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VOICES OF HOPE: CLIMATE SCIENCE OCDE PROJECT GLAD® UNIT OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCE (OER) Intermediate – Middle School

North Central WA Educational Service District Written by Kate Lindholm & Dr. Sara Martinez


ATTRIBUTION AND LICENSE Attribution Photos Cover image by stokpic from Pixabay IconName1, IconName2, IconName3…, from Project GLAD® copyright Orange County Department of Education (OCDE). Used with permission P. 153 Photos from Pixabay | Pixabay License Other photos throughout document have license information on image. Standards Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and English Language Arts © Copyright 2010. National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers. All rights reserved. Next Generation Science Standards © Copyright NGSS Lead States. 2013. Next Generation Science Standards: For States, By States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. English Language Proficiency Standards with Correspondences to the K-12 Practices and Common Core State Standards © Copyright ELPA21. All rights reserved See also: Washington English Language Proficiency (ELP) Descriptors and Standards Third party content Project GLAD® is copyright Orange County Department of Education (OCDE). All rights reserved. Used with permission. NextSteps Action Plan Resource Used with permission. PBLWords Presentation Rubrics Used with permission. License Except where otherwise noted, this work by North Central Educational Service District is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (4.0) License. All logos and trademarks are property of their respective owners. Sections used under fair use doctrine (17 U.S.C. § 107) are marked. This resource may contain links to websites operated by third parties. These links are provided for your convenience only and do not constitute or imply any endorsement or monitoring by North Central Educational Service District. Please confirm the license status of any third-party resources and understand their terms of use before reusing them. North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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OVERVIEW Purpose of Unit The purpose of this Climate Science NTC Project GLAD® unit is a call to action, providing equity of access for all students. Through a model of instruction that promotes language development within core content, the Voices of Hope unit teaches students the science behind climate change and equips them with the tools necessary toward making a positive impact on our planet.

ClimeTime This unit was commissioned by the North Central Washington Educational Service District (NCESD). The project is part of the ClimeTime Grant awarded the NCESD to build and support science teacher training intersecting Next Generation Science Standards with climate science. The ClimeTime grant was issued by Washington Governor Inslee and facilitated by the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI), in collaboration with the UW Institute for Science + Math Education.

OCDE Project GLAD® The Orange County Department of Education (OCDE) is the official National Training Center for the Project GLAD® (Guided Language Acquisition Design) model. It is the holder of the OCDE Project GLAD® trademarks and copyrights. The authors of this unit, Kate Lindholm and Dr. Sara Martinez, are certified, active Tier IV trainers of OCDE National Training Center. This unit has received OCDE Project GLAD® permission to be published and distributed as an Open Educational Resource.

Teacher Training with this Unit Option 1: OCDE Project GLAD® is a model of professional development that enhances teachers’ design and delivery of standards-based instruction through an integrated approach with the intent of building language proficiency and academic comprehension for all students, especially English learners/emerging bilinguals. A Tier I Project GLAD® training consists of a Two Day Research and Theory Workshop and a four-five day Classroom Demonstration. To host a certified OCDE Project GLAD® Tier I training with this unit, contact Kate Lindholm at NCESD: katel@ncesd.org.

Option 2: Climate Science Unit – 3 Day Immersion & Climate Kit Three day training for teachers to delve into the content behind the unit and walk away with the resources created to teach the unit to intermediate – middle school students. Contact Kate Lindholm to register or schedule a three day immersion. katel@ncesd.org.

Acknowledgements Recently I attended the conference, “Rising Voices: Converging Voices: Building Relationships and Practices for Intercultural Science.” The conference focused on indigenous people and atmospheric scientists working together to create positive change and highlighted the importance of acknowledging the people who occupied the land before we were here. As such, we acknowledge their vital role and contributions as we engage in this unit on earth science and climate change. – Kate Lindholm, NCESD STEM Specialist/OCDE Project GLAD® Consultant North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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TABLE OF CONTENTS OVERVIEW ................................................................................................................................. 3 IDEA PAGES............................................................................................................................... 7 UNIT THEME ....................................................................................................................................... 7 KEY CONCEPTS .................................................................................................................................. 8 STEAM CONNECTIONS .................................................................................................................... 10 21ST CENTURY FOCUS.................................................................................................................... 11 STANDARDS .................................................................................................................................... 13 NGSS ............................................................................................................................................................... 13 CCSS - ELA ........................................................................................................................................................ 16 ELPS ................................................................................................................................................................ 33

GLOSSARY ....................................................................................................................................... 38 RESOURCES .................................................................................................................................... 43

PLANNING PAGES ................................................................................................................... 52 STRATEGIES: HOW WILL I TEACH THE STANDARDS? ..................................................................... 52 ........................................................................................................................................................ 54 UNIT CALENDAR .............................................................................................................................. 55 LITERACY AWARDS .......................................................................................................................... 59 PREDICTION/REACTION GUIDE ....................................................................................................... 62 TEACHER MADE BIG BOOK ............................................................................................................. 64

INPUT STRATEGIES ................................................................................................................. 71 RATIONALE ...................................................................................................................................... 71 GRAPHIC ORGANIZER...................................................................................................................... 72 .......................................................................................................................................................................... 74 GRAPHIC ORGANIZER – World Map: Effects of Climate Change ........................................................ 76 World Map – ELD Review ............................................................................................................................. 80 GRAPHIC ORGANIZER – Timeline: Climate Science ............................................................................. 82

PICTORIAL INPUT CHART: Burning Fossil Fuels ............................................................................... 85 Pictorial – ELD Review .................................................................................................................................. 86 .......................................................................................................................................................................... 87

NARRATIVE INPUT CHART ............................................................................................................... 88 My Wounded Island by Jacquez Pasquet .................................................................................................. 88

Story MaP .................................................................................................... 90 North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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My Wounded Island – ELD Review ............................................................................................................. 91

GUIDED ORAL PRACTICE STRATEGIES ................................................................................... 93 RATIONALE ...................................................................................................................................... 93 CHANTS ........................................................................................................................................... 95

READING & WRITING STRATEGIES ....................................................................................... 107 RATIONALE .................................................................................................................................... 107 MIND MAP ..................................................................................................................................... 109 PROCESS GRID.............................................................................................................................. 110 EXPERT GROUP: ............................................................................................................................ 114 Deforestation .................................................................................................................................................114 Food Waste ...................................................................................................................................................117 Cattle Overpopulation ..................................................................................................................................121 Single Use Plastics ......................................................................................................................................124

POETRY FRAME ............................................................................................................................. 128

EXTENDED ACTIVITIES FOR INTEGRATION ........................................................................... 130 RATIONALE: ................................................................................................................................... 130 CLIMATE SCIENCE INVESTIGATIONS ............................................................................................. 131 Reflecting Heat .............................................................................................................................................131 Carbon: Up in Smoke ..................................................................................................................................132 Rising Sea Levels .........................................................................................................................................133 Harnessing Sun’s Energy ............................................................................................................................ 135

TEAM ACTION PLAN .............................................................................................................. 136 Objective ....................................................................................................................................... 136 ACTION PLAN INPUT ...................................................................................................................... 138 Action Plan Student Packets ......................................................................................................................139

ASSESSMENT & FEEDBACK STRATEGIES ............................................................................ 143 OBJECTIVE ..................................................................................................................................... 143 GRAFFITI WALL .............................................................................................................................. 144 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH & WRITING ASSIGNMENT ....................................................................... 146 Pre-Write GRAPHIC ORGANIZER .................................................................................................... 147 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH & WRITING ASSIGNMENT ....................................................................... 147 TEACHER GENERATED TEST ......................................................................................................... 151

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IDEA PAGES WHAT DO I NEED TO TEACH? ENDURING UNDERSTANDING:

UNIT THEME

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

FOCUS AND MOTIVATION

We have individual and collective power to create change related to climate science. Where are  Earth is a complex, interconnected system we going? with a changing climate. 

We impact our environment and our environment impacts our lives.

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Cross cultural theme: Social and environmental justice 21st Century Themes: Global awareness and environmental literacy

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What is climate? What causes climate change?

What effect does climate change have on the planet, earth’s systems and people?

 

What impact do humans have on the rise of earth’s mean surface temperature? What inspires people to make changes that affect climate?

What can we do to reduce global climate change?

Focus and Motivation strategies to assess our starting point and set the purpose for learning 

Prediction/Reaction Guide

Observation Charts

 

Inquiry Charts Teacher Made Big Book/Power Point

Cognitive Content Dictionary

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

Where are we starting?

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Assessment and Feedback strategies for formative and end of unit summative assessments

ASSESSMENT AND FEEDBACK

KEY CONCEPTS

What concepts do we need to learn to get from here to there?

Prediction/Reaction Guide

 

Voices of Hope Indiv. Writing Assignment Team Project Based Action Plan

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Process Inquiry and all charts Teacher-Made Test

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Student-Made Test using Graffiti Wall Student Debate Connected to Research Project

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Team Jeopardy Where’s My Answer?

Climate is the average weather pattern in an area over a long period of time. (NGSS 3-ESS2-1)

Climate can be observed, measured and analyzed to find patterns and predict future weather. (NGSS 3-ESS2-1)

Climate impacts the variability of weather events around the world and varies according to regions. (NGSS 3-ESS2-2)

The earth's systems and their interactions are impacted by climate: geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, biosphere (NGSS 5-ESS2-1)

Established climate patterns across the earth are changing.

Climate change is impacted by the warming of the Earth's atmosphere (global warming) through the increased release of greenhouse gases including carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), ozone (O3) and water vapor (H20).

Effects of climate change on the planet include extreme weather events, melting glaciers, melting permafrost, rising sea levels, changes in ocean chemistry, changes in ecosystems (including migration patterns, and plant and animal populations), and increased forest fires.

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

How will we know when we arrive?

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KEY CONCEPTS CONTINUED

People are impacted by climate change physically (air pollution, asthma, disease), economically (effects of extreme weather, rising sea levels), emotionally and socio-politically (tensions and destabilization due to forced migration and effects of changing climates on livelihoods, infastructure, and communities).

Human activities, such as the release of greenhouse gases associated with burning fossil fuels, deforestation, food waste, rotting garbage and the increase in livestock populations are major factors in the current rise in Earth's mean surface temperature. (NGSS ESS3.D MS)

Reducing the level of climate change and reducing human vulnerability to whatever climate changes do occur depend on the understanding of climate science, engineering capabilities and other kinds of knowledge. (NGSS ESS3.D MS)

We can reduce climate change individually and collectively by using alternate energy sources, reducing energy use, raising awareness, protecting natural forests and engaging in reforestation, reducing meat consumption, conserving and recycling resources, and creative design solutions.

People are inspired to make changes when they have a personal experience or deep understanding of the impact global change has on their own lives, the lives of people they care about, and their environment.

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STEAM CONNECTIONS

Creating connections for students in… SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING ARTS & MATHEMATICS

STEAM stands for science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics. STEAM is important because it pervades every part of our lives. All students need to be good citizen scientists in order to understand the world around us and be responsive to issues that we deal with daily. Some of the important STEAM connections in this unit include: 

Highlight the many STEAM fields as it pertains to climate science. If students don’t consider a STEAM career by middle school they are much less likely to enter the field.

“In the 21st century, scientific and technological innovations have become increasingly important as we face the benefits and challenges of both globalization and a knowledge-based economy. To succeed in this new information-based and highly technological society, students need to develop their capabilities in STEM to levels much beyond what was considered acceptable in the past” (National Science Foundation).

Ensure our society continues to make fundamental discoveries and to advance our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and the universe.

Generate the scientists, technologists, engineers, and mathematicians who will create the new ideas, new products, and entirely new industries of the 21st century.

Provide the technical skills and quantitative literacy needed for individuals to earn livable wages and make better decisions for themselves, their families and their communities.

Strengthen our democracy by preparing all citizens to make informed choices in an increasingly technological world.

Prepare and engage all students no matter their gender, race, or background.

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PARTNERSHIP FOR 21ST CENTURY 21ST CENTURY FOCUS

www.battelleforkids.org

21st Century Learning: “Ensuring student success in a world where change is constant and learning never stops.” Framework or 21st Century Learning

21st Century Themes Global Awareness  Use 21st century skills to understand and address global issues  Learn from and working collaboratively with individuals representing diverse cultures, religions, and lifestyles in a spirit of mutual respect and open dialogue in personal, work, and community contexts Environmental Literacy  Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the environment and the circumstances and conditions affecting it, particularly as relates to air, climate, land, food, energy, water, and ecosystems  Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of society’s impact on the natural world  Investigate and analyze environmental issues, and make accurate conclusions about effective solutions  Take individual and collective action towards addressing environmental challenges (e.g., participating in global actions, designing solutions that inspire action on environmental issues) 21st Century Learning & Innovation Skills Critical Thinking & Problem Solving Reason Effectively  Use various types of reasoning (inductive, deductive, etc.) as appropriate to the situation  Use systems thinking  Analyze how parts of a whole interact with each other to produce overall outcomes in complex systems  Make judgments and decisions  Effectively analyze and evaluate evidence, arguments, claims, and beliefs  Analyze and evaluate major alternative points of view  Synthesize and make connections between information and arguments  Interpret information and draw conclusions based on the best analysis  Reflect critically on learning experiences and processes Solve Problems  Solve different kinds of non-familiar problems in both conventional and innovative ways  Identify and ask significant questions that clarify various points of view and lead to better solutions

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ST

21 CENTURY FOCUS CONT.

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PARTNERSHIP FOR 21ST CENTURY Communication  Articulate thoughts and ideas effectively using oral, written, and nonverbal communication skills in a variety of forms and contexts  Listen effectively to decipher meaning, including knowledge, values, attitudes, and intentions  Communicate effectively in diverse environments (including multilingual)  Use communication for a range of purposes  Utilize multiple media and technologies, and know how to judge their effectiveness a priority as well as assess their impact Collaboration  Collaborate with others  Demonstrate ability to work effectively and respectfully with diverse teams  Exercise flexibility and willingness to be helpful in making necessary compromises to accomplish a common goal  Assume shared responsibility for collaborative work and value the individual contributions made by each team member Creativity and Innovation Think Creativity  Use a wide range of idea-creation techniques (such as brainstorming)  Create new and worthwhile ideas (both incremental and radical concepts)  Elaborate, refine, analyze, and evaluate their own ideas in order to improve and maximize creative efforts Work Creatively with Others  Develop, implement, and communicate new ideas to others effectively  Be open and responsive to new and diverse perspectives; incorporate group input and feedback into the work  Demonstrate originality and inventiveness in work and understand the real-world limits to adopting new ideas  View failure as an opportunity to learn; understand that creativity and innovation is a long-term, cyclical process of small successes and frequent mistakes Implement Innovations  Act on creative ideas to make a tangible and useful contribution to the field in which the innovation will occur

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NEXT GENERATION SCIENCE STANDARDS (NGSS) STANDARDS NGSS

4th Grade EARTH’S SYSTEMS Earth’s Systems: Processes that Shape the Earth  4-ESS2-1: Rainfall helps to shape the land and affects the types of living things found in a region. Water, ice, wind, living organisms, and gravity break rocks, soils, and sediments into smaller particles and move them around. Biogeology  4-ESS2-1: Living things affect the physical characteristics of their regions. EARTH & HUMAN ACTIVITY Natural Resources  4-ESS3-1: Energy and fuels that humans use are derived from natural sources, and their use affects the environment in multiple ways. Some resources are renewable over time, and others are not. Natural Hazards  4-ESS3-2: A variety of hazards result from natural processes. Humans cannot eliminate the hazards but can take steps to reduce their impacts. Designing Solutions to Engineering Problems  4-ESS3-2: Testing a solution involves investigating how well it performs under a range of likely conditions. 5th Grade EARTH’S SYSTEMS Earth Materials and Systems  5-ESS2-1: Earth’s major systems are the geosphere (solid and molten rock, soil, and sediments), the hydrosphere (water and ice), the atmosphere (air), and the biosphere (living things, including humans). These systems interact in multiple ways to affect Earth’s surface materials and processes. The ocean supports a variety of ecosystems and organisms, shapes landforms, and influences climate. Winds and clouds in the atmosphere interact with the landforms to determine patterns of weather. The Roles of Water in Earth’s Surface Processes  5-ESS2-2 Nearly all of Earth’s available water is in the ocean. Most fresh water is in glaciers or underground; only a tiny fraction is in streams, lakes, wetlands, and the atmosphere EARTH & HUMAN ACTIVITY Human Impacts on Earth Systems  5-ESS3-1: Human activities in agriculture, industry, and everyday life have had major effects on the land, vegetation, streams, ocean, air, and even outer space. But individuals and communities are doing things to help protect Earth’s resources and environments.

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NEXT GENERATION SCIENCE STANDARDS (NGSS) STANDARDS NGSS

3rd – 5th Grade ENGINEERING DESIGN Defining and Delimiting Engineering Problems  3-5-ETS1-1: Possible solutions to a problem are limited by available materials and resources (constraints). The success of a designed solution is determined by considering the desired features of a solution (criteria). Different proposals for solutions can be compared on the basis of how well each one meets the specified criteria for success or how well each takes the constraints into account. Developing Possible Solutions  3-5-ETS1-2: Research on a problem should be carried out before beginning to design a solution. Testing a solution involves investigating how well it performs under a range of likely conditions  3-5-ETS1-2: At whatever stage, communicating with peers about proposed solutions is an important part of the design process, and shared ideas can lead to improved designs  3-5- ETS1-3: Tests are often designed to identify failure points or difficulties, which suggest the elements of the design that need to be improved. Optimizing the Design Solution  3-5-ETS1-3: Different solutions need to be tested in order to determine which of them best solves the problem, given the criteria and the constraints. Middle School EARTH’S SYSTEMS

The Roles of Water in Earth’s Surface Processes  

  

MS-ESS2.4: Water continually cycles among land, ocean, and atmosphere via transpiration, evaporation, condensation and crystallization, and precipitation, as well as downhill flows on land. MS-ESS2-5: The complex patterns of the changes and the movement of water in the atmosphere, determined by winds, landforms, and ocean temperatures and currents, are major determinants of local weather patterns. MS-ESS2-4: Global movements of water and its changes in form are propelled by sunlight and gravity. MS-ESS2-6: Variations in density due to variations in temperature and salinity drive a global pattern of interconnected ocean currents. MS-ESS2-2: Water’s movements—both on the land and underground— cause weathering and erosion, which change the land’s surface features and create underground formations.

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STANDARDS NGSS

NEXT GENERATION SCIENCE STANDARDS (NGSS) Middle School Continued EARTH & HUMAN ACTIVITY Natural Resources  MS-ESS3.1: Humans depend on Earth’s land, ocean, atmosphere, and biosphere for many different resources. Minerals, fresh water, and biosphere resources are limited, and many are not renewable or replaceable over human lifetimes. These resources are distributed unevenly around the planet as a result of past geologic processes. Natural Hazards  MS-ESS3-2: Mapping the history of natural hazards in a region, combined with an understanding of related geologic forces can help forecast the locations and likelihoods of future events. Human Impacts on Earth Systems  MS-ESS3-3: Human activities have significantly altered the biosphere, sometimes damaging or destroying natural habitats and causing the extinction of other species. But changes to Earth’s environments can have different impacts (negative and positive) for different living things.  MS-ESS3-4: Typically, as human populations and per-capita consumption of natural resources increase, so do the negative impacts on Earth unless the activities and technologies involved are engineered otherwise. Global Climate Change  MS-ESS3-5: Human activities, such as the release of greenhouse gases from burning fossil fuels, are major factors in the current rise in Earth’s mean surface temperature (global warming). Reducing the level of climate change and reducing human vulnerability to whatever climate changes do occur depend on the understanding of climate science, engineering capabilities, and other kinds of knowledge, such as understanding of human behavior and on applying that knowledge wisely in decisions and activities.

