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International School of Stavanger 2013 - 2014 EARLY CHILDHOOD AND PRIMARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

2007-2008 VISION STATEMENT The ISS vision is to prepare students for greater global participation by helping them become responsible, empowered learners. Welcome to the International School of Stavanger Early Childhood and Primary School, for children from the age of three, in Pre-School through Grade Five. The Early Childhood division is for children in pre-school through Grade 1. The Primary School division is for students in Grades 2-5. Our goal is to provide students with an English language education, in a supportive, academically stimulating and multicultural environment. To accomplish this, we provide courses and activities in a caring atmosphere taught by highly qualified teachers focused on your child’s needs in an international setting. This curriculum overview provides general information on courses offered in levels Pre-School through Grade Five at ISS. You’ll find information for each level and course of study. Each course is more detailed curriculum with standards and benchmarks, available in discussion with your child’s teachers. At Primary School Open House teachers will offer more detail of how your child’s courses of study are put into action. The material in this booklet is intended to offer an overview of the children’s tasks at school. A separate Parent-Student Handbook details school procedures and rules we follow. We hope the information helps you gain a general understanding of what we learn, how we learn and how we know we’ve learned. If you have any questions, the staff will be glad to assist you. Ms Jill Raven

Dr. Len Duevel

Early Childhood Principal

Primary School Principal


TABLE OF CONTENTS

GUIDING STATEMENTS .....................................................................................................................................3 VISION STATEMENT...........................................................................................................................................3 MISSION STATEMENT........................................................................................................................................3 OBJECTIVES .......................................................................................................................................................3 EARLY CHILDHOOD AND PRIMARY SCHOOL GENERAL DESCRIPTION ...................................................4 ADMISSIONS .......................................................................................................................................................4 GRADE LEVEL COMPARISON TABLE .............................................................................................................6 PRE-SCHOOL 3 ...................................................................................................................................................7 PRE-SCHOOL 4 ...................................................................................................................................................8 AFTERNOON AND EXTENDED CARE FOR PRE-SCHOOL ............................................................................9 GRADE LEVEL KINDERGARTEN ....................................................................................................................10 GRADE ONE ......................................................................................................................................................11 GRADE TWO .....................................................................................................................................................12 GRADE THREE..................................................................................................................................................13 GRADE FOUR ....................................................................................................................................................14 GRADE FIVE ......................................................................................................................................................15 ASSESSMENT ...................................................................................................................................................16 ART.....................................................................................................................................................................16 LIBRARY ............................................................................................................................................................17 MUSIC ................................................................................................................................................................18 NORWEGIAN LANGUAGE ARTS ....................................................................................................................19 NATIVE NORWEGIAN .......................................................................................................................................19 NORWEGIAN AS A MODERN LANGUAGE.....................................................................................................19 PHYSICAL EDUCATION ...................................................................................................................................20 STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES .....................................................................................................................21 PARKING RULES FOR ISS ..............................................................................................................................22

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GUIDING STATEMENTS VISION STATEMENT Inspire a community of responsible, globally-engaged empowered learners. MISSION STATEMENT ISS provides an internationally-accredited, engaging and challenging English-language education in a supportive, multicultural environment where students have the opportunity to fulfill their potential. Our Aim Our aim is to enable students to become self-determining, respectful, responsible, contributing global citizens who will succeed in continuing educational programs and beyond. Our Values Learning At ISS, we believe everyone is capable of learning and achieving. Developing a passion for and love of learning is key to students becoming lifelong learners. Students are encouraged to reflect and develop an awareness of one's own learning process. In preparing for an ever-changing global community we inspire learners to develop collaborative, creative, critical thinking and technological skills. Well-being At ISS, we value the whole child and believe students leading physically and emotionally healthy, ethical, active and balanced lives in a safe environment will contribute to their self-esteem and enable them to become more effective learners. Community At ISS, we celebrate the spirit of belonging and a sense of community at the school, local and global levels. Respecting diversity and valuing international and intercultural understanding, the school fosters actions intended to make positive contributions to a more equitable and sustainable world. OBJECTIVES ISS has developed the following strategic planning domains and operational objectives in order to translate our Vision, Mission, Aim and Values into practice. Core Objectives Learning: Promote learning and foster intellectual growth at all grade levels. Well-being: Provide a safe environment that nurtures the emotional, physical and developmental needs of all its students, and promote the basis for a safe, healthy and meaningful working environment for our students and staff. Community: Foster meaningful multi-cultural relationships, provide support for internationally mobile families, communicate effectively and encourage positive contributions in the school, local and global communities. Supporting Objectives Governance & Leadership: Maintain effective governance and leadership to ensure optimal operation of the school. Infrastructure & Resources: Maintain an appropriate infrastructure in order to create a safe, pleasant and effective learning environment. (Approved at Board of Trustees, 4th February 2013)

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EARLY CHILDHOOD AND PRIMARY SCHOOL GENERAL DESCRIPTION The ISS Primary School includes Pre-School through Grade 5, ages three through eleven. The curriculum is international and draws on the best practices of many of the English language education systems around the world. ISS uses a curriculum written and updated to specifically meet the changing needs of its students, rather than tied to any one national curriculum. The curriculum is tied to attainment standards typical of accredited international schools. ISS was involved in authoring the International Schools Curriculum Project which later became the Primary Years Programme of the International Baccalaureate. Students work in classrooms with one homeroom teacher for English language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, information technology and religion, philosophies of life and ethics. Teachers of parallel groups plan together for these disciplines. There are specialist instructors in Art, Music, Band, Physical Education, Library and Norwegian. ISS is sensitive to the needs of children in a mobile community. It is normal for ISS students to welcome new students who start at the beginning of the year and throughout the school year. We encourage new students to contact our current students and teachers via letter or e-mail prior to arrival, or a visit to the school is always encouraged. This can be arranged by contacting the ISS Admissions Officer. It is the intent of the Primary School that children leave with the knowledge that they are special, with tolerance for others, a sense of self-esteem and a positive attitude towards learning. In addition to the academic curriculum outlined in this guide, the Primary School provides a variety of extra-curricular activities. Information about those activities is published during the school year in the ISS newsletter, The Informer and on the school’s website, www.stavanger.no. ADMISSIONS The school’s Admissions & Communications Officer plays an important role in the admissions process. The director and principal decide on admission and grade placement after reviewing a child’s date of birth and consulting previous school records and years of successful equivalent schooling completed. Appropriate placement may also be dependent on pertinent consultation with the previous schools´ and ISS staff. If records are incomplete, placement will be contingent on other factors. ISS reserves the right to make changes in the initial placement if subsequent observations and/or testing indicate the need for a change. Following school policy situations where a child may have some learning support needs, the input from the Learning Support/Guided Study Team is essential in assisting in deciding on whether to admit a child. As ISS operates under the Norwegian Education Act, §2.12, students for whom the educational program of the school is deemed by the administration to be inappropriate cannot be admitted. Following directives from the Directorate for Education and Training, continued enrolment is dependent on whether ISS can provide for the educational needs of the student. Readmittance of students is not automatic. The Director is authorized to deny continued enrolment or readmission to an applicant for scholastic, behavioral, or financial reasons. The parents of that student shall be notified as soon as possible of a decision to deny readmission. Payment of Financial Obligations For continued attendance at the school, financial obligations must be taken care of in a timely manner, following the information listed on invoices. Entrance Age Children entering Pre-School 3, Pre-School 4, Kindergarten or grade one must be of age by September 1st of the current year (three for Pre-School 3, four for Pre-School 4, five for Kindergarten, six for grade one, etc.). If this is in conflict with the school entrance age in other countries, a request can be made for special consideration. After consultation, with parents, teachers, and the school counselor, the principal’s decision is final. Pre-School Admission to ISS Pre-School 3 and Pre-School 4 is restricted for children who will continue at ISS after Pre-School 4 who enroll at the 'company/military' tuition rate. Applications made through Stavanger Kommune will only be reviewed after direct application to ISS. The ISS Director reviews only those applications that are made using ISS application forms. Learning Support All students are expected to follow the school’s academic curriculum and so admission is dependent on the school being able to meet the students’ special educational needs within the scope of its programmes. It is, therefore, important that parents provide accurate and relevant information about their child’s diagnosed or possible special educational needs, including copies of any previous professional reports. Page 4


