand to casinos in other U.S. gambling hubs (Las Vegas, Reno, etc.) the profits could begin to pile up. As it stands, GameCo has already contracted with Human Head to develop other types of casino-based video games — a brawler and another type of shooter. Danger Arena is only one player in a current jackpot moment for the local game development scene. Last month, Perblue Studios sold their mobile role-playing game DragonSoul to GREE International Entertainment for an undisclosed sum. Raven

Software, Madison’s largest developer, just released Call of Duty Modern Warfare: Remastered, a reboot of the 2007 franchise classic that’s being marketed as part of the digital deluxe version of the new Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare on PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC. Speaking of Call of Duty, Raven and Human Head are currently partnering on Call of Duty Live, a free-to-play version of the game Raven’s charged with developing. “I’m pretty bullish on how things are looking locally,” says Gerritsen, who also remains involved in the Madison Games Alliance, a coalition between the local games development community and the Madison Regional Economic Partnership to keep Madison on the game-development map. His company’s contract sheet gives him plenty of reasons to be confident. Casino games aren’t the only new branch Human Head’s been exploring of late. It’s pounced on the exploding interest in virtual reality to pair with locally based Madison Avenue Worldwide on a VR-based internal training product for Verizon. Lisa Rahn, Madison Avenue’s CEO, says it’s just the beginning of the VR possibilities the partnership could provide. “We have the expertise on things like return on investment,” says Rahn. “They’re experts in technology.” Despite dabbling in corporate training and casinos, Human Head’s not leaving the traditional game space anytime soon. It’s partnering with Hipster Whale (of Crossy Road fame) to port Boxy Kingdom, the mobile app it released this summer, to consoles, where it’ll be known as Crossy Kingdom. It also just inked an agreement to develop an experimental action game title with Square Enix for PlayStation 4, PlayStation 4 Pro and PC, keeping its feet firmly in the gaming platforms where it first made its name. “It’s different than anything we’ve done,” says Gerritsen. “But you have to be adaptive. We’re known as a narrative action studio. We’re bringing that into other areas of the industry.” ■

11


n OPINION

Tread lightly Recreation plan for former Badger Ammo site should not include motorcycles, rocketry BY JOEL PATENAUDE

ISTHMUS.COM DECEMBER 1–7, 2016

Joel Patenaude serves on the Wisconsin Nonmotorized Recreation and Transportation Trails Council.

12

Just south of Devil’s Lake State Park and the Baraboo Hills, the former Badger Army Ammunition Plant enters a new era. Once the world’s largest production facility for ammunition propellants, fueling World War II, the Korean and Vietnam wars, “Badger” workers burned excess toxic chemicals in open pits, leaving the residue to leach into thousands of acres of soil and groundwater and contaminate private wells beyond its borders. The U.S. Army replaced a handful of those wells and, in 2001 and 2006, dredged tens of thousands of pounds of mercury, lead and other metals from the sediment in one Lake Wisconsin bay, where tens of millions of gallons of Badger wastewater was pumped between 1942 and 1976. The Army ceased operation of the plant in the late 1970s, but concerted cleanup efforts didn’t start until the 1990s. Removal of Badger Ammo’s 1,400 buildings took place after the plant was decommissioned in 1997. Now the most contaminated corners of the 7,300-acre site are clean, at least to levels deemed safe for grassland birds, hikers and bicyclists — those who will tread most lightly on the land. That will suffice for prairie restoration, the primary focus of the property’s new landlords. The Sauk Prairie State Recreation Area — 3,385 acres of the original ammo plant — will be managed by the state Department of Natural Resources. Cattle and bison may come to graze on much of the remainder, under the auspices of the Ho-Chunk Nation and Dairy Forage Research Center. A not altogether copacetic mix of conservation and recreational uses is proposed in the draft master plan for the state recreation area, which the DNR has submitted for final approval by the Natural Resources Board on Dec. 14. While hikers needn’t worry about coming into contact with carcinogens at the site, it’s noteworthy that the plan does not risk longer-term exposure that could come from camping there. And the absence of an ATV trail, strongly opposed by fans of silent sports, is no longer part of the DNR’s plan or a threat to churning up suspect soil. (The Wisconsin Nonmotorized Recreation and Transportation Trails Council, on which I serve, passed a resolution in favor of “lowimpact and nature-based recreation” and against ATV trails or a shooting range.) Yet the plan does allow for dual-sport motorcycles (ones that can be ridden on and off roads), which could disturb the polluted dirt that remains beneath the surface in some corners. Furthermore, launchers of model rockets, an unintended parody of the machinery of war that laid waste to the area, will be permitted to upset the tranquility and habitat under cultivation up to

WISCONSIN DEPT. OF TOURISM

Dual sport motorcyclists, like those riding here on the Northern Wisconsin Adventure Trail, want access to the Sauk Prairie State Recreation Area.

nine days per year. And despite considerable opposition to the idea, the property remains a backup site for a firearms shooting range, should another location not be found elsewhere in southern Wisconsin. These proposed uses threaten to derail decades of local advocacy for safe and sustainable use of this vast tract of unique real estate. A 2003 DNR inventory of Badger’s natural resources found 97 likely breeding species of birds, among them grassland-loving meadowlarks, bobolinks, bobwhite quail and dickcissels. “It’s all about the grassland birds. That’s what the science tells us is the value of Badger,” says Laura Olah, executive director of Citizens for Safe Water Around Badger, the tenacious group she cofounded in 1990. “Any use that brings a lot of noise, that is disruptive, that’s going to cause erosion and disturb nesting are things that should fall away as not a good idea.” Seventy miles of disused roads still exist on the property. The DNR plans to use some of the roadways but remove a lot of them, too, to make way for 20 miles’ worth of hiking trails, 15 miles of family-friendly biking trails, 12 miles of trail for horseback riding, 10 miles of mountain bike singletrack and another 4.5 miles of the Great Sauk Trail. The proposal to allow motorcycle riders to take over 50 percent of these biking and equestrian trails for up to six days is the most worrisome part of the draft plan. Which trails will be “repurposed” for this is as unclear as the reasons these machines are more acceptable than ATVs. When the Wisconsin Off-Highway Motorcycle Association in 2012 urged local club members to lobby the DNR for access to the new recreation area, it provided a sample letter that said riders prefer singletrack trail that is “narrow, often in wooded areas” with “elevation changes.” That sounds a lot like the hilly northernmost portion of the property, closest to Devil’s Lake State Park, as the majority of the land to the south is flat and wide open. These events or races (the plan neither

authorizes nor prohibits racing or specifies whether a 25 mph speed limit on the existing roads would be enforced) will be limited to 100 motorcycles per day for up to six days a year. These events will close the trails to all other users. The DNR insists event organizers would be responsible for fixing any damage done to the trails, hopefully to the standard necessary for safe and enjoyable bicycling the rest of the year. That portion of the plan sounds shortsighted, especially in comparison to the news

THIS MODERN WORLD

that 4.5 miles of abandoned rail corridor within Badger is to become part of the Great Sauk Trail. This segment of multiuse trail — open to cyclists and other self-propelled users in the warm weather months and snowmobilers in the winter — is the lynchpin for a trail that not only links Sauk City and Prairie du Sac to Devil’s Lake, Wisconsin’s most popular state park, but is key to the Great Sauk Trail extending from Middleton, just west of Madison, through the park and on to Reedsburg. From there trail users would be able to continue on the 400 State Trail to Elroy, through the celebrated tunnels on the Elroy-Sparta State Trail and on to two other state trails that take riders another 80 miles along the La Crosse and Mississippi rivers en route to Marshland. It could still take years to fund and construct the Great Sauk Trail and the other trails planned for the Sauk Prairie State Recreation Area. (Add the cost of restoring native habitat and building a visitor center and the DNR says it needs $9 million.) So why risk having to rebuild those trails by allowing motorcycles to rip them up a few days a year? After decades of abuse subjected to the former Badger site, a commitment to treading lightly on the land is overdue. Anyone wishing to speak on the draft master plan at the Natural Resources Board Dec. 14 meeting must register by 11 a.m. on Dec. 9 (email Laurie.Ross@wisconsin.gov or call 608267-7420). Written testimony is due then, too.

BY TOM TOMORROW

© 2016 WWW.THISMODERNWORLD.COM


ovember 24

December 1

n FEEDBACK

The • Art • of • Fine • Jewelry

On the wrong track

As a proud resident of the nation’s “nicest” and least black-friendly liberal bubble (very little irony here), I write to help liberals avoid many of the same distortions the altright bubble provides for its “constituents.” The “kerfuffle,” a nice, polite, progressive word for fight, over career tracking in MMSD schools clearly shows one thing: Madison parents, like most middle-class parents, don’t want jobs for their kids, they want careers (“Pathways Pilot Program Debut,” Anticlastic forging in silver andtogold 11/23/2016). Thus, classroom job-tracking, as opposed to “Health careers with a focus on social justice,” is a Big Bad Deal. 1306 Regent Street, Madison, WI 53715 608.257.2627 Kids have way too many options as it is. No middle-class family wants their kid to be a career CNA or phlebotomist anyway. December 15 up, and either train your kids for Wake Don’t try this at home some kind of job, while they last, or get out of the way and let other parents use the It is good to see the article about prescribed public schools for their primary purpose: fire and ecosystems restoration (“Burned producing an educated and level-headed and Born Again,” 11/23/2016). It would be good to stress, however, that the technique workforce. Michael Butkus-Bomier (via email) requires training to be used safely and effectively. Jan Ketelle (via email) A tank by any other name

The • Art • of • Fine • Jewelry Hanna Cook-Wallace

Alexandra Hart

Studio Jewelers

The • Art • of • Fine • Jewelry

Re: “Not a Tank” (Isthmus.com, 11/23/2016): So it’s a tank? Wil Borowski (via Facebook) “Rescue vehicle”? To attack protesters? Greg Ferguson (via Facebook)

December 15

Cast, Same Qu e m i a SThe • Art • of • Fine • Jewelry z,

F E U N! M A S

S

Alexandra Hart

Correction An article in the Nov. 23 issue, “Burned and Born Again,” gave an incorrect ratio for the fuel used in drip torches by the city during prescribed burns. The workers use a 4-to-1 diesel/gasoline mix.

Pamela Froman

Studio Jewelers

Share comments with Isthmus via email, edit@isthmus.com, and via Forum.isthmus.com, Regent Street, Madison, WISt.,53715 Facebook and Twitter, or write1306 letters to Isthmus, 100 State Suite608.257.2627 301, Madison WI 53703. All comments are subject to editing. The views expressed here are solely those of the contributors. These opinions do not necessarily represent those of Isthmus Publishing Company.

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■ COVER STORY

IN FOR THE LONG HAUL S R            

I

t is nearly midnight when we

ditional Native American song. On the

arrive at Oceti Sakowin camp after

northern horizon, dozens of massive

driving more than 750 miles from

floodlights are mounted high on a ridge,

Madison to the federally controlled

their light a stark, mechanical contrast

lands near North Dakota’s Standing

to the firelit camp.

Rock Indian Reservation. There’s a dif-

“What’s that?” I ask.

ferent kind of darkness when you’re

“That’s DAPL,” says Airto Castaneda-

this deep into Indian country — we

Cudney, who along with 10 other vol-

passed the last street light a while ago.

unteers drove overnight from Madison

There are no homes or businesses out

on Nov. 15 to deliver donated food and

this far, save a casino and gas station 10

supplies to the Standing Rock Sioux and

miles down the highway.

their allies, who have been camped near

When we hit the security checkpoint,

the banks of the Missouri River for more

it is too dark to see much of the encamp-

than six months. DAPL is shorthand for

ment — and the thousands reported

the Dakota Access Pipeline — a $3.7 bil-

to be living here — but the light from

lion, 1,172-mile-long oil transport project

nearby campfires glows warm against

that aims to ship crude from the Bakken

the pitch-black landscape. The camp at

oil fields south to an oil storage tank farm

night is quiet, but for the steady beat of

and pipeline hub in southern Illinois.

drums and distant voices raised in tra-

The Native Americans call the pipeline

DECEMBER 1–7, 2016 ISTHMUS.COM

ALLISON GEYER

15


n COVER STORY

ISTHMUS.COM DECEMBER 1–7, 2016

“black snake,” in reference to an old Lakota prophecy that

16

foretells of a black snake rising from the depths of the earth and invading tribal lands, bringing with it death and destruction. The Standing Rock movement began April 1 when tribal historian LaDonna Brave Bull Allard founded the Sacred Stone camp on her private land near the Cannonball River. The camp began as a site of cultural preservation and nonviolent resistance to the Dakota Access Pipeline. Over summer the settlement grew, drawing thousands to the area as word spread about the protest. More than 3,000 people are now living in three distinct settlements — Oceti Sakowin, Rosebud and Sacred Stone. The protesters — who call themselves “water protectors,” a nod to the pipeline’s potential impact on the tribe’s water source — have clashed with law enforcement as well as private security guards hired by the developer. Behind the scenes, teams of lawyers on both sides are battling in federal court. The pipeline developer has an obligation to get oil flowing by Jan 1, 2017. If the deadline is missed, contracts with its partner companies will expire, putting the project at risk. With the project deadline looming and the harsh North Dakota winter fast approaching, protesters have declared their intent to remain camped at Standing Rock until the pipeline is defeated. At the heart of their protest is the issue of sovereignty — the Standing Rock Sioux and other Native American tribes want to exercise their right to protect their ancestral lands. The decision to stay has thrown the camps into a massive overhaul as workers rush to fortify structures before the weather becomes dangerous. It also puts the protesters in violation of orders from federal officials to abandon their largest settlement by Dec. 5. Digging in for a cause has become a resurgent tactic of protest movements. Matt Kearney, a UW-Madison Ph.D. candidate in sociology who studies these movements, sees plenty of parallels between Standing Rock and Wisconsin’s Act 10 protests, when activists in 2011 occupied the state Capitol to protest Gov. Scott Walker’s proposal to restrict collective bargaining rights. The Standing Rock camps also have similarities to the Occupy Wall Street protest movement that began in New York in 2011. Activists have used occupation tactics for generations, but Kearney says there has been a recent revival of encampment-style protests across a variety of causes. And with Donald Trump — who owns stock in DAPL — about to become president, he believes the trend could continue. In his research, Kearney found that occupation-style protest movements have a profound impact on those who participate. “Commitment to the cause gets increased by the experience of being part of the protest,” he says. Castaneda-Cudney certainly feels connected to the Standing Rock movement. He first traveled to the protest site on Oct. 30, arriving just days after authorities broke up an encampment on land owned by the pipeline developer. At that time, it was the most violent clash between demonstrators and law enforcement to date — after a daylong standoff, police surrounded protesters with armored trucks, deployed pepper spray and arrested more than 140 people. “I was trying to go out there before the clash, but that event made it more clear and urgent for me to get involved,” he says. “I wanted to see firsthand what was actually taking place on our own soil and to our own citizens.” His earlier experience at the camp had a profound impact. “When I came home the first time, I felt like I abandoned my family,” Castaneda-Cudney says. “It was hard to come home and see the folks back here not have the same urgency to make a change as the water protectors.”

The temperature on the North Dakota prairie has warmed to above freezing by mid-morning on Nov. 17. Amid a cluster of weathered teepees, fire pits and military tents, the volunteers from Madison strip off their winter layers as they unload a refrigerated box truck packed full of supplies.

“Can someone pinch me? I think I’m dreaming,” Winona Kasto, a Lakota chef who runs one of the camp kitchens, says as she watches volunteers organizing piles of donated food. The Madison group brought thousands of pounds of fresh produce — kale, squash, onions and more — as well as packages of meat, cartons of eggs and pallets of reusable jugs of filtered water. Kasto is delighted to see the industrial-sized bags of Kickapoo Coffee (a Wisconsin roaster named for a Native American tribe) and is joyfully puzzled to receive several jumbo ziploc bags of bright orange Wisconsin cheese curds — a delicacy unfamiliar to the Lakota people but no less appreciated. Under Kasto’s direction, volunteers carefully pack the bounty inside a walled tent, which was set up just the day before to serve as a pantry. The plastic shelves groan under the weight of donated food. “This is like an Indian Wal-Mart,” she jokes. “I feel like Santa came overnight, and I’m not even Christian.” Kasto, 47, has been cooking traditional Lakota food for her people for more than 30 years. She learned the recipes from her mother and grandmother and says her family had a tendency to “cook big,” often inviting other families on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation to join them at their table. That prepared her well for her role in the kitchens at Oceti Sakowin camp, where she has lived

Volunteers from Madison, including WORT journalist Alexander Cramer (left) and 9-year-old Aiden Rodriguez (right), deliver food.