CROSS CUTTING CONCEPTS (4th Grade – MS)   

Patterns Cause and effect Systems and system models Stability and change

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COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (ELA) STANDARDS CCSS - ELA

5th Grade

FIFTH GRADE READING: LITERATURE Key Ideas and Details:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.1 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.2 Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.3 Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact). Craft and Structure:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.5 Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.6 Describe how a narrator's or speaker's point of view influences how events are described. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. READING: INFORMATIONAL TEXT Key Ideas and Details:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.1 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.2 Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.3 Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

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COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (ELA) STANDARDS CCSS - ELA

5th Grade

FIFTH GRADE READING: INFORMATIONAL TEXT CONTINUED Craft and Structure:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.4 Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.5 Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.6 Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.7 Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.8 Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s).  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.9 Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. READING: FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS Phonics and Word Recognition:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.5.3 Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.5.3.A Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context.

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COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (ELA) STANDARDS CCSS - ELA

5th Grade

FIFTH GRADE READING: FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS CONTINUED Fluency:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.5.4 Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.5.4.A Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.5.4.B Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.5.4.C Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. WRITING Text Types and Purposes:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.1.A Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer's purpose.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.1.B Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.1.C Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently, specifically).  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.1.D Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented. 

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.A Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.B Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.C Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrast, especially).

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COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (ELA) STANDARDS CCSS - ELA

5th Grade

FIFTH GRADE WRITING CONTINUED Text Types and Purposes Continued  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.D Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.2.E Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented. Production and Distribution of Writing:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Gradespecific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.5 With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grade 5 here.)  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.6 With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of two pages in a single sitting. Research to Build and Present Knowledge:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.7 Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.8 Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work and provide a list of sources.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.9.A Apply grade 5 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or a drama, drawing on specific details in the text

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19 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (ELA)

STANDARDS CCSS - ELA

5th Grade

FIFTH GRADE WRITING CONTINUED  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.9.B Apply grade 5 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., "Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point[s]""). Range of Writing:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. SPEAKING & LISTENING Comprehension and Collaboration:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1.A Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1.B Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1.C Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1.D Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.2 Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.3 Summarize the points a speaker makes and explain how each claim is supported by reasons and evidence. Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.4 Report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

20 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


STANDARDS CCSS - ELA

5th Grade

COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (ELA) FIFTH GRADE SPEAKING & LISTENING CONTINUED  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.5 Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) and visual displays in presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when appropriate to task and situation. (See grade 5 Language standards 1 and 3 here for specific expectations.) LANGUAGE Conventions of Standard English:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.1.A Explain the function of conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections in general and their function in particular sentences.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.1.B Form and use the perfect (e.g., I had walked; I have walked; I will have walked) verb tenses.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.1.C Use verb tense to convey various times, sequences, states, and conditions.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.1.D Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense.*  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.1.E Use correlative conjunctions (e.g., either/or, neither/nor).  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.2.A Use punctuation to separate items in a series.*  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.2.B Use a comma to separate an introductory element from the rest of the sentence.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.2.C Use a comma to set off the words yes and no (e.g., Yes, thank you), to set off a tag question from the rest of the sentence (e.g., It's true, isn't it?), and to indicate direct address (e.g., Is that you, Steve?).  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.2.D Use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.2.E Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

21 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


STANDARDS CCSS - ELA

5th Grade

COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (ELA) FIFTH GRADE LANGUAGE CONTINUED Knowledge of Language:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.3.A Expand, combine, and reduce sentences for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style.

Vocabulary Acquisition and Use: 

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 5 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.4.A Use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.4.B Use common, grade-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., photograph, photosynthesis).  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.4.C Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.5.A Interpret figurative language, including similes and metaphors, in context.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.5.B Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.5.C Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonyms, antonyms, homographs) to better understand each of the words. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.5.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal contrast, addition, and other logical relationships (e.g., however, although, nevertheless, similarly, moreover, in addition

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

22 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (ELA) STANDARDS CCSS - ELA

7th Grade

SEVENTH GRADE READING: LITERATURE Key Ideas and Details:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.3 Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot). Craft and Structure:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.5 Analyze how a drama's or poem's form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.6 Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. READING: INFORMATIONAL TEXT Key Ideas and Details:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

23 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (ELA) STANDARDS CCSS - ELA

7th Grade

SEVENTH GRADE READING: INFORMATIONAL TEXT CONT. Craft and Structure:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.5 Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.6 Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.  Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.7 Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium's portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words).  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.9 Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing different interpretations of facts. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. WRITING Text Types and Purposes:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.1.A Introduce claim(s), acknowledge alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.1.B Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

24 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (ELA) STANDARDS CCSS - ELA

7th Grade

SEVENTH GRADE WRITING CONTINUED Text Types and Purposes Continued  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.1.C Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), reasons, and evidence.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.1.D Establish and maintain a formal style.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.1.E Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. 

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.A Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.B Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.C Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.D Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.E Establish and maintain a formal style. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.2.F Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

Production and Distribution of Writing:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.5 With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

25 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


STANDARDS CCSS - ELA

7th Grade

COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (ELA) SEVENTH GRADE WRITING CONTINUED Production and Distribution of Writing Continued  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and link to and cite sources as well as to interact and collaborate with others, including linking to and citing sources. Research to Build and Present Knowledge:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.7 Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further research and investigation.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.9.A Apply grade 7 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history").  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.9.B Apply grade 7 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g. "Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims").

Range of Writing: 

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

SPEAKING AND LISTENING Comprehension and Collaboration  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

26 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


STANDARDS CCSS - ELA

7th Grade

COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (ELA) SEVENTH GRADE SPEAKING AND LISTENING CONTINUED Comprehension and Collaboration Continued  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.1.A Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.1.B Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.1.C Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others' questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.1.D Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.2 Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.3 Delineate a speaker's argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.4 Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.5 Include multimedia components and visual displays in presentations to clarify claims and findings and emphasize salient points.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. LANGUAGE Conventions of Standard English  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

27 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (ELA) STANDARDS CCSS - ELA

7th Grade

SEVENTH GRADE LANGAUGE CONTINUED Conventions of Standard English Continued  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.1.A Explain the function of phrases and clauses in general and their function in specific sentences.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.1.B Choose among simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal differing relationships among ideas.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.1.C Place phrases and clauses within a sentence, recognizing and correcting misplaced and dangling modifiers.*  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.2.A Use a comma to separate coordinate adjectives (e.g., It was a fascinating, enjoyable movie but not He wore an old[,] green shirt).  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.2.B Spell correctly. Knowledge of Language:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.3.A Choose language that expresses ideas precisely and concisely, recognizing and eliminating wordiness and redundancy.* Vocabulary Acquisition and Use:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.4.A Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.4.B Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., belligerent, bellicose, rebel).  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.4.C Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

28 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (ELA) STANDARDS CCSS - ELA

7th Grade

SEVENTH GRADE LANGUAGE CONTINUED Vocabulary Acquisition and Use Continued  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.4.D Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.5.A Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological allusions) in context.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.5.B Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonym/antonym, analogy) to better understand each of the words.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.5.C Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g., refined, respectful, polite, diplomatic, condescending). CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. SIXTH - EIGHTH GRADE SCIENCE AND TECHNICAL SUBJECTS (GRADES 6-8) Key Ideas and Details:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RST.6-8.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RST.6-8.2 Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; provide an accurate summary of the text distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RST.6-8.3 Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks. Craft and Structure:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RST.6-8.4 Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6-8 texts and topics.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RST.6-8.5 Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to an understanding of the topic.

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

29 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (ELA)

STANDARDS CCSS - ELA

6th-8th Grade

SIXTH – EIGHTH GRADE SCIENCE AND TECHNICAL SUBJECTS CONTINUED Craft and Structure Continued  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RST.6-8.6 Analyze the author's purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RST.6-8.7 Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text with a version of that information expressed visually (e.g., in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table).  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RST.6-8.8 Distinguish among facts, reasoned judgment based on research findings, and speculation in a text.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RST.6-8.9 Compare and contrast the information gained from experiments, simulations, video, or multimedia sources with that gained from reading a text on the same topic. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RST.6-8.10 By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently. SCIENCE WRITING

Text Types and Purposes: 

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.1 Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.1.A Introduce claim(s) about a topic or issue, acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.1.B Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant, accurate data and evidence that demonstrate an understanding of the topic or text, using credible sources.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.1.C Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.1.D Establish and maintain a formal style.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.1.E Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.2 Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

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30 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (ELA) STANDARDS CCSS - ELA

SIXTH – EIGHTH GRADE SCIENCE WRITING CONTINUED

Text Types and Purposes: 

6th-8th Grade

    

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.2.A Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories as appropriate to achieving purpose; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.2.B Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.2.C Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.2.D Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.2.E Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.2.F Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

Production and Distribution of Writing:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.5 With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas clearly and efficiently. Research to Build and Present Knowledge:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.7 Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a selfgenerated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

31 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS (ELA) STANDARDS CCSS - ELA

SIXTH – EIGHTH GRADE SCIENCE WRITING CONTINUED

Research to Build and Present Knowledge Continued: 

6th-8th Grade

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Range of Writing:  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.6-8.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

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STANDARDS ELPS

ENGLISH LANGAUGE PROFICIENCY STANDARDS (ELPS) 1. Construct meaning from oral presentations and literary and informational text through grade-appropriate listening, reading, and viewing. 2. Participate in grade-appropriate oral and written exchanges on information, ideas, and analyses responding to peer, audience, or reader comments and questions 3. Speak and write about grade-appropriate complex literary and informational texts and topics 4. Construct grade-appropriate oral and written claims and support them with reasoning and evidence 5. Conduct research and evaluate and communicate findings to answer questions or solve problems 6. Analyze and critique the argument of others orally and in writing 7. Adapt language choices to purpose, task, and audience when speaking and writing 8. Determine the meaning of words and phrases or oral presentations and literary and informational text 9. Create clear and coherent grade-appropriate speech and text 10. Make accurate use of standard English to communicate in gradeappropriate speech and writing Click the links below to download, print, or view Washington ELP Standards: http://www.k12.wa.us/MigrantBilingual/ELD.aspx 

Gr K-5 with ELA Correspondence

 

Gr. 6-8 with ELA Correspondence Gr. 6-8 with Literacy in Content Area Correspondence

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STANDARDS ELPS

4th-5th Grade Achievement Indicators

Source: http://www.k12.wa.us/ELPA21/pubdocs/ELPA21Grade4-5ALDs-Eng-ADA.pdf North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

34 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


STANDARDS ELPS

4th-5th Grade Achievement Indicators

Source:http://www.k12.wa.us/ELPA21/pubdocs/ELPA21Grade4-5ALDs-Eng-ADA.pdf North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

35 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


STANDARDS ELPS

6th-8th Grade Achievement Indicators

Source:http://www.k12.wa.us/ELPA21/pubdocs/ELPA21Grades6-8ALDs-Eng-ADA.pdf North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

36 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


STANDARDS ELPS

6th-8th Grade Achievement Indicators

Source:http://www.k12.wa.us/ELPA21/pubdocs/ELPA21Grades6-8ALDs-Eng-ADA.pdf North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

37 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


GLOSSARY Unit Vocabulary

TIER II VOCABULARY WORDS     

Tier II Vocabulary has two defining characteristics. 1.High frequency words often used across contexts    

predict analyze anticipate collaboration

AND 2. Specificity. The words can be described using basic (Tier I) vocabulary.  

Tier I: happy Tier II: excited, pleased

For more info. See Isabel Beck’s Bringing Words to Life (2013).

 

                

Accumulate - to gather or pile up Activist – person who campaigns to bring about political or social change Analyze - to determine the meaning of something by breaking down its parts Atmosphere - the mixture of gasses around a planet Average – an amount, standard, level or rate regarded as usual or ordinary Cause – reasonable grounds for doing, thinking, or feeling something Climate - the average weather patterns of an area over a long period of time (based on conditions of temperature, air pressure, humidity, precipitation, winds, sunshine and cloudiness) Conserve - to use something carefully, so it doesn't get wasted Current - movement of water in oceans, seas and large lakes Decay - to rob or break down Decomposition – state or process of rotting; decay Degrees - units for measuring temperature on a given scale (Fahrenheit or Celsius) Desert – dry, barren area of land, especially one covered with sand, characteristically desolate, waterless and without vegetation Drought - long periods without rain Effect – change which is a result or consequence of an action or other cause Energy – power derived from the utilization of physical or chemical resources, especially to provide light and heat or to work machines Erode - to slowly wear away by the action of water, wind or ice Evaporate - when liquid changes into a vapor or gas Famine - a severe, long term food shortage Food loss – food intended for human consumption that was lost or wasted during the production and distribution process Food waste - food intended for human consumption being discarded and thrown away because of oversupply or individual eating habits Forecast - prediction of future weather Hypothesis – proposition made as a basis for reasoning, without any assumption of its truth Impact – have a strong effect on someone or something

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38 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


GLOSSARY Unit Vocabulary

TIER II VOCABULARY WORDS          

Tier III Vocabulary includes low frequency words that are often specific to a particular context.   

     

isotope quadrilateral protagonist

For more info. See Isabel Beck’s Bringing Words to Life.

Infrastructure – basic physical and organizational structures and facility needed for the operation of a society or enterprise Inference – conclusion reached on the basis of evidence and reasoning Interconnected - when two or more things have an impact on each other Lava – hot molten or semifluid rock erupted from a volcano or fissure, or solid rock resulting from cooling of this Nonrenewable – not capable of being replenished (natural resource or source of energy) Observation – the ability to notice things, especially significant details Pollution - harmful substances in the war, water or land Prediction - what a person thinks about something ahead of time based on observation, experience and reasoning Recycle - the collection, processing and repurposing of materials that would otherwise be thrown away Renewable – a source of energy that is not depleted by use, such as water, wind, or solar power Smog - a mixture of fog and smoke or other pollution Technology – the application of scientific knowledge for practical purposes, especially in industry Temperature - a measurement of how hot or cold something is Thermometer - an instrument that measure temperature Tornado – destructive vortex of violently rotating winds having the appearance of a funnel-shaped cloud and advancing beneath a large storm system Weather - the conditions in the atmosphere at a specific time and place

TIER III VOCABULARY WORDS 

Agricultural development - modern farming methods that include mechanical, chemical, engineering and technological methods. Also called industrial agriculture  Air pressure - the force of air pressing on the surface of an object  Atom - the smallest possible piece of an element that still has all the properties of that element  Atmospheric scientist – one who studies weather and climate and examines how those conditions affect human activity and the earth in general  Barometer - a tool used to measure air pressure North Central Washington Carbon cycle - the movement of carbon through the earth's 39 Educational Service District ecosystem OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Carbon dioxide - colorless gas found naturally inVoices of Hope Earth's Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez Science, atmosphere combining carbon and oxygen.Climate Formed by the2019 burning of fossil duels, rotting of plants and animals and breathing out of animals or humans.  Carbon footprint - the total amount of carbon dioxide and other


TIER III VOCABULARY WORDS GLOSSARY Unit Vocabulary

   

                 

Biosphere - regions of the earth that contain living organisms Carbon - a chemical found in nonliving things like coal and diamonds, and in all plants and animals Carbon cycle - the movement of carbon through the earth's ecosystem Carbon dioxide - colorless gas found naturally in Earth's atmosphere combining carbon and oxygen. Formed by the burning of fossil duels, rotting of plants and animals and breathing out of animals or humans. Carbon footprint - the total amount of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases emitted over the full life cycle of a product or service, or by a person or family in a year Celsius - a scale to measure temperature Clean air engineer – specialize in either indoor or outdoor air quality and work on issues such as emission control, contaminant removal, and workplace ventilation Climate change - a change in regional and global climate patterns over time Climate Zone – divisions of Earth’s climates into general zones according to average temperatures and rainfall: polar, temperate and tropical Climatologist - a scientist who studies past patterns and changes in climates to help predict changes in the future Cyclone - powerful rotating ocean storm that forms in the Indian ocean with winds of at least 74 miles per hour Deforestation - the cutting down of forests Desalination – process of removing salt from seawater Ecologist – expert in or student of ecology Ecosystem - a interconnected community of living and nonliving things and their environment Element - a substance that cannot be split into a simpler substance, all the atoms are the same Equator - imaginary line around the center of the Earth Fahrenheit - a scale to measure temperature Fossil - the remains of traces of plants and animals left over long periods of time Fossil fuel - Coal, oil and natural gas fuel formed in the earth from the remains of plants and animals Garbologist - a scientist who studies trash to learn about the lives of the people who created the trash Geologist - a scientist who studies the history, structure and origin of the earth

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40 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


GLOSSARY Unit Vocabulary

TIER III VOCABULARY WORDS                   

Geosphere - solid part of earth, such as soil, sediment and rocks, also called the lithosphere Glaciologist - a scientist who studies glaciers Global warming - a gradual increase in the Earth's average temperatures Greenhouse gases - gasses that trap heat when released into the atmosphere, such as carbon dioxide, methane and water vapor Hurricane - powerful rotating ocean storm that forms on either side of the Americas with winds of at least 74 miles per hour Hydrosphere - regions of the earth that contain water as solid, liquid or gas on the surface or in the atmosphere Industrial Revolution - period of time from about 1750 to 1850 when people started using machines to make things in factories Industrial technology - the art and science of complex machines used to perform tasks associated with farming and ranching Inuit – indigenous people of northern Canada and parts of Greenland and Alaska Magma – hot fluid or semifluid material below or within earth’s crust from which lava and other igneous rock is formed on cooling Methane - a colorless and odorless gas that burns easily and is used for fuel, composed of carbon and hydrogen Meteorology - the study of atmosphere, weather and weather forecasting Molecule – group of atoms bonded together - representing the smallest fundamental unit of a chemical compound that can take part in a chemical reaction Monsoon – seasonal changes in atmospheric circulation and precipitation associated with the asymmetric heating or land and sea Nitrogen - the most common gas in the earth's atmosphere Oxygen - a colorless gas in the atmosphere that people and animals need to breathe to stay alive Permafrost - in polar and tundra regions, ground that is under the top layer of the oil that is permanently frozen Polar - climate zone near the poles characterized by cold and generally low precipitation Polar engineer – one who plans, design and implements projects related to the climate zone near the poles

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41 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


GLOSSARY Unit Vocabulary

TIER III VOCABULARY WORDS             

Precipitation - any kind of weather that involves water coming out of the atmosphere are falling to the ground (rain, sleet, snow, hail) Renewable energy - energy from a source that doesn't get used up, including energy from the sun and wind Satellite - an object created by humans that orbits a planet and can be used to measure weather Solar engineer – one who plans, designs, and implements solar energy projects Solar panel - a device used to capture sunlight and convert it to usable energy Solar power - energy from the sun converted to electricity Stratosphere – second major atmospheric layer above the troposphere, extending in altitude from 8-30 miles; no weather occurs in the stratosphere Temperate - weather, temperature or climate that is mild. Temperate zones are usually found about halfway between the equator and the poles Topography - surface features of the land Tropical - Climate zones near the equator characterized by year round warm weather and high humidity Troposphere – lowest region of the atmosphere, extending from the earth’s surface to a height of about 3.7- 6.2 miles; lower boundary of the stratosphere Tundra - cold, dry, treeless land in the Arctic c regions of northern Europe, Asia and N. America. Below the surface, the ground is covered in permafrost. Typhoon - powerful rotating ocean storm that forms in the western Pacific ocean with winds of at least 74 miles per hour

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42 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