If parents withhold or misrepresent information, continued attendance at ISS could be jeopardized. English as an Additional Language Students whose first language is not English, or students who have been enrolled in an EAL programme in their previous school, will be evaluated by the EAL teacher, using standardized language tests, to assess the child’s ability in English as a normal part of the admissions process. Proficiency in English is not a pre-requisite for admission to ISS, and grade level placement is according to a child’s date of birth and consulting previous school records and years of successful equivalent schooling completed. Assessments for Placement New middle and high school students may be asked to undertake mathematics, English, French, Norwegian or Spanish placement tests. Please remember that all placements are initially only provisional. Grade Level Placement: Primary School Retention, Repeating a Grade Level When students enrolled in the primary school do not achieve at a proficient level in meeting expectations as shown in data and assessment from teachers, a child may be best served by having an extra year in the same grade level. It is the responsibility of the teachers and parents to communicate with each other as soon as possible in a school year if it a child is not meeting the expectations such that there is predicted probable success in meeting expectations at the next grade level. If the child’s teacher, the parents and the principal agree that a child would be best served by an extra year in the same grade level, the child will be placed in the same grade level for the following school year. Once a decision is reached, the adults are expected to support this decision fully for the benefit of the child. Should the teachers, parents or principal question the decision of placement for an extra year in the grade level, this question must be brought to the attention of the other two named groups as soon as possible and as early in the school year as possible, and a discussion should take place to form a conclusion if a change is to be made. If a child is placed in the next grade level due to objection from a parent to a decision regarding staying in the same grade level for an additional year when the teachers and principal feel an extra year would be best for the child, the parents should not expect the child will receive additional assistance from learning support teachers. In extreme cases, where it is felt the child cannot be served or would be harmed by continuing in the program at ISS, the Retention Policy section of the 7.300 Admissions Policy of the Policy Manual will be applied. Grade Level Placement: Middle and High School, Repeating a Grade Level In the middle and high schools it is required that students pass their classes in order to advance to the next grade level, except in very special cases. Promotion in the high school is specifically based upon the number of credits earned. Details may be found in the High School Curriculum Overviews under “High School Promotion Requirements.”

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GRADE LEVEL COMPARISON TABLE ISS uses one system of names similar to that in many international schools. The following chart shows the age-appropriate grade for your child, as well as ISS grade levels compared with UK year group and Norwegian grades ‘klasse’. Norwegian AGE BIRTH DATE ISS GRADE UK GRADE and Birth Date 3 turning 4 Pre-school (age 3 by Pre-School 3 Nursery September 1) 4 turning 5 Reception/ Reception/ Reception Pre-School 4 (age 4 by Pre-School 4 September 1) 5 turning 6 Kindergarten Kindergarten Year 1 1. klasse (age 5 by September 1) (age 6 by December 31) 6 turning 7 Grade 1 Grade 1 Year 2 2. klasse (age 6 by September 1) (age 7 by December 31) 7 turning 8 Grade 2 Grade 2 Year 3 3. klasse (age 7 by September 1) (age 8 by December 31) 8 turning 9 Grade 3 Grade 3 Year 4 4. klasse (age 8 by September 1) (age 9 by December 31) 9 turning 10 Grade 4 Grade 4 Year 5 5. klasse (age 9 by September 1) (age 10 by December 31) 10 turning 11 Grade 5 Grade 5 Year 6 6. klasse (age 10 by September 1) (age 11 by December 31) 11 turning 12 Grade 6 Grade 6 Year 7 7. klasse (age 11 by September 1) (age 12 by December 31) 12 turning 13 Grade 7 Grade 7 Year 8 8. klasse (age 12 by September 1) (age 13 by December 31) 13 turning 14 Grade 8 Grade 8 Year 9 9. klasse (age 13 by September 1) (age 14 by December 31) 14 turning 15 Grade 9 Grade 9 Year 10 10. klasse (age 14 by September 1) (age 15 by December 31) 15 turning 16 Grade 10 Grade 10 Year 11 Videregående 1 (age 15 by September 1) (age 16 by December 31) 16 turning 17 Grade 11 Grade 11 Year 12 Videregående 2 (age 16 by September 1) (age 17 by December 31) International Baccalaureate Year One 17 turning 18 Grade 12 Grade 12 Year 13 Videregående 3 (age 17 by September 1) (age 18 by December 31) International (International Baccalaureate Baccalaureate or other Examination Examination)