ALLISON GEYER PHOTOS

While many of the activists at Standing Rock are vegetarian or vegan, traditional Lakota recipes use plenty of meat. Hunters from camp bring in deer, elk, sbuffalo and even roadkill for the kitchens to prepare.


Winona Kasto (left) talks with writer Allison Geyer outside Soup Kettle Kitchen, which Kasto runs. The kitchen feeds more than 350 people a day and specializes in traditional Native American recipes.

a march from San Francisco to Washington, D.C., that aims to raise awareness about the health issues that affect Native Americans. When asked how the camp will survive without her cooking, she says, “hopefully we won’t be here anymore.” “We’re going to defeat the pipeline by then.”

Many at Standing Rock share Kasto’s

CHAR BRAXTON

The pipeline’s parent company, the Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners, says the pipeline will create thousands of jobs, boost state and local sales and tax revenues by millions of dollars during construction and “enable domestically produced light sweet crude oil from North Dakota to reach major refining markets in a more direct, cost-effective, safer and environmentally responsible manner.” Pipeline proponents argue the shipping method is safer than transporting oil by rail or truck, but critics say pipelines pose unacceptable risks. As U.S. crude oil production has surged in the last several years, so has the incidence of pipeline failures. A 2015 report from the Associated Press found that since 2009, the annual number of “significant accidents” on oil and petroleum pipelines has spiked by nearly 60 percent, which is roughly on par with the increase in U.S. crude oil production. An early proposal for Dakota Access had the project crossing the Missouri River north of Bismarck, but that plan was rejected over concerns about the project’s impact on the city’s water supply. The pipeline was rerouted to cross the river near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers approved the pipeline company’s water-crossing permits in July using a “fast-

DECEMBER 1–7, 2016 ISTHMUS.COM

Madison volunteer Jaeryn Smith serves lunch at Soup Kettle Kitchen. Smith works for Slide Food Cart, whose owner, Christine Ameigh, helped organize the food donation drive and trip to Standing Rock.

and worked since August. She headed up the camp’s largest kitchen for a time, where she fed thousands, but recently left to run her own operation, which she calls Soup Kettle Kitchen. “At the regular kitchen, we made a lot of vegetarian and vegan food,” Kasto says. “There are a lot of vegans here.” While it makes sense that an encampment of environmental activists would cater to those who have sworn off meat, she wants to serve her people their traditional foods. For the Lakota, that means meat. Dietary staples include game animals like elk, deer and buffalo. Outside the kitchen there is a freshly killed deer, a big brown doe covered in a tarp and waiting to be butchered. Kasto’s kitchen setup is simple — an open tent with propane-fueled stoves and burners, and a handful of volunteers preparing and serving food. And it’s effective, serving about 350 people each day, by her estimate. Lunch today is french toast, served with homemade maple syrup, mandarin oranges and a dusting of powdered sugar. There’s no hope of the food staying hot when you’re eating outdoors in frigid temperatures and strong winds, but it’s as good as anything you’d find in a restaurant. For Kasto, cooking is spiritual, an act of love and prayer. She sees food as gifts from the Earth and the Creator, as “medicine” that keeps her people strong. “I always wanted to take a small business class and open my own restaurant,” she says, “but this is better.” Kasto plans to stay at Oceti Sakowin camp until February, when she will travel to California to take part in The Longest Walk,

optimism. But the feeling of imminent victory isn’t stopping the encampments from preparing for winter. “It’s a huge job,” says Caitlin Stanley, a 26-year-old volunteer from Tampa, Florida, helping lead the winterization efforts. “And we have new campers coming every day.” Theron Begay, a member of the Navajo Nation from New Mexico, arrived at Standing Rock in early November and over two weeks has helped fortify nearly half of the Oceti Sakowin Camp. At one of the daily winterization meetings held in the camp’s geodesic dome, he urges people to move the sprawling settlements closer to the center of camp for safety. Near the Southwest Camp, a section of Oceti Sakowin Camp where Begay and Stanley are based, volunteers are building a large wooden structure to serve as a woodshop. The most urgent project is constructing wooden floors for large military tents to provide insulation from the ground. These tents will serve as communal sleeping areas for campers who have been staying in light, summerweight tents. Workers are also putting up dozens of “tarpees” — a type of heavy-duty teepee made of tarpaulins and insulated with plastic bottles and other recyclable materials. “They eliminate waste, and they keep people warm,” Stanley says. Each tarpee sleeps about 14. Volunteers are working to rig at least three solar systems to power the camp. Eventually they plan to build a bathhouse, composting toilets and a water treatment system. Paul Sherlock, a contractor from Cleveland, Ohio, says the construction team has been working around the clock to finish all the jobs. He’s been supplementing the camp’s supplies with trips to Lowe’s in Bismarck, spending thousands from his own pocket on lumber and equipment. “We don’t have time to worry about where the money is coming from,” he says. Much of the winterization plans have come at the request of tribal elders. But not everyone agrees about some of the tactics and equipment being used. The elders were reluctant to approve the use of batteries, citing concerns about chemical leaks. And while many of the more permanent structures require digging for construction, that’s frowned upon, too. “If DAPL can’t dig, we can’t dig,” Stanley says.

17


ISTHMUS.COM DECEMBER 1–7, 2016

n COVER STORY

18

track” permitting process known as Nationwide Permit 12. This allowed the Corps to treat the pipeline like a series of small construction sites with wetland crossings instead of a four-state infrastructure project. The loophole granted the pipeline developer exemption from a cumulative environmental review. The Standing Rock Sioux tribe filed a lawsuit in July against the Corps, alleging that in granting the permits, the agency violated multiple federal statutes, including the Clean Water Act, the National Historic Protection Act and the National Environmental Policy Act. After a series of motions and filings, the Corps on Nov. 14 announced it would delay an easement pending further environmental review. The next day, Energy Transfer Partners filed a countersuit claiming the Corps has no right to delay the easement, which is the final hurdle preventing the developer from digging under the Missouri River. Drilling equipment is already in place. The legal experts present at Standing Rock declined to discuss the lawsuits, saying much of the litigation is being handled by outside lawyers. At the protest site, people with legal training are focused on helping people who have been arrested and observing law enforcement for potential human rights violations. In a Nov. 21 statement, Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chairman Dave Archambault II urged President Barack Obama to take action. “The easement to build the unsafe Dakota Access Pipeline has not been granted. But under the cover of darkness, North Dakota law enforcement continues to engage in unlawful and dehumanizing tactics to subdue peaceful water protectors with tear gas and water cannons,” Archambault wrote. “We are deeply saddened that despite the millions of Americans and allies around the world who are standing with us at Standing Rock, a single corporate bully — backed by U.S. government taxpayer dollars through a militarized law enforcement — [continues] to be sanctioned by aggressive, unlawful acts.” Archambault was referencing the events of Nov. 20, when law enforcement used a water cannon in subfreezing temperatures on protesters who were attempting to remove a barricade on a bridge near the encampment. The clash happened the day after the Madison group left Standing Rock, but Giovana Schluter Nunes, a New York City-based freelance photographer, was on the scene. “I had never covered something so violent,” she says. Police denied using water cannons to break up the demonstration, saying instead they used a fire hose to extinguish fires that protesters had started on the bridge. Nunes disputes this, saying the only fires she saw were bonfires to keep people from freezing, none of which were lighted on the bridge. “It was 25 degrees outside, and the police were spraying people with cold water — that’s immediately not okay,” she says, adding that people could have died had there not been medics at camp. Video taken at the scene backs up Nunes’ account. Twenty-six people were hospitalized and more than 300 were injured during the clash, according to media reports, including a 21-year-old woman who might still lose her arm from her injuries. Witnesses at the scene say she was hit by a concussion grenade thrown by police. On Nov. 25, the Army Corps of Engineers sent a letter to the Standing Rock Sioux, notifying tribal leaders of plans to close all federally managed lands north of the Cannonball River on Dec. 5, effectively issuing an eviction notice to the thousands of residents at the Oceti Sakowin Camp. In the letter, John W. Henderson, a district commander with the Corps, cited “safety concerns” as the reason for the closure. He urged protesters to move to a “free speech zone” on land south of the river. North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple has also ordered the activists to leave, citing safety concerns. Both say they have no plans to forcibly remove the protesters. The Standing Rock movement has been described as an occupation. But it’s important to note that the camps are on Native American lands, as established by the 1851 Treaty of Fort Laramie. Over time, the ownership of those lands be-

came disputed (particularly when white settlers found gold during the latter half of the 19th century), but the Great Sioux Nation never ceded the territory. From the Native American perspective, law enforcement represents the occupying force.

Regis Ferland stands beside the barrel stoves he made to heat his camp, which is home to about 50 people, all from Michigan.

Regis Ferland, a member of the Chippewa tribe from Mount Pleasant, Michigan, sees a connection between the Dakota Access Pipeline fight and the water sovereignty struggles around the world, including in his home state. He points to the 2010 pipeline spill that fouled the Kalamazoo River with hundreds of thousands of gallons of crude oil, the ongoing lead contamination crisis in Flint and the massive water service cutoffs and price gouging allegations in Detroit. People in Michigan have made that connection as well, with hundreds showing up for a Standing Rock solidarity rally in Lansing on Nov. 5. “This isn’t just a Native American issue — this affects everyone,” says Ferland, 35, who has been at Standing Rock on and off for the past three months. He sees the water protectors’ movement — and the direct-action tactics used — as a model to continue the fight for water rights in Michigan and beyond. “We’re taking this movement and bringing it back home,” he says.

ALLISON GEYER PHOTOS

Jessie Kushner (second from left), of Madison, runs an adventure-based therapy program that helps at-risk youth, many of whom are Native American. Jud Gauthier (left) and Micah Nickey (right), both Native Americans from Wisconsin, are volunteer mentors with Kushner’s program. Nickey’s son, Sequoyah, is second from right. The movement could soon come to Wisconsin, says Jud Gauthier, a member of the Menominee tribe from Keshena. “There’s a long history in Wisconsin of extracting resources,” he says. Native American activists from his reservation in northern Wisconsin have been protesting an open pit mine proposed near the state’s border with Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Known as the Back Forty mine, environmentalists say the operation could leach acid and arsenic into the Menominee River. Wisconsin has seen its share of oil pipeline activity as well, with developers and activists battling over the Enbridge Sandpiper project and the tar sands pipeline that runs through Dane County.

Gauthier speaks of the Native American prophecy of the Seventh Generation, which foretells a time, seven generations after European colonization, when Native Americans would join with other races and lead an uprising to win back stewardship of the land. Many at Standing Rock believe that the movement is a manifestation of this prediction. But Gauthier believes that corporations can operate with a Seventh Generation mentality as well. Pipelines can be defeated, but they can also come back, years later, offering the same jobs. “This is a generational fight,” says Gauthier, whose parents were environmental activists. “There’s always more work to do.” n


STARRING SYLVIA McNAIR

DEC. 2, 3, 4 | Overture Hall A family friendly celebration to send your spirits soaring!

Soprano Sylvia McNair, star of Broadway and the Metropolitan Opera

John DeMain, Conductor Sylvia McNair, Soprano MADISON SYMPHONY CHORUS Beverly Taylor, Director MADISON YOUTH CHOIRS Michael Ross, Artistic Director MOUNT ZION GOSPEL CHOIR Tamera and Leotha Stanley, Directors

buy b uy ttickets ickets now! now!

This concert This concert sells sells oout. ut MADISONSYMPHONY.ORG, the Overture Center Box Office or (608) 258-4141

MAJOR FUNDING PROVIDED BY American Printing | Nedrebo’s Formalwear | BMO Wealth Management Hooper Foundation/General Heating & Air Conditioning Maurice and Arlene Reese Family Foundation | National Guardian Life Insurance Company | An Anonymous Friend ADDITIONAL FUNDING PROVIDED BY Colony Brands, Inc. | J.H. Findorff & Son Inc. Reinhart Rein hart Boe Boerner Van Deu Deuren re s.c. | Hans and Mary Lang Sollinger Wisconsin Wisconsi Wisc onsin n Arts Arts Board Board

Connect Connec Con nectt with with us us!! #madisonsymphony

Come 45 minutes early to the concerts! Enjoy carols sung by the Madison Symphony Chorus in the magically lit Overture Hall lobby.

DECEMBER 1–7, 2016 ISTHMUS.COM

join us!

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S TAY WA R M W I T H ART EVENTS THIS MONTH PRESENTED BY UW–MADISON UPCOMING EVENTS — A SAMPLER

Shakespeare in Wisconsin 2016 Join the UW-Madison Libraries, Arts Institute, the Chazen Museum of Art and many other supporters as we celebrate Shakespeare in Wisconsin 2016. For more events around the state, visit:

shakespeare.library.wisc.edu

THROUGH DEC. 11 EXHIBITION

First Folio! The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare and Presenting Shakespeare CHAZEN MUSEUM OF ART 750 UNIVERSITY AVE HOURS VARY (CLOSED MON) A rare copy of Shakespeare’s First Folio, on tour from the Folger Shakespeare Library, is on view along with a collection of Shakespeare theater posters from around the world. FREE

THROUGH DEC. 11 THEATRE

It’s a Wonderful Life: a Live Radio Play MITCHELL THEATRE, VILAS HALL 821 UNIVERSITY AVE HOURS VARY — THURS–SUN

ISTHMUS.COM DECEMBER 1–7, 2016

This holiday classic comes to life as a live 1940s radio play, complete with music and sound effects. Special events: Dec. 3 — broadcast live by WPR, Dec. 4 — ASL interpreter and Dec. 9 — post-show talkback.

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$10 -20

THROUGH DEC. 11 ART VIEWING

Rebirth by Manabu Ikeda CHAZEN MUSEUM OF ART 750 UNIVERSITY AVE HOURS VARY (CLOSED MON) Twelve hundred days after he started, Chazen artist-in-residence Manabu Ikeda has finished his 10 x 13-foot masterwork Rebirth. FREE

DECEMBER 16

EXHIBITION & PERFORMANCE

FILM

Tactile Textiles: Colors and Culture

Sixty Six

THIRD FLOOR, MADISON PUBLIC LIBRARY • 201 W MIFFLIN ST 7:00-10:00 PM — FRI New works by students in Meeta Mastani’s Tactile Textiles – From 2D to 3D course will be unveiled as part of The Bubbler @ Madison Public Library’s Night Light series. There will be two performances of Rubedo – a collaborative dance piece created by Li Chiao-Ping Dance. Exhibition on view until Dec. 6. FREE

CINEMATHEQUE 4070 VILAS HALL 821 UNIVERSITY AVE 7:00 PM — FRI Assembled from 13 years worth of dazzling short films, this eye-popping magnum opus is an incomparably rich visual and auditory experience. Lewis Klahr’s unique cut-out animation techniques and Lichtensteinesque sensibility conjure a 2D dreamscape of Los Angeles, while burrowing deep into the national psyche. FREE

DECEMBER 3–4 DANCE CONCERT

Kloepper Concert 549 LATHROP HALL 1050 UNIVERSITY AVE 8:00 PM — SAT | 2:30 PM — SUN

DECEMBER 1 CONCERT

The Blind Boys of Alabama Christmas Show with Liz Vice WISCONSIN UNION THEATER 800 LANGDON ST 8:00 PM — THURS This group of blind, African-American, roofraising gospel singers toured the South during the Jim Crow era, played at benefits for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and sung for three different presidents in the White House. $10 -39

DECEMBER 2

The UW–Madison Dance Department presents the 5th annual Kloepper Concert, a studio performance of new student work, in the historic Louise Kloepper Studio. Purchase tickets in advance Dec. 1 in the lobby of Lathrop Hall, 12:00-2:00 p.m. Cash only. $10

DECEMBER 9 MUSIC

Choral Union with Chamber Orchestra MILLS HALL, HUMANITIES BUILDING • 455 N PARK ST 8:00 PM — FRI Mead Witter School of Music presents Leonard Bernstein’s Chichester Psalms, Johannes Brahms’s Nänie, and Ludwig van Beethoven’s Mass in C with Beverly Taylor as conductor. $8-15

arts.wisc.edu Detailed Calendar Parking | Ticketing

DECEMBER 17–18 VISUAL ART

Holiday Craft Sale + Blow Your Own Glass Ornament LOFTS GALLERY, ARTS LOFT BUILDING 111 N FRANCES ST 9:00 AM-5:00 PM — SAT-SUN Support the art students of UW-Madison! Find one-of-a-kind art to take home, including prints, ceramics, glass and more. You can also Blow Your Own Ornament for $45 with the Mad Gaffers (a student glassblowing club). FREE TO ATTEND


FOOD & DRINK■BOOKS■SPORTS■ MUSIC■SCREENS

Off the shelf, into the kitchen Five outstanding books from 2016 about the food of the upper Midwest BY TERESE ALLEN ■ ILLUSTRATION BY TODD HUBLER

Prime rib and minty grasshoppers. Feminist farmers and feisty bartenders. The terroir of the North. It’s all here in these five new titles highlighting upper Midwestern foods and authors.

reservation, I learned more about tribal food, culture and family life reading this single slender book than I did in more than two decades as his regional neighbor. Good Seeds is a poignant, important book. In Winter’s Kitchen: Growing Roots and Breaking Bread in the Northern Heartland By Beth Dooley (Milkweed Editions) Many of these same themes resonate in a new book from Minneapolis author Beth Dooley. She gives us solid journalism woven with warm personal reflection in an exploration of the pleasures and promise of the “cold weather” local foods movement of the upper

Midwest. This is no screech — it’s a calm, measured study of what’s working in the so-called flyover region, with tales of growers, gatherers and artisans and the iconic foods they produce. Once a doubting Thomas herself, New Jersey-born Dooley tracks her own journey from leery transplant to enthusiastic advocate, and, as she puts it, she “cooks her way home” to discover that “a locally sourced winter diet is more than a possibility; it can be healthy, community-based, economically just and — most of all — delicious.” CO NT I NU E D O N PAGE 2 3

DECEMBER 1–7, 2016 ISTHMUS.COM

Good Seeds: A Menominee Food Memoir By Thomas Pecore Weso (Wisconsin Historical Society Press) “This is how I understand cooking, as part of a family process that includes spirit, the forest environment and fuel for cooking — all before the meal can be prepared.” Sentences like this elegantly express the author’s multiple perspectives as anthropologist, artist, Menominee Indian, family member, cook.