NONFICTION FOR STUDENTS RESOURCES Nonfiction Students

Bennett, J. (2016). A Global Warming Primer: Answering your Questions about The Science, the Consequences, and the Solutions. Boulder, CO: Big Kid Science  A clear and accessible description of what we know about climate change, where there are uncertainties, and the range of possible solutions. Benoit, P. (2011). Climate Change. New York: Children’s Press.  Overview of climate change in an easy to read format. Addresses the impact of climate change and ways to combat climate change. Replete with text features, maps, timelines and photos. Chambers, C. (2017). Stickmen’s Guide to Earth’s Atmosphere in Layers. Minneapolis, MN: Lerner Pub.  Exploring the atmospheric layers surrounding Earth, including the troposphere where weather occurs Claybourne, A. (2016). 50 Things you Should Know About Wild Weather. Lake Forest, CA: QEB Pub.  Illustrated presentation of how weather works and what happens when it gets wild Cole, J. & B. Degen. (2010). The Magic School Bus and the Climate Challenge. New York: Scholastic.  Engaging overview of climate change: causes, impact and ways we can make a difference Dakers, Diane. (2015). The Carbon Cycle. New York: Crabtree.  Illustrating the process of how carbon moves through the oceans, atmosphere and living things Dow, K. & T. Downing (2006). The Atlas of Climate Change: Mapping the World’s Greatest Challenge. Berkeley: University of California Press  Covers a wide range of climate-change topics: warning signs; causes of change; ocean acidification; food, water and health impacts; economic and social impacts; low carbon development; monitoring carbon emissions; renewable energy; agreements reached in Copenhagen and Cancun Farndon, J. & M. Dent (Ed). (2007). Weather. New York: Dorling Kindersley Limited.  Eyewitness book with illustrations and text to discover the world’s weather, from heat waves and droughts to blizzards and floods and the technology we use to study weather patterns

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43 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


NONFICTION FOR STUDENTS RESOURCES Nonfiction Students

Fradin, J. & D. Fradin. (2008). Witness to Disaster: Drought. Washington DC:National Geographic.  Illustrated history of droughts around the world, comparing impacts on a wide variety of societies. See also Witness to Disaster: Hurricanes, by same author. Furgang, Kathy. (2012). Kids Everything Weather. Washington DC: National Geographic.  All you need to know about weather and all of its wildness will be found in the pages of this colorful, energetic, and accessible book. Godkin, C. (2006). Fire! The Renewal of a Forest. Markham, Ontario: Fitzhenry & Whiteside.  The life cycle of a forest is examined, from its devastation to its gradual renewal Hardyman, R. (2016). Surviving the Ice. Sole Survivor. New York: Gareth Stevens Pub.  Readers are introduced to the coldest places on Earth, including how people like scientists live there and the threatening animals they could encounter. Kallen, S. (2018). Trashing the Planet: Examining our Global Garbage Glut. Minneapolis, MN: Twenty-First Century Books.  Upper Intermediate/Middle School Level Text. Illustrated and proactive look at the impact of garbage on earth and space and what we can do to and what we can do to reduce, reuse, recycle and upcycle Kenney, K.L. (2016). The Science of Glaciers: How Temperature Works. Minneapolis, MN: Abdo Pub.  How glaciers are impacted by changing temperatures Kudlinski, K. (2015). Boy Were We Wrong about the Weather! New York: Penguin Group.  Metacognitive exploration of how our thoughts about weather have changes over time and the pioneers that made meteorology the science it is today. (Primary grades) Lindeen, M. (2016). The Carbon Cycle. Minneapolis, MN: Lerner Pub.  Eye catching photos, information captions, and succinct yet engaging text introducing young readers to the carbon cycle. (Ages 8-11) Maloof, Torrey. (2015). Extreme Weather. Huntington Beach, CA: Teacher Created Resources.  Examines the various types of extreme weather and how to be prepared and safe. (Primary grades)

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44 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


NONFICTION FOR STUDENTS

RESOURCES Nonfiction Students

Nagle, J. (2009). Reducing your Carbon Footprint at School. New York: Rosen Central.  Practical ways to reduce your carbon footprint. (Primary grades) Senker, C. (2017). Desert Climates. Chicago, IL: Heinemann Raintree.  This book explores the characteristics of desert climates, climate change and how plants, animals, and people have adapted to life in desert regions Senker, C. (2017). Polar Climates. Chicago, IL: Heinemann Raintree.  This book explores the characteristics of polar climates, climate change and how plants, animals, and people have adapted to life in polar regions Senker, C. (2017). Temperate Climates. Chicago, IL: Heinemann Raintree.  This book explores the characteristics of temperate climates, climate change and how plants, animals and people have adapted to life in temperate regions Shuckburgh, E. and C. Chambers. (2015). Polar Scientist. The Coolest Jobs on the Planet. Chicago, IL: Raintree.  Find out what’s involved in becoming a polar scientist from a top researcher in the field; equipment and skills used and challenges of conducting research and experiments in sub-zero temperatures Singer, M. (2000). On the Same Day in March: A Tour of the World’s Weather. New York: HarperCollins.  A primary grade look at weather conditions around the world by highlighting weather in different places on the same day in March. Sneideman, J. & E. Twamley. (2015). Climate Change: Discovering how it Impacts Spaceship Earth with 25 Projects. White River Junction, VT: Nomad Press.  A pro-active approach to climate change with hands-on activities and stories of kids and adults who are making a positive environmental difference. (Ages 9-12) Stewart, Melissa. (2015). Hurricane Watch. New York: HarperCollins.  Level 2 Reader that explores how hurricanes form, how scientists track the storms and what you can do to stay safe. (Primary grades) Thompson, C. (2016). Climatologists! Broomall, PA: Mason Crest.  Scientists in Action series. Examines the tools, methods and learning of climatologists studying climate change and what we can do to change the world for the better. Waldron, Melanie. (2013). Polar Regions. Habitat Survival. Chicago, IL: Raintree.  Explore polar habitats around the world, looking at the plants and animals that live there and the adaptations that help them to survive. Food webs, maps and photos help bring the topic to life. Threats to polar habitats are also covered, as well as efforts to preserve them.

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45 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


FICTION FOR STUDENTS – Realistic, Historical & Poetry RESOURCES Fiction Students

Realistic Fiction Hobbs, W. (2013). Never Say Die. New York: HarperCollins. Nick is a 15 year old Inuit hunter who goes on an adventurous expedition to photograph the decreasing population of migrating caribou, while fighting extreme elements and a fearsome bear. (Chapter book: ages 8-12) Lester, A. (2013). Sophie Scott Goes South. HMH Books for Young Readers. Nine year old, Sophie, shares her journey to Antarctica on the icebreaker her dad captains. Filled with facts and illustrations, the story recounts memories from the author's personal journey to Antarctica as a child. (Ages 6-9) Historical Fiction Olson, T. (2019). Lost in the Antarctic: The Doomed Voyage of the Endurance. New York: Scholastic. In an attempt to become the first voyage to cross the continent of Antarctica, Shackleton and his crew are stuck on the ice for 9 months. As the ship breaks into pieces, the crew must abandon ship and embrace a journey of survival in the freezing Antarctic region. Smith, R. (2011). Storm Runners: The Surge. New York: Scholastic. The second book in the Storm Runners series. Having just survived Hurricane Emily Chase and his friends find themselves in the midst of flood waters at the home of the Rossi Brother's Circus. (Chapter book: ages 8-12). Tarshis, L. (2015). I Survived #3: Hurricane Katrina. New York: Scholastic. Hurricane Katrina brings together a boy, a dog and the storm of the century. Barry finds himself swept away by the flood waters. Will he survive the storm of the century? (Chapter book: ages 8-12).

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46 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


ONLINE FOR STUDENTS RESOURCES Online Students

A Guide to the Energy of the Earth https://ed.ted.com/lessons/a-guide-to-the-energy-of-the-earth-joshua-m-sneideman Animated video by Joshua Sneideman explaining earth's systems, energy and its connection to climate change. Appropriate for 6th grade and above. A Journey Through Climate History http://www.abc.net.au/innovation/environment/cc_timeline.html. Interactive timeline of climate events throughout history to 2010. Changing the Balance: The Carbon Cycle. http://changingthebalance.thinkport.org/the_carbon_cycle.html. Interactive images illustrating the carbon cycle. Climate Change: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration http://www.education.noaa.gov/Climate/ Multimedia, explanation and links for teachers and students on Climate Change (carbon cycle, changing seasons, climate change, climate monitoring) Climate Kids: NASA https://climatekids.nasa.gov/menu/weather-and-climate/. Interactive explorations for multiple topics related to climate Climate Time Machine https://climatekids.nasa.gov/time-machine/. Watch how climate change has impacted sea ice, sea level, carbon emissions and average global temperature through time EarthCam https://www.earthcam.com. Take students on a virtual field trip anywhere in the world using EarthCam. These global webcams allow you to view numerous locations around the world in real time. Use the webcams to challenge students to study weather patterns in areas outside of their local community Hurricane Hunters www.hurricanehunters.com. Learn about scientists that fly into hurricanes to learn more about these storms. National Atmospheric and Space Admin's Kid's Club http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forkids/kidsclub/flash/index.html. Videos and activities about space, greenhouse gases, weather, climate and more Online Communities: WorldVuze and ePals WorldVuze https://www.worldvuze.com/login and ePals https://www.epals.com/#/connections Two online communities where students can interact with other students and share perspectives from around the world. Have students come up with questions about weather patterns

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47 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


RESOURCES Online Students

ONLINE FOR STUDENTS Owlie Skywarn - National Weather Service for Kids https://www.weather.gov/owlie/. Interactive site with games, activities lessons and links for students and teachers about weather science, weather safety and weather related careers. Space Place http://Spaceplace.nasa.gov/planet-weather/en/. Interactive site to learn more about weather on earth and throughout the solar system STEM Careers http://ionfuture.org. Interactive opportunity to explore various STEM related careers, watch interviews, learn the skills needed in school to pursue that path, find connected movies and books. Includes careers related to weather and climate Weather Updates https://weather.com. Weather updates for local regions and around the world Weather: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration http://www.education.noaa.gov/Weather_and_Atmosphere/ Multimedia, explanation and links for teachers and students on Weather (weather systems, weather patterns, extreme weather) Weather Wiz Kids http://www.weatherwizkids.com/#. Meteorologist Crystal Wicker's site for kids with topics covering natural disasters, experiments, and weather in general

ONLINE FOR TEACHERS Online Teachers

7 Days of Garbage https://www.greggsegal.com/P-Projects/7-Days-of-Garbage/1/thumbs Photographer Gregg Segal has families collect their garbage over the course of a week and records the results in images. Drawing attention to the amount of garbage American's use each week. Algalita Marine Research and Education http://www.algalita.org. Organization created by Captain Charles Moore, the first person to encounter the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Focus on supporting students to be change agents in reducing plastic trash in the world's oceans. CLEAN (Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network) https://cleanet.org/index.html. A collection of over 700 free, ready to use learning resources for secondary through higher ed classrooms. Helpful research site for elementary teachers. Climate Change Classroom Resources: NCSE https://ncse.com/classroom-resources. National Center for Science Education resources for educators specific to teaching about climate change.

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48 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


RESOURCES Apps

PHONE/TABLET APPS Earth Now, NASA It’s free, it’s dazzling and it puts Earth in the palm of your hands. NASA’s “Earth Now” app displays real-time global satellite data of your planet’s vital signs. Great for students, teachers and anyone interested in Earth science, this 3D app can be your go-to source for carbon dioxide conditions, gravity anomalies, ozone levels over Antarctica and more. Download it to your Apple or Android device to keep your eye on the Earth.

Images of Change Human activities, a changing climate and natural disasters are rapidly altering the face of our planet. Both NASA satellites and ground photographers have captured these changes in the form of eye-opening before-and-after images of phenomena ranging from glacial retreat to urbanization. Each image can be viewed side-byside or with an interactive slider and in context on a world map. Download it for free to your iPhone and iPad to learn about your changing world.

Offset NASA’s latest educational game, Offset, is part-pong, part-resource management and 100 percent retro. The goal is to slow the pace of global warming, and players learn about the global carbon cycle, different carbon sources and ways alternative energy and reforestation can help offset those sources. Take on the challenge if you think you have quick fingers and strong multitasking skills!

ONLINE FOR TEACHERS Climate Generation: A Will Steger Legacy https://www.climategen.org/blog/category/climate-lessons/. Climate change lesson plans and ideas from Will Steger. Hurricane Hunters www.hurricanehunters.com. Learn about scientists that fly into hurricanes to learn more about these storms. Instagram Template https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/instagram-peer-assessment-11100045. Free downloadable Instagram template for use with Literacy Awards or individual research projects. National Hurricane Center www.nhc.noaa.gov Track tropical storms moving across the Atlantic Ocean.

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49 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


RESOURCES Media: Movies & Videos

MEDIA: MOVIES & VIDEOS Beijing Besieged by Waste. (2011). Wang Jiu-liang Studio. DVD. Photographer visits illegal landfills around Beijing to create a documentary about the city's garbage crisis. The Disappearing Frontier (Series). 4.15.15. Tzu Chi360. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_g0lLHBfyIY. A look the people and events surrounding climate change in Alaska, particularly on the island of Sarichef. Garbage Dreams. (2009). New York: Iskander Films. DVD. Documentary about three teenage boys born in a community of "trash pickers' near Cairo Egypt. Stormageddon. (2011). Washington DC: National Geographic. https://www.dailymotion.com/video/xj19ra. Explorer presents the dramatic images of this catastrophic weather year and introduces the people who risked their lives to capture them on film. Tornado Intercept. (2005). Washington DC: National Geographic. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MwiOIx5XYXk A scientist and filmmaker explore the intricate and potentially deadly forces of a tornado by driving into the hear the actual storm in a specially-designed vehicle they constructed Trashed. (2007). Seattle: CustomFlix. DVD. A look inside North America's garbage business and why American's produce so much garbage. The Boy who Harnessed the Wind. True story about human inventiveness and its power to overcome crippling adversity.

RESOURCES Related Curriculum

RELATED CURRICULUM Brand Audit Toolkit. Break Free From Plastics. https://www.breakfreefromplastic.org/brandaudittoolkit/. Tool kit to raising awareness by collecting litter, sorting it by company, and posting pictures of the single-use plastic pollution with an encouragement to change packaging practices. Project Based Learning https://www.mypblworks.org. Resources and support for designing and implementing project based learning experiences such as Action Plan.

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50 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


Teacher Background

BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE Flannery, T. (2015). Atmosphere of Hope: Searching for Solutions to the Climate Crisis. New York: Atlantic Monthly Press. Flannery draws on the latest science to argue the need for action and provides examples of innovation and strategies from around the world for alternate fuel sources. (See also his first book on Climate Change, The Weather Makers) Gore, Al. (2017). An Inconvenient Sequel Truth to Power: Your action handbook to learn the science, find your voice, and help solve the climate crisis. New York: Rodale. Nye, B. (2015). Unstoppable: Harnessing Science to Change the World. New York: St. Martin's Press. Bill Nye challenges today's generation to create a cleaner, more efficient, and happier world. Wennersten, J. & D. Robbins. (2017). Rising Tides: Climate Refugees in the Twenty-First Century. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press. A close look at how climate change is impacting human migration and factors related to climate refugees. Beach, R. (2017). Teaching Climate Change to Adolescents: Reading, Writing, and Making a Difference. New York: Routledge. Keeley, P (2016). Uncovering Student Ideas in Earth and Environmental Science: 32 New Formative Assessment Probes. Virginia: NSTA Press.

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51 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


PLANNING PAGES STRATEGIES: HOW WILL I TEACH THE STANDARDS?

FOCUS AND MOTIVATION

INPUT

GUIDED ORAL PRACTICE

Zero Noise Signal

 

Personal Standards Literacy “Climate Science” Awards

 

Prediction/Reaction Guide Cognitive Content Dictionary with Signal Word

Observation Charts

Inquiry Charts

Teacher Made Big Book/Power Point

Graphic Organizer: A Warming Earth

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Graphic Organizer: World Map - Effects of Climate Change Graphic Organizer: Timeline – Discoveries and Innovations

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Pictorial Input: Burning Fossil Fuels Narrative Input: My Wounded Island Read Alouds

Guest Speakers

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T-Graph for Social Skills/Team Points 10:2 Lecture with Primary Language

Numbered Heads & Heads Together

Picture File Cards – Observe, Categorize, Classify, Label

 

Exploration Report Chants/Poetry

Sentence Patterning Chart

Personal Interactions

 

Team Action Plan Presentations Home School Connections

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52 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


Whole Class • Whole-Class Mind Map • Process Grid • Cooperative Strip Paragraph • Poetry Frames • Found Poetry: ___________________ • Narrative Story Map (Graphic Organizer) • Listen and Sketch • Memory Bank

Flexible Groups • Team Tasks – Anything modeled whole group • Expert Groups • ELD Group Frame • Clunkers and Links (at/above) with SQ3R • Emergent Reading Group with Cooperative Strip Paragraph • Ear to Ear reading • Focused Reading

Individual • Interactive Journals • Individual Tasks • Individual Research and Writing Project • Individual Interview and Field Experience

Field Experience – Climate and Conservation

 

Field Experience – Renewable and Nonrenewable Energy Tour Debate – Climate Change: Fact or Fiction?

 

Say it with Art – Climate Art Team Projects Action Plan – See Action Plan Category

Climate Science Investigations o Rising Heat o Carbon: Up in Smoke o Rising Sea Levels o Harnessing Sun’s Energy

READING & WRITING

EXTENDED ACTIVITIES

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53 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


ACTION PLAN

UNIT ASSESSMENT & FEEDBACK

  

Collaborative Input: Guess My Category Action Plan Research (Organization, Career, Scientist, Community) Action Plan Project Development

 

Action Plan Implementation Action Plan Presentations

Individual and Team Reflective Growth and Summative Assessments

Exit Tickets Learning Logs ELD Group Frame 10:2s Portfolio: Individual Tasks Graffiti Wall Game: Jeopardy Student and Teacher Created Tests Individual Research &. Writing Assignment with Rubric Team Action Plan with Individual and Team Rubrics

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Connections: Additional Strategies

HOW W

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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UNIT CALENDAR - (6 WEEK) Customized and used by permission: nextsteps.teachable.com

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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FOCUS & MOTIVATION STRATEGIES OBJECTIVE: Focus students’ attention on content while engaging interest RATIONALE: • Activate and build connections • Spark interest, excitement and engagement • Set purposes for learning (student-driven) • Identify and assess prior knowledge OCDE Project GLAD Learning Guide. (2015). Page 29

Zero Noise Signal

OCDE Project GLAD® Learning Guide 30

Three Personal Standards

31

STRATEGIES

Climate Unit Resources

Literacy Awards

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33

Prediction/Reaction Guide

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39

Cognitive Content Dictionary Observation Charts

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Inquiry Chart

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Teacher Made Big Book/ Power Point

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See OCDE Project GLAD® Learning Guide for step by step instructions related to each strategy. Learning Guides are received during certified OCDE Project GLAD® trainings. For information about receiving Project GLAD® training with this Climate Science unit, contact Kate Lindholm katel@ncesd.org at the North Central Educational Service District. North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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LITERACY AWARDS

Mario José Molina

William Kamkwamba

Mexican-American, � Chemist, � Discoverer

� Inventor, Engineer, � Author, Born in Malawi, Africa 1987 Image: achievement.org Send your comment to Will on the back

Send your comment to Mario on the back

So proud to receive the Nobel Prize for my discovery of how CFC gases destroy the Earth’s ozone layer! Tnx! #1995 #ozonealert

Today I built a wind turbine out of bicycle parts, gum trees and treasures from the scrapyard. Soon I’ll build a solar powered water pump! What would you like to invent? #windpower #solarpower #2006

Ian Joughin

Greta Thunberg

Canadian-American, ❄ Climatologist, � Engineer & Researcher @Polar Science Ctr

Swedish, � Climate Ac vist, Student

Image.PolarDiscovery

Send your comment to Ian on the back

Hi from Greenland! Today, I’m inves ga ng the impact of Greenland’s mel ng ice sheets. Radar satellites help me es mate ice sheet movement! #brrrr #icemelt

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

Send your comment to Mario on the back

Today 1.4 million people followed my lead on an interna onal climate strike. Together we can make a difference! #nobelpeaceprizenominee

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DID YOU KNOW… You can determine the temperature outside (Fahrenheit) by counting the number of cricket chirps in 15 seconds then adding 37? (Sneideman,, 30). Find this book is our resource library and add your own fascinating weather or climate fact on the back of this award.