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PRE-SCHOOL 3 Pre-School 3 classes meet five days per week from 8:30 to 15:15. Teachers receive children starting from 08:20. Children enrolled in Pre-School 3 do not take the school bus. Entrance Age Requirement Children are eligible for Pre-School 3 in August if their 3rd birthday falls on or before 1st September of the academic year. Pre-School 3 provides opportunities which promote social, emotional, physical and language development, effective communication skills and the development of readiness skills and work habits. Our aim is to encourage self-confidence, spontaneity, curiosity and self-discipline and to enhance each child`s sense of dignity and self-worth. Teaching Methods Children learn best in natural settings that allow them to be active participants. Children enrolled in Pre-School 3 are not “taught” in the traditional sense of the word. At ISS, children develop their potential through planned activities that stimulate, guide and encourage a love of learning. A thematic approach is used to develop skills in the following areas: Language and Communication Physical Education and Health Art and Culture Science and Technology Values and Ethics Social Awareness of the Society and Environment Mathematics Emotional and Social Skills As early childhood educators we provide and arrange opportunities for exploration and growth, rather than offering children solutions. Children must be allowed to discover answers themselves through experiment and investigation. Children learn best when there is a planned curriculum of activities focused on a particular theme or concept. Themes covered in Pre-School 3 orient around the main them, Ourselves and Our Environment. Pre-School 3 encourages your child to be a/an Explorer Creator Communicator Interactor Questioner Thinker Socialiser Problem Solver Norwegian In Pre-School 3 the children are introduced to aspects of Norwegian culture and language through appropriate use of polite expressions, songs and games. Cultural events, Christmas and Norwegian Constitution Day (17th May), are also included in classroom activities. Specialist Areas The children are taught beginner computer skills by the classroom teacher. Children visit the Primary School Library on a weekly basis, where they are introduced to a wide variety of children’s literature through reading and discussions with the library staff. The children also attend Physical Education classes in the school gymnasium, which are taught by a physical education specialist teacher. Speech and Development The Pre-School 3 Programme supports the acquisition of spoken English, paying special heed to the needs of the individual student. It aims to assist students for whom English is not spoken at home to adjust to the academic programme and social life at school as rapidly as possible. More detail on the plan of study is available from the teacher.

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PRE-SCHOOL 4 Pre-School 4 classes meet five days per week from 8:30 to 15:15. Teachers receive children starting from 08:20. Children in Pre-School 4 do not take the school bus. Age Requirement: Children are eligible for Pre-School 4 if their 4th birthday falls on or before 1st September of the academic year. Teaching Methods The major theme in Preschool 4/Reception is “Ourselves and Our Environment” which is developed through a wide variety of methods. At ISS, children explore their interests through planned activities that are develop mentally appropriate and designed to stimulate, guide and encourage a love of learning. A thematic approach is used to promote skills and knowledge in the areas that contribute to the balanced growth of the whole child: Language and Communication Physical Education and Health Art and Culture Science and Technology Values and Ethics Social Awareness of the Society and Environment Mathematics Emotional and Social Skills The themes used to support these areas of growth change monthly and include: August September October November December January February March April May June

Orientation to the Classroom, Recycling All About Me, Family Family and Friends, Autumn Wild Animals Celebrations Winter Activities Under the Sea Transportation Health and Dental Health Spring, Plants Summer Activities

Literacy awareness will be promoted in each topic through the daily reading of good children’s literature, morning messages, environmental print and introduction to concepts of print. Children are also encouraged to express their ideas and creativity in journals, dictation and painting. Norwegian In Pre-School 4, children are introduced to aspects of Norwegian culture and language through appropriate use of polite expressions, songs and games. Cultural events, Christmas and Norwegian Constitution Day (17th May), are also included in classroom activities. Specialist Areas The children are taught beginner computer skills by the classroom teacher. They visit the Primary School Library on a weekly basis, where they are introduced to a wide variety of children’s literature through reading and discussions with the library staff. The children also attend Physical Education classes in the school gymnasium, which are taught by a physical education specialist teacher. Speech & Development The Pre-School 4 programme supports the acquisition of spoken English, paying special heed to the needs of the individual student. It aims to assist students, for whom English is not spoken at home, to adjust to the academic programme and social life at school as rapidly as possible. Children with communication difficulties may be referred to a consultant. More detail on the plan of study is available from the teacher.

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AFTERNOON AND EXTENDED CARE FOR PRE-SCHOOL Children staying for Afternoon Day Care should bring a packed lunch, in addition to two healthy snacks, to meet their nutritional requirements during a full school day. In the afternoon programme the children are offered a programme of enrichment, promoting social, emotional, physical and language development. Creative play is largely child-directed and learning takes place in a natural setting that allows the children to be active participants. Under adult supervision, each child is encouraged to explore, create, communicate, interact, question, think, reason, socialize and solve problems. The children are given the opportunity for learning within specific contexts of music, art/craft activities, cooking, computer use and physical exercise. Both indoor and outside play is an integral part of the afternoon programme. Children attending the afternoon programme do not take the school bus. Extended care is also available so children can arrive early and stay later when pre-arranged at the beginning or mid-way through the school year. This is only available for a small number of children at an additional cost, whose parents demonstrate a specific need for this service. Information is available from the Primary School Principal. Hours for this service are from 7:45-8:30 and 15:15-16:15. An ISS employee such as an assistant will provide care for the children, but this time is only meant as child minding with no academic offerings. Children who are not collected by 16:15 are taken to the school office so staff can leave at their assigned time. If a parent collects a child late without prior notification, this service of extended care time for the child will be suspended.

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GRADE LEVEL KINDERGARTEN Children are only eligible for grade level Kindergarten if their fifth birthday falls on or before September 1st of the academic year. The grade level Kindergarten is considered the first of 13 full academic school years at ISS. The school day begins at 08:30 and ends at 15:15. Children in Kindergarten may ride the school bus. If parents bring children to school, please let the children walk to the classroom independently after the first week of school so they can build skills in taking care of their personal needs such as changing shoes and hanging up their coat. These are important skills to practice every day. Teachers receive children starting from 08:20. In Kindergarten, Science, Social Studies, and religion, philosophies of life and ethics are integrated with Language Arts. There are three basic themes through which we integrate other disciplines. These are the themes that we focus on during the year: All About Me Science: Senses, Health and Growth Social Studies: Working Together At School The World Around Us Science: Weather and Seasons Social Studies: Where We Live Caring For Earth Science: Materials and their Properties Social Studies: People Change the Earth Like all other primary grades at ISS, Kindergarten Language Arts is taught using a balanced literacy framework. The framework employs a wide variety of activities in the areas of reading, writing, listening and speaking, and word study/phonics. Learning in Kindergarten Language Arts includes learning about the alphabet, letter sounds and blends, sight vocabulary, literature responses, writing skills, penmanship skills, and reading comprehension and decoding strategies. The children also learn to analyze and evaluate literature, to sequence stories and events, and to respond to literature through discussion, art and writing. As students begin to write, they are encouraged to use inventive spelling. Our goal is that children will recognize reading and writing as an interrelated process of constructing meaning. Mathematics is based upon an active, verbal, manipulative-based text, Everyday Mathematics. It encourages children to use their mathematics knowledge in a variety of settings, while expanding on what they already know. Topics include numeration, counting numbers to 100, number stories, sorting and patterning, geometry, measuring, money, telling time to the hour, data handling, graphing, and basic adding and subtracting. In addition, students have specialist instruction in Art, Physical Education, Music, Norwegian and Library. Homeroom teachers lead lessons in other areas of the curriculum including IT (Information Technology/Computers) and Social and Emotional Health. The themes studied in the Kindergarten classroom are followed and reinforced in these classes, where appropriate, throughout the year. Students learn and use a variety of programs on several platforms to enhance the whole curriculum. For example, in Language Arts, children use the computer for both writing and graphics. IPads are used extensively in the classroom to enhance student learning across the curriculum. Teachers of Kindergarten students understand that five-year-old children are enthusiastic, curious and ready to learn. We expect to build a strong foundation from which to learn basic concepts in all subject areas. Opportunities are provided for children to develop their potential as learners in a variety of settings. We strive to create a nurturing environment that encourages a positive self-image. The Kindergarten year should personify imagination, experimentation, academics and "joyful" independent investigation. In addition, students have specific instruction in Art, Physical Education, Music, Norwegian and Library.