Raised in the big, multigenerational home of his matriarch grandmother and medicine-man grandfather, Tom Weso grew up eating (and hunting, gathering and growing) traditional foods along with modern fare. The book is organized by ingredient — beaver, wild rice, maple syrup, etc. — with chapters and recipes on German beer, Wisconsin diner meals and the concession foods at county and tribal fairs. But Weso’s stories are much more than culinary tales or instruction. Plain-spoken and occasionally hilarious, Weso sparks understanding and connection. A contemporary of Weso who grew up less than an hour away from the Menominee

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■ FOOD & DRINK

Rib masters

Ribs are dry-rubbed and served “naked” with a choice of four house sauces to add.

The Thirsty Goat knows its smoked meats BY LINDA FALKENSTEIN

There’s suddenly a slew of pubs with names that echo each other and may rattle around in your head if you are not paying close attention — the Flying Hound, the Parched Eagle and now, the Thirsty Goat. They are unrelated to each other; they just sound like they should be. Cheat sheet: The Parched Eagle is a nanobrewery in the town of Westport, the Flying Hound is an alehouse in Fitchburg, and the Thirsty Goat is a pub in the revamped former Casa del Sol, just off South Fish Hatchery Road (also in Fitchburg). Our topic today is the Thirsty Goat. It was originally conceived of as a brewpub, but onsite brewing is not yet up and running. Instead there are 32 taps, leaning to familiar craft brews. The list ranges from macros Bud Light, Miller Lite and Guinness Stout to state classics Spotted Cow, Fantasy Factory, Bedlam and Warped Speed. For the true brewhound, there are a few lesser-seen picks, like Sea Dog Wild Blueberry from Maine. It’s good news to see this rather large building occupied again, drawing crowds. You might think the area already had the beer/ food thing covered, as the Fitchburg location of the Great Dane is just a block south. But the Goat is developing as more of a sports bar. There’s a large bar area and a smaller dining area off to one side, and everywhere you look there’s a television screen. The food menu here is much smaller than the Great Dane’s, and focuses on meats from the smokehouse. When in Rome, do as the Romans, and when you go to a place that specializes in

smoked meats, get the smoked meats. Here the meat is flavored with a dry rub and served, as they say, “naked.” The dry rub works very well at imparting deep flavor to the meat, and if you wanted to enjoy the brisket or the baby back ribs naked, that would be an understandable choice. The half-rack of baby back ribs was rich, meaty, smoky, not terribly fatty and in no need of sauce. That said, any of the four housemade sauces (sweet and tangy, house, bourbon, and spicy chipotle, found on the table in squeeze bottles) are fun additions to the sliced brisket or pulled pork sandwiches or the trio of sliders (pork, beef and chicken) served as appetizers. The sauces don’t taste that different from each other, although the chipotle is spicier and the bourbon has the deepest flavor. Vegetarians will be hard-pressed to find much on the menu. If they eat fish, though, a surprise hit is the salmon fillet, a properly cooked piece of fish that had a bit of grill crisp on the exterior but was tender within. Our server said I was the first person in her experience to order the salmon; it’s good, if a bit overpriced at $17. It comes with seasonal vegetables (on that night fresh brussels sprouts, cooked to that hard-to-achieve moment between chewy and mushy) and a salt-crusted baked potato. Yes, there are big flakes of kosher salt on the jacket, and it’s advisable to eat the skin. Other entrees are a petite filet, rib-eye and an Iowa pork chop. Less successful is the broasted chicken. “Broasted” just means a process of frying chicken

RYAN WISNIEWSKI

under pressure, so this is fried chicken. It reminded me of Chester’s fried chicken, a national franchise found in gas stations and convenience stores. The real problem isn’t the batter, or the cooking method — it’s the nature of mass-market chicken in this country, tending to rubbery and greasy and flavorless no matter what a kitchen does to it. Sides vary in quality. The coleslaw is bland; housemade chips are crisp and salty and easy to like; mac and cheese is creamy but mild; chipotle corn is spicy but also chewy and greasy; the side salad is better than average, with romaine and decent toppings. At this point, the Thirsty Goat is a sports bar with good barbecue and lots of taps. I’m not sure if it even needs to brew its own beer. The place is hopping, a fun atmosphere to watch a game. But if you’re just looking to eat, it’s hard to escape the noise. Even the dining room has screens, including one that covers most of one wall. It’s very, very loud in the Thirsty Goat, even when it’s not full. On a recent Saturday evening with college football on, conversation at a table for four was almost impossible. It wasn’t even a Badgers game. But who knows, maybe the quality of the barbecue makes conversation unnecessary. When in Rome.... ■

THE THIRSTY GOAT ■ 3040 Cahill Main, Fitchburg ■ 608-422-5500 ■ Thirstygoatbrew.com ■ $8-$26 11 am-1 am Mon.-Thurs., 11 am-2 am Fri.-Sat., 11 am-10 pm Sun.

Midwest books continued from 21

Drink Like a Woman: Shake. Stir. Conquer. Repeat By Jeannette Hurt (Seal Press) Milwaukee writer Jeanette Hurt’s latest book pays tribute to legendary women from both real and literary life — each with the tale of a gutsy, glass ceiling-smashing crusader, paired with an original cocktail recipe to honor her contributions. Hurt also covers such extras as bar accessories, hangover cures and even the sexist history of American cocktail culture. Boldly illustrated, feistily written and anything but “girly,” Drink Like a Woman is an entertaining antidote to what ails patriarchy-worn feminists.

Care for a Frida Kahlúa, anyone? Or how about a Bloody Mary Richards? Soil Sisters: A Toolkit for Women Farmers By Lisa Kivirist (New Society Publishers) Lisa Kivirist would fit right in with the rest of the heroines in Hurt’s book. Kivirist’s latest (she is co-author of four previous books related to food and sustainability) is an engaging and practical guide to farming that’s geared to the fastest-growing group in agriculture — women. As founder-director of an award-winning resource center for rural women, and a local farmer herself, Kivirist is well placed to instruct on the full spectrum of resources that today’s female growers need. She covers risk management, business planning, raising livestock and much more. Along the way, she shares the stories of more than 100 very cool women who are transforming our broken food system. ■

Multi-Cuisine • North & South Indian • Indo-Chinese Lamb • Chicken • Tandoori Specialties Vegetarian • Biryani Specialties – OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK – Lunch (buffet & à la carte) 11:30am-3pm Dinner (à la carte) 5-10 pm

6913 University Ave • 608-824-0324 www.AmberIndianMadison.com

DECEMBER 1–7, 2016 ISTHMUS.COM

Wisconsin Supper Clubs: Another Round By Ron Faiola (Agate) One of my fondest memories of supper clubs is an early one, when several high school friends and I drove in a borrowed green Ford Mustang “up the coast” from Green Bay to the Club Chalet, an A-frame that sat on a rise off Highway 57, and boasted great views of the bay. It was a rite-of-passage adventure that included a swanky, out-of-town destination, Alaskan king crab legs and tub-sized oldfashioneds (illegal, but we got away with it). Countless supper club experiences later, I still get that grown-up, I-belong feeling, and I still relish the classic fare served up with heartland graciousness at such places as those in Ron Faiola’s new hardcover.

Faiola’s second book of supper clubs covers 50 establishments arranged in geographic sections, with big photos on every page. His tone is easygoing and personal, and his stories blend supper club and family history with culinary and architectural description.

23


■ FOOD & DRINK

Laissez le bon temps rouler

Big-time saison

The Cre-old Fashioned from the Blue Velvet

The Parched Eagle nanobrewery and pub in the town of Westport is the smallest brewery in the Madison metro area. Jim Goronson’s brewhouse provides an outlet for some very creative beers. Alferd, a current fall seasonal for the brewpub, is a black rye imperial saison that typifies the kind of creative beer that a brewer can feel free to make on this kind of small-batch system. A variation on the saison, this complex beer is made with a half-dozen malts, among them a pleasant, bready pilsner, and a de-bittered black malt called Blackprinz, which gives this beer its dark color. It also has a high percentage of rye malt for a spicy dry background. A peppery spiciness comes from ground Indian coriander. It’s hopped with Northern Brewer, Tettnang and Czech Saaz for light bitterness and herbal grassy notes that go well with the dry earthiness of the coriander and French saison yeast. There’s also a light fruity

ISTHMUS.COM DECEMBER 1–7, 2016

The Blue Velvet Lounge, 430 W. Gilman St., is probably best known for its Godivaliquored dessert drinks and assorted martinis. Though its tapered purple lights can make cocktails appear almost garish in color, it offers comfort on warm nights and chill evenings alike. Bartender Tim Schmock’s take on the traditional Wisconsin old fashioned offers sass and bravado. The colorful drink recently won first place in one of Korbel Brandy’s monthly drink contests; this one tested the mixology skills of eight Wisconsin bartenders. The Cre-old Fashion is made in a similar way to the classic version, though small twists to the ingredients make it an entirely new drink. Creole bitters from the Bitter Truth, muddled with orange, offer a taste that’s first tangy, then bitter, then fresh — replete with the candy-sweetness of orange pulp. Ginger ale tossed over a shot of Korbel provides the hearty punch of a Moscow Mule. While bar patrons guzzle down rail mixers to Schmock’s playlist of

24

Alferd from the Parched Eagle

Cre-old Fashioned at the Blue Velvet Lounge.

CAROLYN FATH

’90s music (think MC Hammer’s “U Can’t Touch This”), the Cre-old Fashioned offers a welcome diversion: a touch of energy, tempered by grace and good taste. — LEXY BRODT

Treat those in your life to the things they love with an exclusive gift card valid at all four Deja Food restaurants. Present the gift of local flavor, and award-winning dining for an unforgettable experience. Gift cards are available at each restaurant, or online at dejafoodgroup.com.

ROBIN SHEPARD

sweetness that emerges in the background from organic Valencia orange zest added late in the brewing. Alferd, strong and warm at 8.5 percent ABV, is available only at the Parched Eagle, where it sells for $6/glass. As a fall seasonal, the beer is expected to have a limited run. Definitely worth the trip to Westport for a glass.

— ROBIN SHEPARD


ROBINIA COURTYARD SATURDAY DEC. 10

Wilton’s Waffle Takeover at BLC

MONDAY

TUESDAY

Sunday Brunch at Julep

DEC. 5 LIVE AT JULEP

DEC. 6 AT DUSK

10am - 2pm ____________

$5 waffles DEC. 24

SUNDAY

Wilton’s Waffle Takeover

Dan Walkner & John Knudsen 6-8pm • FREE

featuring The Goonies

DEC. 12

DEC. 13 AT DUSK

Half-off Bottles JULEP JAMS: of Wine Louka Patenaude,

at BLC

at Barolo

3pm - midnight

$5 waffles

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DEC. 7

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DECEMBER 1–7, 2016 ISTHMUS.COM

25


■ FOOD & DRINK

Bringing breakfast back The Ugly Apple is a pioneer in the early morning cart scene BY DYLAN BROGAN

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The Ugly Apple is trying something new for Capitol Square food carts: breakfast. Chef Laurel Burleson saw an opening for a morning meal cart when researching mobile vending last year. “The food cart scene is so well supported in Madison. But no one was really doing breakfast,” says Burleson. Such a cart “seemed like it might appeal to someone who wants something fast, but also homemade and substantial, on their way to work.” Ugly Apple serves biscuit LINDA FALKENSTEIN sandwiches (made with ham or Start the day on the Square with a market friata. bacon from Stoddard’s in Cottage Grove), apple fritters, muffins, “I also started to hear from farmers at oatmeal, market vegetable frittatas, and bislocal markets about the difficulty of sellcuits and gravy as well as rotating specials. The ing their ugly produce. It’s still tastes great food cart operates on the corner of Wisconsin but just wasn’t being sold because it had a Avenue and Mifflin Street 7-10 a.m., Monday scratch or was the wrong shape,” says Burthrough Thursday. On Friday morning, Ugly Apleson. “So I got the idea of buying overstock ple serves office workers at University Research produce — the things that don’t sell at the Park. Burleson intends to be open for business farmers’ markets — and trying to use that.” through the winter (unless there’s a blizzard). A commitment to using tasty — if not Burleson has worked in professional kitchaesthetically perfect — produce is also ens since high school. Her experience in Madwhat inspired Burleson to name her food ison includes stints as a sous chef at Bishop’s cart Ugly Apple. Bay Country Club as well as Nostrano. While “The name goes back to the Ugly working in the restaurant industry, Burleson Duckling story,” says Burleson. “The ugly was always bothered by the amount of food apple still becomes a beautiful fritter.” ■ that’s wasted.

Eats events Uplands Dairy Dinner Sunday, Dec. 4

ISTHMUS.COM DECEMBER 1–7, 2016

r e e b

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t f a cr r a e y l l a

do

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Oliver’s Public House will feature cheeses from Uplands Cheese Company of Dodgeville in this special dinner. Highlights include Rush Creek Reserve fonduta; Pleasant Ridge Reserve with black truffle gnocchi; Kielbasa Krakowska with dumplings, sauerkraut and cheese broth and more. Tickets ($70) at oliverspublichouse.com or 608-819-8555. At 2540 University Ave., 5-8 pm.

Holiday Game Supper off

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Beer e vent alerts YE AR-ROUND OFFERS a nd DE ALS

Sunday, Dec. 4

Where’s the beef? Not at this five-course meal. The menu includes breast of pheasant, roasted loin of rabbit, wild mushroom stuffed goose, venison and hickory nut tart for dessert. At Harvest, 21 N. Pinckney St., 6-8 pm. Reserve tickets ($65) through the restaurant, 608-255-6075.

Pioneer Wisconsin foodways Wednesday, Dec. 7

Asparagus and barley groats, anyone? Learn about lost early European and Yankee dishes brought to Wisconsin by immigrants at this Culinary History Enthusiasts of Wisconsin (CHEW) event. Author Kathleen Ernst leads the discussion at Goodman Community Center, 149 Waubesa St., 7:15 pm. More info at chewwisconsin.com.