DID YOU KNOW… There is more carbon dioxide (CO2) in our atmosphere today than ever recorded in history? Visit the NASA Climate Time Machine to see how climate indicators are changing over time.. North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

Image.Pixabay.com

Image.Pixabay.com

DID YOU KNOW… One of the primary victims of climate change is the ocean? How do you think climate change impacts the ocean? Check out this video to learn more and what we can do to help..

Image.Pixabay.com

Image.Pixabay.com

DID YOU KNOW… Temperatures in Antarctica are rising twice as fast as in the rest of the world (Benoit, 23). Why do you think that is happening? Watch this fascinating video about the cause and effect of glacial melting in Antarctica.

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GARBOLOGIST CONSERVATIONIST

GLACIOLOGIST HYDROLOGIST

On the back, write 3 facts you’ve learned about climate change. (Cite your sources.)

Image.pixabay.com

PERSON B: 97% of climate scientists agree that climate change is real and human caused. Today’s data illustrates a clear change from climate cycles in our past.

PERSON A: Climate change isn’t real. It’s just part of the natural cycle that’s always happened.

THE CLIMATE DEBATE

METEOROLOGIST CLIMATOLOGIST GEOLOGIST

� Climate Change Careers: Word Search �

Climate 20 10

As Earth’s climate warms, ice in Antarctica and Greenland is melting. This causes the level of the oceans to rise.

1970

National Aeronautics and Space Administr ation

It’s important to keep an eye on our planet and all the ways that it’s changing. Right now, it’s the only one we’ve got!

NASA satellites can measure sea level rise from space.

On the back, create a Venn diagram comparing weather and climate.

They can also track changes in the climate by measuring the clouds. W e know that changes in the number, size or location of clouds could be caused by a change in Earth’s climate

Keeping an eye on changing weather can help us plan ahead.

For more information, go to: climate.nasa.gov/ kids/ weather-climate

NASA satellites are always orbiting Earth, looking down at our oceans and clouds. And they monitor Earth’s climate in other ways too.

Keeping track of Earth’s sea level is one way that we can know how quickly the climate is changing.

W eather is only temporary. For example, a blizzard can turn into a flood after just a few warm spring days.

But it’s important to keep an eye on changes to Earth’s climate too. And NASA has observed that Earth is getting warmer.

climate.nasa.gov/ kids

W e know that if thunderclouds are forming overhead, it’s probably a good idea to stay inside.

Take a look outside your window. Is it hot and sunny? Is it cloudy and rainy? Is there snow on the ground? W hen you look out the window, you’re seeing what the weather is like today.

W eather

Climate, on the other hand, is more than just a few warm or cool days. Climate describes the typical weather conditions in an entire region for a very long time—30 years or more.

W hat’s the difference between weather and climate?

Source: Effects of Climate Change World Map

T R U O D H G _________________

T T E E E A P M R ________________

R P M E T S R R A O ______________

R E L A G C I _____________

U D T N R A _____________

VOCABULARY JUMBLE PUZZLE


Name____________________

PREDICTION/REACTION GUIDE PREDICTION/REACTION GUIDE Voices of Hope: Climate Science Directions: Please respond by sketching and writing below.

1. Weather patterns are constantly changing over time. What people call global warming is just part of the natural changes that happen with time. True or false. Explain your thinking. Prediction

Reaction

What confirmed or changed your thinking?

2. Explain the positive effects of greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide and methane. Prediction

Reaction

What confirmed or changed your thinking?

3. Truth or opinion? Eating steak impacts climate change. Prediction

Reaction

What confirmed or changed your thinking?

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLADÂŽ Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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4. Create a Venn diagram comparing the difference between weather and climate. Prediction

Reaction

What confirmed or changed your thinking?

5. Burning fossil fuels like coal or oil provides energy. What impact does burning fossil fuels have on our environment? Prediction

Reaction

What confirmed or changed your thinking?

6. How can I be a voice of hope with my words and actions related to climate change? Prediction

Reaction

What confirmed or changed your thinking?

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLADÂŽ Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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TEACHER MADE BIG BOOK The Big Book of Climate Change by Kate Lindholm Table of Contents PATTERNS  Climate Change CAUSE AND EFFECT  Animals  Ocean Life  People  Land  Extreme Weather DESIGN SOLUTIONS  Careers  We can make a difference _________________________ PATTERNS Climate Change

Earth is a complex, interconnected system with a changing climate. The change in climate is caused by human impact. There are many natural cycles in the fluctuation (change) of temperatures over time (climate). This cycle with warmer and colder temperatures has brought some normal changes in the sizes of glaciers. However, the planet's average surface temperature has risen about 1.62 degrees Fahrenheit (0.9 degrees Celsius) since the late 19th century. Most of this warming has happened in the last 35 years. 2016 was the warmest year on record with 8 out of 12 months being the warmest ever on record. There was also a natural cycle of carbon dioxide content in the atmosphere. There is now an increase of 100 parts per million more CO2 in the atmosphere, more than any other period of time. As we look at human activity with fossil fuels, increased populations using more resources, and additional pollution it is clear that humans are causing the increase in carbon dioxide and therefore the increase in the planet’s temperature.

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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I used to think that changes in climate were just following the normal pattern, but now I know the change in climate is caused by human impact. _________________________

CAUSE AND EFFECT Animals

Earth is a complex, interconnected system with a changing climate. Animal patterns of migration, hunting, and food sources is changing as our climate changes. Yet many still face "increased extinction risk due to climate change." Indeed, a 2015 study showed that vertebrate species—animals with backbones, like fish, birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles—are disappearing 114 times faster than they should be, a phenomenon that has been linked to climate change, pollution, and deforestation. One main impact on wildlife is the disruption in their habitats. These disruptions are often due to changes in temperature and availability of water. These affect the vegetation and the animals who feed upon this vegetation. Wildlife can sometimes move to new space and still thrive. However, with the increase in human population as well, new habitats are often not available. Creating corridors to help the species move to new areas is one way of helping wildlife. Many birds have altered the timing of long-held migratory and reproductive routines to better sync up with the warming climate. And some hibernating animals are ending their slumbers earlier each year, perhaps due to warmer spring temperatures. The ice in the Arctic sea is melting and disappearing earlier in the spring and freezing later in the fall. This changes how the polar bear hunts. A polar bear likes to stalk a seal on the ice. Seal blubber is the bear’s favorite food. However, with less sea ice polar bears are having to hunt on land. They are less able to find their preferred food on land. The Adélie penguin is an Antarctic bird that lives mostly on tiny crustaceans called krill. Krill live on the underside of the ice sheets. But as the Antarctic ice sheets begin to melt the krill population is dwindling. This is forcing the penguins to migrate further in order to find food. When they have to spend more energy to find food they are less successful at breeding and raising their young.

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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I used to think that animal patterns were all part of a natural cycle, but now I know that animal patterns of migration, hunting, and food sources are changing as our climate changes. _________________________

Ocean Life

Earth is a complex, interconnected system with a changing climate. The ocean is absorbing too much of our emissions causing serious threat to the underwater life. The ocean has absorbed over 90% of the heat from climate change and is the sink (meaning it absorbs or takes in) for roughly 30% of human-caused carbon dioxide emissions. As ocean waters warm, many sea animals are responding by traveling further northward and deeper in search of cooler ocean temperatures. Acropora cervicornis or staghead coral that live in the waters of the Caribbean is critically endangered. The combination of warming waters and ocean acidification from additional carbon dioxide in the ocean waters is leading to a decline in this reefbuilding animal. Coral are very sensitive to changes in temperature. The orange-spotted filefish dwells in coral reef habitats, on which it is totally dependent. In addition, the orange-spotted filefish is highly sensitive to warm water. The animal went extinct in Japan during an episode of warmer ocean temperatures in 1988. I used to think that the ocean was not part of the absorption of greenhouse gases, but now I know the ocean is absorbing too much of our emissions causing serious threat to the underwater life. _________________________

People

Earth is a complex, interconnected system with a changing climate. The change in climate is caused by human impact. Humans are the cause of rising temperatures on our planet. Rising temperatures are primarily caused by the carbon pollution we generate when burning fossil fuels and the pollution-capturing we prevent by destroying forests. Carbon dioxide (CO2), methane, North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLADÂŽ Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

66 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


soot, and other pollutants we release into the atmosphere act like a blanket trapping the sun’s heat and causing the planet to warm. In areas with milder winter, rat populations are increasing, especially in big cities. Rats bring with them disease. Ecoli and salmonella are spread through the urine and feces of the rats. But they don’t carry rabies, at least that is good news! The rat problem is linked to food waste. They are getting all the food they need from the waste that humans throw out. So, if we tackle the food waste problem, we will be helping to reduce the rat problem as well. I used to think people didn’t impact the climate, but now I know the change in climate is caused by human impact. _________________________ Land

Earth is a complex, interconnected system with a changing climate. Some of the impacts on the land, due to climate change, is still unknown. Not only are animals migrating to different areas with the shifting temperature, but so are plants, causing the landscape to change. When climate patterns for an area change it affects when plants bloom, when the leaves drop from trees, and pollination. Many trees are adapted to particular temperature and moisture conditions. When these conditions change the saplings are unable to grow. The species try to migrate. The effects many not be noticeable for many years. Trees like the sugar maple only grow in a very particular area, and it is likely that the southern range will have no more maple trees. There is also an increase in pests. For example, the pine bark beetle used to only live one life cycle during the year in Alaska. However, in recent years it has lived longer with the warm season las ting longer and now often completes two or three cycles. I used to think the land would not be affected by climate change, but now i know that some of the impacts on the land are still unknown. _________________________

Extreme Weather

Earth is a complex, interconnected system with a changing climate. The increase in earth’s temperatures causes many extreme weather events. North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

67 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


Higher temperatures are worsening many types of disasters, including storms, heat waves, floods, and droughts With the planet warming, higher temperatures lead to more evaporation, drying out soil and intensifying drought conditions in many areas. Also, with more evaporation, that means more moisture in the atmosphere. When there is more moisture, rainfall is more intense. For example, the rainfall from Hurricane Harvey was 15% more intense. There will be more category 4 and 5 storms as temperatures continue to rise. Rising sea-levels are leading to higher storm surges and more floods. Most of the sealevel rise comes from the expansion of warming oceans (like all liquids, water expands as it heats up). The rest of the rise comes from melting glaciers and ice sheets. The increase in snowfall may also be linked to climate change. This seems backward but a warmer atmosphere holds more moisture. Then as temperatures drop that moisture falls as snow. The warming Arctic waters make the jet stream weaker and this allows the frigid polar air to travel farther south. Drought conditions jeopardize access to clean drinking water, fuel out-of-control wildfires, and result in dust storms, extreme heat events, and flash flooding. With an increase in heat waves, this can lead to loss of pay, as workers who work outside will be unable to do their jobs. It will also lead to increased deaths. Continued high greenhouse gas emissions will create the perfect storm of heat wave ingredients: high temperatures, increased dryness and high humidity. I used to think that increased temperatures would make all seasons hotter and dryer, but now I know that the increase in earth’s temperatures causes many extreme weather events. _________________________

DESIGN SOLUTIONS Careers

Earth is a complex, interconnected system with a changing climate. Many jobs that don’t exist today will work to correct climate change.

Engineers North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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Manufacturing is a major section of green jobs that exist today. Engineers working on retooling the auto industry are working to create transportation that consumes less fossil fuel and creates less pollution. Transportation currently burns about 2/3 of America’s oil and produces about 1/3 of its greenhouse gases. Electric cars are one major area where engineers are working on new designs and technologies.

Green Design Professionals Many cities are working to increase the amount of greenspaces in the city. Some are planting on the rooftops of high rises in order to grow more food for the people in the city, but also help to insulate the building. Rooftops that are green don’t absorb the heat like asphalt roofs do and reduce the inside temperature by 10* F. The California Academy of Sciences has a green roof that incorporates skylights in order to light the sciences building within, in addition to keeping the building cooler. Green design professionals like architects, landscapers, and urban farmers are helping to slow climate change in many urban settings. Wind Energy Workers Those who believe in the power of the wind see that by 2050 wind could provide onethird of the world’s electricity production, reducing the need for fossil fuel burning. The field of wind power continues to grow, but wind power only accounts for 2.3 percent of the nation’s total electric power generation. In Europe that number jumps to 6.3 percent. Water Engineers & Scientists Sometimes there is too much water from hurricanes and floods, sometimes there is too little with droughts. The quality of our water is critical for life. Scientists work around the world to solve all the problems with water. Engineers design and develop new products and procedures for saving water. Other workers help to educate people about how to conserve water. Construction workers build water saving devices while agriculture workers help reduce the use of water for farming. I used to think I had to choose a job that exists today, but many jobs that don’t exist today will work to correct climate change. _________________________ We Can Make a Difference

Earth is a complex, interconnected system with a changing climate. We can all make a difference for a better planet. Reducing Carbon Footprint North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

69 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


Your carbon footprint is the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) released into the air because of your own energy needs. One way to reduce this footprint is to switch to compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) instead of old lightbulbs. CFLs only use 25% as much electricity to give the same amount of light. Unplug! Any electronic gadget uses power even when it is off. If you plug your TV, DVD player, game system, or other appliances into a surge protector with an on/off switch you can easily switch off all power to these devices. Another way to use energy wisely is to wash clothes in cold water and hang clothes to dry. That dryer is a huge energy hog! Transportation is a major contributor to emissions into our atmosphere. Whenever you can ride a bike, take public transportation, share a ride with others, and switch to an electric or hybrid vehicle.

Waste less When shopping, use reusable grocery bags. Help remember to take them out of the car and into the store. Recycle what you can. Find out with your local community what can be recycled and where. And instead of using disposable water bottles, use a reusable bottle. Another way to reduce waste is to stop buying “fast fashion”. This is the production of clothing that is very inexpensive, like a $4 t-shirt. When we pay so little for something we don’t mind throwing it away. Landfills have heaps and heaps of clothing because we buy and wear only a few times before throwing away. Buy higher quality that you intend to keep longer, shop at vintage clothing shops and trade with family and friends to breathe new life into your wardrobe. I used to think there was nothing I could do, but now I know we can all make a difference for a better planet.

_________________________

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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INPUT STRATEGIES OBJECTIVE: To provide direct content instruction RATIONALE: • • • • •

Allow universal access to the core curriculum Provide direct instruction of concepts, skills and academic vocabulary Engage students in active participation Pattern concepts auditorily, visually, kinestically and linguistically Scaffold instruction with gestures, visuals and real items for comprehensibility

OCDE Project GLAD Learning Guide. (2015). Page 82.

STRATEGIES

Climate Unit Resources

OCDE Project GLAD® Learning Guide

Graphic Organizer – Overview “A Warming Earth” Graphic Organizer - World Map “Effects of Climate Change” Graphic Organizer – Timeline “Climate Science” Pictorial Input Chart “Burning Fossil Fuels” Narrative Input Chart “My Wounded Island” Narrative Story Map (Reading & Writing Strategy) Learning Log (Reading & Writing Strategy) ELD Review (Guided Oral Practice Strategy)

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83

75

83

81

83

84

89

87

101

89

210 240

72, 79, 85, 90

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See OCDE Project GLAD® Learning Guide for step by step instructions related to each strategy. Learning Guides are received during certified OCDE Project GLAD® trainings. For information about receiving Project GLAD® training with this Climate Science unit, contact Kate Lindholm katel@ncesd.org at the NCESD. North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

71 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


GRAPHIC ORGANIZER: The Warming Earth This is the first input presented and provides the big picture of concepts explored throughout the unit. With this purpose, it falls under the category as a Graphic Organizer. However, due to the strong visual depiction of concepts sketched within the input itself, it can be presented in either a Graphic Organizer style (with additional pictures added at the time of initial input) or a Pictorial Input style (with additional pictures added during a subsequent day of processing the content).

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLADÂŽ Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez RECEPTIVE

Kate Lindholm, NCESD Dr. Sara Martinez, Strategic Steps

EARLY PRODUCTION • Yes/No • One Word • Either/Or

STAGES OF LANGUAGE ELP ACQUISITION Modalities (ELPA21) PRE-PRODUCTION • Point to • Show me • Yes/no

T: How does burning fossil fuels make the earth warmer? S: Burning makes it warmer because ______. T: Is it because of extra carbon dioxide or methane in the atmosphere? S: It is because of_________.

T: Are both ice and glaciers in T: Are greenhouse gases helpful the hydrosphere? or harmful? S: They are ______________. S: __(Yes)__, they are. (Both answers are correct!)

S: Student points to rocks, soil, continents, etc.

Predict, influence, impact, design, imagine, what if, influence, create, analogy Often has multiple answer possibilities

S: I would create _______. (a poster, a video, a song)

T: What would you create that would influence the most people to make that change?

S: I could encourage people to ___________.

S: I chose the ____sphere because it has_________. (If students are struggling with this one word frame – go to a yes/no, then either/or, then back to the one word frame.)

T: What would you want you encourage people to change?

S: Student points to one of the spheres.

T: If you wanted to influence other people to make one change to reduce greenhouse gases, which sphere would the change come from?

Topic: Design solutions

DOK 4: EXTENDED THINKING

T: Why did you choose that sphere?

T: Show me what would happen if T: Point to the sphere where you there were no greenhouse gases? could make one small change S: Students pantomime being starting today? very cold or frozen. S: Student points to one of the T: Trace the cycle of carbon spheres. between plants and humans. S: Trace the carbon dioxide to oxygen interchange between plants/humans.

T: Point to two things that are found in the geosphere.

Topic: Personal/class impact

Justify, infer, explain reasoning, critique, assess, defend, why, evaluate, cause/effect, analyze Often has multiple answer possibilities

Topic: Greenhouse gases

DOK 3: STRATEGIC THINKING & REASONING

Topic: Sphere components

summarize, compare/contrast, categorize, explain, describe, interpret, classify, how Usually has a “correct” answer

• locate, define, identify, list, match, who, what, when, where Usually has a “correct answer”

DOK 2: SKILLS & CONCEPTS

DOK 1: RECALL & REPRODUCTION

ELD Review: Graphic Organizer – The Warming Earth Depth of Knowledge & Stages of Language Acquisition Grade Level: Intermediate/MS

The Warming Earth – ELD Review

PRODUCTIVE

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North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez INTERACTIVE

S: The ___sphere contains the elements ___________.

T: Identify a sphere and list the elements within it.

S: The biosphere includes ________.

T: Explain how reduction of ice and snow is contributing to a warming earth. S: With a reduction in ice and snow ________.

T: How do greenhouse gases affect the temperature of the earth? S: Greenhouse gases affect the temperature of the earth by___________.

T: How does the biosphere use elements in the atmosphere? S: The (humans in the biosphere use _(O2)_ to _(breathe).

T: Are greenhouse gases helpful or harmful? S: I think _______ are ________ because________.

DOK 2: SKILLS & CONCEPTS

S: Responses will vary.

S: Responses will vary. T: If we were to choose one warming factor that we could make the greatest difference in as a class, which one would it be? Justify your answer.

T: Why is that change a better choice for you than something else? (analyze)

S: I can _____________.