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GRADE ONE Students enter Grade One at various levels of achievement. ISS offers support to those students who need a challenge or are struggling in an area of study through differentiation of instruction. Students who enter classrooms with advanced skills are offered supplemental activities in order to challenge them. In Grade One, students use leveled books. When a child needs enrichment, or more challenging material, the book level is easily adjusted for that child's needs. Reading instruction serves each student with their individual reading level from where he or she is reading fluently and comprehending. In Language Arts, writing activities are open-ended and allow students the opportunity to develop more complicated skills. There are also enrichment activities in mathematics, science and social studies. Language Arts is of the utmost importance in Grade One. Our main focus is to enrich and strengthen each child’s individual reading and writing abilities. A variety of strategies and resources are used to reach this goal as our emergent readers and writers progress towards fluency. Language Arts includes oral and silent reading, reading individually with the teacher and reading in large groups. The students engage daily in the writing process as they begin to write in several genres and for a variety of purposes. These include journals, narratives and poetry. Through the writing process, conventions, punctuation and spelling develop. Common procedures for instructional strategies using Writer’s Workshop incorporate the six traits of writing: ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, and conventions. Students are exposed to a variety of rich and engaging books used to meet individual needs. Leveled readers are used during guided-reading for small group instruction at each students reading level. Students are introduced to new vocabulary and a variety of genres through teacher read-aloud and shared reading. Students reinforce learning through independent silent reading. Students use novels from the classroom library, a guided-reading library and the Oxford Reading Tree series. In addition, literature will be used to integrate the social studies and science curricula. Phonics, spelling and handwriting are taught in the context of literature used and read. Language Arts is reinforced and enriched through both library and computer classes. Mathematics is taught daily, using Everyday Mathematics as a core text. Using the spiral approach, mathematics study introduces, teaches and reinforces grade level concepts throughout the year as well as integrates problem-solving skills. In our daily mathematics we encourage the use of manipulative materials and hands-on activities that are used to learn the properties of addition and subtraction that are stressed throughout the year. In Grade One the following concepts are taught: classification, number relationships, graphing, metric measurement, geometry, place value, time and fractions. Calculators and computers are tools that are used to reinforce learning of these mathematics concepts. Instructional techniques include individual instruction, partner activities, small groups and whole class instruction. Social Studies: In Grade One “Global Diversity” is our year-long theme. With this in mind, Grade One pupils study four continents: Africa, Asia, Europe and North America over the course of the year, focusing on Kenya, China, Norway and Native North Americans. We explore our focus question, “How are people and animals around the world alike and different?” To promote deeper understanding of this theme and question, students examine key questions about the continents using these social studies concepts: history, society, geography, global/future and current events. Science: Science is taught using a constructive and hands-on approach. The students are invited to learn by building on their prior knowledge, exploring science modules, discussing ideas and facts and discovering the joy of experimenting. The focus is on a balanced curriculum of life, earth and physical sciences. The skills of observation, measurement and recording and using data to draw conclusions are practised. The four main modules that we focus on in Grade One are plants, growing and changing, sound and light and weather. Students learn and use a variety of programs on several platforms to enhance the whole curriculum. For example, in Language Arts, children use the computer for both writing and graphics. IPads are used extensively in the classroom to enhance student learning across the curriculum. In addition, students have specific instruction in Art, Physical Education, Music, Norwegian and Library.

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GRADE TWO Language Arts takes up a large part of a Grade Two student’s day. Language Arts includes reading, listening and speaking skills, process writing (journals, stories, articles, and letters), phonics, spelling, grammar skills and handwriting. Emphasis is placed on comprehension skills, including categorizing, context, predicting outcomes, sequencing, main idea, character development, drawing conclusions, and noting details. An equal emphasis is placed on study skills, summarizing, dictionary skills, reading graphs, photographs and charts, and reading for enjoyment. Language Arts is taught with a variety of resources and strategies. Leveled readers are used during guided-reading for small group instruction at each student’s reading level. Students are introduced to new vocabulary and a variety of genres through teacher read-aloud and shared reading. Students reinforce learning through independent silent reading. Students demonstrate comprehension skills through novel studies. Common procedures for instructional strategies using Writer’s Workshop incorporate the six traits of writing: ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, and conventions. Spelling is learned using a variety of resources, such as Words Their Way. Both Oxford and American spelling conventions are taught and accepted. Mathematics is taught daily using Everyday Mathematics as a core text. The following concepts are taught: addition and subtraction (facts to 18), patterns and graphs, place value to 1000, number relationships and counting patterns (counting on and back, counting by 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10 and 25), 2-digit and 3-digit addition and subtraction (with and without trading), geometry, fractions (parts of a whole and of a set), metric measurement, Norwegian kroner, time, and introductory multiplication and division. Whole class, small group, partner, and individual instruction are used to present and practice these concepts. There is an emphasis on problem solving, and different strategies are explored to assist children to see the “how and why” of each skill before doing problems on paper. Examples include drawing pictures, acting out, making estimations, using the "guess and check" method, making a table or graph, using logical reasoning, finding patterns, and using manipulative materials. Students learn and use a variety of programs on several platforms to enhance the whole curriculum. For example, in Language Arts, children use the computer for both writing and graphics. IPads are used extensively in the classroom to enhance student learning across the curriculum. In Grade Two Social Studies, the "throughline", or overall direction of inquiry, is "How do temperature and water affect people, plants, and animals around the world?" Using this throughline, the students explore the geography, climate and historical events from different regions of the world. There are four units of study in Social Studies: Hot, Wet Places (The Rainforest) Hot, Dry Places (The Deserts) Cold, Wet Places (Norway) Cold, Dry Places (Arctic & Antarctic) Grade Two Science units: Chemical reactions Adaptations Solar System Electricity and magnetism States of Matter In addition, students have specific instruction in Art, Physical Education, Music, Norwegian and Library.