■ SPORTS

How the Badgers rose UW football is in the national title hunt BY MICHAEL POPKE

The Wisconsin Badgers wrapped up their regular season on Nov. 26 with a post-Thanksgiving Day 31-17 come-frombehind-victory at home over Minnesota — leaving fans with plenty to be grateful for regardless of what the next few weeks bring. If you’ve paid even a little attention to college football, you know that the 10-2 Badgers won the Big Ten West and will play 10-2 Big Ten East champion Penn State in the Big Ten Championship at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis on Saturday, Dec. 3. This will be Wisconsin’s fourth appearance in the title game in the past six years — the most by any other team in the conference, by the way — and they’ve won it twice. You also know that UW, No. 6 in the College Football Playoff rankings as of Nov. 30, could secure a spot in the fourteam College Football Playoff with a victory over the Nittany Lions. How did Wisconsin, unranked at the start of this season when the Badgers beat No. 5 LSU at Lambeau Field on Sept. 3, end up in the national title hunt with the likes of Alabama, Clemson and Washington? Let me count the ways: • The Badgers overcame a daunting schedule. They played five top 10 teams and beat three of them (LSU, No. 7 Nebraska and No. 8 Michigan State). Wisconsin lost the other two by a total of 10 points (Ohio State, in double-overtime, and Michigan). • Head coach Paul Chryst didn’t commit at quarterback. By rotating senior Bart Houston and redshirt freshman Alex Hornibrook,

Christmas in Paoli Dec. 3 DAVID STLUKA / UW ATHLETICS

Vince Biegel (47) and Leo Musso (19) celebrate Saturday’s win over Minnesota, led by quarterback Bart Houston (13).

Chryst kept both players in full-on readiness mode all season and played each of them as needed. • Pressure? What pressure? Last year at this time, the Badgers were coming off a productive but not entirely remarkable 9-3 regular season, and we all were waiting to find out in which ho-hum bowl game they would play. (It was the Holiday Bowl, and they beat USC.) This year, preseason expectations were high, but arguably no more so than usual. Three months

later, Wisconsin is in the national championship conversation and bringing a sixgame winning streak into Indy. If UW’s defense, which held the Gophers to 60 yards in the second half and forced four interceptions, can pick up against Penn State where it left off against Minnesota, the Badgers will help keep Madison’s mind off politics for the next few weeks. ■

Dreaming of an old-fashioned Christmas? Come to Paoli, Saturday, Dec. 3, for carriage rides, caroling, and good cheer. Discover unique gifts you won’t find at the mall. CLUCK is open 10 am to 5 pm

6904 Paoli Road / 608-848-1200 www.cluckthechickenstore.com Four miles south of Verona

DECEMBER 1–7, 2016 ISTHMUS.COM

27


Gift Certificate Sale

■ MUSIC

Purchase $100 of gift certificates through December 23 and receive a complimentary $20 gift Certificate.

J. Hardin wrote songs for The Piasa Bird while working the night shi at a Madison inn.

Purchase gift certificates online at portabellarestaurant.biz or paisansrestaurant.biz OR stop in or call us at

425 N. Frances St. • 256-3186

Paisan’s

Italian Restaurant 131 W. Wilson St. • 257.3832

Returning from self-exile J. Hardin releases a Midwestern opus BY ANDY MOORE

$8 STUDENTS $15 ADULTS

FRIDAY, DEC 9 / 8PM

CHORAL CHORAL UNION UNION WITH UW CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Beverly Taylor, Conductor Leonard Bernstein’s

Chichester Psalms Johannes Brahms’s

Nänie

Ludwig van Beethoven’s

ISTHMUS.COM DECEMBER 1–7, 2016

Mass in C

28

MEAD WITTER SCHOOL OF MUSIC Mills Hall, 455 N. Park Street MUSIC.WISC.EDU Tickets 608.265.2787

The panic attacks were coming closer and closer together by the time J. Hardin had his first job interview in Madison. He’d been in town just two days; two days off the road from a two-month tour that ended in Los Angeles, a city he intended to make his new home. Two weeks into that, he bolted back to Wisconsin. The long-bearded Hardin arrived to the interview wearing a threadbare, snap-button shirt, polyester pants and scuffed, pointytoed cowboy boots. “About the only clothes I had,” he says. His long hair raged this way and that before succumbing to gravity and settling down across his shoulders. He got the job. “They were absolutely desperate,” Hardin says. Thing is, it was absolutely the job Hardin was desperate for — night-shift maintenance man at a Madison inn. An 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. gig where he could be alone with his jagged thoughts. “I needed to be the guy staying up all night in a spooky old house figuring it out.” That was in 2010, and in the months leading up to Hardin’s new career in the hospitality industry, he had slowly but surely become unglued. While touring the country with Chicago and Austin-based songwriters, his mental health had declined and selfmedication had increased; drugs and alcohol had become part of a “daily maintenance.” Those two weeks post-tour in L.A. congealed a plan that he’d been cooking up. “I decided to eliminate everything from my life. Everything. To try to find out the meaning of it all.” Before clocking in to that first overnight shift at the inn, Hardin gath-

ered up all the pieces of his lifestyle and put them on the shelf. “I needed to get to a place in life where, if anyone took anything away from me, whether it was music or some kind of substance I was using as a crutch, it wouldn’t completely break me.” So began a four-year hiatus from music for the now 31-year-old Hardin. Those were years, ironically, that Hardin claims were “easily the most valuable time creatively” in his life. While he had no intention of creating music during that time, all but one song on Hardin’s new, powerful album of gothic folk songs called The Piasa Bird were the result of his journaling during those long, solitary nights at the inn. Born and raised in the Mississippi River town of Alton, Illinois, Hardin is the grandson and son of Boeing Aircraft workers. He sailed from home at 19 and threw out the anchor in Kenosha, a choice he admits was like throwing a dart at the map. He quickly got down to business, writing, recording and performing under the pseudonym Everett (his middle name) Thomas (“a little more than arbitrary”). In Kenosha he fell in with other talented Milwaukee musicians, including the slightly older, kindred folk-spirit Hayward Williams, who, over the course of seven days in Rockford at Midwest Sound, oversaw production of The Piasa Bird, Hardin’s first recording under his real name. “He’s a courageous writer,” says Williams. “He sets a few targets down-range and hits every bullseye by the last chord. All I needed to do was find the right players and get out of the way.” Among those players: Williams himself on bass and vocals, Dan McMahon (Cory Chisel & the Wandering Sons) and Miles Nielsen (Rusted Hearts) on guitars and keys.

A mythical creature feared and propagated by the Illini Indians centuries ago, the piasa (PIE-a-saw) was a vicious, lion-sized, human-eating bird that flew the updrafts of the Mississippi River bluffs where it dwelled. Hardin comes from that place, too, and the songs on the album have all the mystique of its namesake. Hardin’s sound combines the pioneer instincts of Levon Helm with the rapture and intelligence of Bonnie “Prince” Billy. Hardin says he’s a words-first, music-later composer. That style suited the journal-tomusic pathway this work was preordained to follow. Three of the last four songs on The Piasa Bird were the result of one very long piece of prose from Hardin’s Kerouac-style journaling during those quiet nights at the inn: “My Oh My” and “Oh, Sophia Parts 1 and 2.” “I write the way that I listen,” says Hardin. “I like to take in all the details. I guess I like pulling the plow a little bit.” Hardin goes back in the harness come February. That’s when he’ll join Hayward Williams for a two-month tour of Italy. Meanwhile, Hardin and his wife, Kaitlin, who he says has been a rock-solid support throughout these trying years, just bought a house in Madison. He says that Madison is “the first place in my adult life that has truly felt like home.” “I’m still in the process of getting it together,” Hardin says. “But one thing I’ve learned for sure is that no one owes the world an apology or an explanation for who they are as an individual. Allowing myself to feel and experience life so intensely, and go through the doldrums, and come out of them having learned something about myself has been liberating.” ■


Need room to conga at the office holiday party?

JEFF MILLER

Lyle Anderson is waiting to find out if he will be allowed to play the bells, post-retirement.

Will the bells still toll? UW looks at ways to restart carillon concerts BY JAY RATH

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The massive bell tower that has served as the symbolic voice of UW-Madison has been silent since August. For decades, the carillon at 1160 Observatory Drive treated campus visitors and students to tours and hour-long concerts each Sunday, and offered 15-minute concerts Wednesdays and Fridays. (A great favorite in 2013 was the theme to Game of Thrones.) During daylight hours, the carillon also rang on the hour and quarter-hour. There are several reasons for the silence. The automated clockwork developed a fault late in the summer of 2014. Carillonneur Lyle Anderson retired in September, after 30 years. And a recent report has uncovered a variety of potential safety issues. Officially part of the UW School of Music, the iconic 85-foot tower stands in front of the Social Sciences building, adjacent to Muir Woods. It was completed in 1936, built of local sandstone with donated funds. It is one of the largest carillons in the country, its 56 bells spanning four and a half octaves, played from a large console of levers. Despite his retirement, Anderson says he would like to continue playing the bells somehow, but university rules are thorny when it comes to paying people who receive retiree benefits. “The catch-22 situation seems to be at an impasse at the moment,” says Anderson. “We have to follow human resources policies when people retire,” explains Susan Cook, director of the School of Music. “We are looking to be able to use our own gift resources to continue to have a carillonneur of some kind. Whether that will be Lyle coming back as a retired annuitant or something else, I don’t know.” Complicating matters, the School of Music took the opportunity after Anderson

retired to request a review of the tower from the UW Department of Environment, Health and Safety. In addition to the need for asbestos abatement, better signage and fire safety improvements, much of the 18-page study deals with ladders and their repair. It also notes a wobbly keyboard bench and speculates that sound levels inside the tower might be dangerously loud. Steve Wagner, director of UW Facilities Planning & Management, says some minor repairs and maintenance will take place in the short term while his department looks at the report’s other recommendations. “Until then,” says bell-ringer Anderson, “I’m simply sitting by the phone, waiting for it to ring.” n

Have your holiday event at the Best Western Plus InnTowner

29

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For fu


■ MUSIC

“Don’t touch people. How hard is that?” Local effort addresses harassment at music shows BY DYLAN BROGAN

Last year, Emily Mills was waiting to go onstage at the Crystal Corner Bar with her punk duo Damsel Trash when a stranger sidled up to her. “I was looking at my phone. Someone came up behind me and kissed my neck,” says Mills, who founded the band with former Madison musician Meghan Rose. “At first, I figured this must be someone that I know. But it wasn’t. It was just some guy who was drunk or something and thought he was being cute. I nearly throttled him.” Mills, who is also the editor of the local LGBT magazine Our Lives, posted about the experience on social media. That caught the attention of Scott Gordon, editor of the music and culture website Tone Madison. “Over time, I would hear dribs and drabs about women getting persistent, unwanted advances from men at shows,” says Gordon. “Harassment [at music shows] affects a lot of people. It’s something that you often hear about in the form of anecdote that rarely gets elevated to a larger conversation.” In the months that followed, Mills and Gordon began collaborating on an effort to improve the local music scene for women and “other marginalized people.” In October, Tone Madison launched Consent, Amplified — a project that seeks to address harassment and spark discussion on how to create safer, more inclusive spaces. One facet of the endeavor is a survey where people can confidentially share incidents they’ve witnessed or experienced at shows in Madison. So far, there have been more than two dozen submissions.

TOMMY WASHBUSH

“The uptight Midwest demeanor coupled with the wildness of drink[ing] and music often brings out a suppressed savagery in men that’s very distressing and oppressive,” one person shared in the survey. On Nov. 15, Tone Madison hosted a panel discussion and Q&A under the Consent, Ampli-

fied umbrella at the Arts + Literature Laboratory. Mills moderated the talk and invited four panelists from the Madison music community: independent promoters Lili Luxe and Sarah Akawa; Dana Pellebon, co-owner of the Frequency; and Martha White, a local actor who works at the Cardinal Bar.

At the event, Mills asked why strangers think it’s acceptable to touch another person without consent. She said tattoos and “for some reason black women’s hair” are often taken as an invitation to invade personal space. “I don’t care who you are...don’t touch people,” said Mills. “How hard is that?” The discussion also hit on creating environments that are inclusive to people of color and the queer community. Pellebon, who is black, puts the onus on people who aren’t being harassed to drive change. “It is not my responsibility to dismantle the system that was designed to oppress me,” said Pellebon. “It is your responsibility, as a person of privilege, to help others that do not have those same advantages. And if you are not doing that — in every aspect of your existence — then you have a problem.” A podcast of the Consent, Amplified panel discussion is available at tonemadison.com. Tone Madison plans to follow up on ideas discussed at the talk. Gordon says the group is working on facilitating workshops for musicians, venue owners, bartenders and others in the music community on how to create spaces where harassment isn’t tolerated. The outlet is also keeping its survey open to continue compiling firsthand accounts of harassment. “We want to turn this into ongoing action. There are some very tangible ideas out there on how to create safe environments. There’s an opportunity to share knowledge and information. We are definitely going to figure out how to do that in the near future,” says Mills. “A lot of this is just refusing to put up with it anymore.” ■

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ISTHMUS.COM DECEMBER 1–7, 2016

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HOLIDAY SHOW AND SALE

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Fri, Sat, Sun • Dec. 9, 10 & 11 FRI & SAT 10-5 • SUN 11-4

Contemporary and traditional styles - silver, turquoise, coral, shell, lapis, and more! Priced from $20 and up. 1817 Monroe St. Madison, WI 53711 608.251.5451

FRI-SAT DEC 2-3 MONROE ST New jewelry from our India buying trip

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31


n SCREENS

Forbidden romance Loving tells the story of the couple who changed marriage law BY STEVE DAVIS

NOW PL AYING FANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEM CC & DESCRIPTIVE NARRATION Fri: (1:30, 4:10), 6:45, 9:45;

Sat: (11:00 AM, 1:30, 4:10), 6:45, 9:45; Sun: (11:00 AM, 1:30, 4:10), 6:45; Mon to Thu: (1:30, 4:10), 6:45

LOVING

NO PASSES - CC & DESCRIPTIVE NARRATION

Fri: (1:45, 4:20), 7:00, 9:35; Sat: (11:10 AM, 1:45, 4:20), 7:00, 9:35; Sun: (11:10 AM, 1:45, 4:20), 7:00; Mon to Thu: (1:45, 4:20), 7:00

ARRIVAL

NO PASSES - CC & DESCRIPTIVE NARRATION

Fri: (1:30, 4:05), 6:55, 9:25; Sat: (11:00 AM, 1:30, 4:05), 6:55, 9:25; Sun: (11:00 AM, 1:30, 4:05), 6:55; Mon to Thu: (1:30, 4:05), 6:55

ALLIED

NO PASSES - CC & DESCRIPTIVE NARRATION

Fri: (1:40, 4:15), 6:50, 9:30; Sat: (11:05 AM, 1:40, 4:15), 6:50, 9:30; Sun: (11:05 AM, 1:40, 4:15), 6:50; Mon to Thu: (1:40, 4:15), 6:50

DOCTOR STRANGE

CC & DESCRIPTIVE NARRATION

Fri: (1:50, 4:25), 7:05, 9:40; Sat: (11:20 AM, 1:50, 4:25), 7:05, 9:40; Sun: (11:20 AM, 1:50, 4:25), 7:05; Mon to Thu: (1:50, 4:25), 7:05

MOONLIGHT

CC & DESCRIPTIVE NARRATION

Fri & Sat: (2:00), 6:50, 9:20; Sun: (11:15 AM, 2:00), 6:50; Mon: (2:00 PM); Tue to Thu: (2:00), 6:50

HACKSAW RIDGE

Fri to Thu: (4:10 PM)

CC & DESCRIPTIVE NARRATION

THE ROYAL OPERA HOUSE: LES CONTES D’HOFFMANN SPECIAL EVENT!!! Sat: (10:00 AM); Mon: 7:15 PM

Amenity Fees Vary With Schedule - ( ) = Mats. www.sundancecinemas.com/choose LOCATED AT HILLDALE MALL 608.316.6900 www.sundancecinemas.com Gift Cards Available at Box Office

Showtimes subject to change. Visit website to confirm Closed captioning and descriptive narrative available for select films

Showtimes for December 1 - December 7

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ISTHMUS.COM DECEMBER 1–7, 2016

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Try to get your head around this: Less than half a century ago, an interracial couple could go to prison in 16 states for committing the felonious crime of exchanging marriage vows. Today, this criminalization of matrimony seems unfathomable, but for simple country folk Richard Loving (Joel Edgerton), a white man, and Mildred Loving (Ruth Negga), an African American woman, it was a waking nightmare that lasted nine years until the United States Supreme Court struck down Virginia’s anti-miscegenation statute as unconstitutional in 1967. (The court most recently referenced that decision’s characterization of marriage as a fundamental right when invalidating bans against same-sex marriage in 2015.) Loving (a title that works on more than one level) unhurriedly recounts this husband and wife’s near decade-long ordeal by showing their quiet and unwavering commitment to each other. The pacing is slow and thoughtful. Director/screenwriter Jeff Nichols (Mud, Take Shelter) no doubt calibrates the film so deliberately to convey how this grossly unfair law constantly weighs on the Lovings, particularly when they risk long-term imprisonment upon returning from exile to the state they call home. (A scene late in the film, in which Richard panics as a speeding car kicking up a trail of dust barrels toward their isolated rural home, is a wry comment on the lack of artificial high drama here.) Even when you know how this story ends, you still feel anxious as time drags on and on and on. Though it’s impossible to know exactly how these two people felt in coping with this untenable situation — they only wanted to get married and raise a family — Nichols gives you a damn good idea, even when it slightly wears your patience.