DOK 3: STRATEGIC THINKING & REASONING T: How would that change look in your life today?

S: Response will vary.

T: Imagine you were using YouTube to communicate one small change people could make to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. What would you video include?

S: I would_________ because_____.

T: How would you share what you created to reach the most people?

DOK 4: EXTENDED THINKING

Within these ELP Standards, we assume simultaneous development of language and content-area knowledge, skills, and abilities. ELLs do not need to wait until their ELP is sufficiently developed to participate in content area instruction and assessment. “Research has shown that ELLs can develop literacy in English even as their oral proficiency in English develops (Bunch, Kibler, & Pimentel, 2013, p. 15). Footnotes: English Language Proficiency Standards, p2

A student’s ability to demonstrate proficiency at a particular ELP level will depend on context, content-area focus, and developmental factors. Thus, a student’s designated ELP level represents a typical current performance level, not a fixed status. An English language proficiency level does not identify a student (e.g., “Level 1 student”), but rather identifies what a student knows and can do at a particular stage of English language development, for example, “a student at Level 1” or “a student whose listening performance is at Level 1.” Progress in acquiring English may vary depending upon program type, age at which entered program, initial English proficiency level, native language literacy, and other factors (Bailey & Heritage, 2010; Byrnes & Canale, 1987; Lowe & Stansfield, 1988).

ELP modalities are the means or manner by which communication takes place. The three modalities are receptive (listening and reading), productive (speaking and writing), and interactive (listening, reading, speaking, writing).

ADVANCED FLUENCY

INTERMEDIATE FLUENCY • Open Ended

SPEECH EMERGENCE • Either/Or • Simple sentence

T: Does the biosphere include living things or earth materials like rocks and soil?

ELD Review: Graphic Organizer – The Warming Earth Depth of Knowledge & Stages of Language Acquisition Grade Level: Intermediate/MS DOK 1: RECALL & REPRODUCTION

PRODUCTIVE

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Kate Lindholm, NCESD Dr. Sara Martinez, Strategic Steps

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GRAPHIC ORGANIZER World Map – Blank Template

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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GRAPHIC ORGANIZER – World Map: Effects of Climate Change

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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World Map Graphic Organizer: Effects of Climate Change Delivery Support STEAM focus: integration of research and technology used to predict, measure and respond to climate change. For step by step design and delivery instructions related to all Graphic Organizers see OCDE Project GLAD® Learning Guide.

DESIGN Create chart with world outline. How much of the outline you prep ahead of time and how much you present in front of students will depend on your grade level and purpose of the lesson. For students in 5th grade in above, we have the complete world map outline already marked on the chart before starting the lesson.

DELIVERY 1. Introduction & Climate Zones 

Define weather and climate 10:2: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WEATHER AND CLIMATE?

Review continents and oceans – “say it with me” (depending on grade level)

 

Add Climate Key Color in climate regions on the map as you add them to the key. Consider colored pencils so you can easily write over it with marker. o Tundra – colored pencil on map o Tropical/Subtropical – colored pencil on map o Desert – colored pencil on map o Temperate – colored pencil on map

TRANSITION: Now let’s look at the effect of climate change on the Tundra/Polar regions – video 10:2 WHAT ARE TWO CHARACTERISTICS OF TUNDRA? North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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2.Tundra 

Part 1: Melting Permafrost o Define permafrost o Coastal erosion o Ground sinks – Batagaika Crater and Alaska examples o CO2 increase o Infectious diseases 10:2: ONE OF THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE IS MELTING PERMAFROST DUE TO TEMPERATURE INCREASES IN THE ARCTIC. WHAT ARE THE EFFECTS OF MELTING PERMAFROST?

Part 2: Melting Glaciers o Define glaciers o Glacial melt simulation – video o Glacier National Park examples o Antactrica glacial melt o IMBIE Collaboration of Scientists 10:2: HOW ARE CLIMATOLOGISTS AND POLAR SCIENTISTS TRACKING THE IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON GLACIERS?

TRANSITION: As glaciers melt on one side of the world, gravity pushes that water toward other parts of the world, particularly in tropical/subtropical regions near the equator.

3.Tropical/Subtropical 

Part 1: Rising Sea Levels o Description o Climate refugees o Video Prompt – Watch for ways Maldive Islanders are using technology in the midst of rising sea levels. o VIDEO and 10:2 connected to prompt. o Show technology pictures o Public Awareness

TRANSITION: Another effect of climate change we’re seeing in tropical/subtropical climates is extreme weather. North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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 Part 2: Extreme Weather o Major tropical storms – hurricanes, cyclones, typhons o Tidal waves and tsunamis o Meteorologists using technology to predict and provide advance warning systems TRANSITION: An extreme weather event that’s being affected by climate change is extreme heat in desert zones.

4.Desert: Extreme Heat/Drought  

Description – drought Syria example – climate refugees

 

This problem created an opportunity for creative solutions. iCARDA: Drought resistant crops and solar desalination 10:2 WHAT IMPACT DO YOU PREDICT 1 MILLION CLIMATE REFUGEES HAD ON THE CITIES AND COUNTRIES THEY MOVED TO?

TRANSITION: “WA State is such a diverse climate region. It includes areas of desert, rainforests and temperate climate regions.”

5.Temperate: Forest Fires 

Temperate climates tend to have lots of trees. We have experienced that in WA state! 10:2 HAVE YOU OR SOMEONE YOU KNOW BEEN AFFECTED BY FIRES IN OUR AREA? TELL YOUR NEIGHBOR.

 

Connection between climate change, dry vegetation and increased lightening Impact of forest fires 10:2: WHAT ARE THREE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE?

LEARNING LOG PROMPTS Text: Sketch/write a minimum of three effects of climate change. You: What is one question you have from our lesson?

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North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

INTERCONNECTEDNESS

IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE Analyzing Analyze, appraise, calculate, categorize, classify, compare, contrast, criticize, differentiate, discriminate, distinguish, examine, experiment, explain, identify, infer, question, test

ENGINEERING/DESIGN SOLUTIONS Evaluating Appraise, argue, assess, choose, compare, critique, decide, debate, defend, determine, discuss, estimate, evaluate, judge, justify, predict, prioritize, rate, recommend, select, support, value, verify

Level of Questioning Creating Arrange, assemble, collect, compose, combine, construct, create, design, develop, devise, forecast, formulate, hypothesize, imagine, invent, manage, organize, plan, prepare, propose, set up

Stages of Language Acquisition ELP Modalities (ELPA21)

S: Points to melting glaciers or melting permafrost or increase in temperature

S: Answers will vary Yes/No

T: Does climate change impact one area of the world more than others?

S: Yes/No

S: Students may point to a picture on the map, themselves, or one another

T: Point to one reason sea levels are rising.

T: Should people be held responsible for their impact on climate change?

S: Yes

Speech Emergence

S: One word or short answer using chart for support

T: How?

S: Students choose one of the climate zones

T: Where would an additional increase in the earth’s temperature have the greatest impact on people?

S: Students choose one of the climate zones

T: Who do you think is more aware of the impact of climate change? People in the tundra/polar, tropical, temperate or desert zone?

S: either answer is acceptable (move to open ended based on student response)

Either/Or T: When you work on designing a solution to climate change would you make an invention or tell people about climate change?

Productive Yes/No T: Are there design solutions not already on the map that we can do to help slow climate change?

Early Production

T: Point to who is responsible for climate change?

S: Point to drones, draught resistant crops, etc (based on student interest)

Point To, Locate, Trace T: Point to a design solution that you can imagine a way to improve upon.

Receptive

Preproduction

Grade Level: Intermediate/MS

Input Chart: World Map – Impact of Climate Change

ELD Matrix: New ELP Standards, Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy, Depth of Knowledge

S: Responses will vary from elevated CO2 contributing to more forest fires, to diseases being transmitted from people exposed in the polar zones

T: Explain how melting permafrost could impact someone’s life in a temperate zone.

S: Answers will vary

T: In what way should people be held responsible for their impact on climate change? What would that look like?

S: Answers will vary

T: How would you make a plan to educate people about climate change?

S: Answers will vary

Open Ended T: What engineering ideas do you have that could reduce an effect of climate change?

Interactive

Intermediate Fluency

Advanced Fluency

World Map – ELD Review

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1820

1881

1882

Global Population

Scientists, Discoveries & Innovations

First Coal fired, steam hydroelectric dam powered trains are build by Thomas standard for travel Edison near worldwide Niagara Falls (NY)

French physicist, Joseph Fourier, describes earth's natural "greenhouse 1714 effect" British ironworker, Thomas Newcomen, invents steam engine. Paves the way for Industrial Revolution and industrial use of coal.

1804 1billion

"This aqueous vapour is a blanket more necessary to the vegetable life of England than clothing is to man."

vapor and other greenhouse gases and climate change.

Observatory built at Mauna 1960 Loa, Hawaii where Charles Keeling invents technology 3 billion he uses to measure CO2 1957 data at Mauna Lao and US oceanographer Antarctica. 1975 1960 Roger Revelle and Provides scientific proof CO2 chemist Hans Suess concentration is rising First weather 4 billion prove ocean sinks satellite 1970 cannot absorb all the launched extra CO2 entering the First Earth Day in US atmosphere April 22nd 1896 Swedish scientist, Svante Arrhenius, EPA (Environmental Protection 1927 publishes first Agency) formed to implement calculations linking federal laws to protect the 2 billion global warming to environment human caused CO2 1979 1890 emissions Mass production of First World 1859 cars creates Climate demand for Conference in Irish physicist, John Tyndall, gasoline Geneva show relationship between water

1958

1992 1999 6 billion 2005

2010

China overtakes US as world's biggest greenhouse gas emitter

Almost 28% of electricity worldwide generated from renewable resources

2013

2015

Policies, Laws & Government

How will you impact the earth's climate?

UNFCCC Paris Agreement Adopted. 196 countries agree to keep global temp under 2 degrees Celsius (3.6F) and 2015 further to 1.5 Celsius (2.7 F). US increase of Signed on Earth Day 2016 solar power and entered into force Nov usage 6800% 4, 2016. since 2006 2016 Hottest year ever recorded. 18 of 19 hottest years recorded in history occurred since 2001 2019 (except 1998) Greta Thunberg 2019 instigates student led climate 7.7 billion TODAY strikes in over 125 YOU! countries

reaches lowest summer coverage in recorded history

Largest oil spill in 2011 US, on Deepwater 2011 Horizon, Gulf of 7 billion Data reveals Mexico concentration of greenhouse gases rising faster than previous years 2012 recorded Arctic ice cap

agreement to reduce emissions of heat trapping gases by 5% between 2008 and 2012. Begins 2005. US does not ratify.

Too many storms. National Hurricane 1997 Center runs out of names for UNFCCC Kyoto Protocol first time 2009 adopted. World's first

Energy Star label introduced to identify energy efficient appliances

Contributing Factors & Effects

1987 5 billion

William Kamkwamba invents wind turbine from bicycle parts, gum and scrapyard treasures in Malawi

1987

"We are seeing a vast increase in the amount of carbon dioxide reaching the atmosphere… The result is that change in the future is likely to be more fundamental and more widespread than anything we have known hitherto."

UK Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher gives speech to UN calling for global treaty on climate change.

1989

UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change) environmental treaty adopted. 196 countries agree to limit greenhouse gas emissions

Climate Science Timeline  

EB

1992

GRAPHIC ORGANIZER – Timeline: Climate Science


CLIMATE CHANGE TIMELINE Delivery Support The Climate Change timeline is a hybrid strategy merging elements from both the Graphic Organizer and Narrative Input strategies. The lesson begins in a typical Graphic Organizer fashion – introducing the concept, writing the title, sketching the world and writing the key at the bottom. At that point, it transitions into a hybrid presentation style. Each circle is added with text already on it. The bold words within the text are the words/phrases students will repeat with the teacher during input. Additional circles with an image corresponding to each date are also added. During a subsequent processing of the strategy, students will add additional vocabulary cards to the chart. Technology Integration: During initial lesson – integrate the following resources: 1. Timeline 2011 Rising rate of Greenhouse Gases (CO2) https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/ccgg/trends/history.html 2. Timeline 2015/2016 NASA – Global Temperature Change Graph and Timeseries 1884-2018 The time series shows the five-year average variation of global surface temperatures. https://climate.nasa.gov/vital-signs/global-temperature/ Extension Activity After presenting and processing the Climate Change Timeline as a whole class, students identify one focus area within our timeline and create their own timelines highlighting that topic (as it relates to climate science). For example:  

Timeline of renewable energy sources Atmospheric changes in carbon dioxide over time (including technology used to gather data)

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    

Average earth’s temperature changes over time (including technology used to gather data) Impact of climate change on the earth’s oceans and coral reefs Sea level rise and climate change Careers and Climate Science Transportation and its effect on climate change

This is either done as a team task or in partners. Students integrate technological skills into their timeline creations by using a computer program (or mobile app). Available on computer or with app for ipad or android. http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/interactives/timeline_2/ Mobile app: RWT Timeline, International Reading Association

Timeline Resources and Works Cited: A Journey Through Climate History - Interactive Online Timeline. http://www.abc.net.au/innovation/environment/cc_timeline.html *** THIS IS A HELPFUL RESOURCE FOR STUDENTS TO USE WHEN GENERATING THEIR OWN TIMELINES. BBC News. Sept 20, 2013. A Brief History of Climate Change. https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-15874560 Jerram, Dougal. Utterly Amazing Earth. 2017. Penguin Random Books. NASA. Global Temperature Chart. https://data.giss.nasa.gov/gistemp/graphs/graph_data/Global_Mean_Estimates_based_on_Land_ and_Ocean_Data/graph.txt NOAA (National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration. Trends in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide. https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/ccgg/trends/history.html Sneideman, Joshua & Twamley, Erin. Climate Change: Discover How it Impacts Spaceship Earth. 2015. Nomad Press. ThoughtCo. May 9, 2019. Current World Populations and Future Projection. https://www.thoughtco.com/current-world-population-1435270 World Wildlife Fund. Paris Climate Agreement. Moments of Climate Action. https://www.worldwildlife.org/pages/paris-climate-agreement

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PICTORIAL INPUT CHART: BURNING FOSSIL FUELS

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Kate Lindholm, NCESD Dr. Sara Martinez, Strategic Steps

SPEECH EMERGENCE • Either/Or • Phrases • Simple sentence

EARLY PRODUCTION • Yes/No • One Word • Either/Or

PRE-PRODUTION • Point to • Show me • Yes/no

STAGES OF LANGUAGE ACQUISITION (ELPA21)

ELP Modalities

locate, define, identify, list, match, who, what, when, where Usually has a “correct answer”

summarize, compare/contrast, categorize, explain, describe, interpret, classify, how Usually has a “correct” answer

T: How are renewable and nonrenewable resources different? S: Renewable resources are ____ and nonrenewable resources are ______.

S: Burning fossil fuels _releases carbon dioxide and methane.

S: _______ are burned to create electricity.

T: Point to the resource that is captured through movement S: Hydro or wind T: Are renewable or nonrenewable resources burned to create electricity?

Topic: Comparing nonrenewable and renewable resources T: Point to the resource we burn to create electricity S: coal or oil.

DOK 2: SKILLS & CONCEPTS

T: What effect does burning fossil fuels have on the atmosphere?

S: Plastic comes from both_.

Repeat question for oil and natural gas. T: Does plastic come from coal or oil?

S: Student points to under the earth.

T: Where is coal formed?

Topic: Fossil fuels

DOK 1: RECALL & REPRODUCTION

ELD Review: Pictorial – Burning Fossil Fuels Depth of Knowledge & Stages of Language Acquisition

RECEPTIVE PRODUCTIVE

Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez INTERACTING

Pictorial – ELD Review North Central Washington

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Justify, infer, explain reasoning, critique, assess, defend, why, evaluate, cause/effect, analyze Often has multiple answer possibilities

S: I would encourage people to _________________________ because __________________.

T: In talking about the impact of fossil fuel use, would it be better to encourage people to stop all fossil fuel use, to change one area of use, or to decrease all areas of use? Why?

S: We should stop ____________. • We should decrease___________. • We shouldn’t worry about______________.

T: What area of fossil fuel use should we stop completely? • What area of fossil fuel use should we just decrease? • What area of fossil fuel use should we not worry about?

S: ______ it is/is not. (yes or no)

T: Is it realistic to tell people to stop all fossil fuel use?

Topic: Evaluate eliminating vs decreasing fossil fuel use

DOK 3: STRATEGIC THINKING & REASONING Predict, influence, impact, design, imagine, what if, influence, create, analogy Often has multiple answer possibilities

S: I can change ____ by ___________________.

T: What is a change you can make for a healthier planet starting tomorrow?

S: I would ______ because _____________________.

T: Imagine a cleaner earth. To make this happen would you walk & bike more or reduce use of plastics?

S: Point to renewable energy or other design solution

T: Show me one area that you can change for a cleaner earth.

Topic: Design Solutions

DOK 4: EXTENDED THINKING

Grade Level: Interm/MS


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S: We burn fossil fuels to_________________.

T: Why do we burn fossil fuels?

T: How would you approach talking to people about the impact of their fossil fuel use? Why would you recommend that approach? S: Responses will vary

T: Compare and contrast the methods used to produce electricity with renewable vs nonrenewable resources. S: Responses will vary

S: Responses will vary

T: How would you design an investigation to find out which design solution in your life would have the greatest impact?

Grade Level: Interm/MS

Kate Lindholm, NCESD Dr. Sara Martinez, Strategic Steps

Within these ELP Standards, we assume simultaneous development of language and content-area knowledge, skills, and abilities. ELLs do not need to wait until their ELP is sufficiently developed to participate in content area instruction and assessment. “Research has shown that ELLs can develop literacy in English even as their oral proficiency in English develops (Bunch, Kibler, & Pimentel, 2013, p. 15). Footnotes: English Language Proficiency Standards, p2.

A student’s ability to demonstrate proficiency at a particular ELP level will depend on context, content-area focus, and developmental factors. Thus, a student’s designated ELP level represents a typical current performance level, not a fixed status. An English language proficiency level does not identify a student (e.g., “Level 1 student”), but rather identifies what a student knows and can do at a particular stage of English language development, for example, “a student at Level 1” or “a student whose listening performance is at Level 1.” Progress in acquiring English may vary depending upon program type, age at which entered program, initial English proficiency level, native language literacy, and other factors (Bailey & Heritage, 2010; Byrnes & Canale, 1987; Lowe & Stansfield, 1988).

ELP modalities are the means or manner by which communication takes place. The three modalities are receptive (listening and reading), productive (speaking and writing), and interactive (listening, reading, speaking, writing).

ADVANCED FLUENCY

INTERMEDIATE FLUENCY • Open Ended • Complex sentences

ELD Review: Pictorial – Burning Fossil Fuels Depth of Knowledge & Stages of Language Acquisition

INTERACTING


NARRATIVE INPUT CHART My Wounded Island by Jacquez Pasquet Day 1: Present whole story Learning Target: We understand how rising sea levels are impacting people’s lives. 

10:2: What is the monster in this story and how is it impacting people’s lives?

10:2: How do you think this experience will impact Imarvulak’s life and career as an adult?

Day 2: Process for vocabulary Learning Target: We use context clues to determine the meaning of new vocabulary. 

10:2: Tell your neighbor three new vocabulary words you learned and what they mean.