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GRADE THREE Language Arts includes reading, listening and speaking skills, process writing (journals, stories, and articles), phonics, spelling, grammar skills and handwriting. Emphasis is placed on comprehension skills, including categorizing, context, predicting outcomes, sequencing, main idea, character development, drawing conclusions, and noting details. An equal emphasis is placed on study skills, including summarizing, dictionary skills, reading graphs, photographs and charts, and reading for enjoyment. Language Arts is taught with a variety of resources and strategies. Leveled readers are used during guided-reading for small group instruction at each student’s reading level. Students are introduced to new vocabulary and a variety of genres through teacher read-aloud and shared reading. Students reinforce learning through independent silent reading. Students develop additional comprehension skills through novel studies. Common procedures for instructional strategies using Writer’s Workshop incorporate the six traits of writing: ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, and conventions. High frequency words, common spelling patterns and words drawn from topics and children’s writing form the basis of spelling units. In Language Arts our scheme has extended work for writing, grammar and reading. All students have individualized readers at varied levels. In Mathematics, students begin the year reinforcing and reviewing basic addition and subtraction. Multiplication is then reintroduced. Multiplication tables are learned and memorized developing the fundamental concepts that will enable the children to multiply using large numbers. Other areas such as geometry, metric measurement, graphs, fractions, decimals, division, time and money are covered throughout the year. Problem solving is interspersed throughout each unit and is related to the operations being taught. Everyday Mathematics is used as a core text. There is extended work available. Computers are an integrated part of the curriculum. Students learn and use a variety of programs on several platforms to enhance the whole curriculum. For example, in Language Arts, children use the computer for both writing and graphics. IPads are used extensively in the classroom to enhance student learning across the curriculum. The children are exposed to a variety of programs that reinforce or extend work done in class. Information technology is used to enhance leaning in many curricular areas. Students learn to use the Internet for research and develop the skills required including keyboarding, word processing and using the Internet wisely and safely. The overall theme for Social Studies is “How can we learn from people of the past?” In Grade 3 we look at the indigenous peoples of the South America, European Middle Ages and Life in Stavanger, Norway. The three Science units include pollution in our environment, sound and plants. In Science and Social Studies we have scope for further research and extended writing. In addition, students have specific instruction in Art, Physical Education, Music and Norwegian and Library.

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GRADE FOUR Students come to Grade Four at various academic levels and learning backgrounds. The numerous subjects in Grade Four allow the students to have opportunities to work at their own pace. Various strategies are used by the teachers to differentiate the instruction in the classroom for all levels. These consist of self-assessment, peer assessment, student formulated rubrics, independent mathematics work, expansion of multiplication tables, Book Club and dictations, based on reading ability and comprehension, Writers’ Workshop independent creative writing, and homework variation based on student ability. Study in Grade Four Language Arts focuses on reading and analysis of literature. Language Arts is taught with a variety of resources and strategies. Leveled readers are used during guided-reading for small group instruction at each student’s reading level. Students are introduced to new vocabulary and a variety of genres through teacher read-aloud and shared reading. Students reinforce learning through independent silent reading. Students demonstrate comprehension skills through novel studies. Responses to literature are conducted in several different ways, including group discussions, role-play, writing reactions to texts, book report projects and searching for the elements of a story line. Oral reading by teachers to students and by students to the class helps foster an appreciation of reading, listening skills and the importance of oral delivery. In coordination with reading, the students produce pieces of writing by using the writer’s workshop process. Common procedures for instructional strategies using Writer’s Workshop incorporate the six traits of writing: ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, and conventions. Each child is asked to edit, revise, conference with their peers and teacher and produce final written pieces. Additionally, spelling study is generated from a variety of areas including written work, words that foster vocabulary development and commonly misspelled words. Students learn and use a variety of programs on several platforms to enhance the whole curriculum. For example, in Language Arts, children use the computer for both writing and graphics. IPads are used extensively in the classroom to enhance student learning across the curriculum. Students learn to use the Internet for research and develop the skills required for working effectively with word processing. Mathematics stresses skills in basic operations: addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. Students learn through the use of a variety of activities, including manipulative materials, drills, group work, problem solving and everyday experiences. This builds a foundation for higher-level mathematics. Grade Four students are also taught skills from the following concepts: place value, data gathering and reporting, graphing, probability, measurement, time, geometry, fractions, decimals, percentages and money. These skills are coordinated with other subjects, when applicable. Everyday Mathematics is the core text, supplemented with teacher-made and other materials. Social Studies Major Themes How people have adapted to conditions and changes on Earth? How we can learn from the experiences of others, past and present? How can modern technology, such as robotics, help us model and understand how the Ancient Egyptian monuments were built? What were the significant inventions in the 20th century? Science Major Themes Students compare and contrast the different Biomes of the world and animal adaptations. For example, students will examine the location of Australia and research Aboriginal society and how the geography of Australia has affected the way these people live. Students explore our Solar System and investigate individual planets. Students investigate causes and consequences of earthquakes and volcanoes and research their geographical location. Students explore these topics through both cooperative and independent research. Social Studies and Science are taught together whenever possible. In addition, students have specific instruction in Art, Physical Education, Music Norwegian and Library. Outdoor Education Week (leirskole) is an integral part of the educational programme. Students and teachers attend Gullingen Leirskule where they participate in a variety of outdoor activities that seek to expand and enhance their normal classroom activities. In addition, students work to develop their independence and social skills as the students live and work together and widen their knowledge of Norway, its culture and traditions.