The Lovings (played by Joel Edgerton and Ruth Negga) lived a nine-year nightmare.

All too frequently, historical and biographical films bestow a saintly nobility upon their subjects, transforming human beings into purposely constructed symbols. When that happens, a movie can become preachy and annoying. Loving skirts this temptation and, except for a couple of scripted platitudes uttered by Mildred (Negga, in a performance so pure and uncomplicated she gets away with it), it resists glorifying these reluctant heroes — David Wingo’s swelling score aside. Indeed, Richard’s inability to easily verbalize his feelings defines the film’s aesthetic. He speaks as if words must pry themselves from his mouth to be heard,

Who can you trust? Allied is an old-fashioned potboiler BY MARYANN JOHANSON

Allied could easily be a romantic war drama recently rediscovered from the 1940s, perhaps one inspired by Casablanca. There’s certainly a wonderfully old-fashioned feel to the tale of the Canadian intelligence operative (Brad Pitt) and the French resistance fighter (Marion Cotillard) who team up to assassinate a Nazi official in French Morocco...in, yes, Casablanca. A year later, they have married and are living in London when their loyalties are called into question by the Royal Air Force, to which he is transferred.

There are a few good bits of stuff blowing up — the sequence in which a damaged German bomber slowly falls from the skies over London is full of exquisite tension — but the action of war mostly takes a back seat to the emotional turmoil that inevitably occurs when spies whose lives depend on the success of their lies must trust one another, if they can. Director Robert Zemeckis judiciously balances psychological and physical suspense, and ends up with an elegant potboiler that seems to hail from a cinematic era when silences heavy with suspicion spoke louder than words. n

similar to the way Heath Ledger’s Ennis Del Mar struggled to express himself in Brokeback Mountain. But when the inexperienced ACLU lawyer representing the couple (a strangely cast Nick Kroll, who smiles a lot) asks Richard what he would like him to tell the members of the Supreme Court during oral arguments, the usually inarticulate man gives a response so simple and distilled you want to reach out and hug him: “Tell the judge I love my wife.” Up to this point, Edgerton’s earnest performance has felt a tad actorly, but in that sweet-spot moment, it rings like a wedding bell. n

A Canadian operative (Brad Pitt) marries a French resistance fighter (Marion Cotillard).


Marmato: Colombian Film Showcase: Documentary about Canadian mining companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actions in a Colombian town. UW Red Gym, Dec. 1, 5:45 pm.

26THANNUAL

Film events

&

Black Narcissus: Five nuns open a convent in the Himalayas. Central Library, Dec. 1, 6:30 pm.

POLISH FILM FESTIVAL

Marquee Theater â&#x20AC;˘ Union South â&#x20AC;˘ 1308 West Dayton St.

Rifftrax Holiday Special Double Feature: Mike Nelson, Kevin Murphy, Bill Corbett and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weird Alâ&#x20AC;? Yankovic take down Santa Claus Conquers the Martians and a collection of holiday shorts. Point and Palace-Sun Prairie, Dec. 1, 7 pm.

Blindness

1 PM

Story of a woman working for the Stalinist-era Polish government

She Loves Me: Roundabout Theatre Companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s musical starring Laura Benanti, Zachary Levi and Jane Krakowski. Point, Dec. 1, 7 pm.

3:15 PM

National Lampoonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Christmas Vacation: Clark Griswold (Chevy Chase) and family face an array of disastrous situations. UW Union SouthMarquee, Dec. 1 (9:30 pm), Dec. 3 (11 pm) and Dec. 4 (6:15 pm). Impunity: Colombian Film Showcase: Documentary about paramilitary violence in Colombia. UW Red Gym, Dec. 2, 6 pm. Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory: A boy gets a â&#x20AC;&#x153;golden ticketâ&#x20AC;? to tour a candy factory founded by the eccentric Mr. Wonka (Gene Wilder). UW Union South-Marquee, Dec. 2 (6 pm) and Dec. 3 (9 pm). Morris From America: A coming-of-age story set in Heidelberg, Germany. Pinney Library, Dec. 2, 6:30 pm. Another Nice Mess: The Restored Laurel & Hardy: Shorts Helpmates, County Hospital, Their First Mistake and the Oscar winner The Music Box. UW Cinematheque, Dec. 2, 7 pm. Barakamon: Anime Club screening (RSVP: 2464548). Hawthorne Library, Dec. 2, 7 pm.

English subtitles

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4

Planet Single

Romantic comedy about two young people and a dating website

December 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11, 2016

FREE ADMISSION â&#x20AC;˘ www.polishfilmfest.com

The Playhouse at Overture Center for the Arts

THE BUDDIES ARE BACK!

presents

Tickets: $35 General, $20 Students through Overture Center Ticket Office at (608) 258-4141 or www.fourseasonstheatre.com

Young Frankenstein: Gene Wilder stars as the grandson of the mad scientist in this classic. UW Union South-Marquee, Dec. 2 (8:30 pm) and Dec. 3 (6 pm). The Flying Deuces: Laurel and Hardy in the French Foreign Legion. UW Cinematheque, Dec. 2, 8:45 pm. Critical Edge Film Festival: Local & student films. UW Union South-Marquee, Dec. 3, noon. The Goalieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anxiety at the Penalty Kick: Unconventional thriller by director Wim Wenders. UW Cinematheque, Dec. 3, 7 pm. Polarity: Skateboard film by Josh Oakes. Barrymore Theatre, Dec. 3, 8 pm. Blindness: Polish Film Festival: The story of the imprisonment of Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski. UW Union South-Marquee, Dec. 4, 1 pm. Embrace of the Serpent: A spellbinding account of an indigenous shamanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s encounters with Western explorers in the Amazon. UW Vilas Hall-Room 4008, Dec. 4, 1:30 pm. The Snake Pit: UW Cinematheque: Olivia de Havilland plays a woman suffering from delusions and anxiety. Chazen Museum of Art, Dec. 4, 2 pm. Planet Single: Polish Film Festival: Romantic comedy featuring a reality show about internet dating. UW Union South-Marquee, Dec. 4, 3 pm.

Holiday Fest

Book, Story, & Lyrics by

Chocolate of Peace: Colombian Film Showcase: Follow cacao through the story of the peace community of San Jose de Apartado. UW Union South-The Marquee, Dec. 7, 6 pm.

Day of Wrath: Witchcraft and adultery in 17thcentury Denmark. Bos Meadery, Dec. 7, 7 pm. CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap: Documentary about the lack of female/minority software engineers, with discussion following. Verona Library, Dec. 8, 6:30 pm. The Cursed Ones: A West African child is accused of witchcraft, and a reporter and a pastor attempt to convince the community otherwise. UW Union South-Marquee, Dec. 8, 7 pm.

FRED ALLEY

17TH ANNUAL

ARTS AND CRAFTS FAIR Warner Park Community Recreation Center Saturday, December 3, 2016 9:00 am - 3:00 pm www.cityofmadison.com/parks/wpcrc

$1 Admission ý)ÊÌ3DUNLQJ 9HQGèV

Dec. 21-23 Dec. 26-Jan. 1 MON. DEC

26

7:30pm

TUE. DEC

27

7:30pm

Music & Story by

JAMES KAPLAN WED. DEC

21

7:30pm WED. DEC

28

7:30pm

THU. DEC

Starring everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite Marvin & Lloyd

DOUG MANCHESKI & STEVE KOEHLER

22

7:30pm THU. DEC

29

7:30pm

FRI. DEC

23

7:30pm FRI. DEC

30

7:30pm

THEATRE

2090 Atwood Ave. (608) 241-8633 barrymorelive.com

SAT. DEC

31

2:30pm 7:30pm

SUN. JAN

1

New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day

4:30pm

All tickets are General Admission $29 on sale at Sugar Shack, Star Liquor, MadCity Music, B-Side, Frugal Muse, Strictly Discs, the Barrymore, online at barrymorelive.com or call & charge at (608) 241-8633. For Group Rates, please call the Barrymore Box Office at (608) 241-8633.

DECEMBER 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7, 2016 ISTHMUS.COM

One, Two, Three: UW CREECA screening & discussion of Billy Wilderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1961 comedy. Humanities Building-Room 1651, Dec. 6, 7 pm.

GUYS on ICE 33


WORT-FM 41st Birthday Bash

Fountain: Jeff Larsen, free, 8 pm. High Noon Saloon: The Last Revel, Feed the Dog, 8:30 pm. Knuckle Down Saloon: Blues Jam with Tate & the 008 Band, celebrating 30 years of jams, 8 pm.

Friday, Dec. 2, High Noon Saloon, 5 pm

Majestic: Figure, Prototype, Stratus, 9 pm.

The year: 1975. White House staffers were found guilty in the Watergate cover-up, Stevie Nicks joined Fleetwood Mac, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show opened on Broadway. In Madison, a tiny radio station with the call letters WORT signed on to the airwaves. The call letters stood for “World’s Oldest Radio Transmitter” because of the station’s rickety antenna. Forty-one years later WORT is a model of successful community radio for the nation. And they don’t just make good radio; they also throw one helluva party. Music starts at 5:15 pm with Tijuana Brass revivalists Hirt Alpert and goes all the way to bar time, closing out with garage-surf from Fury Things. At 8 pm the king of alt-country, Chicagoan Robbie Fulks (pictured), takes the stage. Fulks is the bastard son of George Jones and Louis C.K. His latest, a literate opus called Upland Stories, is partly based on journalist James Agee’s groundbreaking reporting on Southern poverty in the 1930s.

picks

thu dec 1 MU S I C

fellow gospel artist Liz Vice, who released her debut album, There’s a Light, last fall. Here’s hoping she joins the Boys for a song or two.

Mason Lounge: Brennan Connors & Stray Passage, jazz, free, 8:30 pm. Mickey’s Tavern: Mal-O-Dua, free, 5:30 pm. Nottingham Coop: Bell & Circuit, Mori Mente, Tippy, 7 pm. Tip Top Tavern: Tos Hopkins, folk, free, 9 pm. UW Humanities-Morphy Hall: UW Jazz Standards & Contemporary Jazz ensembles, 7:30 pm.

T H EAT ER & DA N C E Beta Blockers: Generations: Left of Left Center presents scenes by Ned O’Reilly: 7 pm, 12/1, Capital Brewery, Middleton; 7:30 pm, 12/2, Glass Nickel-Atwood; 2 pm, 12/3, Monona Library; 6 pm, 12/4, Lakeside Street Coffee House; 7 pm, 12/7, Brink Lounge. $10. leftofleftcenter.com. It’s a Wonderful Life: Musical adaptation of the Capra film by Verona Area Community Theater, 7:30 pm on 12/1-2, 2 & 7:30 pm on 12/3 & 2 pm, 12/4, Verona Area High School. $16. vact.org. It’s a Wonderful Life: Radio play-style adaptation by Joe Landry, produced by University Theatre, 12/1-11, Vilas Hall-Mitchell Theatre, at 7:30 pm Thursdays-Fridays and 2 & 7:30 pm SaturdaysSundays (note: 8 pm on 12/3). $20. 265-2787. The Undertow: A grieving psychiatrist and troubled rock star try to recover in this play by Michael Tooher, 11/18-12/10, Broom Street Theater, at 8 pm Thursdays-Saturdays. $11. 244-8338.

CO MEDY

PICK OF THE WEEK ANDY GOODWIN

Thibaut Garcia Thursday, Dec. 1, Gates of Heaven Synagogue, 7:30 pm

Toulouse-born guitarist Thibaut Garcia has been playing since he was 7, honing his skills at Spanish-influenced, classically inspired guitar. Now 22, he’s a darling of the international circuit. Recipient of numerous guitar prizes (including first at the 2015 Guitar Foundation of America International Artist Competition in Oklahoma City), Garcia brings a light, dancing touch to his work. For a taste, check out his new album Leyendas, released earlier this year.

Greg Fitzsimmons, Jacob Williams, Esteban Touma: 8:30 pm on 12/1 and 8 & 10:30 pm, 12/2-3, Comedy Club on State. $15-$10. 256-0099.

A RT EXH I B I TS & EV EN TS Traa dy Liooar/Time Enough: Photographs, noon-4 pm Saturdays, 12/3-17, PhotoMidwest (reception 7 pm, 12/1). photomidwest.org. Shia Fisher: Photographs, 12/1-1/3, Health Sciences Learning Center, 2nd Floor. 263-5992. Mad Metals Holiday Art & Jewelry Sale: UW student organization fundraiser, 10 am-7 pm, 12/1-3, UW Art Lofts. madmetalsuw@gmail.com. Wisconsin Triennial: 9/24-1/8, Madison Museum of Contemporary Art (gallery talks: Helen Lee 1 pm, 12/1; John Hitchcock 1 pm, 12/8; studios tour 6-9 pm, 12/2, from MMoCA, $60). 257-0158.

S PEC I A L EV EN TS Wine & Choice: Annual NARAL Pro-Choice Wisconsin fundraiser, 6 pm, 12/1, Table Wine. $75 ($35 low income). RSVP: prochoicewisconsin. org. 287-0016. Get Festive with Agora: Free carriage rides, music & refreshments, 4-8 pm, 12/1, Agora Center, Fitchburg. Donations encouraged for Agrace HospiceCare. 277-2606.

ISTHMUS.COM DECEMBER 1–7, 2016

L EC T URES & S EMI N A RS

34

Blind Boys of Alabama Christmas Show

Amanda Shires

Thursday, Dec. 1., UW Memorial Union-Shannon Hall, 8 pm

Even if you’ve never heard Amanda Shires’ voice, chances are you’ve heard her fiddle. The Texan has played with the likes of John Prine, Justin Townes Earle and her husband, Jason Isbell, in addition to releasing six albums of her own. The most recent, this year’s My Piece of Land, is another example of her masterful musicianship, which has won her comparisons to both Emmylou Harris (vocally) and Tom Waits (lyrically). With Andrew Leahey.

’Tis (nearly) the season for holiday music, and what better way to celebrate than with gospel institution the Blind Boys of Alabama? Performing cuts from their cozy 2014 album Talkin’ Christmas! and traditional tunes, the group promises to please — be prepared to smile, stand and sway all night long. Joining the Blind Boys of Alabama as opener is

Thursday, Dec. 1, Frequency, 8 pm

Mr. Jackson Thursday, Dec. 1, Mr. Roberts, 9 pm

Ethan Jackson doesn’t just bring the noise, he also brings the funk — and he brings it bigtime. The Madison musician behind the Mr. Jackson project plays synth-heavy R&B that paints him as a funnier, smarter version of the Weeknd. With fellow Madison keyboard slingers Queenager and the Fatal Eggs. Bos Meadery: Stillhouse Six, free, 6:30 pm.

The Writer’s Life: Discussion of food & culture criticism by Linda Falkenstein (Isthmus) & Samara Kalk Derby (Wisconsin State Journal), 7 pm, 12/1, Madison College-Downtown-Room 240. 258-2489. John Nichols: Talk by the “People Get Ready! The Fight against a Jobless Economy And a Citizenless Democracy” co-author, 6:30 pm, 12/1, Central Library. wilpf-madison.org.

FO O D & D RI N K Tasting for a Cause Gala: Monona East Side Business Alliance fundraiser, 5-8 pm, 12/1, HarleyDavidson of Madison, with casino-style gaming, tasting stations, beer & wine, silent auction. $50. RSVP: mononaeastside.com. 222-8565.


BARRYMORE

UW SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND

MADISON MUSIC COLLECTIVE PRESENTS

Delicious Creative Inc. presents

SAT. DEC. 3

NYC: Best Ensemble of the Year (2015)

GABRIEL ALEGRIA

A whirlwind of Madison talent, writing and producing 9 mini-musicals, created in just 7 days, and performed one night only. A theatrical tour de force you won’t find anywhere else!