Day 3: Process for dialogue and/or inferencing Learning Target: varies based on grade level standards 

10:2: varies based on grade level standards

Day 4: Process with Graphic Organizer (Story Map - based on grade level standards) Day 5: Students interact with original text (Ear to Ear Reading) Day 6-10 – Targeted ELD Instruction using ELD Group Frame Process Vocabulary Word Cards:  Inūpiat  devouring  Sarichef  miniscule  Arctic Circle  ancestors  igloos  Shishmaref  caribou  tundra

        

snowmobile pack ice plunge fury gnawed ancient retreating dike glaciers

         

rising sea levels immense crumbling cackles totem crane climate refugees Nome mainland summer camp

Extension Resource: The Disappearing Frontier YouTube series. Videos interviewing people from Sarichef island. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_g0lLHBfyIY North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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Narrative Dialogue Bubbles

What’s happening in the sea affects what’s happening to me.

I don’t want to go to Nome. I’m scared we’ll lose our traditions in a city that knows nothing of our customs.

Other areas of the world are also victims of rising sea levels.

I think we should work together to build a new village on the mainland. Why is this creature trying to hurt our island?

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STORY MAP

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COMPARE/CONTRAST PAST AND PRESENT

RELOCATION JUSTIFICATION Analyzing Analyze, appraise, calculate, categorize, classify, compare, contrast, criticize, differentiate, discriminate, distinguish, examine, experiment, explain, identify, infer, question, test

PREDICTION/DESIGN SOLUTIONS Evaluating Appraise, argue, assess, choose, compare, critique, decide, debate, defend, determine, discuss, estimate, evaluate, judge, justify, predict, prioritize, rate, recommend, select, support, value, verify, weigh

Level of Questioning Creating Arrange, assemble, collect, compose, combine, construct, create, design, develop, devise, forecast, formulate, hypothesize, imagine, invent, manage, organize, plan, prepare, propose, set up

Stages of Language Acquisition ELP Modalities (ELPA21)

Grade Level: Intermediate

T: Has life changed much from when Imarkaluk’s grandfather was growing up to the present day?

S: Yes or no

S: One word answer like “snowmobile.”

S: Points to one difference S: Yes (i.e. dogsleds vs snowmobiles) T: What is one change?

T: Point to one difference between Imarkaluk’s childhood and when her grandfather was little.

S: Points to house moving, picture of Nome, or grandfather in home

T: Do you think Imarkaluk’s grandfather will have to move to Nome at some point too?

S: Technology, glacier, ocean, climate change

T: What has created the most change over time? (Or rephrase as an either/ or question)

S: I think her grandfather should…. (student chooses one).

T: What do you think Imarkaluk’s grandfather should do? Move with the family or stay at the summer camp?

S: Crane, skies or computer

S: Yes or no

S: Point to monster (if island sinks), point to the character/technology (i.e. crane, skis, dike)

T: What decision do you think Imarkaluk’s family should make?

Either/Or T: Image you are going to create an invention to save the island. What tool would you rather have a crane, skis or a computer?

Productive

Speech Emergence

Yes/No T: Will there be an invention in time to save the island of Sarichef?

Early Production

Point To, Locate, Trace T: Who or what do you predict will determine the future of the island?

Receptive

Preproduction

Input Chart: Narrative Input: My Wounded Island

ELD Matrix: New ELP Standards, Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy, Depth of Knowledge

S: Responses will vary from transportation to food to environmental factors.

T: Compare how life has changed for the Inuit people since Imarkaluk’s grandfather was young to the present day.

S: This is where all my memories are. Staying will keep those memories alive.

T: How would you defend Imarkaluk’s grandfather’s decision to stay in the summer camp?

S: Answers will vary

Open Ended T: What are some inventions that you think could solve the problem of islands being overtaken by the sea?

Interactive

Intermediate Fluency

Advanced Fluency

My Wounded Island – ELD Review


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GUIDED ORAL PRACTICE STRATEGIES OBJECTIVE: Improve oral language production RATIONALE: • Promote collaboration through academic discourse • Promote meaningful interactions with academic language • Support negotiating for meaning and metacognition • Guide opportunities to interact with text • Ensure ample time for processing and metacognition • Build self-esteem • Foster primary language support • Develop phonemic awareness • Promote 21st century skills OCDE Project GLAD Learning Guide. (2015). Page 122

STRATEGIES

Climate Unit OCDE Project GLAD® Resources Learning Guide

T-Graph for Social Skills & Team Points 10:2 Lecture

135

Cooperative Learning

133

Numbered Heads & Heads Together

133

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GUIDED ORAL PRACTICE STRATEGIES CONTINUED… Strategies

Climate Unit OCDE Project GLAD® Resources Learning Guide

Picture File Cards – Observe, Categorize, Classify, Label Exploration Report Chants/Poetry

138 140 94

Sentence Patterning Chart Guess My Category (See Action Plan) Team Action Plan Presentations

151 137

143

140

277

Personal Interactions Home School Connections

145

153 100

156

See OCDE Project GLAD® Learning Guide for step by step instructions related to each strategy. Learning Guides are received during certified OCDE Project GLAD® trainings. For information about receiving Project GLAD® training with this Climate Science unit, contact Kate Lindholm katel@ncesd.org at the North Central Educational Service District.

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CHANTS

Activists Here There Activists here, activists there, Activists, activists everywhere! Passionate activists communicating intentionally, Courageous activists implementing locally, Focused activists researching globally, Innovative activists engineering creatively. Activists at the polar ice caps, Activists on the Maldives islands, Activists around Siberia’s mega slump, And activists in Washington state. Activists here, activists there, Activists, activists everywhere!

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Climatologist Bugaloo

I’m a climatologist and I’m here to say I study weather patterns along the way Sometimes I look at data, sometimes I write a book, Sometimes I’m in the field just to take a look Patterns, changes, impact too Doing the climatologist Bugaloo As we study long term patterns in the earth’s atmosphere, The temperature is changing, thermometers make that clear Hygrometers measure water vapor in the air Another greenhouse gas impacting the stratosphere Patterns, changes, impact too Doing the climatologist Bugaloo From the bottoms of the oceans to the surface of the sun Instruments on weather stations show the damage done Flooding across our rivers and droughts through desert bands Higher temperatures create disasters at sea and on the land Patterns, changes, impact too Doing the climatologist Bugaloo We drill deep inside the ice cores examining layers line by line Frozen time capsules. Climatic history. An archive across time. Compressed into each layer reveal clues of weather conditions Precipitation and wind patterns and atmospheric compositions Patterns, changes, impact too Doing the climatologist Bugaloo North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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I Know a Polar Bear By Sara Martinez (modified “I Know A…” chant frame)

I know a polar bear A vulnerable arctic polar bear A vulnerable arctic polar bear Whose population is decreasing. She needs the ice to hunt for seals And sneak up on her prey But warming temps and melting ice Are threatening her each day. She’s adapted to her habitat Now change is coming much to fast The bears will need our help to last But help is on the way. We make a difference when we choose To recycle, reduce and reuse Relying less on fossil fuels Keeps warming temps at bay. I know a polar bear A vulnerable arctic polar bear A vulnerable arctic polar bear Whose future we can save.

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Climate Career Chant (based on “I’m a Nut” tune) We’re conservationist, through and through, Caring for our planet is what we do. We minimize waste and recycle too. We innovate, create and repurpose what we use. We’re c-o-n-s-e-r-v-a-t-I-o-n-I-s-t-s We’re c-o-n-s-e-r-v-a-t-I-o-n-I-s-t-s We’re climatologists, it’s who we are. We study climate changes both near and far. Precipitation, wind and the atmosphere too, All point to shifts in climate science news. We’re c-l-i-m-a-t-o-l-o-g-i-s-t-s We’re c-l-i-m-a-t-o-l-o-g-i-s-t-s We’re environmental engineers, we’ll give you a hint, Creativity is key to reducing carbon footprints. Satellites and radars, mapping drones too, Illuminate the danger if we don’t act soon. We’re environmental e-n-g-I-n-e-e-r-s We’re environmental e-n-g-I-n-e-e-r-s We’re student activists, we’ll give a shout, With our words and our actions, we’ll get the news out. We can each make a difference in the climate too, With conscientious decisions in what we chose. We're student a-c-t-i-v-i-s-t-s We're student a-c-t-i-v-i-s-t-s

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A Clean Earth Sung to tune: 7 Rings, Ariana Grande Yeah, Clean air and sunshine, we see miles and miles Rivers run freely, the Columbia bubbles Glaciers and ice sheets, polar bears roam These are a few of my favorite things Been through some bad stuff, the Earth has rebounded Acid rain once plagued us, steadily decreasing Rather have clean water, stop the pollution These are a few of my favorite things Climate is changing, temps increasing Ice is melting, sea is rising Carbon Dioxide? Too much we’re making I see it, I like it, the earth, we got it Clean earth, we got it, help earth, we got it Clean earth, we got it, help earth, we got it Carbon Dioxide? Too much we’re making I see it, I like it, the earth, we got it Panels are placed across fields and buildings Turbines high up on the hills or steep ridges Hydropower on rivers to power machines These are some types of renewable things Sunlight collected, converted and used Wind energy helping not to be confused. Water moving turbines for electricity We’re talking about renewable energy. My heart is aching, our earth it’s breaking Pre-cip-i-tation, too much be flooding The drought is harsh, the fires are raging But we can change, the earth, we got it

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Clean earth, we got it, help earth, we got it Clean earth, we got it, help earth, we got it Carbon Dioxide? Too much we’re making I see it, I like it, the earth, we got it The earth, be lookin’ like scared lands If it’s not trees, then hurt planet Replant is the way to go The way it gets oxygen for me I don’t mean to fuss, buts its what will heal the world for us When you see the trees, clean the air with ease Shoot, go from the store to pollute Get BPA outta’ the food, give me the glass Never mind, I got my bag No plastics left to pollute Look at this pile, look at this mess Don’t have any trash, we can do with less Don’t have fast clothes when we dress Time to re-use, then we don’t stress Clean earth, we got it, help earth, we got it Clean earth, we got it, help earth, we got it Carbon Dioxide? Too much we’re making I see it, I like it, the earth, we got it

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DATE__________________ HOME/SCHOOL CONNECTION #1 Voices of Hope: Climate Science While observing a natural environment, consider the connections and interactions between the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. Draw and label several interactions between the spheres.

Name: ______________________

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Adult Signature: ________________________

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HOME/SCHOOL CONNECTION #1 Voices of Hope: Climate Science Spanish: FECHA CONEXION #1 PARA CASA/ESCUELA Voces de Esperanza: Ciencias Climáticas Observando el medioambiente natural, considera las connexiones e interacciones entre la geosfera, biosfera, hidrosfera y atmósfera. Dibuja y etiqueta varias interacciones entre las esferas. Nombre:

Firma del Adulto:

Vietnamese:

NGÀY:___________________________ KẾT NỐI GIA ĐÌNH/TRƯỜNG HỌC #1 Tiếng Hy Vọng: Khoa Học Khí Hậu

Trong khi quan sát một môi trường thiên nhiên, hãy nghĩ về sự kết nối và tác động lên nhau giữa địa quyển, sinh quyển, thuỷ quyển, và khí quyển. Vẽ và đánh dấu vài sự tác động lên nhau giữa các khối cầu. Tên:________________________________Chữ Ký của Người Lớn:_______________________

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DATE__________________ HOME/SCHOOL CONNECTION #2 Voices of Hope: Climate Science Over the next week collect data about your family carbon footprint. Make a plan of how you can reduce your impact on the environment. Item used/behavior

How often during week?

Name: ______________________

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

What could you change?

Adult Signature: ________________________

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HOME/SCHOOL CONNECTION #2 Voices of Hope: Climate Science Spanish: FECHA CONEXION #2 PARA CASA/ESCUELA Voces de Esperanza: Ciencias Climáticas Durante la próxima semana, recolecta datos acerca de tu huella de carbono familiar. Crea un plan de cómo puedes reducir tu impacto en el medioambiente. Artículo usado/ comportamiento

Nombre:

¿Con qué frecuencia lo haces durante la semana?

¿Qué podrías cambiar?

Firma del Adulto:

Vietnamese: NGÀY:____________________________________ KẾT NỐI GIA ĐÌNH/TRƯỜNG HỌC #2 Tiếng Hy Vọng: Khoa Học Khí Hậu Trong nội tuần tới thu nhặt các dữ liệu về vết Cacbon của gia đình bạn. Làm một kết hoạch để bạn có thể giảm bớt ảnh hưởng của mình vào môi trường. Vật dùng/tác động

Bao nhiêu lần trong một tuần?

Bạn có thể thay đổi như thế nào?

Tên:________________________________Chữ Ký của Người Lớn:__________________________ North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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DATE__________________ HOME/SCHOOL CONNECTION #3 Voices of Hope: Climate Science With someone from your family, schedule and interview a person currently contributing to your team’s action plan focus area (call, skype, in person). Who did you interview________________________ Title and organization_________________________ Date and method of interview___________________ Describe what you learned about the problem and how it is being addressed. How will you apply this knowledge to your Team’s Action Plan?

Name: ______________________ North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

Adult Signature: ________________________

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HOME/SCHOOL CONNECTION #3 Voices of Hope: Climate Science Spanish:

Vietnamese:

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READING & WRITING STRATEGIES OBJECTIVE: To develop competency in grade level reading and writing skills RATIONALE: • Provide print rich, language functional environment • Integrate a variety of texts and media • Model and teach reading and writing complex and content specific text patterns • Use interactively with oral activities • Balance cooperative and individual groupings • Implement gradual release instruction as a scaffold (whole group to small group to individual instruction) • Stress the joy and purpose of reading and writing OCDE Project GLAD Learning Guide. (2015). Page 170

STRATEGIES

Climate Unit OCDE Project GLAD® Resources Learning Guide

WHOLE GROUP Whole Class Mind Map: Single Topic Graphic Organizer Process Grid

108

196

109

196 203

Cooperative Strip Paragraph Poetry Frames Memory Bank

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

127

172 224

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Strategies Found Poetry

Climate Unit OCDE Project GLAD® Resources Learning Guide 175

Narrative Story Map

89

210 238

Listen & Sketch

SMALL GROUP/PAIRS 184

Team Tasks Expert Groups

113

187 265

ELD Group Frame Assessment & Feedback Strategy

Clunkers & Links Metacognitive Reading Emergent Reading Group with Cooperative Strip Paragraph Ear to Ear Reading

219

Focused Reading

231

Partner/Individual Interviews and Field Experience (See Home School Connection #3)

214 234

104

INDIVIDUAL 236

Interactive Journals Individual Tasks Individual Research & Writing Project (see Assessments)

145

See OCDE Project GLAD® Learning Guide for step by step instructions related to each strategy. Learning Guides are received during certified OCDE Project GLAD® trainings. For information about receiving Project GLAD® training with this Climate Science unit, contact Kate Lindholm katel@ncesd.org at the North Central Educational Service District. North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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Effect

MIND MAP

Cause

Design Solution

Description

Interesting Fact

_____ 109


PROCESS GRID CATEGORIES

DESCRIPTION

CAUSE

EFFECT (on climate change)

DESIGN SOLUTION

INTERESTING FACTS

BURNING FOSSIL FUEL

DEFORESTATION

CATTLE OVERPOPULATION

FOOD WASTE

SINGLE USE PLASTIC

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CATEGORIES

DESCRIPTION

BURNING FOSSIL   FUELS

Non-renewable Coal  Oil (gasoline & plastics)  Natural gas (propane)  Cycle to create coal, oil, natural gas with heat and pressure (and time) DEFORESTATION  31% of land  300 million people live in forests  1.6 billion depend on forest for livelihood Losing 18.7 million acres annually

CAUSE

EFFECT (on climate change)

DESIGN SOLUTION

INTERESTING FACT

 

            

1st fuel burning wood Coal – industrial revolution Oil 1900s 1st auto Power industry Run vehicles Heat homes electricity

Farms Livestock (cattle ranching) Mining Drilling Forestry practices Wildfires Urbanization

     

   

additional CO2 released into atmosphere Additional methane released World’s factories = 38 billion tons CO2 1 gallon gas = 20 pounds CO2 39% electricity in US burning coal 2nd leading cause of global warming Less oxygen (rain forests provide 40% oxygen) Release excess carbon Less CO2 absorbed Species extinct Deforestation - more CO2 than all cars & trucks

          

Paris agreement 17% energy from renewable Electric/hybrid cars Bus, walk, carpool, bike Reduce plastics No-idle rules Plant trees (absorbs 48 lbs CO2/year) Engineering chainsaw alert Planting trees Logging combined with replanting Reduce Reuse Recycle

 

WA state is 2nd in US on renewable energy (80% electricity from renewable energy) August 2016 – Scotland 100% electricity from wind power Countries working together Paris Climate Agreement includes deforestation Goal cut greenhouse gases to net zero

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CATEGORIES

DESCRIPTION

CAUSE

EFFECT (on climate change)

DESIGN SOLUTION

INTERESTING FACT

FOOD WASTE

 

    

School cafeteria Food labeling Food Bus Creative leftovers Store food in freezer Ugly fruit Compost Raise awareness

UC Davis feed seaweed to cows, reduces methane Eat vegan

 

 

20 lbs/ person/month 1/3 food to waste 1.3 billion tons

 

CATTLE OVERPOPULATION

 

Increase 17% since 1980 2.6 billion cattle by 2050

 

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

Food loss Expired before destination, food in fields, natural weather disasters Food waste Homes restaurants, schools Developing countries doubled consumption of milk Tripled consumption of meat Americans eat the most, 270 pounds per person each year

   

 

  

8% human caused GG 35% turkey meat on Thanksgiving Landfills-methane Methane – 30x more harmful Landfills – 3rd leading cause of methane emissions Clearing forests to raise more beef Cereal crops used to feed livestock, too expensive to feed people Waste products into water Water usage 1 lb meat = 5000 liters of water Methane released with burps = 14% of greenhouse gases

  

 

   

Waste to Energy powerplants Boil garbage – steam produces electricity Low gas emissions 3000 tons of waste/day Electricity 40,000 homes & businesses Meatless Mondays Reduce methane, one cow’s methane = CO2 of 7800 miles driven in car

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SINGLE USE PLASTICS

 

300 million tons – 1000 Empire State Bldg/annually Doubled every decade Almost half – single use

   

Lightweight & strong Half of cars made of plastic Boeing Dreamliner Airbus A350

   

 

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

Fossil fuels; oil gas Release CO2 Landfills Single use – packaging, grocery bags, straws Damage ecosystems 4.8 trillion-12.7 trillion pieces of plastic in oceans/annually

      

Grocery bags Glass storage containers Thermos bottles Wax worms & mealworms Microbe help plastic decompose Recyclable plastics Biodegradable bioplastics

 

Katie Williams – “trash art” Greg Segal – photographer “7 Days of Trash” Brand audits

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EXPERT GROUP: Deforestation

Name_______________________ ____

Video link: Climate 101: Deforestation. National Geographic. Retrieved from: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/global-warming/deforestation/ (2.32min)

DESCRIPTION Forests cover 31% of the land on our planet. They produce oxygen we need to breathe and provide homes for people and wildlife. Many of the world’s most threatened and endangered animals live in forests. 300 million people worldwide live in forests. 1.6 billion depend on the benefits forest provide for their livelihood, such as food, fresh water, clothing, medicine and shelter. Forests around the world are under threat from deforestation, the mass cutting down of trees. We’re losing 18.7 million acres of forests every year, equal to 27 soccer fields every minute.

CAUSES Deforestation can happen quickly or over time. Cutting down forests for farms, livestock, mining, and drilling cause more than half of all deforestation. Forestry practices, wildfires and building new homes account for the rest. In Malaysia and Indonesia, forests are cut down to plant for palm oil, which can be found in everything from shampoo to crackers. In the Amazon, cattle ranching, and farms are key causes of deforestation (Selection from Nunez, Climate 101).