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GRADE FIVE Classes in Grade Five, the final year of Primary School, provide a challenge for each student according to abilities and needs, while being developmentally appropriate for the young pre-adolescent. It is a year of demonstrating responsibility. Students come to Grade Five at various academic levels and learning backgrounds. The subjects in Grade Five allow the students to have multiple opportunities to work at their own pace. Various strategies are used by the teachers to differentiate instruction in the classroom for all levels Language Arts emphasizes language skills drawn from a variety of sources. Leveled readers are used during guided-reading for small group instruction at each student’s reading level. Students are introduced to new vocabulary and reinforce learning through independent reading. Students demonstrate comprehension skills through novel studies. Emphasis is placed on developing skills in spelling, vocabulary and grammar, and responding to and analyzing text in terms of plot, structure, themes and purpose. Common procedures for instructional strategies incorporate the six traits of writing: ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, and conventions. Writing is done in all subjects and for many purposes. Writing forms and skills are sometimes taught formally to a whole class, at other times students may work on many different forms of writing in an individualized format. Writing is taught as a process and students develop their skills in paragraphing, composing, revising and editing their own writing. Information technology is used to enhance leaning in many curricular areas. Students learn and use a variety of programs on several platforms to enhance the whole curriculum. For example, in Language Arts, children use the computer for both writing and graphics. IPads are used extensively in the classroom to enhance student learning across the curriculum. Students learn to use the Internet for research and develop the skills required for working effectively with word processing. The primary mathematics’ source Everyday Mathematics, challenges children on many levels and incorporates higher-level concepts into several mathematics strands. A spiral model of presentation carries concepts through many different applications in order to enhance retention and understanding. Strands taught in Grade Five include computation, geometry (perimeter, area, volume, compass, protractor and co-ordinate geometry), data and statistics (understanding and creating graphs; mode, median, range, maximum, minimum), fractions, ratios, decimals and percents (concept building, computation and application) and early algebra skills (positive and negative numbers, functions, algebraic reasoning). Research projects, which are interdisciplinary in nature, are assigned throughout the year. Whilst topics generally focus on Science or Social Studies, they incorporate many Language Arts skills as well. Use of both the Primary School and Secondary libraries is used, along with a variety of on-line resources available through the Internet. Social Studies in Grade Five has an underlying theme which focuses on the European colonisation of different areas of the world from the time of the Vikings. Areas are studied with emphasis on thoughtful investigation and development of research skills. Attention is also given to geography skills, such as map reading. Science incorporates elements from life science and physical science. The students participate in hands-on experiments, learn the process of science and skills such as observing, making predictions, collecting and recording data, testing predictions, analyzing, drawing conclusions and making inferences and generalizations. Specific units include Electricity, human growth and development, human body systems and simple machines. In addition, students have specific instruction in Art, Physical Education, Music, Norwegian, and Library. Outdoor Education Programme (Leirskole) is an integral part of the educational programme. Students and teachers attend Gullingen Leirskule where they participate in a variety of outdoor activities that seek to expand and enhance their normal classroom activities, as well as work on developing their independence and social skills. The main activity for Grade 5 outdoor education is cross-country skiing.

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ASSESSMENT Students in the Pre-School are assessed on a continual basis, and meetings to discuss a child’s progress are arranged with parents two times a year. Additionally, a report is made at the end of the school year about the child’s progress in Language and Communication, Physical Education and Health, Art and Culture, Science and Technology, Values and Ethics, Social Awareness of the Society and Environment, Mathematics and Emotional and Social Skills. Following mandates in Norway, children in their first years of school should only be given assessment without a number grade, with no distinction between oral and written grades. Students in Grades Kindergarten through Grade Five are assessed continually throughout the school year, and assessment is reported in written form to parents four times a year. Meetings to discuss a child’s progress, Parent-Teacher Conferences, are arranged two times a year. Feedback to students is offered almost daily. Teachers evaluate a student’s attainment/achievement, effort/engagement/organization/progress and learner profile/conduct as to whether it meets expectations, exceeds expectations or is below expectations. Achievement expectations are described in rubrics and sometimes in rubrics for specific assignments, tasks or tests. Standards are externally set for attainment/achievement at each grade level and for each quarter of a school year, i.e., the expectations increase for each school year and during each school year. Students are assigned an academic descriptor for which evidence shows a best fit, not a single incident or an average of incidents. ART What the students will learn: Creating Art – plan and organize ideas; use the language of art; increase visual awareness; develop craftsmanship Historical and Cultural Context – explore the influence of history, culture and art on each other; understand that art preserves and defines history and culture Critical Analysis and Interpretation – describe and interpret works of art, their own and others’ art work Connections – make connections to other disciplines, art careers and personal experiences The goals of the art program are to: Provide means of non-verbal communication Increase visual awareness Provide decision making opportunities Develop visual problem solving Understand basic concepts of the visual arts Develop perceptual skills Encourage control of basic art materials and tools Collaborate Strengthen the concept of self and self-confidence Allow for free expression (in meaningful ways) Develop appreciation for the individuality of others Enhance sensitivity to our environment

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LIBRARY The Primary School Library provides a collection of 10,000 books, a variety of magazines and access to online subscription databases. These resources are selected to support and enrich the curriculum. Children in Pre-School through Grade Five visit the library on a weekly basis. During this time they receive instruction in the use of the library, read and are read to, and may choose a book to take home. Parents are also invited to use the library to check out books for their children. Reading for leisure is promoted at all grade levels. Children in Pre-School meet with the library teacher to become more acquainted with the library and literature suitable for their age and proficiency. In their library class Kindergarten, Grade One and Grade Two students are taught how to use the Primary School Library, responsible care for library materials, and literature appreciation. Young readers are assisted in finding appropriate reading materials, and are taught selection skills. Instruction for Grade Three focuses on location skills. The Dewey Decimal System is taught, and the organization of the fiction section is introduced. Students become acquainted with the use of the online library catalog (OPAC). Students become increasingly more independent using the library. In Grade Four, instruction strengthens location skills in fiction and nonfiction, and introduces the organization of biographies. Students continue to learn how to use the online library catalog (OPAC), and call number recognition. Grade Five library classes reinforce skills learned in Grade 4 and teach the use of databases. Some of these online databases can be accessed at school or from home. Grade Four and Grade Five students become increasingly more independent. Skills in research are taught in conjunction with reports written in other classes. Students learn how to make safe and effective choices of online sources. Grade Level Topics Kindergarten & Grade 1 Grade 4 Library orientation Nonfiction organization using the Dewey Decimal Library personnel and procedures System Care and responsibility for library materials and facilities Fiction organization Parts of a book Biography organization Literature appreciation Call number recognition Promoting reading Location skills Online catalog Literature appreciation of true and traditional stories Promoting reading Grade 2 Library organization Parts of a book Selection skills Reference materials Literature appreciation of contemporary and traditional stories Promoting reading

Grade 3 Nonfiction organization using the Dewey Decimal System Fiction organization Location skills Call number recognition Literature appreciation of contemporary and traditional stories Promoting reading

Grade 5 Library organization Call number recognition Location skills Online catalog Search strategies Online reference databases Indexes Nonfiction reading Literature appreciation of true and traditional stories Promoting stories