TUE. DEC. 13

AFRO-PERUVIAN SEXTET

WED. DEC. 14

SUNDAY, DEC. 4

$16 advance, $18 dos

arewedelicious.com FRI. DEC. 16 - 8:00PM

3 PM CONCERT

THU. DEC. 15

UW OLD MUSIC HALL

UGLY

(doors open 2:30 pm)

Gen. Admission $20/$15 MMC, MJS Students w/ID: $10 Advance Tickets at madisonmusiccollective.org

2090 Atwood Ave. (608) 241-8864

FRI. DEC. 2 - 8:00PM

JAZZ ON A SUNDAY

925 Bascom Mall, Madison, WI

THEATRE

DJ Josh B. Kuhl vs DJ Nick Nice

CHRISTMAS SWEATER BALL SAT. DEC. 17

SAT. DEC. 31

The Evjue Foundation

115 KING STREET, MADISON ON SALE NOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT WWW.MAJESTICMADISON.COM, MAJESTIC BOX OFFICE OR BY PHONE (800) 514-ETIX

a john waters christmas

Tickets $38 advance, $45 d.o.s. Gold Circle VIP (includes early entry & preferred seating, and a post-show meet and greet with John) $115 advance General Admission – All Seated Show

Tickets on sale at Sugar Shack, Star Liquor, MadCity Music, B-Side, Frugal Muse, Strictly Discs, the Barrymore, online at barrymorelive.com or call & charge at (608) 241-8633.

FRIDAY FEB 3

CAPITOL THEATER OVERTURECENTER.ORG 608-258-4141

WITH SPECIAL GUEST

CUDDLE MAGIC

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MARCH 1

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FRANKPRODUCTIONS.COM

DECEMBER 1–7, 2016 ISTHMUS.COM

CAPITOL THEATER

35


Free, fun exploration stations for kids and families

RIVETING ROBOTS Saturday, December 3 10 a.m. to Noon Explore the world of robots during this free event held on the first Saturday of every month! •

Learn how robots are used in space

Build and program a robot

Create art with a robot

Drive a robot

M USIC

five albums of infectious hip-hop jams, most recently this year’s Identity, which features collaborations with Macy Gray and Big K.R.I.T. With Madison’s own DJay Mando.

Tiny Moving Parts Friday, Dec. 2, Frequency, 8 pm

Whitney Friday, Dec. 2, Majestic Theatre, 9 pm

The members of Chicago indie pop band Whitney have quickly earned a devoted fan base thanks to their romantic take on the folk and soul music of the ’60s and ’70s. With a built-in horn section and softly-sung melodies, it’s easy to see how Whitney’s debut album, Light Upon the Lake, became one of the most-loved Midwestern indie rock exports of 2016. With Disq and Milwaukee’s Soul Low.

Guitar Hero and Rock Band video games exist because of bands like Tiny Moving Parts. The Minnesota trio specializes in intricate guitar wizardry and polyrhythmic drumming, all married to Dylan Mattheisen’s emotive, occasionally screamy vocals. Imagine a collaboration between American Football and the Fall of Troy, and that’s TMP in a nutshell. With Microwave, A Will Away. Bos Meadery: Imaginary Watermelon, 6:30 pm. Bowl-A-Vard Lanes: Metal Gonz, rock, 9 pm. Brocach-Monroe Street: The Currach, 6 pm Fridays. Cardinal Bar: Tony Castañeda Latin Jazz Quartet, free, 5:30 pm; DJ Chamo, Latin, 9 pm. Chief’s Tavern: Frankie Lee, Chuck Bayuk & Tom Dehlinger, free, 6:30 pm. Club Tavern, Middleton: Universal Sound, free, 9 pm. Delaney’s: Bob Kerwin & Doug Brown, jazz, free, 6 pm. High Noon Saloon: WORT-FM birthday party, 5 pm. Hody Bar, Middleton: Killer Cars, rock, free, 9 pm. Knuckle Down: Aaron Williams & the Hoodoo, 9 pm. Overture Center: Madison Symphony Orchestra, Christmas concert with soprano Sylvia McNair, MSO Chorus, Madison Youth Choirs, Mt. Zion Gospel Choir, 7:30 pm. Also: 8 pm on 12/3, 2:30 pm, 12/4. Stoughton Opera House: Mipso, 7:30 pm. Tip Top Tavern: Fin Zipper, free, 10 pm.

Bring a non-perishable food item to support NBC15’s Share Your Holidays

January 7

Adaptation & Survival

2201 Atwood Ave.

2609 E. Washington Ave • Madison 608.204.6258 www.MaltHouseTavern.com We’re proud to once again host the Open M-F; 2pm Sat; Closed Sun Black4pm Earth Pottery Group for their

for the Holidays!

annual pottery sale. Buy your holiday 1st Place “Favorite Bar For Beer” gifts from local this year. 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013,artisans 2014 Isthmus Readers Poll

Black Earth Kiln Group “America’s 100 Best Beer Bars” Madison’s Craft BeerSale Oasis Holiday Pottery 2011, 2013 Draft Magazine SAT, DEC. 3, 10AM 2PM Madison’s Craft Beer Oasis THE MALT HOUSE “10 Hottest to Madison’s CraftPlaces Beer Oasis Madison’s Craft Beer Oasis 2609 E. Washington Ave • Madison MALT HOUSE DrinkTHE Whiskey Around the U.S.” THE MALT HOUSE 608.204.6258 Madison’s CraftOasis Beer Oasis Madison’s Craft Beer Madison’s Craft Oasis Beer THE MALT THE MALT HOUSE THE MALT HOUSEHOUSE

THE MALT HOUSE 2609 E. •Washington Ave • Madison 2609 E.2609 Washington Ave Madison E. Washington Ave • Madison 608.204.6258 608.204.6258 608.204.6258

Zagat BlogAve • Madison 2609 E. Washington 2609 E. Washington Ave www.MaltHouseTavern.com 1st “Favorite Place For Beer”• Madison 1st Place “Favorite Bar “Favorite For Beer” 1st Place Bar ForBar Beer” www.MaltHouseTavern.com www.MaltHouseTavern.com www.MaltHouseTavern.com Open 4pm M-F; Sat;Sun Closed Sun Open 4pm M-F; 2pm Sat; Closed Sun Open 4pm M-F; 2pm Sat;2pm Closed

608.204.6258 Open E. 4pm M-F; 2pm Sat; Sun 608.204.6258 2609 Washington AveClosed • Madison www.MaltHouseTavern.com “10 Hottest Places to “10 Hottest Places to “10 Hottest Places to Drink Whiskey Around U.S.” Drink Whiskey Around the U.S.” Drink Whiskey Around the U.S.”the www.MaltHouseTavern.com 608.204.6258 Open 4pm M-F; 2pm Sat; Closed Sun 2010, 2012, 2013,Poll 2014 Isthmus 2010, 2011,2010, 2012,2011, 2013, 20142011, Isthmus Readers 2012, 2013, 2014 Isthmus Readers Poll Readers Poll

“America’s 100 Best Beer Bars” “America’s 100 Best Bars” “America’s 100Beer Best Beer Bars” 2011, 2013 Draft Magazine 2011, 2013 Draft Magazine 2011, 2013 Draft Magazine

1st Place “Favorite Bar For Beer” Open 4pm M-F; 2pm Closed Sun 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014Sat; Isthmus Readers Poll 1stwww.MaltHouseTavern.com Place “Favorite Beer” … and STILL Bar no For TVs! 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 Isthmus Readers Poll Open 4pm “Favorite M-F; 2pm Sat; Closed Sun 1st Place Bar For Beer” “America’s 100 Best BeerReaders Bars” 2010,“America’s 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 Isthmus Poll 100 Best Beer Bars” Zagat Blog Zagat Blog

Zagat Blog

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2013 Draft Magazine 1st Place 2011, “Favorite Bar For Beer” 2011, 2013 Draft Magazine

UW Humanities Building-Mills Hall: UW Student Brass Quintet, free, 6:30 pm.

Nils Bultmann and Friends Friday, Dec. 2, Arts + Literature Laboratory, 8 pm

discovery.wisc.edu/SaturdayScience | towncenter@warf.org | 608.316.4382 Discovery Building, 330 N. Orchard St. | Free/low-cost parking across University Ave. (lot 20)

Madison’s Craft Beer Oasis THELocal MALT HOUSE Buy Pottery

Up North Pub: Karen Wheelock, free, 8 pm.

Next month’s topic

NECKERMAN INSURANCE SERVICES

ISTHMUS.COM DECEMBER 1–7, 2016

fri dec 2

Liliana’s: John Widdicombe & Paul Filipowicz, 6:30 pm.

Sponsored by

36

■ ISTHMUS PICKS : DEC 2 - 3

SAT. DEC. 3 TONY CASTAÑEDA’s BIRTHDAY BASH!

Though he’s now based in California’s Bay Area, Nils Bultmann’s roots are right here in Madison. The violist not only grew up here, but received his degree in music performance at UW-Madison, where he studied with Sally Chisholm. Now he’s finished up a Ph.D. in music composition at UC Berkeley and returns home for an unforgettable night of multimedia exploration and orchestral innovation. Come out and show the hometown hero some love.

UW Union South-Sett: Lex Allen, Emilie Brandt, 9 pm. VFW-Cottage Grove Road: Frank James, 7:30 pm.

T H EAT ER & DA N C E

(608) 249-4333

Are We Delicious: Musical Heroes

9:45 $10

A dedicated group of actors and musicians creates an original musical show in just one week. This year’s wham bam of an election plays a central role in the nine vignettes, which range from goofy farce to hardhitting mockery. Obamacare confronts the grim reaper, Beano the Super Clown takes on the Orange Man. And the creators of off-Broadway’s Walmartopia (including Isthmus arts editor Cat Capellaro) reunite for Pussy Grabs Back. Hometown heroes John Nichols of The Capital Times, Shannon Barry of Domestic Abuse Intervention Services and community activists Callen Harty and Stephanie Rearick will also be speaking.

Friday, Dec. 2, Barrymore Theatre, 8 pm

with TONY CASTAÑEDA LATIN JAZZ BAND and EDI REY Y SU SALSERA

free cake and tequila shots while they last! ____________________________________

CLOSED SUN. DEC. 4, 4PM - MON. DEC. 5, 4PM ____________________________________ MON. DEC. 5 5:30-6:15 pm $3 THE KING OF KIDS MUSIC

DAVID LANDAU ____________________________________ MON. DEC. 5 7:30-9:30pm $5 sug. don.

Oak Street Ramblers

sponsored by Door County Brewery ____________________________________

THUR. DEC. 8 6 - 8:30pm Benefit for PHIL LADWIG feat. Chuck Bayuk, Tony Kannan, Kristy Larsen, Shari Davis, Kenny Koeppler, James Lutz, Karen Heine , Frankie Lee, Jimmy Voegli, Mel Ford and Andy Linderman www.harmonybarandgrill.com

Far East Movement Friday, Dec. 2, Liquid, 10 pm When their 2010 summer jam “Like a G6” broke through, Far East Movement became the first Asian American artists to top the Billboard charts. But the L.A.-based rap group had been around long before then, releasing

SEARCH THE FULL CALENDAR OF EVENTS AT ISTHMUS.COM


Holiday Variety Show Saturday, Dec. 3, Stoughton Opera House, 7:30 pm

Big Fish Friday, Dec. 2, Overture Center, 7:30 pm

Four Seasons Theatre and Theatre LILA are collaborating on a re-imagined version of Big Fish, a musical that pits a son rooted in reality against a father known for his tall tales. Instead of a big Broadway aesthetic, the creative team is putting its own spin on the production, using a small bluegrass ensemble and actors’ bodies to create stage pictures. ALSO: Saturday (7:30 pm) and Sunday (2 pm), Dec. 3-4. Through Dec. 11. The 39 Steps: Fast-paced whodunit based on the film/ novel, 7 pm, 12/2-3 & 9/10, West High School. $10. eventbrite.com/o/868973531. Last Week in December: Encore Studio for the Performing Arts holiday-themed comedy/drama, 12/217, Mary Dupont Wahlers Theatre, at 8 pm FridaysSaturdays, plus 2 pm, 12/11. $15. 255-0331. Les Misérables: Madison Country Day School Theatre Department musical, 7 pm on 12/2 and 3 pm, 12/3, Madison College-Truax Mitby Theater. $12. 850-6375.

B OOKS / S P O K EN WORD Lucy Jane Bledsoe: Discussing “A Thin Bright Line,” 7 pm, 12/2, A Room of One’s Own. 257-7888.

A RT EX H I B I TS & E VE N TS Leslie Iwai: Through 1/22, Overture Center-James Watrous Gallery (reception 5:30-7:30 pm, 12/2, with talks by the artist and Dr. Mark Burkard). 265-2500.

SP ECI A L EV EN TS Atwood-Winnebago Winter Festival: Special events & activities, 5-9 pm, 12/2, at businesses along Winnebago Street & Atwood Avenue. Bring donations for Goodman Community Center food pantry. 709-1322.

sat dec 3

In addition to skits and an impossibleto-resist cookie party, guests will be treated to a variety show headlined by Madison’s rhythm and soul all-stars, the People Brothers Band, with support from WheelHouse, Gin Mill Hollow, Rev. Eddie Danger and Gabby Parsons. Don’t be a Scrooge and “bah humbug” this one.

SAT, JAN 21, 2017 | GALA 8:30—11PM ISTHMUS AFTER PARTY | 11PM—2AM

GALA SPONSORS

Pachinko Saturday, Dec. 3, Crystal Corner Bar, 9 pm

Pachinko was one of Madison’s prime exports to the rock world in the 1990s and early ’00s, but noise from their direction subsided about a decade back. A reunion last year has led to new songs (soon to make up an album, if the stars align) by the original lineup. Saturday they are anchoring a stellar bill of Madison rockers at the Crystal Corner, including Vanishing Kids, No Hoax and Clean Room.

Kevin Devine & the Goddamn Band Saturday, Dec. 3, High Noon Saloon, 8:30 pm

Though he’s a frequent tour mate of the beloved, groundbreaking indie band Brand New, Kevin Devine expresses the quieter tendencies of the group. He plays a heartfelt brand of acoustic indie rock that’s influenced countless young musicians armed only with a guitar and feelings. Think of him as a scrappier, less polished Dashboard Confessional. His ninth album, Instigator, was released this fall. With Pet Symmetry, Petal.

Reecy Pontiff

Two of Madison’s most fiercely beloved bands are back at full strength and set to headline a sure-to-be-unforgettable night of music. While both Screamin’ Cyn Cyn & the Pons and Damsel Trash (pictured) have seen members leave for New York within the past year, the two fem-punk dynamos are back together and ready to remind Madison what made us love them in the first place.

PRINT SPONSOR

J E W E L E RY S P O N S O R

M E N ’ S F O R M A LW E A R S P O N S O R

M E D I A PA R T N E R S

A PROUD MEMBER OF

Additional support from Ron & Deborah Krantz, Susan & Jonathan Lipp, Tom Berenz, Rare Steakhouse & Trek Bicycle Corporation.

OV E RT U R E.O R G / F R O S T I B A L L

JAN 3 – 8

Jersey Boys

JAN 10

CITIZEN: Reggie Wilson/ Fist and Heel Performance Group

JAN 12 FREE

MadCity Sessions: Oh My Love & Modern Mod

JAN 12

Patti LaBelle

JAN 14

Brown Bear, Brown Bear and Other Treasured Stories

JAN 25 – FEB 5

The Phantom of the Opera

FEB 12

Boyz II Men

FEB 18

Duck Soup Cinema: Safety Last

FEB 19

Elephant & Piggie’s We Are in a Play!

Saturday, Dec. 3, Mother Fool’s, 8 pm

She got her start playing smutty songs in New Orleans burlesque shows. Now Reecy Pontiff has moved on, becoming a Colorado Jeep tour guide and a world-traveling troubadour known as “Rocky Mountain Flirt.” In this intimate show, she shares her quirky ukulele tunes, including “(I Liked You Better When) You Were on the Drugs” and gritty ballads, including “Queen of the Birds on a Wire.” She’s debuting songs from a new album, Mississippi Mountain Mud.

COMMUNITY PARTNER

SPONSORED BY

SERIES SPONSOR

GET SOCIAL PRESENTED BY

GODFREY KAHN S.C.