EFFECTS Deforestation is the second leading cause of global warming. It impacts people’s livelihoods and threatens a wide range of plant and animals. 80% of Earth’s land animals and plants live in forests. Entire species could die out if deforestation continues, such as the orangutan and Sumatran tiger. Cutting down trees adds the carbon the tree was holding into the environment and removes the tree's ability to absorb existing carbon dioxide. Trees also release the oxygen we need to breathe. Tropical rainforests provide 40% of the oxygen in our atmosphere. In the last 50 years, 17% of the Amazon rain forest has already been lost. Scientists say that deforestation in tropical rainforests results in more carbon dioxide in our atmosphere than all the cars and trucks across the world.

DESIGN SOLUTIONS Conservationists believe there is reason to hope. People are working together to preserve existing forests and restore lost forests. For example, an environmental engineer, Topher White, designed a way to use recycled cell phones to send an alert when chainsaws being used to illegally cut down trees. In Kotota, Tanzania, people planted more than 2 million trees on their small island in 10 years, to repair previous damage. Careful logging is another way to reduce the effect of deforestation. If forests are replanted at the time of harvest, the carbon released from the trees that are cut will be absorbed by the new trees as they grow. We can make a difference too. Each tree we plant helps our environment. We can choose to reduce, reuse and recycle the products we use that come from trees. Together, we can stop and restore the impacts of climate change in our world.

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INTERESTING FACTS Countries are joining together to fight climate change, and deforestation is an important part of this process. For the first time ever, at the Paris climate agreement in 2016, reducing deforestation and promoting forest conservation was part of a worldwide climate agreement. The agreement between countries has a goal to cut greenhouse gases released in the atmosphere to a net zero by the second half of this century.

Works Cited: Earthday Network. Deforestation and Climate Change. Retrieved from https://www.earthday.org/campaigns/reforestation/deforestation-climate-change/ Forest Resources. Burning biomass releases CO2. How can this be sustainable? Retrieved from https://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/tools-and-resources/biomass-energy-resources/technical-and-regulatory/biomasssustainability/ Gibbens, Sara. (12/19.2018). This island was on the brink of disaster. Then, they planted thousands of trees. National Geographic. Retrieved from https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2018/12/pemba-kokota-tanzaniaislands-reforest-and-adapt-to-climate-change/ Harris, Nancy et al. (11.13.2018). When a tree falls? Is it deforestation? World Resource Institute. Retrieved from https://www.wri.org/blog/2018/09/when-tree-falls-it-deforestation Khokhar, Tariq & Mahyar Eshragh Tabary. (3/21/2016). Five forest figures for the International Day of Forests. The World Bank. Retrieved from https://blogs.worldbank.org/opendata/five-forest-figures-international-day-forests Leahy, Stephen. (8/2/2017). Your floor may be made of illegal tropical wood. National Geographic. Retrieved from https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/08/wildlife-watch-illegal-logging-papua-new-guinea/ National Geographic. Rain Forests. Retrieved from https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/habitats/rainforests/ Nunez, Christina. Climate 101: Deforestation. National Geographic. Retrieved from https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/global-warming/deforestation/ Nunez, Christina. (6/15/17). Your old cell phone can help save the rain forest. National Geographic. Retrieved from https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/06/topher-white-engineer-rainforests-explorer-festival/ Rosner, Hillary. (12/13/2018). Palm oil is destroying rainforests. But try going a day without it. National Geographic. Retrieved from https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2018/12/palm-oil-destroying-rainforests-householditems/ Rosner, Hillary. (12/2018). Palm oil is unavoidable. Can it be sustainable? National Geographic. Retrieved from https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/12/palm-oil-products-borneo-africa-environment-impact/ United Nations Climate Change. Paris Climate Agreement. Retrieved from https://unfccc.int/process-andmeetings/the-paris-agreement/the-paris-agreement

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Name_______________________ World Wildlife Fund. Threats - Deforestation. Retrieved from https://www.worldwildlife.org/threats/deforestation ____

EXPERT GROUP: Food Waste

DESCRIPTION Have you ever picked up a 20-pound sack of potatoes? That's how much food is wasted per person each month, averaged across the world's population. Currently, a third of all fruits, vegetables, meat, dairy, seafood and grains produced for human consumption goes to waste. This equals 1.3 billion tons of waste. Every year, that much food waste weighs more than 10,000 of the world's largest aircraft carriers. That's more than enough food to feed every hungry person on the planet!

CAUSES There are two areas to consider when looking at the causes of food loss or waste. Food loss describes food that spoils or becomes expired before it reaches its destination. This can happen due to inappropriate packaging, lack of refrigeration or delays in delivery. The highest rate of food loss occurs from food left in the fields. Natural weather disasters contribute to this method of food loss as well. Food waste refers to food that is not eaten when we receive more than we need, whether it's at the grocery store, schools, restaurants or in our homes. When food goes bad or is thrown in the garbage it ends up in landfills. Imagine all the food that is thrown away at school during lunch every day!

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EFFECTS Food waste worldwide is responsible for almost 8% of all human caused greenhouse gas emissions. Imagine Thanksgiving in the United States. The USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) estimates 35% of all turkey meat on Thanksgiving is wasted. At Thanksgiving, consumers purchase around 736 million pounds of turkey. Every year, approximately 204 million pounds of that is thrown away, more than the weight of 80 school buses. Throwing away turkey isn't just a waste of money ($282 million), it effects our environment. When turkey, and any other wasted food, is thrown away it ends up in landfills. Landfills produce the greenhouse gas called methane (CH4). Methane is 30 times more powerful as a heat trapping gas in the environment than carbon dioxide. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that landfills are the third-leading cause of methane emissions in the U.S. Nearly 1/5th of methane emissions come from landfills.

DESIGN SOLUTIONS Reducing food waste is one of the most important things we can do to reverse global warming, while feeding more people. Some schools are changing the way they distribute food in the cafeteria to reduce waste. One school found that by labeling food differently, such as "X Ray Vision Carrots" and "Super Strength Spinach" more produce was eaten and less thrown away. Others discovered that moving recess before lunch helped students work up an appetite and not rush through lunch to get outside. Those students ate 54% more fruits and vegies than other students. Some schools are working with nonprofits like Food Bus or Food Rescue to distribute extra unopened milk, carrots, whole fruit and other items to people in the community. Together, simple solutions can yield giant results. Some simple solutions for everyday food conservation include: North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLADÂŽ Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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Plan ahead and buy only what you need.

Get creative with leftovers. Use websites like Supercook to find recipes that include ingredients you already have in the kitchen. Share leftovers with others.

Use your freezer to store food instead of the refrigerator. Consider buying frozen food instead of fresh unless you know you'll eat it right away.

Give "ugly" fruit some love! Just because fruits or vegies are bruised doesn't mean they have to be thrown away. Try using these in smoothies, bread or soup.

Compost food scraps. Composting releases significantly less greenhouse gases than when food goes to a landfill.

Spread the news. The more people know about food waste, the more changes they can make.

INTERESTING FACTS Environmental scientists are inventing creating ways to tackle the problem of landfills. One example is a design solution called Waste to Energy Power Plants. Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach County, Florida has developed the most advanced and cleanest Waste to Energy Power Plant in North America. They designed a way to process garbage and waste in three boilers, instead of adding it to a landfill. As the boilers burn up the garbage and waste, the steam is directed to a turbine that produces electricity. Additional technology limits how much gas is released in the air during the process. The Solid Waste Authority plant can process 3000 tons of waste every day and convert it to enough electricity to power over 40,000 homes and businesses that would normally be fueled by burning fossil fuels. There are creative solutions for the problems we encounter in life!

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Works Cited: Bloom, Jonathan. (11.16). Schooling food waste: how schools can teach kids to value food. Food Tank. Retrieved from https://foodtank.com/news/2016/11/schooling-food-waste-how-schools-can-teach-kids-tovalue-food/ Frischmann, Chad. (7.31.18). The climate impact of the food in the back of your fridge. The World Post. Retrieved from https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/theworldpost/wp/2018/07/31/foodwaste/?moredirect=on&noredirect=on&utm_term=.1328fc7058f4. Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO). (2013). Food Wastage Footprint: Impacts on Natural Resources. Retrieved from http://www.fao.org/3/i3347e/i3347e.pdf Hamerschlag, Kari and Kumar Venka. Meat Eater's Guide to Climate Change and Health: Lifecycle Assessments: Methodology and Results. Environmental Working Group. (2011). Retrieved from http://static.ewg.org/reports/2011/meateaters/pdf/methodology_ewg_meat_eaters_guide_to_health_and_ climate_2011.pdf Kiley, Rich. (10/5/16). RIT awarded nearly $1 million from NSF to develop food waste solutions. Eurek Alert. Retrieved from https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-10/riot-ran100516.php Nlller, Eric. (11.22.12). Is Thanksgiving a big waste of turkey? Discovery News. NBCNews.com. Retrieved from http://www.nbcnews.com/id/49930129/ns/technology_and_science-science/t/thanksgiving-bigwaste-turkey/#.XHjCYVNKjjA Price, Joseph and David. (12/9/14). Lunch, Recess and Nutrition: Responding to Time Incentives in the Cafeteria. SSRN.(December 9, 2014). Available at https://ssrn.com/abstract=2536103 Tenenbaum, Laura Faye. Waste not, Want not: Is climate change a challenge, or an opportunity? Or both? (10/9/15). NASA Global Climate Change. Retrieved from https://climate.nasa.gov/blog/2357/ Naval Technology. (7/5/17). The ten biggest aircraft carriers. Retrieved from https://www.navaltechnology.com/features/feature-the-10-biggest-aircraft-carriers_4067861-4067861/ Worland, Justin. (9/22/15). How your trash is contributing to climate change. Time. Retrieved from http://time.com/4042559/trash-climate-change-landfill/ World Wildlife Fund. (2019). Fight climate change by preventing food waste. Retrieved from https://www.worldwildlife.org/stories/fight-climate-change-by-preventing-food-waste Environmental Protection Agency. (9.15.16) U.S. 2030 Food Loss and Waste Reduction Goal. Retrieved from https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-management-food/united-states-2030-food-loss-and-wastereduction-goal

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EXPERT GROUP:

Name_______________________ ____

Cattle Overpopulation DESCRIPTION Farm animal populations are on the increase worldwide. Not only cattle, but chickens, goats and sheep as well. The cattle population has increased 17% since 1980 bringing the total cattle on the planet to 1.4 billion. The International Agricultural Research group estimates that by 2050 there will be 2.6 billion cattle. There are 7.6 billion people on the planet. That’s about one cow for every three people. Cows are a great source of protein, providing essential nutrients like iron, zinc, and vitamin A.

CAUSES The reason for the increase is that developing countries (defined as: a poor agricultural country that is seeking to become more advanced economically and socially.) have doubled their milk consumption and more than tripled their consumption of meat. The price of beef has declined so developing countries are more able to afford to raise cattle. The greatest increase has been in East and Southeast Asia. Americans still eat more meat than almost anyone else in the world: an average of 270 pounds per person every year! That’s three quarter-pounders every day. That’s a lot of hamburger!

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EFFECTS The effect on the planet comes from many factors involved in the raising of cattle. One major issue is it uses 75% of the world’s agricultural land, which is 30% of Earth’s land surface. In order to have this much land available for cattle many forests are being cleared in order to raise more beef. The amazon forests have cleared 70% of the forests to create grazing land for cattle. A second factor is the use of cereal crops, like barley, corn, oats and wheat used to feed animals. This causes people to starve because they raise the price on grains when they are going to livestock, which also raises the price for humans and people can’t afford to purchase the food. Another factor is the waste products from the farms, runoff of fertilizer and manure gets into the water and increases algae blooms, which stifles the life in the water. Also, water consumption is much higher when raising cattle. To produce one pound of meat it takes between 5000-20000 liters of water. The same one pound of wheat uses 500-4000 liters of water. Finally, enteric fermentation (the process of microbes digesting in a cow’s stomach) releases methane (CH4) when a cow burps. 14% of greenhouse gases comes from cows belching. That is more than the greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere from cars, buses, trains, ships, and planes.

DESIGN SOLUTION An interesting study at the University of California Davis is giving cows seaweed mixed in their feed. The results have been very promising. The day they get this seaweed feed the cows’ burps release only ½ of the methane as without seaweed. UC Davis is doing further study to see what costs would be to produce this particular type of seaweed and if the increased production of this seaweed would cause other problems.

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INTERESTING FACTS Did you know that if we give up eating beef only one time each week over the course of a year it is like not burning 38 gallons of gas, or trading out 12 lightbulbs for LED bulbs? And if we planted a tree instead of giving up beef, it would take 83 years to use up the greenhouse gases. Another way to look at it is one cow’s methane production is equal to the carbon dioxide (CO2) generated from 7,800 miles of driving your car. So think about adopting meatless Mondays in your house!

RESOURCES Worldwatch Institute, Vital Signs: Farm Animal Populations Continue to Grow http://vitalsigns.worldwatch.org/vs-trend/farm-animal-populations-continue-grow https://www.populationconnection.org/article/population-meat-consumption/ https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/nov/19/population-crisis-farmanimals-laying-waste-to-planet https://timeforchange.org/are-cows-cause-of-global-warming-meat-methaneCO2?page=1 https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/food/heres-how-much-giving-up-beef-helps-or-doesnt-help--the-planet/2017/07/20/03bb5ba2-6d60-11e7-b9e22056e768a7e5_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.e88359892095 https://www.onegreenplanet.org/uncategorized/what-would-happen-to-all-the-animals-ifeveryone-went-vegan/ https://www.nationalgeographic.com/foodfeatures/feeding-9-billion/

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EXPERT GROUP

Name_______________________ ____

Single Use Plastics Video link: https://thekidshouldseethis.com/post/plastics-101-what-is-plastic-and-howis-it-made (6 minutes) DESCRIPTION Imagine 1000 Empire State Buildings side by side. Together they would weigh about 300 million tons, which is the same amount of plastic produced every year on our planet. The global production of plastic has doubled approximately every decade since 1950. Plastic has become part of our everyday lives. It is found in lawn chairs, artificial limbs, carpets, clothing, sports equipment and sunglasses. Almost half of all plastic produced is single use plastic: plastic that is used once and then discarded. This includes everything from potato chip bags to mailing bubbles, from shopping bags to straws.

CAUSES Plastic is both strong, lightweight and pliable. This has made it a popular substance for everyday items as well as land, air and sea vehicles. Half of most cars are made of plastic, by volume (not by weight). A similar approach is being used by some of the newer passenger jets like the Boeing Dreamliner and Airbus A350 XWB. Plastic enables us to create vehicles that are tougher and lighter weight which increases fuel efficiency. The question we have to answer for all plastic inventions is, is what we gain by using plastic worth what we lose in the process? Perhaps it’s not as simple as a yes or no response.

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EFFECTS The majority of today’s plastics are created from fossil fuels such as crude oil and natural gas mixed with cellulose and salt. Heating these chemicals breaks them down into molecules. Scientists connect these molecules into chains called polymers which become molded and shaped through additional heat and pressure. When fossil fuels are retrieved from the earth, heated to form plastic, and then heated again during the molding process they release carbon dioxide into the earth’s atmosphere, impacting the amount of greenhouse gases trapped in the stratosphere. Plastics have an additional impact on climate due to their inability to break down. Plastic is good example of the phrase, “What we throw away doesn’t go away.” The plastic items your great, great, great grandparents threw away are still littering the earth and taking up space in our landfills. Single use plastics are of particular concern. These include such things as packaging, plastic grocery bags, and drinking straws. Plastics in our landfills additionally contribute to the release of methane that comes from garbage in landfills as well. Other plastics wind up beside the road, in lakes and oceans. These damage natural habitats, endanger wildlife and pollute communities worldwide. In 2015, a research report estimated between 4.8 trillion and 12.7 trillion pieces of plastic are added to the ocean every year. It’s an environmental issue as well as a budget issue. Dealing with the plastic damaging the oceans’ ecosystems is already estimated to be a $2.5 trillion issue.

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DESIGN SOLUTIONS We can make a difference related to the use and impact of plastic production by our everyday choices. A good place to start is simply exchanging one-time plastic items for non-plastic or repeated use packaging. For example, taking your own grocery bags to the store, using glass storage containers instead of plastic, or carrying a thermos bottle instead of using plastic water bottles. Scientists are working hard to discover and design additional solutions. Recent discoveries include the ability of wax worms and mealworms to break down plastic into compost. Another breakthrough is the discovery of a microbe called ideonella sakaiensis, which minimizes the time needed for plastic to decompose from hundreds of years to a few days. At Berkley lab, scientists are developing recyclable plastics that can be remolded into different uses and colors. Natural innovations include using plants, such as the rubber tree, to create plant-based plastics called biodegradable bioplastics and used as compostable eating utensils and drinking cups.

INTERESTING FACTS People and organizations are creatively raising awareness related to plastic use across our world. Katie Williams is an art activist who creates and displays “trash art” to help raise awareness. Katie creates costumes made of plastic trash and wears them in window displays and on the streets of San Francisco. Williams said, "We actually collected waste from our own arts collective, and in that process of collecting waste, rather than throwing it in the bin, we saw firsthand just how much waste was being created. It was shocking to see how much trash you've accumulated. Once you see it, you cannot unsee it.” Greg Segal is another artist who uses photographs of people surrounded by their weekly trash as a way to highlight this issue and effect change.

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

126 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


Another approach to raising awareness is through brand audits. #Breakfreefromplastic is a global movement that uses brand audits to hold companies accountable for the single-use plastic packaging they create. In a brand audit, a person or team picks up the trash (litter) in a park, on a beach, or any area of your city. The litter is sorted according to the company who manufactured it. Then you take pictures and post those with a hashtag to that company, encouraging them to change packaging habits that are healthier for the planet and climate.

Works Cited: Adelante, Rachelle. (5-8-19). Tackling Plastic Pollution with Trash Art ... A look at our Waste Habits. Greenpeace. Ecowatch. Retrieved from https://www.ecowatch.com/trash-art-2636592849.html Angeli, Garbriel. Plastics 101. National Geographic. Retrieved from: https://thekidshouldseethis.com/post/plastics-101-what-is-plastic-and-how-is-it-made Beaumont, Nicola et al. (3-11-19). Global Ecological, Social and Economic Impacts of Marine Plastic. Science Direct. Retrieved from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/s0025326x19302061 Brand Audit Toolkit. Available from Break Free from Plastic. Https://www.breakfreefromplastic.org/brandaudittoolkit/ Duque, Theresa. (5-6-19). Plastic Gets a Do-Over: Breakthrough Discovery Recycles Plastic from the Inside Out. Berkeley Lab. Retrieved from: https://newscenter.lbl.gov/2019/05/06/recycling-plastic-fromthe-inside-out/ Jambeck, Jenna et al. (2-13-15). Plastic waste inputs from land into the ocean. Science. Retrieved from: https://science.sciencemag.org/content/347/6223/768 Plastics Make It Possible. (4-14-16). Wait…That’s Plastic? Retrieved from https://www.plasticsmakeitpossible.com/whats-new-cool/wait-thats-plastic/ Segal, Gregg. Seven Days of Garbage. Retrieved from https://www.greggsegal.com/p-projects/7-days-ofgarbage/1/thumbs Williams, Katie. Performance art. Retrieved from https://katculture.com/performance-art ____________ Learn more at: https://natgeo.com/planetorplastic

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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POETRY FRAME If I Were in Charge of the World by Judith Viorst

If I were in charge of the world I’d cancel oatmeal, Monday mornings, Allergy shots, and also Sara Steinberg. If I were in charge of the world There’d be brighter night lights, Healthier hamsters, and Basketball baskets forty-eight inches lower. If I were in charge of the world You wouldn’t have lonely. You wouldn’t have clean. You wouldn’t have bedtimes. Or, “Don’t punch your sister.” You wouldn’t even have sisters. If I were in charge of the world A chocolate sundae with whipped cream and nuts would be a vegetable. All 007 movies would be G. And a person who sometimes forgot to brush, And sometimes forgot to flush, Would still be allowed to be In charge of the world.