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MUSIC Music involves the application of previously acquired skills to more conventional forms of expression through music, such as being a member of the choir, continuing handbell ensemble or beginning band. Therefore, the Primary School music programme is designed to be 'hands on'. Students cover topics such as an introduction to reading music through symbolic notation, simple composition with partners or in groups, music through sound stories, rhythm instruments, understanding music through movement and International folk dance. All students from Kindergarten onwards have the opportunity to play the xylophone or other instruments as a class in general music, including Orff instruction. Performance opportunities for students include assemblies, concerts and 'Share in Our Learning' sessions where students teach parents what they have learned. Where appropriate, music works in a cross-curricular fashion with other subjects. Kindergarten through Grade Three music involves interpreting musical language through exploring, creating, listening, performing and working on structured activities in the classroom. Students at all levels are encouraged to create melodic and rhythmic music that is both creative and challenging to the student. Emphasis is on experimentation and writing together in group settings. Students are introduced to handbell ensemble playing in Grade Three. Kindergarten has music twice a week, as a class. In one session, the focus is on general music and instruments; during the other session the focus is on vocal training. Grade One and Grade Two have music three times a week. Two of the sessions are general music and the third session is an all-grade choir session. Grade Three has music twice a week where one session is an all grade choir and the other is general music. In choirs the emphasis is on singing instructionally-appropriate material which by Grade Two includes rounds, partner songs and simple 2-part material. The Kodåly instruction method is used during part of this programme. Grade Four has music twice a week, one session involves general music and the other, choir. In choir the emphasis is on singing instructionally appropriate material which by Grade Four includes rounds, partner songs and 2-part and 3-part material. The instruction method used during all the sessions includes Kodåly, Complete Vocal Technique, Solfège and others. Students cover topics such as choral performance, singing styles and techniques, singing from sheet music and music from around the world. A 'hands on' example of Grade Four general music includes selecting a film clip to which they compose music in groups. All students in Grade Four are taught a handball and guitar unit. Where appropriate, music works in a cross-curricular fashion with other subjects. Grade Five students have music classes two times a week. Grade 5 students sing in a choir, take general music and play either a string or wind instrument of their choice. Choir lessons have an emphasis on singing in unison and in harmony. In general music, students focus on continuing previously-learned knowledge of music theory, are provided opportunities to compose their own music and are exposed to music through the use of technology. Students are introduced to band and strings in Grade 5. In this programme students work co-operatively and engage in creative problem solving skills and decision making that should develop musical independence and interaction skills through small group tasks, disciplined 2/3 part choir and the complex process of playing a band instrument; an interest in and foster enjoyment and appreciation in the lifelong use of musical skills learned; confidence, self esteem and the capacity for emotional expression through performance, composition and self evaluation techniques; response to cultural awareness and the appreciation of human diversity through experiencing the culturally pervasive nature of music. Students also learn about different instruments, before selecting the one they wish to play. While some instruments are available through the school for rental, parents are encouraged to purchase instruments. The skills emphasized in the beginning band/string programme include the following: How to put together, maintain and care for a band/string instrument; Development of technical facility on an instrument; Developing proper embouchure (mouth position), breathing technique and tone quality; Development of pitch reading skills; Developing rhythm reading skills (whole, half, quarter and eighth notes) and knowledge of time signatures; Introduction of scales and key signatures; Developing basic vocabulary of musical terms; The broad area of performing for an audience; Working together as a group toward a common goal, while developing independence within the group; Developing the habit of consistent practice; Efficient practice methods versus just playing through music.

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NORWEGIAN LANGUAGE ARTS ISS offers Norwegian instruction for the beginner through to the native Norwegian speaker. Students begin Norwegian instruction in Kindergarten and continue through Grade 5. The classes are homogeneously grouped, allowing students to move between groups as needed. The school does not offer Norwegian classes in nynorsk. NATIVE NORWEGIAN Native Norwegian classes are designed to meet the needs of native Norwegian speakers or students with near native competence in Norwegian. Because the students in the classes are bilingual and in some cases trilingual, the unique challenges they face and strengths within their language capacity are continually addressed. A course is offered dependent on the number of children enrolled. Grade Kindergarten: The focus in Kindergarten Native Norwegian is vocabulary development. The students engage in roleplay, songs and games. Topics include fairytales, colors, numbers, animals and seasons Grade One: These classes are focused on reinforcing the students’ skills and knowledge. The children are in an environment where they will hear and speak only Norwegian. During the course of the year, students are introduced to the Norwegian alphabet and begin reading. They work on recognizing and reading basic vocabulary. Students are exposed to excerpts from Norwegian children’s literature and folk tales. Activities include reading and dramatizing stories, and learning rhymes, songs and games. Grade Two: The students continue to develop their reading and writing skills. They work on becoming more fluent readers as well as study various common aspects of Norwegian spelling such as the Norwegian vowel sounds. A wide range of Norwegian folk tales and literature for young children will be introduced. The course includes vocabulary development, dramatizing stories, learning rhymes, poems, songs and song games. Cultural events, such as Santa Lucia, Christmas and Norwegian Constitution Day (17th May), are also included in classroom activities. Grades Three and Four: The students continue to develop their skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. They also engage in literature studies, reading and discussing books, as well as becoming familiar with Norwegian fairy tales. The students write their own stories, role plays, poems and book reviews. During these years, spelling and grammar is given more emphasis. The students explore and practice the use of double consonants, diphthongs and other areas of spelling particular to Norwegian. Grade Five: Students continue to develop their mastery of speaking, listening, reading and writing. They read and respond to a variety of texts, among them fiction, non-fiction, articles, short stories, letters, diaries and poetry. The students work with spelling and grammar such as parts of speech, nouns, verbs and adjectives. NORWEGIAN AS A MODERN LANGUAGE Grade Kindergarten: In Kindergarten the students are introduced to aspects of the Norwegian culture and language through stories, role plays and songs. They learn basic vocabulary and short phrases. Grade One: In first grade the students are introduced to aspects of the Norwegian culture and language through stories, role plays and songs. The students read and write short phrases. Cultural events, such as Santa Lucia, Christmas and 17 th of May will be included in classroom activities. Grade Two: The students gain knowledge of Norwegian language and culture through stories, role plays, songs and language games. The students read and write short phrases to expand their vocabulary. Grades Three: The students continue to develop their skills through listening, speaking, reading and writing. They gain knowledge of the Norwegian language and culture through stories, role plays, songs and language games. Beginning in Grade Three, the students are divided into Beginner and Intermediate levels. The intermediate levels expand on the same topics to include focus on sentence structure and on more advanced texts. Students in intermediate classes are expected to follow instruction in Norwegian. Grades Four: In Grade Four the students are divided into Beginner and Intermediate levels. The students continue to develop their skills through listening, speaking, reading and writing. They gain knowledge of the Norwegian language and culture through stories, role plays, songs and language games. Students in the Intermediate group are expected to express themselves mostly in Norwegian and understand instructions given in Norwegian. Grade Five: The students continue to develop their skills through listening, speaking, reading and writing. The students read and write short texts and participate in dramatization and role play. They engage in simple conversations and will be able to answer questions about simple texts both orally and in writing. Although the two levels (Beginner and Intermediate) will work with similar topics, the intermediate level includes translations and also focuses more on grammar. Intermediate students are expected to express themselves mostly in Norwegian and understand instructions given in Norwegian. Norwegian cultural events are included in classroom activities. Page 19