FAMILY SERIES SPONSOR

COMMUNITY PARTNER

SERIES PARTNER

MUSIC SERIES SPONSOR

SPONSORED BY

The Burish Group of UBS Financial Services Inc.

SERIES SPONSOR

FAMILY SERIES SPONSOR

SPONSORED BY

OVERTURE.ORG | 608.258.4141

DECEMBER 1–7, 2016 ISTHMUS.COM

Saturday, Dec. 3, Frequency, 10 pm

®

Aesthetic Center

SERIES PARTNER

MU SI C

Screamin Cyn Cyn & the Pons + Damsel Trash

A F T E R PA R T Y S P O N S O R

37 RECOMMENDED WHEN USED FOR REPRODUCTIONS SMALLER THAN 2.25” WIDE.


n ISTHMUS PICKS : DEC 3 - 8 Alchemy Cafe: Sortin’ the Mail, free, 10 pm. 701A E. Washington Ave. 268-1122 www.high-noon.com

The Last Revel Feed The Dog

thu dec

1

8:30pm

$5 adv, $8 dos

18+

2

Fury Things / The Apologists

ROBBIE FULKS

3

sun dec

4

mon dec

5

AT HIGH NOON SALOON NOON $10

Pet Symmetry / Petal 8:30pm $15 ADV, $17 DOS 18+

Kerosene Kites

Winter Family Hoedown!

(XMAS CD RElease)

Emerald Grove

11am $5, $2 kids, $20 max per family

6pm $8

PUNDAMONIUM:

The Madison Pun Slam!

SICK PUPPIES Haliwel / Devil To Drag 8pm

$16 adv, $18 dos

18+

JEFFREY FOUCAULT Dietrich Strause 7pm

$17

Harmony Bar: Tony Castañeda Latin Jazz Band, Edi Rey y Su Salsera, 9:45 pm.

$10 adv, $15 dos

EVERY THURSDAY

Latin Dance Night

FREE W/ COLLEGE ID BEFORE MIDNIGHT! ____________________

FRIDAY 12/2

LIVE HAPPY HOUR

LATIN JAZZ QUARTET TONY CASTAÑEDA _______________ 5:30 PM

DJ CHAMO’S

Liliana’s: John Widdicombe & Stan Godfriaux, 6:30 pm. Mezze: Charlie Painter & Friends, jazz, free, 9 pm. Mickey’s Tavern: Ka-Boom!Box, free, 10:30 pm. Tip Top Tavern: SheShe, free, 10 pm. Tuvalu Coffeehouse, Verona: Liv Rather, free, 7 pm. UW Humanities Building-Mills Hall: UW All University Strings, free, 4 pm. UW Memorial Union-Shannon Hall: Redefined, 7 pm. UW Old Music Hall: UW & Madison Metropolitan School District Jazz Festival, annual concert by high school ensembles, UW Jazz Orchestra, free, 6 pm.

VENEZUELAN RUMBA PARTY ____________________

10PM

SATURDAY 12/3

CUBAN 8-10PM _ _ _SALSA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ SOCIAL _____

Spicy____________________ Saturdays CHAMO w/ DJ

10PM

Paul Dietrich Ensemble JAZZ____________________ JAM w/ THE NEW BREED _______________

6:30-8PM 9PM

WEDNESDAY 12/7 w/ RADISH, DUDLEY NOON & & NEW NATURE COLLECTIVE 9PM

PROPER METHOD

M A DISON’S CL A SSIC DA NC E B A R

Hoofer Ski & Snowboard Resale: Annual event, 9 am-6 pm on 12/3 and 9 am-3 pm, 12/4, UW Union South-Varsity Hall. Consignment drop-off: 5-9 pm on 12/1 and 9 am-8 pm, 12/2. 262-1630.

SP ECIAL INTERESTS

An opening party for From Here to Her Artist Collective celebrates the empowerment of women. “Mothers of Our Nations,” the group’s latest project, looks at the role women play in instigating social change, focusing on women leading the way in their local communities. For this exhibit, 16 visual artists and poets partnered with womenled groups in Milwaukee and Madison. Ron and Sandy Curran: Photographs, 12/3-1/6, UW Hospital-2nd Floor Surgical Waiting Area. 263-5992. Holiday Art Fair: 60+ local artists, 10 am-5 pm on 12/3 and 11 am-4 pm, 12/4, Middleton Outreach Ministry food pantry, 3502 Parmenter St. 826-3414. HolidayFest: Annual arts & crafts fair, 9 am-3 pm, 12/3, Warner Park Community Recreation Center, with music, door prizes. $1 admission. 245-3690. Winnebago Studios Artists: Works by local artists, 1-6 pm, 12/3, Winnebago Studios. 235-6062.

S PECTATOR SP ORTS UW Women’s Hockey: vs. Minnesota, 3:30 pm on 12/3 and 2 pm, 12/4, LaBahn Arena. $5. 262-1440.

S PECI AL EV ENTS Holiday Express: Annual flower & model train show, 10 am-4 pm, 12/3-31, Olbrich Gardens. $5 ($3 ages 3-12). 246-4550.

Frequency: Sweet Delta Dawn, Flowpoetry, The Material Boys, Funkyard Dealers, Dr Beatz, Jon Schinke, Alexandra Linkabee Kirby (live painting), 9 pm. Harmony Bar: Oak Street Ramblers, bluegrass, 7:30 pm. Liliana’s: Verona High School Jazz Ensembles, 6 pm. Malt House: Bluegrass TeA & Company, free, 7:30 pm. Up North Pub: Gin Mill Hollow, Americana, free, 7 pm.

S PO K EN WO RD Pundamonium: “Pun slam,” 7 pm, 12/5, High Noon Saloon. $6. 268-1122.

A RT EXH I B I TS & EV EN TS

M USIC

First Folio! The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare Through Dec. 11, Chazen Museum of Art

Striking 12: Free mini-performance of Music Theatre of Madison holiday musical, 2 pm, 12/3, Sequoya Library. mtmadison.com.

Children’s Nutcracker Ballet: Kehl School of Dance, 1 pm & 6 pm, 12/3, Waunakee High School. $12/$10. 819-6501.

MUS I C

sun dec 4

Li Chiao-Ping Dance: On Display: Site specific performance, noon, 12/3, Overture Center Lobby. Free. All welcome to participate: comm@lcpdance.org.

A Christmas Carol: Ballet version by StageWorks Projects, 7:30 pm on 12/3 and 1:30 pm, 12/4, Stoughton High School Auditorium. $14. 873-0717.

mon dec 5

Governor’s Mansion Holiday Tours: Free 30-minute tours, 10 am-noon on 12/3 & 10 and noon-2 pm, 12/7-8 & 14-15, 99 Cambridge Rd. Groups RSVP: 246-5501.

T HE ATER & DANCE

UW Men’s Basketball: vs. Oklahoma, noon, 12/3; vs. Idaho State, 7 pm, 12/7, Kohl Center. $34-$26. 262-1440.

TUESDAY 12/6

RECREATION & GAM ES

Zuzu Cafe: Lulu Swing Quartet, free, 7 pm.

Saturday, Dec. 3, Gallery Marzeń, 6 pm

418 E. WILSON ST. 608.257.BIRD CARDINALBAR.COM MADISON’S PREMIERE

Knuckle Down Saloon: James Armstrong, 9 pm.

Mothers of Our Nations

A Very Soulful Dance Party 8pm

ISTHMUS.COM DECEMBER 1–7, 2016

Mad Men Holiday Soirée: Annual ‘60s-themed event with Joe Scalissi (Dean Martin tribute) with Darren Sterud Orchestra, DJ Nick Nice, 8 pm, 12/3, Majestic Theatre. $40 ($35 adv.). 255-0901.

ART E XHIBITS & EV ENTS

18+

Tribute to Otis Redding:

thu dec

38

Cardinal Bar: DJ Chamo, Latin, 10 pm.

Ivory Room: Luke Hrovat-Staedter, Andy Schneider, Brandon Jensen, dueling pianos, 8 pm.

6

8

Whad’Ya Know?: Hosts Michael Feldman & Stephanie Lee, noon, 12/3, High Noon Saloon. $10. 268-1122.

5pm $20 adv, $25 dos (Donations only after 10pm)

tue dec

7

Brink Lounge: Johnny Likes Noize, Kyle Henderson Band, rock, 8 pm.

Hody Bar, Middleton: The Retro Specz, free, 9 pm.

7pm $6

wed dec

Christmas in Paoli: Carolers, carriage rides, special events, noon-5 pm, 12/3, Paoli. visitpaoli.com.

Son del Atlantico / Hirt Alpert

Whad’ya & THE GODDAMN Know BAND

Fair Trade Holiday Festival: Annual event, 9 am-4 pm, 12/3, Monona Terrace, with artisan food, clothing, arts & crafts from around the globe, fashion show 10 am & 1:30 pm. Free admission. fairtrademadison.org.

Bos Meadery: Milkhouse Radio, bluegrass, 6:30 pm.

Fountain: Grant Charles, free, 8 pm.

KEVIN DEVINE

sat dec

Bandung: Mideast Salsa, free salsa lesson, 7:30 pm.

Club Tavern, Middleton: Eddie Butts Band, free, 9 pm.

WORT 41st Birthday Bash! fri dec

Art In Gallery: TVEDTanic, Getaway Drivers, stand-up by Vanessa Tortolano, MamA Cares benefit, 8 pm.

Afro-Peruvian Sextet Sunday, Dec. 4, UW Old Music Hall, 3 pm

The Madison Music Collective concludes its fall Jazz on a Sunday season with the internationally acclaimed Afro-Peruvian Sextet, led by trumpeter and New York University jazz studies professor Gabriel Alegría. As Doug Ramsey of Rifftides writes, “The Afro-Peruvian Sextet is writing a new chapter in the history of Latin jazz.” The show is sure to be energetic and irresistible. Brocach-Square: West Wind, Irish, free, 5 pm. Chazen Museum of Art: Pro Arte Quartet, free, 12:30 pm. The Frequency: Good Trouble, Laundry, 8 pm. High Noon Saloon: Kerosene Kites (CD release), Emerald Grove, 6 pm. Liliana’s, Fitchburg: Tom Waselchuk, 10:30 am. Luther Memorial Church: Winter Choral Concert, UW School of Music annual event, free, 2 & 4 pm. Olbrich Gardens: Ladies Must Swing, 2 pm. The Rigby: Madison Jazz Jam, free (all ages), 4 pm. UW Humanities Building-Mills Hall: UW Concert Band, free, 1 pm; UW University Bands, Mead Witter School of Music concert, free, 4 pm.

BOOKS Ingrid Kallick: Illustrator discussing “Two Troll Tales from Norway,” noon, 12/4, Mystery to Me. 283-9332.

As the year wraps up, so does the Madison exhibit of the treasure known as the First Folio. Published in 1623, the First Folio is the first published collection of Shakespeare’s plays, many of which would have been lost forever if two of the Bard’s fellow actors hadn’t sought to publish them. This rare and priceless book containing 36 plays is now on tour. An accompanying multipanel exhibit explores the playwright’s significance throughout the ages. In conjunction with many other Shakespeare-related activities, the Chazen is also displaying “Presenting Shakespeare: Posters from Around the World.” Through Dec. 11. Stephen Lang: Photographs, 12/5-1/5, UW Hospital2nd Floor Hospital Entrance. 263-5992. Charmaine Harbort: Jewelry, 12/5-1/6, UW Hospital2nd Floor Surgical Waiting Area. 263-5992.

PO L I T I C S & AC T I V I S M Vigil for Peace 35th Anniversary: With the Raging Grannies, birthday cake, noon, 12/5, outside Madison Municipal Building. Bring men’s sock donations for St. John’s men’s shelter. mbspeace1@charter.net.

tue dec 6 MUS I C Brink Lounge: Good Trouble, free/donations, 6:30 pm. Cardinal Bar: Paul Dietrich Ensemble, jazz, free, 6:30 pm; New Breed Jazz Jam, 9 pm The Frequency: Jack Grelle, Jack Klatt, 8:30 pm.

SP ECIAL EV ENTS

High Noon: Sick Puppies, Haliwel, Devil to Drag, 8 pm.

Monroe Street Christmas Walk: Noon-4 pm, 12/4, Monroe Street’s 1700-1900 blocks, with Monroe Street Carolers, entertainment, refreshments. 255-8211.

Up North Pub: The Lower 5th, rock, free, 8 pm.

KIDS & FAM ILY Winter Family Hoedown: 11 am, 12/4, High Noon Saloon. $5 ($20 max per family). 268-1122.

Malt House: Cajun Strangers, free, 7:30 pm. UW Humanities Building-Mills Hall: UW Western Percussion Ensemble, free, 7:30 pm. UW Humanities Building-Morphy Hall: UW Blue Note Ensemble, Jazz Composers Group, Latin Jazz Ensemble, School of Music concert, free, 7:30 pm.


LEC T U R ES & S EM I N ARS Art + Food: Panel discussion by Laurie Beth Clark, Michael Peterson, Jonny Hunter, Mel Trudeau, Tory Miller, 5:30 pm, 12/6, Madison Museum of Contemporary Art. $10. 257-0158.

wed dec 7

icy waters of Lake Monona in 1967, the legendary soul singer became inextricably tied to Madison. So it makes sense that Hive has chosen the Mad Man from Macon as the subject of its next dance party. A live band will play two sets, featuring both originals and covers Redding played during his career. Mod and Motown attire is encouraged, and dancing is mandatory.

WISCONSIN UNION THEATER

THE BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA CHRISTMAS SHOW

MU SI C

TODAY!

Alchemy Cafe: Boo Bradley, blues, free, 10 pm. Cardinal Bar: Foshizzle Family, New Nature Collective, 9 pm.

with Liz Vice Dec. 1, 2016

Frequency: We Should Have Been DJs, Heavy Looks, Gods in the Chrysalis, Token Minority, 8:30 pm. High Noon: Jeffrey Foucault, Dietrich Strause, 7 pm. Ivory Room: Andrew Kreigh, Lindsay Everly, Brandon Jensen, dueling pianos, free, 8 pm. Liliana’s: Dan Barker & Ken Kuehl, free, 5:30 pm. Majestic: Tani Diakite & the Afrofunkstars, Los Chechos, Ceiba Foundation for Tropical Conservation benefit, with tropical plant sale & vendors, 8:30 pm. Malt House: The North Westerns, free, 7:30 pm. Up North Pub: Lost Highway All-Stars, free, 8 pm. UW Humanities Building-Mills Hall: Tom Curry, Anthony Di Sanza, Jessica Johnson, Satoko Hayami, School of Music faculty concert, free, 7:30 pm.

FOOD & D R I N K Tudor Holiday Dinner Concert: Annual Wisconsin Union dinner & show featuring the Philharmonic Chorus of Madison, 5:30 pm, 12/7-8 & 10-11, Union South-Varsity Hall. $58.50-$53.50. 265-2787.

Kyle Landstra Thursday, Dec. 8, Gates of Heaven Synagogue, 7:30 pm Chicago synthesizer wizard Kyle Landstra will headline December’s installment of Tone Madison’s fantastic GateSound concert series, which brings boundary-pushing musicians to perform in the beautiful 153-year old Gates of Heaven in James Madison Park. Expect this performance to lean into transcendence. Madison’s Page Campbell opens.

THE TEN TENORS

Dec. 11, 2016

Buck and Honey’s, Sun Prairie: Robert J, free, 6:30 pm. Cardinal Bar: DJ Chamo, Latin, 10 pm.

thu dec 8 MU SI C

Essen Haus: Bill Roberts Combo w/Bob Corbit, 9 pm. Harmony Bar: Chuck Bayuk, Tony Kannen, Kristy Larson, Shari Davis, Kenny Koeppler, James Lutz, Karen Hein, Frankie Lee, Phil Ladwig benefit, 6 pm.

THE SELDOMS Jan. 27 & 28, 2017

Hop Haus Brewing Company, Verona: Mike’s Mud Music, Americana, free, 7 pm. Ivory Room: Vince Strong, Luke Hrovat-Staedter, dueling pianos, free, 9 pm. Majestic Theatre: The Floozies, Probcause, 8 pm. Also: 8 pm, 12/9.

COME DY Sklar Brothers, Daniel Van Kirk: 8:30 pm on 12/8 and 8 & 10:30 pm, 12/9-10, Comedy Club on State. $25-$15. 256-0099.