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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If I were in Charge of the World By _____________________ with thanks to Judith Viorst

If I were in charge of the world, I’d cancel______________________________________, ______________________________________________, ______________________________________________, and also ______________________________________. If I were in charge of the world, There’d be___________________________________, (Adjective Noun)

______________________________________, and (Adjective Noun)

______________________________________________. If I were in charge of the world, You wouldn’t have _______________________________. You wouldn’t have _______________________________. You wouldn’t have _______________________________. Or ___________________________________________. You wouldn’t even have _________________________. If I were in charge of the world, A ___________________ would be _________________. _____________________ would be _________________. And a person who sometimes __________________ (rhyme), And sometimes forgot to _______________________(rhyme), Would still be allowed to be In charge of the world. North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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EXTENDED ACTIVITIES FOR INTEGRATION OBJECTIVE: To integrate content across all subject areas RATIONALE: • • • • •

Validate multiple modalities of learners Promote creativity Increase motivation Foster self-directed learning Explore real-world applications

OCDE Project GLAD Learning Guide. (2015). Page 254.

STRATEGIES

Climate Unit Resources

OCDE Project GLAD® Learning Guide

Guest Speakers Field Experiences Climate & Conservation Class Debate: Climate Change: Fact or Fiction Say it with Art: Climate Art Team Projects Climate Science Investigations Team Action Plan (Project Based Learning)

130 135

See OCDE Project GLAD® Learning Guide for step by step instructions related to each strategy. Learning Guides are received during certified OCDE Project GLAD® trainings. For information about training teachers with this Climate Science unit, contact Kate Lindholm katel@ncesd.org at the North Central Educational Service District. North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

130 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


CLIMATE SCIENCE INVESTIGATIONS Reflecting Heat Voice of Hope: Climate Science (Use in conjunction with A Warming Earth Graphic Organizer)

Objective Students investigate how varying surfaces absorb or reflect heat in different ways. Description Glaciers, snow and ice reflect the sun’s heat up and beyond the stratosphere. With the reduction of glaciers, snow and ice, less heat is being reflected and more heat is being directly absorbed into the oceans. This contributes to warming ocean temperatures and rising sea levels. Supplies Needed Per Team  heat lamp  white construction paper  dark brown construction paper  blue construction paper

 

3 thermometers science journals (Learning Logs)

Investigation Step by Step 1. Team discussion: How might the temperature change when heat is applied to white, dark brown and blue construction paper? 2. Record your predictions in your individual science journals (write and/or sketch). 3. Place all three different colored construction papers under the heat lamp. 4. Place one thermometer on top of each piece of paper. 5. Wait at least five minutes. 6. Turn off the heat lamp and record the three temperatures in individual science journals. 7. In your teams discuss: How did your predictions match or not match the results of the investigation? 8. Team discussion: How does this investigation support the idea that a reduction in ice and snow is a warming factor which contributes to a warming earth. North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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CLIMATE SCIENCE INVESTIGATIONS Carbon: Up in Smoke Voice of Hope: Climate Science (Use in conjunction with the Burning Fossil Fuels Pictorial Input Chart)

Objective Students will examine evidence pointing to the fact that carbon is released when something burns.

Description When a substance burns it releases carbon into the air. When the carbon enters the air, it becomes carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide is an unseen gas. The carbon portion becomes visible as black soot when a substance is burned. This experiment provides evidence of the release of carbon into the air during burning (i.e. wood, oil, coal, etc.).

Supplies Needed  matches  glass plate  glass of water  science journals (Learning Logs)

Investigation Step by Step 1. Students are sitting in their teams. In your teams discuss what will happen when you hold a burning match under a glass plate. 2. Record your predictions in your individual science journals (write and/or sketch). 3. Place a glass plate on the edge of a counter or table. Ensure that 2-3 inches are hanging over the edge. 4. Light a match and hold it under the edge of the glass plate for 5-10 seconds. 5. Blow out the match or extinguish in glass of water.  6. Discuss with your team what changes you observed. What evidence did you see that carbon was released from the burning match?

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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CLIMATE SCIENCE INVESTIGATIONS Rising Sea Levels Voice of Hope: Climate Science (Use in conjunction with the Effects of Climate Change World Map Graphic Organizer & My Wounded Island Narrative Input Chart)

Objective Students will investigate how melting ice contributes to rising sea levels.

Description As greenhouse gases increase in the atmosphere, warming temperatures cause melting of snow in the hydrosphere. As snow, ice and glaciers melt, additional land mass (geosphere) is exposed. As ice in the form of glaciers and ice sheets, melts off the land the sea levels rise. Ice that is formed on the water does not contribute to the rise in sea level as it melts. Supplies Needed  2 buckets  8 sticks of classroom modeling clay

  

ruler 1 tray of ice cubes 1 liter of water

Investigation Step by Step 1. Show slide with pictures of the following: iceberg, glacier, sea ice and ice sheets. Have student try to label, compare and contrast. Show labels and definitions. 2. Team discussion: When the warming temperatures causes ice to melt, which of these do you predict will NOT create a rise in the sea levels. 3. Divide the clay in half. 4. Take one half per bucket and form a “land mass” to create a “cliff” (flat shelf of land) in the bottom of one side of the bucket. (Repeat for both buckets). 5. In the first bucket, place 6 ice cubes on the land mass and label that bucket “ICE ON LAND – ICEBERGS, GLACIERS & ICE SHEETS”). 6. In the second bucket, place 6 ice cubes on the bottom of the bucket – NOT on the clay. Label this bucket “SEA ICE”). 7. In the “SEA ICE” bucket, pour water over the ice until the ice cubes are floating. The land should not be under the water. North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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CLIMATE SCIENCE INVESTIGATIONS Rising Sea Levels Continued Investigation Step by Step 8. Measure depth of water and add water to the “ICE ON LAND - ICEBERGS, GLACIERS & ICE SHEETS” bucket until it reaches the same depth. 9. Team discussion: Which condition do you think will cause a greater rise in water level? Why? 10. Record predictions in individual science journals. 11. At the following time intervals, measure and record water levels in both buckets. 

15 minutes

 

30 minutes 45 minutes

60 minutes 15 minutes

30 minutes

45 minutes

60 minutes

SEA ICE ICE ON LAND ICEBERGS, GLACIERS & ICE SHEETS 12. Team discussion: How do the results compare with your predictions? Why do think this happened? 13. Record how your thinking was confirmed or changed during this investigation.

Optional Extension Research: Students choose a focus coastal city. Research and resort on the current and potential effect of sea level rise on the people, ecosystems, infrastructure and land. What is being done in that city to respond to the effects of sea rise on their community? What design solutions would you propose?

Investigation Source: EPA https://archive.epa.gov/climatechange/kids/documents/sea-levelrise.pdf North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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CLIMATE SCIENCE INVESTIGATIONS Harnessing Sun’s Energy Voice of Hope: Climate Science (Use in conjunction with the Burning Fossil Fuels Pictorial Input Chart)

Objective Students will research methods of sun (solar) energy and design a solar oven using everyday materials. Description The light from the sun transforms into heat energy when it hits an object. The sun’s energy provides for all life on earth, from photosynthesis for plants to the warming of the earth. When in balance, our atmosphere traps the necessary amount of heat to make Earth habitable. Sun energy is a renewable resource that can help reduce the need for fossil fuel burning. NGSS and Design Process Supplies Needed    

plastic wrap aluminum foil pizza boxes Pringles cans

    

tape glue black paper thermometers students may propose other items

Investigation Step by Step 1. Show pictures of different types of solar ovens: solar oven (box cooker), panel cooker, parabolic solar cooker. 2. Students engage in research in to examine methods of harnessing the sun’s energy for cooking. 3. Students work within the criteria and constraints set forth by the design challenge (i.e. Criteria = to cook a s’more within 5 minutes or reach a certain temperature. Constraints = set price limit/limit types of materials, etc.). 4. Students sketch a design, build a prototype, test prototype, and make at least one revision and retest to create a more optimized solution matching the criteria and constraints. All steps are recorded in individual science journal. 5. Students present designs and write a final reflection on the process answering: What is the most effective method to capture sun’s light to use in cooking? What additional changes would you make to your design to make it more effective? How does this investigation relate to using the sun for a renewable North Central Washington energy source? 135 Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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TEAM ACTION PLAN OBJECTIVE: Apply unit concepts into relevant and change

oriented action plans for a healthier earth. Rationale:

 Connects to 21 century skills  Promotes Enduring Understanding and applications of the unit  Provides a framework to dive deeper into understanding and learning  Teaches cause and effect  Provides a framework for extension and application  Creates relevancy based on student interest

Strategies

Climate Unit OCDE Project GLAD® Resources Learning Guide (step by step instructions for each strategy)

Collaborative Input: Guess My Category Action Plan Research

137

143

138

270

Team Plan Development & Strategic Design Team Plan Implementation Action Plan Individual & Team Formation Growth Reports Action Plan Presentations

136

270

138 138

270 270

140

See OCDE Project GLAD® Learning Guide for step by step instructions related to each strategy. Learning Guides are received during certified OCDE Project GLAD® trainings. For information about training teachers with this Climate Science unit, contact Kate Lindholm katel@ncesd.org at the North Central Educational Service District.

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

136 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


Team Action Plan Process: 1. Whole Group: Identify Areas of Need Create collaborative graphic organizer illustrating categories for change. Use Guess My Category process.

2. Individual Focus Area Students choose which area they want to impact. Each student writes his/her name on a post it notes and places it on the category of their selection.

3. Team Formation Action plan teams are formed based on shared areas of interest.

4. Team Connection Teams meet to share their personal rationale for choosing that area of focus. Teams create action plan team norms by creating a T-Chart for Social Skills specific to their team.

5. Teams Begin Action Plan Process Follow process outlined in Action Plan Student Packets  

Identify the Problem (team discussion) Team Interview (Skype a scientist)

 

Individual Research Argumentation (for and against) Individual Research Spotlight (activist, career, organization)

 

Team Research Results (Process Grid) Brainstorm Action Ideas (pros and cons)

 

Select Idea and Create Smart Goals Action Plan Mapping

 

Action Plan Steps Implementation and Ongoing Reflection

 

Individual Writing Assignment (rubric) Team Action Plan Presentation (rubric)

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VOICES OF HOPE ACTION PLAN INPUT Guess My Category strategy process Learning Target: We can determine areas of impact surrounding climate change and develop an action plan to make a difference related to that area. PLASTICS

CATTLE

How does single use plastics impact climate change? Possible Action Steps Reusable water bottles Recycling plastic bags Cloth grocery bags

How does cattle overpopulation impact climate change? Possible Action Steps Reduce meat portions Eat salad Meatless Mondays

FOOD WASTE

DEFORESTATION

FOSSIL FUELS

How does food waste impact climate change?

How does deforestation impact climate change?

How does burning fossil fuels impact climate change?

Possible Action Steps Shop intentionally Compost Use what’s in the fridge

Possible Action Steps Planting trees Recycle paper Technology instead of paper

Possible Action Steps Walk or bike, carpool Conserve energy Reduce heat/ac

138


Action Plan Student Packets Free downloads of the team and individual action plan packets available at www.ncesd.org/service/science/climate-science


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Action Plan Presentation Rubrics Used by permission of PBLWorks www.pblworks.org (rubric creator John Larmer)

3rd – 5th Grade free download: https://my.pblworks.org/resource/document/3_5_presentation_rubric_ccss_aligned

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Presentation Rubrics, PBLWorks 6th – 8th Grade free download https://my.pblworks.org/resource/document/6_8_presentation_rubric_ccss_aligned

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ASSESSMENT & FEEDBACK STRATEGIES OBJECTIVE: Provide information for formative and summative assessment RATIONALE: • Provide opportunities for metacognition • Assess through individual and team explorations • Utilize alternative means of assessment • Encourage self-regulation OCDE Project GLAD Learning Guide. (2015). Page 264.

STRATEGIES

Climate Unit OCDE Project GLAD® Resources Learning Guide

Formative: 10:2s, Learning Logs, Exit Tickets

265

ELD Group Frame (See Reading & Writing Strategies) Portfolios: Individual Tasks Graffiti Wall

145

268 279 281 267

150

269

143

Jeopardy Individual Research & Writing Assignment (with rubric) Student & Teacher Created Tests

Team Action Plan Assessments & 140 Presentation

270, 277

The OCDE Project GLAD® Learning Guide contains step by step instructions related to each strategy. Learning Guides are received during certified OCDE Project GLAD® trainings. For information about training teachers with this Climate Science unit, contact Kate Lindholm katel@ncesd.org at the North Central Educational Service District. North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

143 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


GRAFFITI WALL

Graffiti Wall Questions Voice of Hope: Climate Science 1. Respond with True or False. Explain your answer and cite your source. The increased temperature of the planet is part of earth’s normal patterns over time. 2. List three causes of climate change and an effect of each one. Cite your source(s). 3. What is one way you can reduce your carbon footprint? Cite your source. 4. How is technology being used to measure the amount of ice loss from polar ice sheets? Circle your answer and cite your source. a. Drones b. Satellite images c. Deep sea diving robots d. Specially equipped airplanes 5. Read the sentence and fill in the blank with the correct fact. Cite your source. Greenhouses gases in the stratosphere keep our planet habitable (warm enough to live and grow). An excess of these gases is trapping heat and causing the planet to overwarm. These greenhouse gases include nitrous oxide, _____________, water vapor and ____________. 6. Sketch a diagram showing how melting glaciers are impacting the amount of heat energy retained in the earth’s atmosphere and oceans. Cite your source. 7. Explain how rising sea levels are impacting people’s lives. Cite your source(s). 8. What impact does each career have on climate science? Cite your sources.   

Climatologist Clean car engineer Solar engineers _______________________________________________

9. What is the definition of climatologist? See following page for answers…

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Graffiti Wall Answers Voice of Hope: Climate Science 1. False. The earth’s mean temperature rise has far exceeded normal fluctuations over time. Source: A Warming Earth Graphic Organizer 2. Students choose three causes of climate change such as burning fossil fuels, deforestation, food waste, cattle overpopulation, and plastics. Effects of each are on the Process Grid. Source: The Process Grid, Expert Groups, Burning Fossil Fuels Pictorial 3. Answers may vary. Examples include reducing use of plastics, recycling, walking/biking instead of driving, eating leftovers (reducing food waste), etc. Source: The Process Grid, Expert Groups, Burning Fossil Fuels Pictorial 4. B. Satellite images. Source: World Map Graphic Organizer 5. Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). Source: A Warming Earth Graphic Organizer 6. Students sketch will resemble light to heat energy arrows from A Warming Earth Graphic Organizer 7. Answers may vary. Examples include forced migration, loss of homes, land, jobs… Sources: Effects of Climate Change World Map, My Wounded Island Narrative Input Chart 8. Climatologist - studies weather patterns over time (Cognitive Content Dictionary) Clean car engineer - designs cars with fewer carbon emissions (Big Book) Solar engineer - designs solutions using energy from the sun (World Map) 9. A climatologist is a climate scientist who studies weather patterns and their impact over time.

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

145 Voices of Hope Climate Science, 2019


INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH & WRITING ASSIGNMENT OPINION/ARGUMENTATIVE WRITING WRITING PROMPT: CLIMATE CHANGE Issues surrounding climate change often lead to debate related to political, financial and personal areas of impact. Is climate change actually happening or is it part of earth’s natural cycle. Does it really matter if we compost, eat less beef, or carpool to school? Should there be laws regulating how much garbage we throw away?

DIRECTIONS This assignment forms the basis of research you will use for a class debate. Choose one area of debate related to the existence of climate change, a special area of impact or a suggested response to climate change. Your paper will be divided into three sections. The first section will argue for the focused area of debate. The second section will argue against. The third section will be your personal reflections and conclusions. Each section should include three reasons to support that perspective with embedded citations.

This essay has six assignments due when submitting your final draft:

1. Prewriting Activities

4. Rough Draft

2. Outline

_______

5. Final Draft

3. Research

_______

6. Works Cited

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PRE-WRITE GRAPHIC ORGANIZER INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH & WRITING ASSIGNMENT

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INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH & WRITING GRADING SCALE

Opinion and argumentative research and writing rubrics with scales that are aligned to CCSS and Smarter Balanced State Assessments can be downloaded using the links below. 

3rd-5th Grade OPINION WRITING RUBRIC & SCALE: https://www.ode.state.or.us/wma/teachlearn/subjects/science/assessment/smarte r-balanced_scoring_rubrics.pdf

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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6th – 8th Grade ARGUMENTATIVE WRITING RUBRIC & SCALE: https://portal.smarterbalanced.org/library/en/performance-task-writing-rubricargumentative.pdf

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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TEACHER GENERATED TEST VOICES OF HOPE: CLIMATE SCIENCE

Name____________________

Use the word bank below to complete the statements and answer the questions. climate

geosphere

atmosphere

permafrost

Paris Agreement

renewable energy

carbon dioxide (CO2)

carbon

1.

______________ is the average weather pattern in an area of a long period of time.

2.

Climate change is impacted by the warming of the earth’s _______________ through the release of greenhouse gases including _______________, methane and water vapor.

3.

In 2016, the _______________________ was signed within the United Nations calling for global reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

4.

Fossil fuels are formed in the ______________ from the remains of living organisms.

5.

All life is made of ____________________.

6.

Energy that uses the natural power of wind, water and solar is called ______________.

7.

Effects of melting ______________ include coastal erosion, an increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) and the ground sinking.

Respond with True of False. Explain your answer. The increase temperature of the planet is part of earth’s normal patterns over time.

Greenhouse gases in our stratosphere keep our planet habitable (warm enough to live and grow).

Short Answer What is one way you can reduce your carbon footprint?

How is technology being used to respond to the effects of climate change? North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLAD® Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

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Circle the picture(s) that best matches your answer.

Which picture(s) shows an effect of rising sea levels.

Which picture(s) shows a design solution that reduces carbon emissions.

Number the pictures according the order of their discovery related to climate change.

Paris Agreement

North Central Washington Educational Service District OCDE Project GLADÂŽ Unit Kate Lindholm, Dr. Sara Martinez

Chinese first use coal as an energy source

Henry Ford invents Model T car

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Speaking (ELL)/Writing Tell me everything you can about what’s happening in this picture.

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NGSS Performance Expectation: Natural Resources 4-ESS3.1 Compare and contrast the use of one renewable and one non-renewable resource and their effect on the environment.

NGSS Performance Expectation: Earth Materials and Systems 5-ESS2.1 Develop a model to describe interactions within and/or between Earth’s systems: the geosphere, the biosphere, the hydrosphere, and/or the atmosphere.

NGSS Performance Expectation: Earth and Human Activity MS-ESS3-5 Human activities are a major factor in the rise of earth’s temperature. How would you convince others of the need to reduce the burning of fossil fuels for greatest receptivity and impact.

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List/Sketch three causes of climate change and the effects of each one on people AND the environment. CAUSE EFFECT ON PEOPLE & ENVIRONMENT

CAUSE

EFFECT ON PEOPLE & ENVIRONMENT

CAUSE

EFFECT ON PEOPLE & ENVIRONMENT

What additional learning did you experience during this unit?

What questions has this learning experience prompted in your mind?

What will you do next with what you learned during this unit?

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Climate Science: Voices of Hope a Project GLAD® Unit  

When researching the enormous impact of climate change, we found so many voices of hope in how people around the world are addressing this d...

Climate Science: Voices of Hope a Project GLAD® Unit  

When researching the enormous impact of climate change, we found so many voices of hope in how people around the world are addressing this d...

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