PHYSICAL EDUCATION Students in Pre-School through Grade Five attend Physical Education class twice a week, ranging from thirty-minute sessions for the lower grades, up to forty-five minute sessions for the older children. The children participate in a wide range of physical activities from fundamental motor skills in Pre-School to skill-based learning for the students in Grades Four & Five. PRE-SCHOOL 3 and PRE-SCHOOL 4 Basic movement experiences and body mechanics are introduced at this level along with locomotor, non-locomotor and manipulative skills. A great emphasis is placed on social skills and listening skills with more emphasis given at the Pre-School 3 level than Pre–School 4. Many of the physical and social skills are taught through the medium of games/plays and stories. KINDERGARTEN and GRADE ONE This programme is designed to develop skills in the following categories: Locomotor Skills Manipulative Skills Rhythmic Skills Gymnastic Skills Games of low organization Story play/games GRADE 2 This programme follows a similar pattern to the Grade 1 programme. The difficulty of the skills and activities have increased to meet the demands of the students’ ongoing physical development, as well as the following additions: Simple relays based on locomotor skills. Non-locomotor skills. Fitness Group Games Lead-up games and skills for team sports Group games GRADE 3 This programme provides a transition between the simplified activity programme of the lower grades and the sports emphasis and more advanced emphasis of the intermediate level. The programme includes the following additions: Locomotor skills Fitness Rhythmic skills Gymnastic Simple games and relays Simple sports skills and activities GRADE 4 By the time the children reach Grade 4 they are ready to move in to an activity block system. Basic movement skill and body mechanics are well developed by this age; therefore, more emphasis and time are spent on developing aspects of perceptual awareness in relation to skill development for a particular activity or sport, rather than developing the skill itself – a characteristic of the lower primary years. The following activities are introduced at this level: The following activities are developed at this level: Football (soccer) Gymnastics Volleyball Creative Movement Dance Fitness Basketball Handball Short Tennis Fitness Ten Pin Bowling Track and Field (Athletics) GRADE 5 The Grade 5 programme builds upon and develops the activities introduced in Grade 4 in order to develop skills for success this year and in the Middle School Physical Education programme. Additional activities covered during Grade 5 are Gymnastics and Skill Related Fitness. SWIMMING / AQUATICS EDUCATION As part of Physical Education the students in grades Kindergarten –Five participate in 5 extended lessons in Swimming/Aquatics. Learning experiences include water safety, stroke development, lifesaving and diving. Students in Grade Kindergarten take part in two introductory swimming lessons. The Physical Education staff is assisted as needed by specialist instructors in this programme. Page 20


STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES International School of Stavanger recognizes that some students require special programs or services in order to meet their needs and to experience success. Programs and services available to students include English as an additional language, learning support, counseling, and health services. For detailed information regarding the student support services available at ISS, please refer to the Student Support Services Reference Guide or contact a Student Support Team member. The reference guide can be obtained from any of the learning support teachers or school counselors. Counseling: The counseling office is committed to providing students with both academic and socio-emotional support services. The programme is based on the belief that each student is unique, possessing intrinsic personal worth, dignity, along with certain basic rights. Individual and group socio-emotional counseling is made available to address a variety of student concerns. These may include assistance with conflict resolution and cultivating positive relationships with peers. The counselors extend and coordinate support services to students, families, and staff where appropriate. English as an Additional Language: English language support is offered to any student whose first language is not English and who does not yet function in English at grade level due to language background. A new student whose first language is not English and who has not spent a significant period of time in an English-language school will be required to undergo assessment of his/ her English skills by the EAL teachers. The purpose of this assessment is to determine whether the student requires language support. Placement in an EAL group is based on the assessment results, information from previous school records and consultation with parents. Students of concern may also be referred for assessment during the course of the school year. Please refer to the English as an Additional Language Information Booklet or contact an English as an Additional Language teacher for more information regarding this programme. The booklet can be obtained from any of the EAL teachers. Health Services: The health service seeks to ensure a healthy school environment where children are regarded as individuals whose emotional, social, cultural identities and values are respected. Health services offered include, student growth and development assessment, a vaccination programme following Norwegian guidelines, vision and hearing testing, administration of medications taken during school hours, assessment/ administration of first aid to injured students and the dissemination of information to the school community regarding health care in Norway. A doctor is available at ISS for screening purposes only. Confidentiality for all those making use of the ISS health service is respected and ensured. Learning Support: Learning Support is a whole school, integrated and staged approach to helping students in need of additional academic support. Its aim is to enable all students to have the opportunity to successfully access the curriculum and be included in the school community. The needs of some students involved in the programme will be met within the classroom through differentiated teaching and appropriate accommodations. Other students, dependent on individual need, will receive additional teaching from a learning support specialist, either in a small group or on an individual basis. A few students will receive individual lessons or support from a learning support teacher in the classroom. Students’ placement in this programme will be based on learning need and following full consultation with parents. The aim of the programme is to support the development of literacy, numeracy and / or speech, language and communication skills. Maximum Support Allocation: Students who require learning support services for more than 3.5 hours per week of their academic programme should consult with the Primary School Principal as a part of the admissions process. Student Study Team/ Referral Process: The Student Study Team (SST) consists of the counselor, learning support teacher(s), principal(s) and school health professional. Other teachers also participate on this team when a student in their class/ course is referred/ to be discussed. This Student Study Team has the responsibility of handling student referrals and coordinating student support services. In order to identify students who may benefit from support services, the school has a referral process in place. Referrals can be submitted by classroom teachers, administrators, counselors, parents, school health professional, past school staff etc. Under most circumstances, the referring person should contact the parent(s) of the student regarding their concern prior to submitting a referral. Referral forms can be obtained from the main school office, Primary School office, and Middle/ High School office or from the learning support teachers, and counselors. Referrals may be submitted for any type of concern an individual has regarding a student (e.g., learning, language, social, emotional, and behavioral). Any referral is appropriate, whether or not the student is determined to require support services. In many cases, the information developed through the referral process itself may help in developing strategies to facilitate the growth of the student. When making a referral, please submit it to a Student Study Team member.

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PARKING RULES FOR ISS

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Pscurriculumoverviews2013 14  

PS Curriculum Overviews 2013 - 2014

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