Tribute to Otis Redding Thursday, Dec. 8, High Noon Saloon, 8 pm

Otis Redding may have been a Georgia native, but when he met his fate in the

UNIONTHEATER.WISC.EDU 608.265.ARTS TM

The presentation of PowerGoes by The Seldoms was made possible by the New England Foundation for the Arts’ National Dance Project, with lead funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, with additional support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

FUN D RAI S ERS Share Your Holidays Grand Finale: Public invited to drive through & drop off non-perishable food or cash donations for Second Harvest Foodbank, 7 am-7 pm, 12/8, Alliant Energy Center-Exhibition Hall (or call 6 am-10:30 pm). secondharvestmadison.org.

FRI, DEC 2 H 9PM H $7

Aaron Williams Grammy Nominated Blues Band

SAT, DEC 3 H 9PM H $8

James Armstrong

“A Masterpiece of Modern Blues” FRI. DEC. 9 Sweet Diezel Jenkins

SAT. DEC. 10 Xavi Lynn’s Julep

2513 Seiferth Rd. 222-7800 KnuckleDownSaloon.com

DECEMBER 1–7, 2016 ISTHMUS.COM

and the HooDoo

39


n EMPHASIS

TOAST CERAMICS n toastceramics.com

Whimsical and inspired Toast Ceramics caters to practical household uses BY ERICA KRUG

When Jackie Matelski, founder of Toast Ceramics, decided to make pottery her full-time gig, she wanted to focus on making practical goods for everyday life. Three years later, she’s found success with these useful items thanks in part to a local following and in part to Etsy, the online marketplace for handmade goods. “I try to solve problems by designing items that work specifically for [a] purpose,” Matelski says. One of her signature items is a tea infuser mug set that comes with a ceramic strainer and a lid to keep tea hot while it steeps. An avid tea drinker, Matelski designed it after years of dissatisfaction with metal tea balls that broke or got rusty. Now the mug set is one of her most popular pieces. In the converted garage studio at her east-side home, Matelski makes mugs,

pour-over coffee sets, planters, pet bowls, salt cellars, bird houses and more. Why the name “Toast”? It’s one of her favorite foods. A new item, a French butter keeper, is designed to keep butter from spoiling while it sits out on the counter for several days (necessary if you want to avoid cold, unspreadable butter for your morning toast). Matelski’s pieces, all $30-$80, have graphic patterns with bold, warm colors like red, orange and yellow. “Fall is my favorite time of year,” Matelski says. The geometric decoration painted on the glazes is a nod to Mid-Century Modern, but she says the inspiration for her designs also comes from spending time outdoors. She’s a cyclist and gardener; few things bring her out of the doldrums like going for a hike or a walk with her dogs, Kayak and Nibs. When designing patterns for her pieces, she tries to translate those feelings of serenity that come from being outside.

Matelski became interested in ceramics when she started making pots in high school in Kenosha. She studied ceramics and photography at UW-Madison, but it wasn’t until she attended a week-long ceramics workshop at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts in Deer Isle, Maine, that she decided to focus on pottery. Pottery won out in part because she enjoys the community that goes along with it — potters commonly share glaze recipes with each other, for instance. After college Matelski spent two years as studio manager at Midwest Clay Project on Winnebago Street. Now she likes working from home and enjoys the creative freedom that comes with running her own business. Toast Ceramics wares are in stock at at Zip Dang, 2606 Monroe St., and Hatch Art House, 1248 Williamson St. Matelski also sells her pottery at craft fairs, including the Good Day Market coming up at Octopi Brewing in Waunakee on Dec. 9-10. n

at

Toast’s signature graphic decorations in bold colors show up on (clockwise from top left) mugs, salt cellars, vases and pet bowls.

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n CLASSIFIEDS

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Jobs Caring People Needed! Energetic, dependable and fun people desired to assist the elderly in Madison. Nonmedical companionship and in-home care. Flexible hours. Home Instead Senior Care: (608) 663-2646.

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Happenings Crestwood Elementary School, 5930 Old Sauk Road, Madison. December 10th 2016, 10am-3pm 5th Annual Holiday Bazaar Free — Open to Public

Health & Wellness Swedish Massage For Men, providing immediate Stress, Tension and Pain Relief. Seven days a week by appt.—same day appointments available. Contact Steve, CMT at: ph/ text 608.277.9789 or acupleasur@aol.com. Gift certificates available for any reason or season @ ABC Massage Studio!

LUNCH. LOCAL. Join us every weekday for Madison's favorite luncheon. Our famous salad bar touts a wide variety of local greens, veggies, cheeses and house-made soups. The menu, which changes seasonally and is crafted with local and organic ingredients, is inspired by the diverse individuals that define our community and is shaped by hardworking local farmers who embody the spirit of Wisconsin.

1 West Dayton Street Madison, WI 53703 Lunch served daily 11:00am - 2:00pm circmadison.com

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Life is full of hard choices. Dinner shouldn’t be one of them. Download the app.

DECEMBER 1–7, 2016 ISTHMUS.COM

Order food online from your favorite restaurants.

41


WELCOMES

WINTERSONG

BARRYMORE 12.10

JONESIN’ “Believe It” — or not.

GUYS ON ICE

BARRYMORE 12.21-23, 26-31

FRZN FEST

HIGH NOON SALOON 1.12-14 1.12 BIG THIEF • SAM EVIAN • HOOPS • IAN SWEET

1.13 CEREMONY • TENEMENT • THE BLIND SHAKE • YOKO AND THE OH NO’S 1.14 NONAME • THEMIND • MIC KELLOGG • RICH ROBBINS

ISTHMUS.COM DECEMBER 1–7, 2016

PHOX

42

DAWES

CAPITOL THEATER 2.3

BARRYMORE 2.6

THE HEAD AND THE HEART

PINK MARTINI

ORPHEUM 2.21

#808 BY MATT JONES ©2016 JONESIN’ CROSSWORDS

ACROSS 1 Sushi fish also called yellowtail 4 Amount a cab driver gives to you 8 “___ O’Riley” (“CSI: Miami” theme song) 12 Participated in racewalking 13 Like a serrano pepper, compared to a poblano 15 Olmert who preceded Ariel Sharon as Prime Minister of Israel 16 Mitsubishi off-road threewheeler, for example 17 Exact quote from Gordon Gekko in “Wall Street” 19 Catchphrase spoken verbatim on the original “Star Trek” series 21 “La ___ Bonita” (U.S. #1 hit for Madonna) 22 ___ & Literacy (brown category in Trivial Pursuit) 23 Army service call used by Al Pacino in all of his movies (not just “Scent of a Woman”) 25 Used an old phrase 27 “Winnie-the-Pooh” marsupial parent 29 202.5 deg. on the compass

30 Conjunction that’s spelled with a backslash 31 “Better Call ___” (spin-off sequel to “Breaking Bad”) 33 Creatures proven to be found at Area 51, for short 34 Process scrupulously utilized by all news outlets (which I obviously didn’t do with a single clue in this puzzle) 38 Abbr. from the Latin for “and many more” 41 Drink produced by the real-life brand Heisler 42 Nobel Peace ___ (award given in Stockholm) 46 Hundred Years’ ___ (which lasted less than 100 years) 47 Suffix meaning “doctrine” which is not a valid Scrabble word by itself 48 One of the original Three Musketeers, along with D’Artagnan 49 Beginning-of-term activities 51 Meat ___ (“Aqua Teen Hunger Force” character with three teeth) 53 RNs report to them

54 Famous Greta Garbo line from “Grand Hotel” 58 Idiom taken directly from Shakespeare’s “King John” 59 ___ Tin Tin (movie German shepherd originally played by a female) 60 Universal plasma donor’s blood type, for short 61 Shout of the recently incarcerated 62 Tic-___-Dough (pencil and paper game) 63 Shrek in the movie series, but not in the original William Steig book 64 Did 100 kph in a 70 mph zone, e.g. 65 Opposite direction from 29-Across

8 “Ain’t Too Proud, ___ Differ” (Temptations hit) 9 What an Australian weatherman may say “it’s gonna be” on an August day 10 Like boulders 11 Use the minus button 13 “Citizen Kane” studio 14 “___ the news today, oh no” (Beatles lyric) 18 Neighborhood in London’s East End 20 Time ___ the Year (selection made since the magazine’s inception) 24 “___ Like the Wind” (“Dirty Dancing” song) 26 Phanerozoic, for one 27 West-side tributary of the Rhine 28 Cheer for a pescador 31 Boat part furthest away from the bow 32 Card played last in a winning game of Klondike solitaire 35 “Santa Barbara” airer, once 36 Three-word EMT skill, for short 37 Jazz artist Diana who married Elvis Presley 38 Bo Sheep in “U.S. Acres,” for one 39 Airplane activity that takes place in the air 40 Night ___ (“X-Men” character aka Hank McCoy) 43 Toyotas and Subarus, in Japan 44 Flowers that repel hummingbirds 45 Sister magazine of Ebony 47 Lives and breathes 48 Singer of the “Spectre” theme song 50 Palmolive spokesperson played by three different actresses 51 Tom whose second novel was “The Bonfire of the Vanities” 52 “... It’s ___! It’s Superman!” 55 “Analyze ___” (2002 sequel) 56 Permanent worker 57 Negative vote 58 Nickelodeon’s trademark slime LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

DOWN 1 Coffee bean that yields more caffeine than its counterpart 2 Venerates, slangily 3 Like an unexpired coupon 4 Flower, south of the Pyrenees 5 Bungling 6 Semillon and Riesling, for two 7 Speaker of the first line of the first episode of “South Park”

Our American flag should be protected! Anyone who burns it should go to jail for 6 months!

CAPITOL THEATER 3.1

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n SAVAGE LOVE

Quickies BY DAN SAVAGE

My boyfriend of almost two years is wonderful, and we have had very few issues. But there is one thing that has almost been a deal breaker. He fiddles with his penis almost constantly — in front of me and in front of our roommates. I’ve confronted him about it a number of times. He said he should be able to fiddle with his dick in every room of the house if he wants to and he should feel comfortable doing so. I told him that he is being “comfortable” at the expense of the comfort of those around him. We’ve had a number of confrontations about this, and he does it a lot less, but he still does it. If he doesn’t stop when I tell him to, I just leave the room. My question to you: Is this behavior unacceptable or am I being unreasonable? Frustrated With The Fiddling Until a few weeks ago, I would have said that neo-Nazis sieg-heiling around Washington, D.C., was unacceptable and any elected official or pundit who didn’t immediately condemn neo-Nazis would be finished politically and professionally. But it turns out that neo-Nazism is just another example of IOIYAR — “It’s okay if you’re a Republican” — and relativism reigns.

w w w.communitysha res .c o m

In other words: “Unacceptable” is a relative concept, not an objective one. That said, I don’t think you’re being unreasonable: Fiddling with your dick in every room of the house is inconsiderate and childish. It sounds like you’re doing a good job of socializing your boyfriend — better late than never — and I would encourage you to keep it up. I’m a straight man in a mostly healthy marriage. Our sex life is average, which I understand is better than some people can hope for, and we communicate well. For example, I felt comfortable admitting to my wife a few weeks ago that I would like more blowjobs. She in turn felt comfortable admitting to me that she would prefer if I showered more often. So we made a deal: I would shower every day and she would blow me twice a month. But the first month came and went with no blowjobs in sight. I’ve showered every single day. Should I bring this up to her? Bathe Longer Or Withhold Sex Your wife doesn’t wanna suck your cock, squeaky clean or stinky cheese. I would recommend outsourcing non-birthday blowjobs — if your wife is okay with that, BLOWS, which she won’t be. I’m a mid-30s bi woman in an incredible poly marriage with a bi guy. A few months ago, I learned that one of my closest friends (also

poly) has a crush on me. I also have always had a crush on him. My crush-friend needed to ask his other partners how they felt about him being involved with me. Three months have gone by, and he’s not yet told me how his other partners feel. One of those partners is under a lot of stress — not the best time to bring up potential new partners to her — but my friend has dated other people in the past three months. I think if he really wanted to do something with me, he would have asked by now. I know you can’t ask someone to give you closure. I’ve also got a shit-ton of pride that prevents me from asking him directly how he feels. Should I just move on? Confused And Pathetic Yup. I am a queer trans woman in my mid-20s, and I am in a monogamous relationship with a queer cis woman. We have been dating for about three months now. We have had an absolutely amazing sex life since day one, except for one caveat: She has never in her life had an orgasm. For most of the time she has been sexually active, she has felt ambivalent about getting off. It has only been in the past month that she has started feeling a “sexual awakening,” as she calls it. We have been making progress, but she

JOE NEWTON

has been having issues with getting caught up in her head when I am pleasuring her. This has been causing dysphoric feelings for her. We have had a few discussions about what we can do about the situation, but we are feeling lost. We know there isn’t going to be a quick fix, but what do we do about this? Confused And Nervous Truly Can’t Overcome Much Exasperation Pot. Email Dan at mail@savagelove.net or reach him on Twitter at @fakedansavage.

Backyard Hero Award

Recognizing outstanding volunteers for their work in our community

Libby Meister Nuestro Mundo, Inc. Libbey Meister is known as a tireless advocate for Nuestro Mundo Inc. and the families at Nuestro Mundo Community School, where she served as board president, and coordinated programs such as the Citywide Dual Language Immersion Summit. She also developed a curriculum for parents to help them better understand their rights and responsibilities at the school. Photo by John Urban

For more information about Nuestro Mundo, Inc. or to volunteer, visit www.nuestromundoinc.org or call: 608.279.1568.

Nola Pastor Rape Crisis Center As a volunteer for Nola started volunteering with Rape Crisis Center (RCC), Nola Pastor in the fall of 2015 and works closely with RCC’s GameChangers youth advisory board. She is well-respected by the teens and brings her knowledge of prevention education to the curriculum development committee she facilitates. Now that Nola is a trained prevention educator, she is an especially strong and a tremendous asset to the team. For more information about the Rape Crisis Center, or to volunteer, visit www.danecountyrcc.org or call 608.251.7273.

Community Shares of Wisconsin supports and funds 66 member nonprofits. Many people, many dreams, one community—Community Shares of Wisconsin.

Sponsors

DECEMBER 1–7, 2016 ISTHMUS.COM

Photo by John Urban

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rutabaga paddlesports

december daily deals calendar Let’s have some fun here! In addition to our regular discounts, each day from now through the 31st we’ll feature something awesome. Thanks for buying local and supporting a family business! Sunday

Monday

Want a boat under your tree? Free delivery on Christmas Eve from our very own Santa!

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Tuesday

Wednesday

Buy a boat now and we’ll store it for free in our warehouse until next March. $200 value!

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Friday

Saturday

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3

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20% off 20% off boat, ski, and 20%off anything that all paddles! bike rack lights up! accessories

5 $50 gift card Sock Sunday when you Buy 3 pairs, get 1 free! register for†the DCSKS! 11 12 Tell us a Clothing Sale! 20% off (clean) joke all clothing! for 10% off one item.¤

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20% off any Wool Additional 20% off 20%off insulated Wednesday! $50.00 off any snowshoes food or drink 20% off all used boat! all paddles! container wool!

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21

22

23

24

25

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31 30 Canoecopia Sunday Pass New Year’s Eve! with $50.00 (open until 3:00) purchase.

Sock Sunday 20% off all Buy 3 pairs, get 1 free! hammocks! 15% off Merry all safety and Christmas! rescue gear!

6

Thursday

10% off any new, non-sale canoe, kayak, or SUP board!

Clothing Sale! 20% off all clothing!

Wool 20% off all Wednesday! dry bags and dry storage! 20% off all wool! Wool 15% off all outfitting Wednesday! 20% off all and fishing wool! accessories!

20% off Surprise $20 gift card all stoves, with purchase discount! Pick filters, and an ornament over $100 cookware! (one per customer) to find out! ¤ Additional 10% off clearance items

ISTHMUS.COM DECEMBER 1–7, 2016

† Door County Sea Kayak Symposium ¤ Excludes, boats, boards, and trailers.

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Sale pricing not valid on Kayaks, Canoes and SUPs unless explicitly stated. Sale prices not valid on Special Orders. No double-dipping on discounts, please.

www.rutabaga.com 2016-12-1 Calendar Full Page.indd 1

220 w. broadway monona, wisc. 53716

rutabagapaddlesports

608.223.9300 hours: mon - fri 10am-6pm, sat 10-5, sun 12am-5pm 11/29/2016 10:19:15 AM

Isthmus: Dec 1-7, 2016  
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